Best of the week, 25 January 2020

Everything you know about Europe is wrong

British liberals have created a Europe of their imagination, but how closely does it resemble reality?

Ed West
Latest from The Post >

Weekend read
08:00

Going vegan will not save the planet

The system of resource extraction remains environmentally destructive

| 25 January

Don’t ask voters how to solve climate change

When national survival is at stake, you call in the experts and worry about the electorate’s consent later

When national survival is at stake, you call in the experts and worry about the electorate’s consent later

Richard Askwith
Why the mummy wars are really class wars

Notionally scientific parenting questions are in truth vehicles for class and cultural debates

Notionally scientific parenting questions are in truth vehicles for class and cultural debates

Mary Harrington
The inconvenient truth about transwomen

Self-identification puts women, children — and trans people themselves — at risk

Self-identification puts women, children — and trans people themselves — at risk

Debbie Hayton
Identity politics is Christianity without redemption

Woke notions of white supremacy and the patriarchy bring back old ideas that people are damned at birth

Woke notions of white supremacy and the patriarchy bring back old ideas about predestination

Antonia Senior
Latest from The Post >

Weekend read
08:00

Going vegan will not save the planet

The system of resource extraction remains environmentally destructive

| 25 January

There is no mental illness epidemic

Thanks to celebrities, more people are demanding help — while those most in need are overlooked

Rural Cornwall is right to be anxious

If the duchy is to survive Brexit, something must be done about its not-so-splendid isolation

Why don’t we remember these 100 million dead?

If we forget the scale of the Spanish Flu horror, we'll be doomed to repeat it

Cultural heroes, please stay out of politics

The finest minds lose all their nuance when they get political on Twitter

Freddie Sayers
What Sajid Javid should say at Davos, but won’t

Dear Chancellor, we’ve written your speech for you — no need to thank us

Peter Franklin
There is no mental illness epidemic

Thanks to celebrities, more people are demanding help — while those most in need are overlooked

Polly Mackenzie
Salvini’s plan to smash Italy’s red wall

Italy's populist leader appeals to millions battered by EU austerity and globalisation

Nicholas Farrell

Italy's populist leader appeals to millions battered by EU austerity and globalisation

Nicholas Farrell
Why the drugs don’t work

Thousands of people are given ineffective medicines because trial data is being purposely skewed

Tom Chivers
How Brexit broke up the ‘special relationship’

Trump's weakening of our military alliance is part of a long-term trend — but Brexit and Iraq accelerated it

Mike Martin


Reaction
17:11

I disagree with the Church about sex, but I’m not leaving

Ambivalence about the church you are a member of is not disloyalty, it is maturity

| 24 January
Reaction
15:04

The Joe Rogan endorsement is a big win for Bernie

Critics of the YouTube star overlook his anti-establishment appeal

| 24 January
Debate
13:27

OK Lisa Nandy, I’ll give you my vote

The Wigan MP is the least uninspiring of the Labour leadership candidates

| 24 January
Idea
08:30

Time to introduce virtue into AI ethics

Could courage, or love, or patience, be part of ‘ethical data’?

| 24 January
Audio
17:04

Audio: Giles Fraser meets geneticist Adam Rutherford

The author and scientist tackles the difficult topic of race and science

| 23 January
Reaction
14:52

France still sees itself as the Protector of Catholicism

The Macron row shows that France takes religion more seriously than Britain

| 23 January
Spotted
07:00

Tyler Cowen is pulling on a dangerous thread

The economist's new ideological framework is missing a moral dimension

| 23 January
Seen Elsewhere
17:00

Two cheers for the Welsh smacking ban

The ruling raises questions about where parental authority should give way to the state

| 22 January
Reaction
12:53

China’s coronavirus will not be the next Black Death

The swift response shows the world has learned from its past failures

| 22 January
Series: The Twenties are still Roaring

The Twenties are still Roaring

From international relations to art and culture, the 1920s made the world of today

The Scottish town that rejected nationalism

In East Fife, Scottish nationalism has slowly become more attractive

John Lloyd
Rural Cornwall is right to be anxious

If the duchy is to survive Brexit, something must be done about its not-so-splendid isolation

Tanya Gold
Boris must be bold: it could save lives

Norway has eradicated child road deaths. With the same political will we could fix our own intractable issues

Ian Birrell
Why are we locking up patients for profit?

Cygnet's fatal failings highlight the shocking flaws in our approach to mental health problems

Ian Birrell

Interviews.

we sit down with original thinkers and talk ideas

Adam Rutherford: How To Argue With A Racist

Giles Fraser talks to Adam Rutherford about his new book.

Debate: How bad is Viktor Orban?

Freddie Sayers gets opposing views from Peter Franklin and Phillip Blond on whether the Hungarian Prime Minister's dangerous reputation is justified.

Richard Layard’s Confessions — History, happiness and mental health

Giles talks to the happiness expert about his journey from the humanities to science, why individualism is making us depressed and how we can be more happy.

Charles Moore’s Confessions — Thatcher, theology and the Tories

Giles talks to the former Telegraph editor about becoming a Catholic, how the licence fee is dividing 'somewheres' and 'anywheres' and why he's never liked the Conservative Party.

Jonathan Sumption’s Confessions – Rights, rhetoric and rationalism

Giles talks to the historian and former Supreme Court Justice about leaving academia behind for a career in law, the problem with human rights and the art of persuasion.

Why does Corbyn’s party hate Britain?

The modern Labour Party decries patriotism and believes Britain's enemies always 'have a point'

James Bloodworth

The modern Labour Party decries patriotism and believes Britain's enemies always 'have a point'

James Bloodworth
In defence of Facebook

There are problems with Zuckerberg's monopolistic intentions, but breaking up his company could do more harm than good

Christopher Rhodes
John Clare, poet of the Somewheres

The politics of the Peasant Poet feel unexpectedly fresh and increasingly urgent today

Mary Harrington

What unites the Nazis and Communists?

It is well worth climbing the literary mountain that is Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate

Douglas Murray
What would you sacrifice for integrity?

Terrence Malick's new film interrogates a moral dilemma with pernicious modern relevance

James Mumford
How to argue with a racist

Adam Rutherford's new book wrestles with the difficult subject of race and science

Giles Fraser
1917 pretends good soldiers don’t kill

Sam Mendes' epic drips with contemporary sentiment and hackneyed stereotypes

John Lewis-Stempel

Box set: Books of the decade

Our contributors recommend some slow reading for the festive season

How would you respond to the rise of Nazism?

Sebastian Haffner’s powerful 1939 memoir Defying Hitler can help us make sense of current uncertain times

Ian Birrell
America has always been a circus

Kurt Anderson's Fantasyland explores the US tendency to blur fact with fiction

Justin Webb
The cost of liberal economics

Tim Jackson's Prosperity Without Growth shows us how to bring the global economy back into the service of human flourishing

Mary Harrington
The End of the World is always nigh

Richard Landes's much underrated Heaven on Earth explores our lust for Armageddon

Daniel Kalder

What does your constituency really think?