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stephen archer
stephen archer
8 months ago

“the last stand of racist rule in Africa”?
What a joke? The native Africans in power are just as racist as the British and other European colonial rulers, be it inter-tribal wars, Muslim oppression, corrupt rulers practicing genocide, or targeting remaining white landowners who are keeping part of the local economy viable. Then there’s the Russian intervention. Sorry, but Africa is bit of a basket case in terms of oppression and lack of civilised rule. A large proportion of the African population is suffering as a result and will there be an end to this?

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
8 months ago
Reply to  stephen archer

Good article but unsubstantiated words like racist and misogynistic spoiled it. Are journalists now aping the corporate ticking off the DIE requirements?

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
8 months ago

Yes, and the use of “toxic masculinity” – from a man – makes me suspect you’re right.

Philip May
Philip May
8 months ago

You beat me to the punch.

Philip May
Philip May
8 months ago

You beat me to the punch.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
8 months ago

Yes, and the use of “toxic masculinity” – from a man – makes me suspect you’re right.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
8 months ago
Reply to  stephen archer

Good article but unsubstantiated words like racist and misogynistic spoiled it. Are journalists now aping the corporate ticking off the DIE requirements?

stephen archer
stephen archer
8 months ago

“the last stand of racist rule in Africa”?
What a joke? The native Africans in power are just as racist as the British and other European colonial rulers, be it inter-tribal wars, Muslim oppression, corrupt rulers practicing genocide, or targeting remaining white landowners who are keeping part of the local economy viable. Then there’s the Russian intervention. Sorry, but Africa is bit of a basket case in terms of oppression and lack of civilised rule. A large proportion of the African population is suffering as a result and will there be an end to this?

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
8 months ago

If accurate, that was something of an eye-opener about the origins of Al Qaeda. What is it with the impotency of the msm that this type of critical insight isn’t more widely known?

The ways in which rogue armies mutate isn’t a recent phenomenon, although modern communications exacerbate their potential to do so. I watched a documentary series on the warring factions in pre-Norman conquest England recently, and the same themes of mercenary switching of loyalties and betrayals between Anglo-Saxon kingdoms as the last waves of Vikings swept through the country (ending when their leader Cnut was proclaimed king) followed a very similar pattern.

Africa now seems the most contested territory, with the former Soviet republics also prone to the same kind of toxic militarism. A thousand years of history and men fighting each other whilst laying waste to the land persists. Is it any wonder many in the West seek to take humanity on a different path? There’s nothing glorious about combat for the sake of it, except in self defence.

martin logan
martin logan
8 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Usama did indeed offer to fight Saddam in Kuwait–as long as no non-Muslims would be involved.
The problem with that was: Kuwait was totally different from Afghanistan, and a guerrilla war had zero chance of winning.
So the dilemma for the (still very Muslim) Saudis was: do you give in to a total nut-job, and thereby enable an empowered Iraq on your border, or do you let a coalition restore Kuwait?
We all know what they did.

Last edited 8 months ago by martin logan
Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The moral is do not employ mercenary troops, recruit infantry from home country and pay them well.
Britain has managed to keep the Armed Forces out of politics since 1660. After the War of the Roses , Henry VII received massive support in reducing the number of armed retainers employed by aristocrats and destroyed their castle walls.

martin logan
martin logan
8 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Usama did indeed offer to fight Saddam in Kuwait–as long as no non-Muslims would be involved.
The problem with that was: Kuwait was totally different from Afghanistan, and a guerrilla war had zero chance of winning.
So the dilemma for the (still very Muslim) Saudis was: do you give in to a total nut-job, and thereby enable an empowered Iraq on your border, or do you let a coalition restore Kuwait?
We all know what they did.

Last edited 8 months ago by martin logan
Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
7 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The moral is do not employ mercenary troops, recruit infantry from home country and pay them well.
Britain has managed to keep the Armed Forces out of politics since 1660. After the War of the Roses , Henry VII received massive support in reducing the number of armed retainers employed by aristocrats and destroyed their castle walls.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
8 months ago

If accurate, that was something of an eye-opener about the origins of Al Qaeda. What is it with the impotency of the msm that this type of critical insight isn’t more widely known?

The ways in which rogue armies mutate isn’t a recent phenomenon, although modern communications exacerbate their potential to do so. I watched a documentary series on the warring factions in pre-Norman conquest England recently, and the same themes of mercenary switching of loyalties and betrayals between Anglo-Saxon kingdoms as the last waves of Vikings swept through the country (ending when their leader Cnut was proclaimed king) followed a very similar pattern.

Africa now seems the most contested territory, with the former Soviet republics also prone to the same kind of toxic militarism. A thousand years of history and men fighting each other whilst laying waste to the land persists. Is it any wonder many in the West seek to take humanity on a different path? There’s nothing glorious about combat for the sake of it, except in self defence.

martin logan
martin logan
8 months ago

The Prigozhin affair is the direct result of the Mafia/KGB model Putin imposed on Russia.
Every aspect of Russia–commerce, entertainment, MSM, etc–was eventually coopted through surreptitious means. Putin essentially created one giant spy network, which only he fully controlled.
This wasn’t “genius.” It was just the only model of control that existed in Putin’s tiny head, learned via his experieince in the KGB.
The problem in all this is that “assets” can quite often turn on their handlers. They do, after all, have minds of their own. And when their handlers become weak, they get ideas…
And that’s what has happened with Prigozhin.

martin logan
martin logan
8 months ago

The Prigozhin affair is the direct result of the Mafia/KGB model Putin imposed on Russia.
Every aspect of Russia–commerce, entertainment, MSM, etc–was eventually coopted through surreptitious means. Putin essentially created one giant spy network, which only he fully controlled.
This wasn’t “genius.” It was just the only model of control that existed in Putin’s tiny head, learned via his experieince in the KGB.
The problem in all this is that “assets” can quite often turn on their handlers. They do, after all, have minds of their own. And when their handlers become weak, they get ideas…
And that’s what has happened with Prigozhin.

Steve Hay
Steve Hay
7 months ago

A lot here about bad things happening in Africa and Eastern Europe. I’ve got news for you these are not the only parts of the world with a supply of disenchanted military prople, who have been abandoned to a greater or lesser extent by their former military masters and the government they represent.
I”m sure the US has a good supply of disenchanted gulf war and Afghanistan veterans who feel pretty abandoned by their former masters. Australia where I am from has its share of unhappy military veterans.
The fact that these veterans have opertuneistic politations and Journalist trying to stitch then up as war criminals does not help the situation.
A charismatic leader in any of these places would be a significant problem for the government concerned.

Steve Hay
Steve Hay
7 months ago

A lot here about bad things happening in Africa and Eastern Europe. I’ve got news for you these are not the only parts of the world with a supply of disenchanted military prople, who have been abandoned to a greater or lesser extent by their former military masters and the government they represent.
I”m sure the US has a good supply of disenchanted gulf war and Afghanistan veterans who feel pretty abandoned by their former masters. Australia where I am from has its share of unhappy military veterans.
The fact that these veterans have opertuneistic politations and Journalist trying to stitch then up as war criminals does not help the situation.
A charismatic leader in any of these places would be a significant problem for the government concerned.