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The Guardian takes a sudden interest in aliens

One of the two 'non-human' beings displayed to the media in Mexico. Credit: Getty

September 18, 2023 - 3:05pm

When a conspiracy theory begins gaining traction online, a thorough takedown is usually guaranteed in the establishment press. Yet when Jaime Maussan, a Mexican journalist and “ufologist” last week unveiled two “alien corpses” at the Mexican national congress, the media was less dismissive than one might have expected.

The Guardian reported that a representative from Mexico’s congress “stressed the importance of listening to ‘all voices, all opinions’”. The paper isn’t historically known for indulging all opinions, voices or perspectives when it comes to science, previously publishing blueprints on how important it is to combat “alternative facts” and “fake news” in the midst of “an uneasy tide of untruths”. Last week’s article concludes that “the congressional hearing was a sign of the increased respectability of a field once seen as the reserve of conspiracy theorists”. 

While Maussan’s claims about “aliens” are treated as credible by the Guardian, the outlet is much more cynical about, for example, Graham Hancock’s Netflix documentary Ancient Apocalypse, which offers alternative theories about prehistory. “Ancient Apocalypse is the most dangerous show on Netflix,” the paper cries in its headline, citing Hancock’s “truly preposterous theory” and asking, “Why has this been allowed?”

One would be hard-pressed to explain how Hancock’s theories on lost civilisations are any more outlandish than the idea that extraterrestrial beings lived on Earth a thousand years ago, yet the Guardian pulls out all the stops to debunk Ancient Apocalypse, even — in a separate article — accusing the programme of racism. In a longer piece last month, the paper disparaged the mainstreaming of “crazy conspiracy theories”, arguing that “it is the nature of conspiracy theories to turn tragedy into grist, to transform grief and human suffering into an abstract game.”

The Guardian is not alone in affording the Mexican aliens story more plausibility than it would other “conspiracy theories”. The Independent treated it with equal credulity, writing about these “mummified specimens” as if their alien status were undisputed. The paper highlights the fact that Maussan was testifying “under oath”, and even declares the previously debunked ufologist an “expert”.

By way of comparison, only a few months earlier, one Independent journalist was so troubled by the debuting of Graham Hancock’s theories on Netflix that he claimed it called into question all independently regulated broadcasters and argued the case for the revival of publicly funded TV. 

The New York Times’s reporting on the “alien discovery” follows the Guardian and Independent model, resisting any attempt to debunk and again making sure to highlight that Maussan was under oath. This, from a publication which once offered advice to those whose friends or family have succumbed to conspiracy theories. Meanwhile, Sky has called those speculating about alien UFO crashes and US Government cover-ups “theorists” as opposed to “conspiracy theorists”. It is a new term to add to the press lexicon. 

Even Nasa seems to be willing to put scepticism to one side: at the end of last week, officials from the US space organisation convened to release a new report on “Unidentified Anomalous Phenomena”. When asked by a BBC reporter what he thought of the “alien corpses”, astrophysicist and Nasa official David Spergel, after conceding that he had only seen the discussion “on Twitter”, said that “when you have unusual things, you want to make data public”. 

Daniel Evans, from the organisation’s Space Mission Directorate, added, “One of the main goals of what we’re trying to do here today is to move conjecture and conspiracy towards science and sanity.” Does the media share this aim? Developments in Mexico in the coming days and weeks may provide a clue.


Panda La Terriere is a freelance writer and playwright.

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M Doors
M Doors
10 months ago

I stopped taking The Guardian seriously years ago.

Saul D
Saul D
10 months ago

Why would an alien look like anything like a human being? Why would we assume their evolution would be anything similar to ours?

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
10 months ago
Reply to  Saul D

Not just a human being. An eerie resemblance to ET

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
10 months ago
Reply to  Saul D

Life in other parts of the universe might not even be carbon-based

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
10 months ago
Reply to  Saul D

The scientific answer is convergent evolution. Many features evolved several different times in earth’s history and were selected for because they we useful each time.
Assuming we’re talking about surface based life from a stellar orbiting planet, some form of organ sensitive to electromagnetic waves is likely. Binocular vision is quite useful, but eyes are very expensive to maintain, so 3 eyes is superfluous, especially if the 2 can be put on something that swivels (aka a neck). Similarly with sound / ears. The details of eye or ear wavelength sensitivity will vary, but it’s not accidental that these organs occur where they do on the body. Butterflies may “taste” with their feet, but would is ever make sense for a species that has developed interstellar travel to do so? 4 or 6 legged walking is also expensive in a creature that needs lots of calories for brain function, so bipedal walking might be quite universal.
Personally though, I find Fermi’s Paradox quite convincing. We are either unique in the galaxy (unlikely) or the universe of designed to preclude functional interstellar travel (more likely, I think.)

Right-Wing Hippie
Right-Wing Hippie
10 months ago
Reply to  Saul D

Well, presumably they would look like human beings so that they won’t reject us out of hand when we tell them that Jesus is their lord and savior as well.

Right-Wing Hippie
Right-Wing Hippie
10 months ago

The Guardian is not alone in affording the Mexican aliens story more plausibility
I think you’re supposed to call them “Mexican undocumented migrants.”

Ian McKinney
Ian McKinney
10 months ago

Very good!

starkbreath
starkbreath
10 months ago

Yes, wouldn’t want to be extraterrestrialist.

J Bryant
J Bryant
10 months ago

“Yet when Jaime Maussan, a Mexican journalist…”
“Graham Hancock’s Netflix documentary…”
Flip the races of those two people. Which one do you think the MSM will take seriously? Which “voice” will be prioritized?

Dumetrius
Dumetrius
10 months ago

They think Graham Hancock is a ‘gateway drug’ to National Socialism. Since Himmler was so into Atlantis.

There’s a good ‘The Rest is History’ on this :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsCryB1mdHE

Albert McGloan
Albert McGloan
10 months ago
Reply to  Dumetrius

Wait ’til they find out about his thoughts on yoga and animal welfare!

Dumetrius
Dumetrius
10 months ago
Reply to  Albert McGloan

And drinking yoghurt!!

Last edited 10 months ago by Dumetrius
Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
10 months ago

Funny how the Guardian seems to care a great deal about aliens from other planets but is remarkably silent about illegal aliens from our own. Of course, at least they’re consistent: open borders, whether national or planetary!

N Satori
N Satori
10 months ago

The most amusing thing about credible UFO/Aliens reports is how it has wrong-footed all those know-it-all media pundits – those people who make a living explaining political, social and moral issues to the rest of us. They were happier when ‘Flying Saucers’ could be dismissed with a sneer. Now they will need to find a political, social and moral framework they can fit the subject into – in order to convince themselves they are on top of it. 

Last edited 10 months ago by N Satori
Dumetrius
Dumetrius
10 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Really ? I think it’s more a case of – You think a sneer hasn’t come along for a while and then two sneers arrive at once.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
10 months ago

Why isn’t anyone questioning why these “specimens”, were allowed to leave Peru, where they were allegedly discovered in 2017? And why it took 6 years to “reveal” the most significant discovery in human history?

Last edited 10 months ago by Warren Trees
Emre S
Emre S
10 months ago

Does this mean going forward that those who question the credibility of UFO claims are going to be called conspiracy theorists?

Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
10 months ago

We should keep an open mind about anything – these two mummies could indeed be aliens.
I don’t believe in Anthropogenic Global Warming.
The evidence is about the same for both items.

Robbie K
Robbie K
10 months ago

Maybe it’s a Remainer who died from the covid vaccine?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
10 months ago
Reply to  Robbie K

Almost certainly the correct answer. Well done sir!

Dumetrius
Dumetrius
10 months ago

The guy associated with these particular aliens has been involved in five other bogus alien claims tho.

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
10 months ago
Reply to  Dumetrius

Sixth time lucky?

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
10 months ago
Reply to  Dumetrius

Joe Biden has been grifting for over 50 years. What’s your point?

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
10 months ago

Mummies? Isn’t that a bit sexist? Dead birthing parent, surely?

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
10 months ago

Doubtlessly The Guardian has taken an interest in this story as it’s typically been confirmed by a former member of Zelensky’s government in Kiev who claimed that the ET was an early Ukrainian nationalist who led the struggle against Moscow.