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Will the law finally stand up to Just Stop Oil?

Police arrest Just Stop Oil climate activists in central London last month. Credit: Getty

June 1, 2023 - 11:15am

A month ago, on the fourth day of Just Stop Oil’s slow-walking campaign, the Government announced the introduction of new legislation enabling police to shut down the protests more quickly. The road-blocking marches have continued every day since, and yesterday it was reported that we must wait another month for the changes to become law. Will they make any difference?

As things stand, protesters have about 15 minutes before police intervene — which is all they need for the media attention they seek. During that time plod looks both weak, for standing around doing nothing, and perversely authoritarian, for manhandling angry members of the public who, not being funded by a billionaire heiress looking to expiate the sins of her oil magnate grandfather, just need to get to work.

But it’s not really the police’s fault. The Human Rights Act requires them to consider the balance of European Convention rights, which takes a little time. Of course, how careful and prolonged their consideration needs to be depends on the detail of the laws created by Parliament, the interpretation of those laws by the appeal courts, and the particular behaviour of the protesters.

Parliament lent a hand last year, by redefining “serious disruption to the life of the community” in s.12 of the Public Order Act 1986 to include, for example, “prolonged disruption to essential services”. And more assistance came in early May with, among other things, the new offence of “locking on” (not much of that going on these last few weeks, note). This has all helped to loosen the shackles imposed by the Supreme Court in 2021 in the Ziegler case.

But as long as Just Stop Oil can capture shareable footage of small numbers of the middle classes in orange T-shirts enraging large numbers of the working classes in orange trousers, they will continue to do so, and the public will be the loser.

Changes coming next month (made by Statutory Instrument, so extremely hard to stop) involve further redefinition of “serious disruption to the life of the community”. Protests over several days can then be judged as a single event, and therefore become amenable to a single decision on policing response. Delay that is “more than minor” will be enough to constitute “serious disruption”, and the effect on police resources will be taken into account. 

This last consideration might weigh quite heavily: over 10,000 police shifts per month are now consumed by Just Stop Oil’s voracious appetite for publicity. With these slots freed up, we might even look forward to an improvement in the appalling response times to burglaries and similar offences.

It is hard to predict, and easy to overestimate, the practical effect of a new law. But in this case, the clearer and more substantial the lawbreaking, the quicker the police will be able to act. So there is reason to believe that, from next month, Just Stop Oil’s fifteen minutes might be more like two, which could narrow their all-important publicity window to vanishing point.

Is it fair? Lord Hoffmann’s famous lines about the importance of the right to protest, and the unspoken agreement between police and protester, are instructive. “Civil disobedience on conscientious grounds has a long and honourable history in this country,” he began, in a 2006 opinion of the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords. “But there are conventions which are generally accepted by the law-breakers on one side and the law-enforcers on the other. The protesters behave with a sense of proportion and do not cause excessive damage or inconvenience. And they vouch the sincerity of their beliefs by accepting the penalties imposed by the law. The police and prosecutors, on the other hand, behave with restraint
”

By causing never-ending disruption out of all proportion to the numbers of protesters, in order to raise awareness of an issue already at the heart of both Government and opposition policy, Just Stop Oil has not held its side of that bargain. And while the police and prosecutors must continue to act with restraint, that may soon start to look a lot less like spinelessness.


Adam King is a criminal barrister at QEB Hollis Whiteman.

adamhpking

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Sharon Overy
Sharon Overy
1 year ago

For the Coronation, protests were allowed, disruption was not. Disruptors were moved/arrested.

The police can already deal with Just Stop Oil and the like. They just don’t want to.

Simon Denis
Simon Denis
1 year ago
Reply to  Sharon Overy

And why doesn’t the law want to confront these people? First, because its own upper echelons have been colonised by leftists – see “long march”; second, because its officers are acutely conscious that the left now dominates all institutions – see “deep state”. It is, in short, not in the interests of P.C Plod to arrest Tarquin Fozzlewick-Smythe, the blue haired vegan son / daughter of Viscount Swizzlestick – big in wind farming – because the posturing brat will not be prosecuted in the first place. And Plod will find his career mysteriously blocked. QED.

Last edited 1 year ago by Simon Denis
Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

Nailed it.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

Lovely!

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

I bet the police would be quick to make arrests if these protesters were silently praying by the side of the road

Last edited 1 year ago by Ethniciodo Rodenydo
N Forster
N Forster
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

I think your answer can be shortened: Class. This is a middle class protest against working class people. The middle class have protection under the law. “Loss of reputation” is still used to reduce the sentences of middle class offenders when guilty. Such a defence isn’t available to the working class.

Hilary Easton
Hilary Easton
1 year ago
Reply to  N Forster

What?

Hilary Easton
Hilary Easton
1 year ago
Reply to  N Forster

What?

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

Nailed it.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

Lovely!

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

I bet the police would be quick to make arrests if these protesters were silently praying by the side of the road

Last edited 1 year ago by Ethniciodo Rodenydo
N Forster
N Forster
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Denis

I think your answer can be shortened: Class. This is a middle class protest against working class people. The middle class have protection under the law. “Loss of reputation” is still used to reduce the sentences of middle class offenders when guilty. Such a defence isn’t available to the working class.

Simon Denis
Simon Denis
1 year ago
Reply to  Sharon Overy

And why doesn’t the law want to confront these people? First, because its own upper echelons have been colonised by leftists – see “long march”; second, because its officers are acutely conscious that the left now dominates all institutions – see “deep state”. It is, in short, not in the interests of P.C Plod to arrest Tarquin Fozzlewick-Smythe, the blue haired vegan son / daughter of Viscount Swizzlestick – big in wind farming – because the posturing brat will not be prosecuted in the first place. And Plod will find his career mysteriously blocked. QED.

Last edited 1 year ago by Simon Denis
Sharon Overy
Sharon Overy
1 year ago

For the Coronation, protests were allowed, disruption was not. Disruptors were moved/arrested.

The police can already deal with Just Stop Oil and the like. They just don’t want to.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

At times I think these protests are permitted so that the general public are manipulated into supporting draconian protest bans.
The fact that yet another billionaire is supporting these destructive protests is making me reluctantly conclude that too much wealth creates messiah complexes among the super-rich.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

I was originally vehemently against the “banning” of billionaires, but the more they fund insane projects, the more I am leaning the other way. I wonder what pet project the first trillionaire will fund?

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Something like immortality. In my previous comment, I mentioned messiah-complexes, but maybe what we’re witnessing are god-complexes. Their mouthpieces in the media are already categorizing us as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ people depending on our willingness to acquiesce to their bizarre agendas.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Something like immortality. In my previous comment, I mentioned messiah-complexes, but maybe what we’re witnessing are god-complexes. Their mouthpieces in the media are already categorizing us as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ people depending on our willingness to acquiesce to their bizarre agendas.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

I was originally vehemently against the “banning” of billionaires, but the more they fund insane projects, the more I am leaning the other way. I wonder what pet project the first trillionaire will fund?

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

At times I think these protests are permitted so that the general public are manipulated into supporting draconian protest bans.
The fact that yet another billionaire is supporting these destructive protests is making me reluctantly conclude that too much wealth creates messiah complexes among the super-rich.

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago

As things stand, protesters have about 15 minutes before police intervene — which is all they need for the media attention they seek

Are they seeking media attention? Demonstrations sought attention in the distant past, when protesting workers or citizens had to turn out with placards and shouted slogans if newspapers chose to ignore or deprecate their cause. Now, though, we have permanent electronic communication and most of these groups have been offered airtime by the BBC and major broadcasters. If you don’t know what “Just Stop Oil” stand for, you’re not going to find out by sitting in a traffic jam they have created and thereby being late for work.
These groups are not after publicity – they are engaging in a form of blackmail. People who have little to lose from being convicted of low-level crime (i.e. comfortable empty nesters, youngsters guaranteed a living by virtue of inherited wealth and privileged networking, and those suffering from a range of mild personality disorders rendering them unemployable anyway) are simply blackmailing the government. “If you don’t do what we say, we’ll make life difficult for you!” It’s a tactic shared by terrorists and toddlers the world over.

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago

As things stand, protesters have about 15 minutes before police intervene — which is all they need for the media attention they seek

Are they seeking media attention? Demonstrations sought attention in the distant past, when protesting workers or citizens had to turn out with placards and shouted slogans if newspapers chose to ignore or deprecate their cause. Now, though, we have permanent electronic communication and most of these groups have been offered airtime by the BBC and major broadcasters. If you don’t know what “Just Stop Oil” stand for, you’re not going to find out by sitting in a traffic jam they have created and thereby being late for work.
These groups are not after publicity – they are engaging in a form of blackmail. People who have little to lose from being convicted of low-level crime (i.e. comfortable empty nesters, youngsters guaranteed a living by virtue of inherited wealth and privileged networking, and those suffering from a range of mild personality disorders rendering them unemployable anyway) are simply blackmailing the government. “If you don’t do what we say, we’ll make life difficult for you!” It’s a tactic shared by terrorists and toddlers the world over.

Giles Toman
Giles Toman
1 year ago

The police should just stay away from these idiotic protests and let actual “people power” prevail. It’d be cheaper and the disruptors would swiftly get removed and posasibly deterred from doing it again.

Giles Toman
Giles Toman
1 year ago

The police should just stay away from these idiotic protests and let actual “people power” prevail. It’d be cheaper and the disruptors would swiftly get removed and posasibly deterred from doing it again.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago

Difficult to believe that the Met Police will start cracking down on actual crime if they spend less time protecting Just Stop Oil protesters from public anger. They weren’t doing much of a job when there were fewer protests to police. [Perennial excuse: We don’t have the resources to properly police the capital].

Tracy Cook
Tracy Cook
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

They will probably just use the extra ressources to investigate the heinous crime of misgendering rapists

Tracy Cook
Tracy Cook
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

They will probably just use the extra ressources to investigate the heinous crime of misgendering rapists

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago

Difficult to believe that the Met Police will start cracking down on actual crime if they spend less time protecting Just Stop Oil protesters from public anger. They weren’t doing much of a job when there were fewer protests to police. [Perennial excuse: We don’t have the resources to properly police the capital].

Erik Hildinger
Erik Hildinger
1 year ago

“But it’s not really the police’s fault. The Human Rights Act requires them to consider the balance of European Convention rights…”
It sounds as though Britain is limited in its response because it has surrendered some of its sovereignty.

Erik Hildinger
Erik Hildinger
1 year ago

“But it’s not really the police’s fault. The Human Rights Act requires them to consider the balance of European Convention rights…”
It sounds as though Britain is limited in its response because it has surrendered some of its sovereignty.

Will K
Will K
1 year ago

No matter how good their argument might be, I don’t wish decisions to be made by the people who shout loudest, or cause the most disruption.

Last edited 1 year ago by Will K
Will K
Will K
1 year ago

No matter how good their argument might be, I don’t wish decisions to be made by the people who shout loudest, or cause the most disruption.

Last edited 1 year ago by Will K
Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago

I’m not sure about energy bills in the UK, but in Australia for quite a while now, you can pay a premium to have up to 100% of your energy supplied by renewables. Obviously they borrow from the fossil fuel supply to keep the lights on when renewables are not producing anything, then pay it back once the sun comes up.
But wouldn’t it better more enlightening to be more accurate with the supply, so that when the renewables stop producing, then the supply is cut until the renewable supply starts back up again?

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

It’s all part of the same grid in eastern Australia, even sanctimonious Canberra, so it makes no difference. More wind and sun requires more gas and coal, simple as that.
The mix is about 80% hydrocarbons, as it has been for decades, and that only counts electricity output to the grid, not the fuel that is expended to keep backups and turbines (including wind turbines) turning in idle times.
Its also fair to ask these people if they count hydro as part of their “renewables”package since it beats wind, even in winter, in NSW (inc ACT), Vic and TAS and then ask them if they support building new dams.
https://aemo.com.au/en/energy-systems/electricity/national-electricity-market-nem/data-nem/data-dashboard-nem

Last edited 1 year ago by nadnadnerb
Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

It’s all part of the same grid in eastern Australia, even sanctimonious Canberra, so it makes no difference. More wind and sun requires more gas and coal, simple as that.
The mix is about 80% hydrocarbons, as it has been for decades, and that only counts electricity output to the grid, not the fuel that is expended to keep backups and turbines (including wind turbines) turning in idle times.
Its also fair to ask these people if they count hydro as part of their “renewables”package since it beats wind, even in winter, in NSW (inc ACT), Vic and TAS and then ask them if they support building new dams.
https://aemo.com.au/en/energy-systems/electricity/national-electricity-market-nem/data-nem/data-dashboard-nem

Last edited 1 year ago by nadnadnerb
Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago

I’m not sure about energy bills in the UK, but in Australia for quite a while now, you can pay a premium to have up to 100% of your energy supplied by renewables. Obviously they borrow from the fossil fuel supply to keep the lights on when renewables are not producing anything, then pay it back once the sun comes up.
But wouldn’t it better more enlightening to be more accurate with the supply, so that when the renewables stop producing, then the supply is cut until the renewable supply starts back up again?

René Descartes
René Descartes
1 year ago

You say Just Stop Oil’s disruption is “in order to raise awareness of an issue”. Not at all. They are stupid, but not so stupid as to think there’s anyone in the UK who isn’t already fully aware of the issue. Their aim is to make the lives of UK citizens as miserable as possible in the hope that they will pressure the government to move away from its current intelligent energy policy (which they don’t like). In short, they have no interest in science or democracy, but only in a form of terrorism.

Last edited 1 year ago by broglets
Phil Rees
Phil Rees
1 year ago

“government’s 
 current intelligent energy policy”! Really? As long as net zero persists it is not ‘intelligent’.

Kit Read
Kit Read
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil Rees

Why aren’t people on the street protesting against Net Zero, a policy which will make the working class disproportionately poorer. They will also not be able to afford e-cars and the ineffectual Heat Pumps.

Last edited 1 year ago by Kit Read
Kit Read
Kit Read
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil Rees

Why aren’t people on the street protesting against Net Zero, a policy which will make the working class disproportionately poorer. They will also not be able to afford e-cars and the ineffectual Heat Pumps.

Last edited 1 year ago by Kit Read
Phil Rees
Phil Rees
1 year ago

“government’s 
 current intelligent energy policy”! Really? As long as net zero persists it is not ‘intelligent’.

René Descartes
René Descartes
1 year ago

You say Just Stop Oil’s disruption is “in order to raise awareness of an issue”. Not at all. They are stupid, but not so stupid as to think there’s anyone in the UK who isn’t already fully aware of the issue. Their aim is to make the lives of UK citizens as miserable as possible in the hope that they will pressure the government to move away from its current intelligent energy policy (which they don’t like). In short, they have no interest in science or democracy, but only in a form of terrorism.

Last edited 1 year ago by broglets
Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago

The tragic thing about Just Stop Oil is that they have a noble cause, yet their actions and approach are only dealing harm to it and turning public opinion against them. If the authorities gain greater powers then no doubt they will escalate their protests further. There will be no winners.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Oh dear, so much disagreement, yet no one says why. Curious.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It’s not curious, it’s just that there is no point wasting time with people like you who believe everything the government tells you.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

People like me? What’s that then? Now I’m definitely curious. Not sure what the government have told me either, I really don’t recall.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

If you think these cretins have a noble cause then you must have accepted the government’s Net Zero agenda.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Don’t you understand that the people on this site are free thinkers. They don’t accept NetZero just because the government says so. If National Geographic and The New Scientist and David Attenborough are your informations sources – the what hope is there?
I have told you many times but you just don’t see it. The ‘Save The Planet’ thing is just one side of a complex argument. ‘Zero’ might just about be OK but ‘NetZero’ is just garbage.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago

Don’t you understand that the people on this site are free thinkers.

Yet here you all are criticising what appears to be my ‘radical’ views, according to you folks. Neither do I subscribe to the UK Net Zero policy, it’s unrealistic. But still a noble cause though.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago

Don’t you understand that the people on this site are free thinkers.

Yet here you all are criticising what appears to be my ‘radical’ views, according to you folks. Neither do I subscribe to the UK Net Zero policy, it’s unrealistic. But still a noble cause though.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

If you think these cretins have a noble cause then you must have accepted the government’s Net Zero agenda.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Don’t you understand that the people on this site are free thinkers. They don’t accept NetZero just because the government says so. If National Geographic and The New Scientist and David Attenborough are your informations sources – the what hope is there?
I have told you many times but you just don’t see it. The ‘Save The Planet’ thing is just one side of a complex argument. ‘Zero’ might just about be OK but ‘NetZero’ is just garbage.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

People like me? What’s that then? Now I’m definitely curious. Not sure what the government have told me either, I really don’t recall.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

The whole concept of climate change reminds me of one of those cheesy time-travel movies where the protagonist goes back in time to stop some calamitous event from happening, only to discover that his journey back in time was the whole reason the calamitous event occurred in the first place. By that I mean that the more crazy stuff we do to prevent the inevitable i.e climate change, the more likely we are about to bring about our own doom e.g. Bill Gates’ attempts to geo-engineer the earth by dimming the sun.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“Saving the Planet” has become a cult based on the delusion that humans can change the 4.5 billion years of climate history our planet has under its belt. The industrial revolution is about 250 years old. Just do the math to realize the insanity of it all.
When humans can stop a solar flare, volcano or the movement of the tectonic plates, then perhaps I’ll change my mind. Hell, if we can stop a summer rain shower, I’d convert.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Ha ha! The irony here is looking at many of these comments we’ve travelled to a room full of cobwebby boomers denying the realities of modern existence and complaining endlessly about young people today. Can’t teach an old dog new tricks!

Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

For boomers say ‘old people’. Take a risk. Go out on a limb. Show that you are capable of true criticism.

Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

For boomers say ‘old people’. Take a risk. Go out on a limb. Show that you are capable of true criticism.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“Saving the Planet” has become a cult based on the delusion that humans can change the 4.5 billion years of climate history our planet has under its belt. The industrial revolution is about 250 years old. Just do the math to realize the insanity of it all.
When humans can stop a solar flare, volcano or the movement of the tectonic plates, then perhaps I’ll change my mind. Hell, if we can stop a summer rain shower, I’d convert.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Ha ha! The irony here is looking at many of these comments we’ve travelled to a room full of cobwebby boomers denying the realities of modern existence and complaining endlessly about young people today. Can’t teach an old dog new tricks!

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It’s not curious, it’s just that there is no point wasting time with people like you who believe everything the government tells you.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

The whole concept of climate change reminds me of one of those cheesy time-travel movies where the protagonist goes back in time to stop some calamitous event from happening, only to discover that his journey back in time was the whole reason the calamitous event occurred in the first place. By that I mean that the more crazy stuff we do to prevent the inevitable i.e climate change, the more likely we are about to bring about our own doom e.g. Bill Gates’ attempts to geo-engineer the earth by dimming the sun.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It is not a noble cause, it is idiocy.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Ultimately these folks care about the future of humanity, that seems like a noble cause to me. It is idiocy to think they can just stop oil however, especially by walking in the road and stuff.

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

I care about the future of humanity. I can’t speak for Just Stop Oil whose actions imply a disdain for humanity

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Don’t we all care about the future of humanity?

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

I care about the future of humanity. I can’t speak for Just Stop Oil whose actions imply a disdain for humanity

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Don’t we all care about the future of humanity?

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Ultimately these folks care about the future of humanity, that seems like a noble cause to me. It is idiocy to think they can just stop oil however, especially by walking in the road and stuff.

Ben Shipley
Ben Shipley
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

The Gulag was founded for a noble cause.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Shipley

A peculiar interpretation indeed.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It is not peculiar, it is absolutely correct.
There is always an excuse for totalitarianism.
You have a very short memory.
Some media people were talking about fining or even jailing people who refused the experimental vaccines.
Look what happened in parts of the US and Canada under soy boy Trudeau.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You’ve completely gone off ‘on one’. Sit down, have a cup of tea, then we might resume when you are more composed.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You’ve completely gone off ‘on one’. Sit down, have a cup of tea, then we might resume when you are more composed.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It is not peculiar, it is absolutely correct.
There is always an excuse for totalitarianism.
You have a very short memory.
Some media people were talking about fining or even jailing people who refused the experimental vaccines.
Look what happened in parts of the US and Canada under soy boy Trudeau.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Shipley

Don’t think so. Unless you think a communist dictatorship is a noble cause.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Ben’s comment went straight over your head.
Did you hear the rushing sound ?

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Ben’s comment went straight over your head.
Did you hear the rushing sound ?

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Shipley

A peculiar interpretation indeed.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Shipley

Don’t think so. Unless you think a communist dictatorship is a noble cause.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Oh dear, so much disagreement, yet no one says why. Curious.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

It is not a noble cause, it is idiocy.

Ben Shipley
Ben Shipley
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

The Gulag was founded for a noble cause.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago

The tragic thing about Just Stop Oil is that they have a noble cause, yet their actions and approach are only dealing harm to it and turning public opinion against them. If the authorities gain greater powers then no doubt they will escalate their protests further. There will be no winners.