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The trouble with arresting Trump He is the Father Gapon of American politics

Be careful what you wish for (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Be careful what you wish for (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)


March 21, 2023   4 mins

On 22 January 1905, the Orthodox priest Georgy Gapon led a large procession of hungry and dissatisfied workers towards St. Petersburg’s Winter Palace, an event that would culminate in the tragedy known as Bloody Sunday, as imperial soldiers opened fire on the unarmed crowds. Father Gapon, however, was not exactly a model revolutionary. Born to a Cossack father, he had excelled in school and seemed destined for a life in the church, and though his life took some twists and turns before he was finally ordained as a priest, he turned out to be a very talented one.

In the years leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1905, Gapon — who had always been interested in the betterment of the poor — eventually set up an explicitly non-socialist, non-revolutionary worker’s organisation focused on education and mutual aid. And he did so with the support of the Russian secret police, the Okhrana, who hoped to use Gapon to sideline the Bolsheviks, Mensheviks, and Socialist Revolutionaries, all of whom hoped to use the workers to overthrow the Tsar.

In other words, the man at the centre of the event that would quite literally spark the 1905 Russian Revolution had been put there in order to prevent it from happening. Gapon’s plan was straightforward, if naïve: he hoped that handing over a written petition to the Tsar — or at least a representative of the Tsar — would mollify the angry workers and de-escalate the rapidly worsening political situation. Once the soldiers started firing on the crowds, however, he quickly lost control of the entire situation. The revolution that Gapon almost certainly had been trying to avoid was now on, and he was simply along for the ride.

At a time when the rumour mill is abuzz with news of the impending arrest of Donald Trump, and the increasing likelihood that America’s 46th President will be subjected to some drawn-out and polarising court spectacle, it is useful to recall the ultimately tragic lessons of 1905. Trump, like Gapon before him, was very much an unlikely protagonist, with little in his life to suggest he’d become a populist candidate or be turned into an enemy of the republic by almost half of America. In 2016, hardly any Republican insiders took him seriously, while Democrats cheered him on and hoped he’d stay in the primary for as long as possible, thinking it would make Hillary Clinton’s stroll into the White House that much easier. On the eve of the election, Trump’s belated victory speech was topped off by The Rolling Stones’ ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’. It was an odd choice of music to celebrate a victory; it was almost as if the Trump campaign had expected to be giving a concession speech instead, and never even took the time to prepare another song.

Both during his time in office and afterwards, Trump has generated more than his fair share of disappointment and disillusionment among both former and current supporters. His rock-star patina of 2016 is by now very tarnished, though it would be foolish to assume it has disappeared completely. With all that said, however, both those who hate Trump and those who idolise him tend to make a similar mistake: they either underestimate him or overestimate him, and often do both at the same time.

The real force behind Trump in 2016 was the same as that of Gapon in 1905. Trump, like Gapon, was propelled not just by his personal qualities, but also by the way these qualities allowed him to serve as a vessel for political passions that were much, much more powerful than him. No matter what they thought they were doing or initially hoped to accomplish, both men eventually ended up being swept along by the tide. The events of January 6th, which the Democratic Party has long tried to turn into America’s own contemporary Bloody Sunday, with fairly modest results, was something that Trump himself was powerless to control.

Many of Trump’s critics style him as a fiendish manipulator, a snake charmer of the uneducated masses who have supposedly been hypnotised by some sort of showbiz “magic” that only Trump himself knows how to wield. But this is almost the exact opposite of the truth. Trump is the sort of politician who holds massive rallies where his own fans, upon hearing things they don’t like (such as being told to stop fussing so much and just get vaccinated), loudly boo him. And to Trump’s credit, he normally takes this in his stride. For a populist, one shouldn’t make light of just how useful this characteristic is. But it also illustrates Trump’s basic power dynamic: even at his own rallies — filled with nothing but his most loyal supporters — Trump is, in a fundamental sense, really only along for the ride. Far from Trump being a snake charmer and “the mob” being a passive victim in this drama, it is his voters and supporters who have made him and who have the power to unmake him. Trump served as an outlet for a deep (and still growing) dissatisfaction inside the American body politic; removing him won’t make that dissatisfaction somehow go away.

In the days ahead, we should keep this in mind. Imprisoning Trump and subjecting him to politically motivated public humiliation or legal action might feel very cathartic, and it might even seem like a good idea. But it’s really not. During times of rising inflation, political polarisation and a growing military crisis, a dormant political volcano always lurks just out of sight. And as things become worse, as the future becomes more gloomy and the present becomes more painful, the risk of a serious eruption greatly increases. Once Gapon had served his purpose leading the march to St. Petersburg, neither the crowds nor the revolution needed him any longer. He died in obscurity soon after, murdered by the very same Socialist Revolutionaries he had once successfully kept away from the main stage. Bloody Sunday led directly to a massive general strike that, at least for a time, completely crippled Russia. And it was also the event that really made workers ready to listen, for the very first time, to the much more radical socialist agitators. Georgy Gapon was no longer needed.

There are many people today who hope to turn the tail end of Trump’s political life into a tragedy, who dream of ruining him, of exacting “vengeance” and making an example out of him. To those people, the tragic tale of Father Gapon, can be summarised quite easily: be very careful what you wish for — for one day, you might just get what you asked for.


Malcom Kyeyune is a freelance writer living in Uppsala, Sweden

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Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

The Democrats seem to still think that if they get rid of Trump they get rid of the angry populist movement that elected him in the first place. They are wrong about that. Look at France and Holland – people are getting very sick of the globalist progressive agenda – Trumpism is here to stay even if Trump isn’t.

Sasha Stone
Sasha Stone
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Yep. In fact, they need Trump because he’s the only thing they have to scare voters at the polls but once Trump is no longer a factor? It’s gonna get ugly.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Sasha Stone

gonna? the word does not exist

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Sasha Stone

gonna? the word does not exist

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

More cynically, I think they’ve decided the more they can keep Trump in the news, the more divided the Republican Party will become and thus their chances of winning the next election will increase. Trump doesn’t command the level of support he once did outside a small band of hardcore loyalists, the majority that voted for him as a way of shaking up the status quo are now tired of his antics and have moved on to other politicians such as De Santis

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Correct. The Donkeys want to run against Trump because Biden and the progressive agenda is very, very unpopular and the last 2+ years have been disastrous. Anything to keep people from thinking about that.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

At this point in time, Trump still commands 30 to 35% of the base. Now that Alvin Bragg wants to d**k around with him expect that number to increase- by how much? – who knows? Americans love an underdog.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

It all becomes clear when one goes to a NASCAR race and looks round at the crowd…A full Talladega speedway has a combined IQ of around 9

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

So, why would YOU go to a NASCAR race if that is what you think ?

paul soto
paul soto
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

somehow i don’t think Nicky has actually been to a NASCAR race.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  paul soto

I worked advising F1 teams for many years and my family owned 2 F1 teams Yeoman Credit and Bowmaker… its all on the net if you look.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  paul soto

I worked advising F1 teams for many years and my family owned 2 F1 teams Yeoman Credit and Bowmaker… its all on the net if you look.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

see below… I worked in the financial side of automotive / motor sports for many years

paul soto
paul soto
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

somehow i don’t think Nicky has actually been to a NASCAR race.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

see below… I worked in the financial side of automotive / motor sports for many years

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

So, why would YOU go to a NASCAR race if that is what you think ?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

It all becomes clear when one goes to a NASCAR race and looks round at the crowd…A full Talladega speedway has a combined IQ of around 9

2A Solution
2A Solution
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

DeSantis 2024.
This isn’t about Trump. We voted for him hoping he would ruin the government, expose the social media liars, the fake press, and the decadent education establishment.

Mission accomplished.

I remember long ago reading Mao went after those same elites, excepting social media, which didn’t exist. I have decided Mao was right.

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Correct. The Donkeys want to run against Trump because Biden and the progressive agenda is very, very unpopular and the last 2+ years have been disastrous. Anything to keep people from thinking about that.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

At this point in time, Trump still commands 30 to 35% of the base. Now that Alvin Bragg wants to d**k around with him expect that number to increase- by how much? – who knows? Americans love an underdog.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
2A Solution
2A Solution
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

DeSantis 2024.
This isn’t about Trump. We voted for him hoping he would ruin the government, expose the social media liars, the fake press, and the decadent education establishment.

Mission accomplished.

I remember long ago reading Mao went after those same elites, excepting social media, which didn’t exist. I have decided Mao was right.

Sasha Stone
Sasha Stone
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Yep. In fact, they need Trump because he’s the only thing they have to scare voters at the polls but once Trump is no longer a factor? It’s gonna get ugly.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

More cynically, I think they’ve decided the more they can keep Trump in the news, the more divided the Republican Party will become and thus their chances of winning the next election will increase. Trump doesn’t command the level of support he once did outside a small band of hardcore loyalists, the majority that voted for him as a way of shaking up the status quo are now tired of his antics and have moved on to other politicians such as De Santis

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

The Democrats seem to still think that if they get rid of Trump they get rid of the angry populist movement that elected him in the first place. They are wrong about that. Look at France and Holland – people are getting very sick of the globalist progressive agenda – Trumpism is here to stay even if Trump isn’t.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

The author of the article tries to be a good academic by bringing in Father Gapon. To me, this part seems irrelevant.
If you want to know why Trump wins votes you need to speak to some rednecks. The world is full of politicians who don’t stand for anything good. Look at the columns of UnHerd and see the bile aimed at MPs who are 100% woke. They won’t fight woke, or stand up for anything; they are grey, they live for sound bites, in a word they are useless.
Then, imagine, someone comes along who is different. This person says what he thinks and actually appeals to the voters. He brings more people out to vote. He is immediately labelled ‘populist’ by the pseudo-intellectuals because he doesn’t follow the usual patterns; the clever people are the ones who want woke because they see themselves as above it all – and woke controls the plebs.
So, ask the rednecks – do you want a populist or do you want the usual grey person who makes things worse. Stand back when they answer
.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

To a large extent right wing parties in the west have brought this on themselves. Appeal to a right wing audience and promise to govern in a right wing manner and then tack to the left when they get in. To many working class voters (and others) they appear to be quite happy to lie to voters to get elected and then shape shift in order to join an elite in-crowd who in general have more ‘progressive’ values. A political version of ‘meet the new boss, same as the old boss.’

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

The right wing might have set the kindling, but it was the left who lit the match, and put fire to fuel.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

The right wing might have set the kindling, but it was the left who lit the match, and put fire to fuel.

Richard Pearse
Richard Pearse
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

True (about the author throwing in the Father Gapon analogy). But what about the other side? Obama, Clinton, Biden and Woke Machine playing the role of the Czar?

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Pearse

As I said, the middle-classes want woke because they are above it. The problems caused by woke are other peoples’ problems. Being woke, thinking about race, being nice to ‘unusual’ people, aspects of tolerance, etc, is a sort of pseudo-religion. It takes peoples’ minds off the real problems. It is a form of mind control.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Pearse

As I said, the middle-classes want woke because they are above it. The problems caused by woke are other peoples’ problems. Being woke, thinking about race, being nice to ‘unusual’ people, aspects of tolerance, etc, is a sort of pseudo-religion. It takes peoples’ minds off the real problems. It is a form of mind control.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
Dianne Bean
Dianne Bean
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

Not sure why you think this only applies to who you call rednecks

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Dianne Bean

Yes, you are right. My experience in the US comes from many visits to Kentucky. There, almost 100% were Trump supporters.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

You have been taken to task about this before. Maybe time to reframe!

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

You have been taken to task about this before. Maybe time to reframe!

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Dianne Bean

Agreed- many Trump supporters including myself are very well educated- they see through the Democrat BS.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

ei fink lotza trump sipotaz iz veri kleve pipl n wel ejjercated an read buks an kan kount an do summs an uvver finkx

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

ei fink lotza trump sipotaz iz veri kleve pipl n wel ejjercated an read buks an kan kount an do summs an uvver finkx

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Dianne Bean

Yes, you are right. My experience in the US comes from many visits to Kentucky. There, almost 100% were Trump supporters.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Dianne Bean

Agreed- many Trump supporters including myself are very well educated- they see through the Democrat BS.

Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

To a large extent right wing parties in the west have brought this on themselves. Appeal to a right wing audience and promise to govern in a right wing manner and then tack to the left when they get in. To many working class voters (and others) they appear to be quite happy to lie to voters to get elected and then shape shift in order to join an elite in-crowd who in general have more ‘progressive’ values. A political version of ‘meet the new boss, same as the old boss.’

Richard Pearse
Richard Pearse
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

True (about the author throwing in the Father Gapon analogy). But what about the other side? Obama, Clinton, Biden and Woke Machine playing the role of the Czar?

Dianne Bean
Dianne Bean
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

Not sure why you think this only applies to who you call rednecks

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

The author of the article tries to be a good academic by bringing in Father Gapon. To me, this part seems irrelevant.
If you want to know why Trump wins votes you need to speak to some rednecks. The world is full of politicians who don’t stand for anything good. Look at the columns of UnHerd and see the bile aimed at MPs who are 100% woke. They won’t fight woke, or stand up for anything; they are grey, they live for sound bites, in a word they are useless.
Then, imagine, someone comes along who is different. This person says what he thinks and actually appeals to the voters. He brings more people out to vote. He is immediately labelled ‘populist’ by the pseudo-intellectuals because he doesn’t follow the usual patterns; the clever people are the ones who want woke because they see themselves as above it all – and woke controls the plebs.
So, ask the rednecks – do you want a populist or do you want the usual grey person who makes things worse. Stand back when they answer
.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
J Bryant
J Bryant
1 year ago

Trump must remain center stage for Biden to win a second term. The Dems will do anything to keep the spotlight on him because that will split the Republican vote between MAGA and non-MAGA, or at least persuade many Republican moderates to stay home on election day.
The Dems seem to be doing quite a good job but, as the author points out, be careful what genie you loose from the box. Once political trials of ex-presidents become acceptable in the US anyone is fair game.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

I don’t think the Dems actually want him convicted. Shows trials are great theatre. They would be quite happy to see this drag on for two more years.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Trump just represents what the Republican Party has become, one seemingly their voters want. He didn’t create it. A party that doesn’t stand for anything positive any more, the party of manufactured white grievance, performative obnoxiousness, the forever culture wars and being against anything and everything the Democrats propose. The party of gutless weasels like McCarthy and Stepanik, the clown car of the Freedom Caucus, Fox News full of millionaires happy to lie and subvert elections if it’s good for the share price
.oh, and tax cuts for billionaires, they will always be in favour of tax cuts for billionaires.

The problem for the Republican Party is that more people vote Democrat than Republican, and have done for some time, so they can only hang on to power, or any chance of regaining the White House, by gerrymandering, and the twin absurdities of the Electoral College and Wyoming being allowed the same number of Senators as Texas or California.

Now, a lot of people who vote Democrat don’t do it out of conviction or any great enthusiasm but because the alternative is so toxic while the whole ecosystem of the right remains in Trumpworld, either with or without the man himself.

So, if Trump ever does end up in jail it will be hugely divisive but the likely reaction of Trumpworld will just alienate more voters than the act itself will repel.

It’s true that a minority of voters may help the Republican Party to keep getting control of one or more branches of power, often because of the inadequacy of the Democrats, but their likely actions in power mean they’ll soon lose it.

The perfect Doom Loop and ultimately bad for America, and the world.

Steven Carr
Steven Carr
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

‘the twin absurdities of the Electoral College and Wyoming being allowed the same number of Senators as Texas or California.’

Yes, the Constitution of the United States of America is absurd, isn’t it?

Perhaps it should be subverted?

Martin Brumby
Martin Brumby
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

The Dems are doing their best.
I repeat what I’ve said before:-
(a) Trump made bad mistakes, but he did more great things (Keeping out of the Paris CoP Net Zero Nonsense Fest, Refusing to pay CCP dominated Tedros and the WHO, Moving the US Embassy to Jerusalem just for three).
(b) If it could be convincingly shown that the Dems didn’t actually steal the 2019 election, it is certain that it wasn’t for the Dems trying their very best.
Meanwhile, whoever pulls Biden’s strings is heading straight to the cliff edge, pedal to the metal.

Alexander Dryburgh
Alexander Dryburgh
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

What you might be forgetting is that the United States is a large geographic nation with most of its population on the two coasts. A structure that tries to balance out those disparities is likely what makes that system work. I should know as I live in Western Canada where are our elections are decided by the time the votes are counted in Toronto’s suburbs. It results in political parties whose goal is to win votes in the eastern third of the country and therefore has policy platforms aimed at those voters. The other two thirds are a second thought. Although we have a Senate in our system they are not elected but chosen by the Prime Minister. I’ve often thought we would be better served by an elected Senate based on an equal number from all provinces and territories.
The geography of large nations is well served by such a system.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

I’m not sure the system does work any more, which I see as part of the problem. While you may want to avoid ‘the tyranny of the majority’, the ‘tyranny of the minority’ is arguably worse.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
1 year ago

Big governments only have to buy off those they need to get elected. Which is why big government is to be avoided. Currently Ottawa is expanded government in an effort to only have to listen to government workers. If they are successful it will be the end of a workable Canadian government.

I like Canada so much, I think there should be 13 of them.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

I’m not sure the system does work any more, which I see as part of the problem. While you may want to avoid ‘the tyranny of the majority’, the ‘tyranny of the minority’ is arguably worse.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
1 year ago

Big governments only have to buy off those they need to get elected. Which is why big government is to be avoided. Currently Ottawa is expanded government in an effort to only have to listen to government workers. If they are successful it will be the end of a workable Canadian government.

I like Canada so much, I think there should be 13 of them.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

The Constitution of the United States was written several hundred years ago and reflected the country and the times the framers of it lived in. So, no I’m not suggesting subverting the constitution just the inescapable fact that both the country and the times are very different today. Voting throughout history, for example, was restricted and defined groups eg women weren’t allowed to vote. That changed as times and attitudes changed.

Republicans are happy to keep the constitution preserved in aspic because it suits their political purposes.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

The Constitution addresses itself to permanent problems, not ephemeral ones. The problem that will never go away is the problem of tyranny. The solution to that problem divided and thus limited governmental powers. That solution is not perfect, but it has worked quite well. Those who want to get rid of the electoral college and the Senate are not at all happy about limitations on governmental powers and are, for that reason, to be feared.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

I wasn’t advocating getting rid of the the electoral college or the Senate just addressing the obvious democratic deficits of both. Why should a vote in one state be worth so much more than a vote in another? Why can a President be elected by ‘electors’ in a winner takes all system when more voters nationally want the other guy, so an election comes down to a few thousand than several million?

I was addressing ‘tyranny of the minority’ not suggesting giving one branch more power.

Politicians need to be accountable to all voters, and act in everyone’s interests, not just an unrepresentative base. This applies to both parties.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

My point was that the senate and the electoral college are anti-tyranny and thus essential if there is to be anything even approaching democracy. Of course the United States is not a democracy but a mixed regime. Pure democracies are fragile and when they crumble it is into tyranny. It sounds to me like we agree that this is “the” political problem.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

My point was that the senate and the electoral college are anti-tyranny and thus essential if there is to be anything even approaching democracy. Of course the United States is not a democracy but a mixed regime. Pure democracies are fragile and when they crumble it is into tyranny. It sounds to me like we agree that this is “the” political problem.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

I wasn’t advocating getting rid of the the electoral college or the Senate just addressing the obvious democratic deficits of both. Why should a vote in one state be worth so much more than a vote in another? Why can a President be elected by ‘electors’ in a winner takes all system when more voters nationally want the other guy, so an election comes down to a few thousand than several million?

I was addressing ‘tyranny of the minority’ not suggesting giving one branch more power.

Politicians need to be accountable to all voters, and act in everyone’s interests, not just an unrepresentative base. This applies to both parties.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

The Constitution addresses itself to permanent problems, not ephemeral ones. The problem that will never go away is the problem of tyranny. The solution to that problem divided and thus limited governmental powers. That solution is not perfect, but it has worked quite well. Those who want to get rid of the electoral college and the Senate are not at all happy about limitations on governmental powers and are, for that reason, to be feared.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

Without the electoral college you get Canada – a PM elected with 32% of the vote who targets entire regions of the country who don’t vote for him.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

electoral college? what an ironic contradiction in terms!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

electoral college? what an ironic contradiction in terms!

Martin Brumby
Martin Brumby
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

The Dems are doing their best.
I repeat what I’ve said before:-
(a) Trump made bad mistakes, but he did more great things (Keeping out of the Paris CoP Net Zero Nonsense Fest, Refusing to pay CCP dominated Tedros and the WHO, Moving the US Embassy to Jerusalem just for three).
(b) If it could be convincingly shown that the Dems didn’t actually steal the 2019 election, it is certain that it wasn’t for the Dems trying their very best.
Meanwhile, whoever pulls Biden’s strings is heading straight to the cliff edge, pedal to the metal.

Alexander Dryburgh
Alexander Dryburgh
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

What you might be forgetting is that the United States is a large geographic nation with most of its population on the two coasts. A structure that tries to balance out those disparities is likely what makes that system work. I should know as I live in Western Canada where are our elections are decided by the time the votes are counted in Toronto’s suburbs. It results in political parties whose goal is to win votes in the eastern third of the country and therefore has policy platforms aimed at those voters. The other two thirds are a second thought. Although we have a Senate in our system they are not elected but chosen by the Prime Minister. I’ve often thought we would be better served by an elected Senate based on an equal number from all provinces and territories.
The geography of large nations is well served by such a system.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

The Constitution of the United States was written several hundred years ago and reflected the country and the times the framers of it lived in. So, no I’m not suggesting subverting the constitution just the inescapable fact that both the country and the times are very different today. Voting throughout history, for example, was restricted and defined groups eg women weren’t allowed to vote. That changed as times and attitudes changed.

Republicans are happy to keep the constitution preserved in aspic because it suits their political purposes.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

Without the electoral college you get Canada – a PM elected with 32% of the vote who targets entire regions of the country who don’t vote for him.

Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How anyone can type that with a straight face, I don’t know. Kudos to you.
Performative? How about AOC at the met gala, maskless with the other maskless celebrities, surrounded by masked workers, as she showed off her ‘tax the rich dress’? How about Pelosi and friends kneeling for BLM in traditional African garb?
Obnoxious? “If you don’t vote for me, you ain’t black!”, :they want to put y’all back in chains”
Culture wars?!? Really? Abortion on demand with no gestational limit. Trans issues: bathrooms (see Loudoun County schools and the rape and sexual assault that took place and the subsequent cover up), women’s sports, women’s prisons. The hijacking of #metoo in order to prevent the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh. The Masterpiece bakeshop endless court proceedings.
MSNBC, CNN, WaPo, NYT and the Russia collusion, the laptop cover up, the covid ‘misinformation’. The coverage of the ‘mostly peaceful protests’ vs the January 6th riot.
The hysterical race baiting and hyperventilating when minority voters move toward Republicans, “these people are white adjacent’, they are “acting White”, “the black face of white supremacy” and so on.
The Democrats never gerrymander? That reminds me, let’s talk about statehood for Puerto Rico and DC.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

You’ve made my point perfectly for me, so thanks for that. Nothing you’ve said details what Republicans offer to all US citizens in terms of policy or positive actions, you’ve just listed a whole bunch of whataboutery about the Democrats. Exactly as I said.

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

It’s really hard to remember all the election policy documents and manifestos isn’t it? So I did back check on Google and, goodness me, Trump did have a policy objective and plan and seemingly acted on that plan. But obviously it never got any press coverage, so naturally no-one remembers what it was about – something forgettable like “Make America Great Again”…

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

The flaw in your argument is that there was no manifesto in 2020, it was “L’etat, C’est Moi” from Trump and was a factor in why he lost.

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

That was an article from Brookings, the seat of lots of anti-Trump commentary (and more…). Explains a lot if you believed that was reality. The Republicans stayed with the same platform as 2016, partly due to Covid: https://ballotpedia.org/The_Republican_Party_Platform,_2020

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

I hadn’t read the article (or Brookings as it happens, I live in the UK) so thanks for sending it through, but I don’t think the lack of a policy platform had much to do with COVID. More voters were repelled by MAGA than enthused by it, hence Trump, a sitting President, lost.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

No, the Dems stole the election.
We know the media buried the Hunter Biden laptop story.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

No, the Dems stole the election.
We know the media buried the Hunter Biden laptop story.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

I hadn’t read the article (or Brookings as it happens, I live in the UK) so thanks for sending it through, but I don’t think the lack of a policy platform had much to do with COVID. More voters were repelled by MAGA than enthused by it, hence Trump, a sitting President, lost.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

L’État, c’est moi.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Trump is living walking proof that irony is as rare as A Stormy Daniels in The Royal Box on Derby Day…

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Trump is living walking proof that irony is as rare as A Stormy Daniels in The Royal Box on Derby Day…

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

That was an article from Brookings, the seat of lots of anti-Trump commentary (and more…). Explains a lot if you believed that was reality. The Republicans stayed with the same platform as 2016, partly due to Covid: https://ballotpedia.org/The_Republican_Party_Platform,_2020

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

L’État, c’est moi.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

The flaw in your argument is that there was no manifesto in 2020, it was “L’etat, C’est Moi” from Trump and was a factor in why he lost.

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

It’s really hard to remember all the election policy documents and manifestos isn’t it? So I did back check on Google and, goodness me, Trump did have a policy objective and plan and seemingly acted on that plan. But obviously it never got any press coverage, so naturally no-one remembers what it was about – something forgettable like “Make America Great Again”…

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

It’s no use feeding the trolls. Anyone who wishes to subvert the constitution says everything you need to know. It’s a direct road to totalitarianism.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

You’ve made my point perfectly for me, so thanks for that. Nothing you’ve said details what Republicans offer to all US citizens in terms of policy or positive actions, you’ve just listed a whole bunch of whataboutery about the Democrats. Exactly as I said.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

It’s no use feeding the trolls. Anyone who wishes to subvert the constitution says everything you need to know. It’s a direct road to totalitarianism.

Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How anyone can type that with a straight face, I don’t know. Kudos to you.
Performative? How about AOC at the met gala, maskless with the other maskless celebrities, surrounded by masked workers, as she showed off her ‘tax the rich dress’? How about Pelosi and friends kneeling for BLM in traditional African garb?
Obnoxious? “If you don’t vote for me, you ain’t black!”, :they want to put y’all back in chains”
Culture wars?!? Really? Abortion on demand with no gestational limit. Trans issues: bathrooms (see Loudoun County schools and the rape and sexual assault that took place and the subsequent cover up), women’s sports, women’s prisons. The hijacking of #metoo in order to prevent the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh. The Masterpiece bakeshop endless court proceedings.
MSNBC, CNN, WaPo, NYT and the Russia collusion, the laptop cover up, the covid ‘misinformation’. The coverage of the ‘mostly peaceful protests’ vs the January 6th riot.
The hysterical race baiting and hyperventilating when minority voters move toward Republicans, “these people are white adjacent’, they are “acting White”, “the black face of white supremacy” and so on.
The Democrats never gerrymander? That reminds me, let’s talk about statehood for Puerto Rico and DC.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

was the word culture and United States used in the same piece? Surely not?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Caty Gonzales

was the word culture and United States used in the same piece? Surely not?

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How dare Republicans to have actual policy preferences! The temerity of them wanting things I don’t like!
Rude, to say the worst.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

You’re missing my point in a spectacular way.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Maybe we are, but are you not also missing an often made point? Human beings face political problems that never change or go away. Something like human greatness is necessary if human beings are to thrive. The Founders of the American regime were great souled, even if flawed. The same thing can be said about Churchill, surely one of the greatest political figures in all of human history. To show one’s palm the the idea of human greatness is tyranny itself.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Maybe we are, but are you not also missing an often made point? Human beings face political problems that never change or go away. Something like human greatness is necessary if human beings are to thrive. The Founders of the American regime were great souled, even if flawed. The same thing can be said about Churchill, surely one of the greatest political figures in all of human history. To show one’s palm the the idea of human greatness is tyranny itself.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

You’re missing my point in a spectacular way.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

You don’t have to like Republicans – I agree with virtually all of your comments – but the Democrats are far more dangerous.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

A party that doesn’t stand for anything positive any more, the party of manufactured white grievance, performative obnoxiousness
From what I can see from this side of the pond I agree with you here about the Republican Party, but replace the word “white” with “black” or “trans” or numerous other groupings and you have the Democratic Party to a tee. This is the problem with much politics today, it is about grievances, not finding positive ways forward in complicated and dangerous times.

Steven Carr
Steven Carr
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

‘the twin absurdities of the Electoral College and Wyoming being allowed the same number of Senators as Texas or California.’

Yes, the Constitution of the United States of America is absurd, isn’t it?

Perhaps it should be subverted?

Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How anyone can type that with a straight face, I don’t know. Kudos to you.
Performative? How about AOC at the met gala, maskless with the other maskless celebrities, surrounded by masked workers, as she showed off her ‘tax the rich dress’? How about Pelosi and friends kneeling for BLM in traditional African garb?
Obnoxious? “If you don’t vote for me, you ain’t black!”, :they want to put y’all back in chains”
Culture wars?!? Really? Abortion on demand with no gestational limit. Trans issues: bathrooms (see Loudoun County schools and the rape and sexual assault that took place and the subsequent cover up), women’s sports, women’s prisons. The hijacking of #metoo in order to prevent the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh. The Masterpiece bakeshop endless court proceedings.
MSNBC, CNN, WaPo, NYT and the Russia collusion, the laptop cover up, the covid ‘misinformation’. The coverage of the ‘mostly peaceful protests’ vs the January 6th riot.
The hysterical race baiting and hyperventilating when minority voters move toward Republicans, “these people are white adjacent’, they are “acting White”, “the black face of white supremacy” and so on.
The Democrats never gerrymander? That reminds me, let’s talk about statehood for Puerto Rico and DC.

Caty Gonzales
Caty Gonzales
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How anyone can type that with a straight face, I don’t know. Kudos to you.
Performative? How about AOC at the met gala, maskless with the other maskless celebrities, surrounded by masked workers, as she showed off her ‘tax the rich dress’? How about Pelosi and friends kneeling for BLM in traditional African garb?
Obnoxious? “If you don’t vote for me, you ain’t black!”, :they want to put y’all back in chains”
Culture wars?!? Really? Abortion on demand with no gestational limit. Trans issues: bathrooms (see Loudoun County schools and the rape and sexual assault that took place and the subsequent cover up), women’s sports, women’s prisons. The hijacking of #metoo in order to prevent the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh. The Masterpiece bakeshop endless court proceedings.
MSNBC, CNN, WaPo, NYT and the Russia collusion, the laptop cover up, the covid ‘misinformation’. The coverage of the ‘mostly peaceful protests’ vs the January 6th riot.
The hysterical race baiting and hyperventilating when minority voters move toward Republicans, “these people are white adjacent’, they are “acting White”, “the black face of white supremacy” and so on.
The Democrats never gerrymander? That reminds me, let’s talk about statehood for Puerto Rico and DC.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

How dare Republicans to have actual policy preferences! The temerity of them wanting things I don’t like!
Rude, to say the worst.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

You don’t have to like Republicans – I agree with virtually all of your comments – but the Democrats are far more dangerous.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

A party that doesn’t stand for anything positive any more, the party of manufactured white grievance, performative obnoxiousness
From what I can see from this side of the pond I agree with you here about the Republican Party, but replace the word “white” with “black” or “trans” or numerous other groupings and you have the Democratic Party to a tee. This is the problem with much politics today, it is about grievances, not finding positive ways forward in complicated and dangerous times.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Trump just represents what the Republican Party has become, one seemingly their voters want. He didn’t create it. A party that doesn’t stand for anything positive any more, the party of manufactured white grievance, performative obnoxiousness, the forever culture wars and being against anything and everything the Democrats propose. The party of gutless weasels like McCarthy and Stepanik, the clown car of the Freedom Caucus, Fox News full of millionaires happy to lie and subvert elections if it’s good for the share price
.oh, and tax cuts for billionaires, they will always be in favour of tax cuts for billionaires.

The problem for the Republican Party is that more people vote Democrat than Republican, and have done for some time, so they can only hang on to power, or any chance of regaining the White House, by gerrymandering, and the twin absurdities of the Electoral College and Wyoming being allowed the same number of Senators as Texas or California.

Now, a lot of people who vote Democrat don’t do it out of conviction or any great enthusiasm but because the alternative is so toxic while the whole ecosystem of the right remains in Trumpworld, either with or without the man himself.

So, if Trump ever does end up in jail it will be hugely divisive but the likely reaction of Trumpworld will just alienate more voters than the act itself will repel.

It’s true that a minority of voters may help the Republican Party to keep getting control of one or more branches of power, often because of the inadequacy of the Democrats, but their likely actions in power mean they’ll soon lose it.

The perfect Doom Loop and ultimately bad for America, and the world.

Daniel P
Daniel P
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

And it looks to me like Bill Clinton and George Bush Jr. would be two reasonable targets for prosecution.
The Clinton Foundation shakedowns. Trips to pedophile island on the Lolita Express with Epstein.
Agree that this is a can of worms they really do not want to open but are apparently dumb enough to. Sorta like getting rid of the filibuster.

Martin Brumby
Martin Brumby
1 year ago
Reply to  Daniel P

Add the blatant corruption of the Clinton Foundation and of the Biden Family.

Martin Brumby
Martin Brumby
1 year ago
Reply to  Daniel P

Add the blatant corruption of the Clinton Foundation and of the Biden Family.

Dianne Bean
Dianne Bean
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

So if it’s proven that Joe did business with communist china and is compromised, you don’t think he should be put on trial?

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

If they want him to run so they can reelect Biden they shouldn’t be trying to convict him now. It invigorates his supporters and if they win they won’t be facing a split Republican party.

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago

The goal is NOT to convict Trump, but to drag out the process of seeing him hounded by reporters and courts on the news every night. The PROCESS IS THE PUNISHMENT, and what will distract voters from the gawd-awful mess Biden has made.

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago

The goal is NOT to convict Trump, but to drag out the process of seeing him hounded by reporters and courts on the news every night. The PROCESS IS THE PUNISHMENT, and what will distract voters from the gawd-awful mess Biden has made.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

I don’t think the Dems actually want him convicted. Shows trials are great theatre. They would be quite happy to see this drag on for two more years.

Daniel P
Daniel P
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

And it looks to me like Bill Clinton and George Bush Jr. would be two reasonable targets for prosecution.
The Clinton Foundation shakedowns. Trips to pedophile island on the Lolita Express with Epstein.
Agree that this is a can of worms they really do not want to open but are apparently dumb enough to. Sorta like getting rid of the filibuster.

Dianne Bean
Dianne Bean
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

So if it’s proven that Joe did business with communist china and is compromised, you don’t think he should be put on trial?

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

If they want him to run so they can reelect Biden they shouldn’t be trying to convict him now. It invigorates his supporters and if they win they won’t be facing a split Republican party.

J Bryant
J Bryant
1 year ago

Trump must remain center stage for Biden to win a second term. The Dems will do anything to keep the spotlight on him because that will split the Republican vote between MAGA and non-MAGA, or at least persuade many Republican moderates to stay home on election day.
The Dems seem to be doing quite a good job but, as the author points out, be careful what genie you loose from the box. Once political trials of ex-presidents become acceptable in the US anyone is fair game.

Steven Carr
Steven Carr
1 year ago

‘Far from Trump being a snake charmer and “the mob” being a passive victim in this drama, it is his voters and supporters who have made him and who have the power to unmake him. ‘

This is why Trump said ‘In reality, they’re not after me. They’re after you.’

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

Exactly. The truth was revealed by H. Clinton’s use of the word “deplorable.” She unmasked the truth seething just below the surface. Her intentions for the working class were and are the same as the Tsars. Or better, the working class would be lucky if it were the Tsar and not her. She all but said out loud what Nietzsche did: “There will never be enough water to wash away all the blood.” This, precisely this, is what Pres. Trump stands against. Those who cling to him know exactly why they do that. It’s a matter if life or death, as was so obviously the case in 1905 Russia. Yet one can only assume that they cling in vain. It all is, and always will be, so terribly regrettable.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Carr

Exactly. The truth was revealed by H. Clinton’s use of the word “deplorable.” She unmasked the truth seething just below the surface. Her intentions for the working class were and are the same as the Tsars. Or better, the working class would be lucky if it were the Tsar and not her. She all but said out loud what Nietzsche did: “There will never be enough water to wash away all the blood.” This, precisely this, is what Pres. Trump stands against. Those who cling to him know exactly why they do that. It’s a matter if life or death, as was so obviously the case in 1905 Russia. Yet one can only assume that they cling in vain. It all is, and always will be, so terribly regrettable.

Steven Carr
Steven Carr
1 year ago

‘Far from Trump being a snake charmer and “the mob” being a passive victim in this drama, it is his voters and supporters who have made him and who have the power to unmake him. ‘

This is why Trump said ‘In reality, they’re not after me. They’re after you.’

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

Love him or loathe him Trump was not a ‘machine politician’, conditioned by years of compromise and favours. He had to go, and be prevented from standing again.
Love him or loathe them Biden (and previously Clinton) are ‘machine politicians’, conditioned by years of compromise and favours.
Meanwhile the Military-Industrial Complex soldiers(!) on although you can amuse yourself by coming up for a new name for the current instantiation. Global-Pharmaceutical Complex perhaps? Whatever the name it requires compliant politicians to smooth the way.
My quiet expectation is that the Elite don’t mind who is the next President – as long as he or she has been conditioned by years of compromise and favours.

michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

Medical -Industrial Complex.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

Larry David should be President!

michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

Medical -Industrial Complex.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

Larry David should be President!

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

Love him or loathe him Trump was not a ‘machine politician’, conditioned by years of compromise and favours. He had to go, and be prevented from standing again.
Love him or loathe them Biden (and previously Clinton) are ‘machine politicians’, conditioned by years of compromise and favours.
Meanwhile the Military-Industrial Complex soldiers(!) on although you can amuse yourself by coming up for a new name for the current instantiation. Global-Pharmaceutical Complex perhaps? Whatever the name it requires compliant politicians to smooth the way.
My quiet expectation is that the Elite don’t mind who is the next President – as long as he or she has been conditioned by years of compromise and favours.

Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
1 year ago

Indicting Trump may be a mistake if you want a stable democratic (small “d”) republic. But not if you want a security state controlled by a tight oligarchy and you want to replace that democracy with a controlled simulacrum that will keep the people quiet and easily manipulable.

As all the evidence suggests is the case.

When intelligent people seem to make big, obvious mistakes you should first ask yourself, “What am I missing?” Maybe they are wrong in the end, but assume that their actions reveal their motives.

Last edited 1 year ago by Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
1 year ago

Indicting Trump may be a mistake if you want a stable democratic (small “d”) republic. But not if you want a security state controlled by a tight oligarchy and you want to replace that democracy with a controlled simulacrum that will keep the people quiet and easily manipulable.

As all the evidence suggests is the case.

When intelligent people seem to make big, obvious mistakes you should first ask yourself, “What am I missing?” Maybe they are wrong in the end, but assume that their actions reveal their motives.

Last edited 1 year ago by Martin Johnson
Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
1 year ago

You want to “turn the tail end of Trump’s political life into a tragedy”? Ignore him. If the Democrats really thought Trump was a threat to the Republic, this is what they would do.
Instead, the Democrat’s political machine is using all its power to keep Trump in the news and rile up his supporters. Why? Because they want him to win the GOP primary. They Biden is so weak they think Trump is the only candidate he can beat, and they are probably right on both counts.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

I think you are totally wrong. The Dems have elections in the bag after over 10 years of fraud.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

I think you are totally wrong. The Dems have elections in the bag after over 10 years of fraud.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
1 year ago

You want to “turn the tail end of Trump’s political life into a tragedy”? Ignore him. If the Democrats really thought Trump was a threat to the Republic, this is what they would do.
Instead, the Democrat’s political machine is using all its power to keep Trump in the news and rile up his supporters. Why? Because they want him to win the GOP primary. They Biden is so weak they think Trump is the only candidate he can beat, and they are probably right on both counts.

Daniel P
Daniel P
1 year ago

Could not agree more. Trump is now and always has been a vehicle for something else. He tapped into something that was already ripe and ready to explode.
His voters CHOSE him as their vehicle. Attacking their vehicle is attacking them. Its not about Trump as a person for them, its about Trump as a symbol of their disdain for the political and social elites.
If they wanted Trump to go away, to stop being a vehicle for these voters, then the thing to do is to ignore him, not attack him.
These politically driven attacks on him via the legal system are simply going to create chaos and turmoil and deepen the social fractures. Better to have allowed his voters to move on. Allowed time to settle things down. DeSantis would have beaten Trump in the end for the nomination.
What all these people should fear? Trump actually remaining relevant and winning the nomination and then winning the election. God help them if he actually gets back into the White House. God help us all. But my guess is that they will kill him before he takes the oath.

Susan Grabston
Susan Grabston
1 year ago
Reply to  Daniel P

Echos of Rome all over the place …

Susan Grabston
Susan Grabston
1 year ago
Reply to  Daniel P

Echos of Rome all over the place …

Daniel P
Daniel P
1 year ago

Could not agree more. Trump is now and always has been a vehicle for something else. He tapped into something that was already ripe and ready to explode.
His voters CHOSE him as their vehicle. Attacking their vehicle is attacking them. Its not about Trump as a person for them, its about Trump as a symbol of their disdain for the political and social elites.
If they wanted Trump to go away, to stop being a vehicle for these voters, then the thing to do is to ignore him, not attack him.
These politically driven attacks on him via the legal system are simply going to create chaos and turmoil and deepen the social fractures. Better to have allowed his voters to move on. Allowed time to settle things down. DeSantis would have beaten Trump in the end for the nomination.
What all these people should fear? Trump actually remaining relevant and winning the nomination and then winning the election. God help them if he actually gets back into the White House. God help us all. But my guess is that they will kill him before he takes the oath.

Bryan Dale
Bryan Dale
1 year ago

After three years of Democrat lockdowns and the resulting economic calamity plus the deranged Biden regime, Trump is more powerful than ever. He’s successful because he’s in touch with ordinary Americans rather than relying on the leftist press to tell him what Americans want.

Bryan Dale
Bryan Dale
1 year ago

After three years of Democrat lockdowns and the resulting economic calamity plus the deranged Biden regime, Trump is more powerful than ever. He’s successful because he’s in touch with ordinary Americans rather than relying on the leftist press to tell him what Americans want.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago

I have stated this before on Unherd, so it’s nice to hear it from an actual professional, that Trump’s enemies have always had it backwards. Trump is what he always was, a showman, a salesman, a circus conductor, a flim flam man, a gambler and a dealer. He’s the sort of man who, had he not been born into wealth, probably would have ended up as a used car salesman, a game show host, a mediocre comedian, or some other such profession that relies on the only above average ability Trump possesses, the ability to read people individually and collectively, identify what motivates them, and use that to get them to vote for him, or buy an overpriced jalopy, or just to get a laugh. When he entered politics and started reading the rooms he found himself in on campaign rallies, he suddenly sounded like a populist revolutionary, because that’s what the people wanted. It was not, notably, what the establishment of either party wanted then or now, but Trump did not care because while he was very much wealthy and upper class, he was never accepted by the wealthy and powerful into their innermost circles, for obvious reasons. It was that personal resentment and disregard for the others of his economic class that allowed him to channel the people’s anger. Now let’s all remember the full chorus of that Rolling Stones song.
“You can’t always get what you want, you can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you might find, you get what you need.”
Neoliberal globalism was and is failing. Trump’s message, or more accurately the message of the people sent through Trump’s election, was the vehicle by which the people delivered that message to the establishment and very much analagous to the Brexit vote, a parallel Trump himself astutely identified when he, considerably less astutely, dubbed himself Mr. Brexit. It was a message long overdue. Speaking as someone who dislikes Trump and found the four years of his presidency both miserable and embarrassing, I concede that it, or something very much like it, needed to happen for history to move to the next phase, whatever that may be. It was a message of resentment, both broad and deep, of the powerlessness that the globalist world has brought us. It was a message of anger towards the diminishing power of individuals and elected governments in the face of impersonal economic forces, unelected bureaucracies, huge profit capturing global corporations, and super wealthy aristocrats. It’s a message that needed to be broadcast loud and clear to anyone who has power or influence in this world, and it has, though human nature is a stubborn thing, and hearing the message is not the same as accepting it. The people who hold power would do well to listen, lest they end up suffering the same ultimate fate as those who placed their hopes on Father Gapon to hold back the tide of history.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

The people I know who voted for Brexit were voting for change, as they didn’t feel the status quo worked for them or their communities, and things were getting worse not better. The problem was that those who they empowered to deliver Brexit had no interest in changing the status quo, they were just another branch of the same establishment who benefited from the way things were.

For communities left behind in the USA, by globalisation and outsourcing etc., who saw Clinton as the embodiment of the establishment Trump seemed to offer an alternative. But, for the reasons you identified, Trump was motivated only by self interest and, of course, one of his first acts was unfunded tax cuts for the rich and the corporations, the very thing they thought a vote against Clinton would prevent. And Trump governed through grievance politics leaving the US as divided, arguably more divided, than when he arrived, and the status quo still firmly in place.

The people in power, whether left or right, have no interest in change because they are they fear they will lose, and they are greedy. The media, certainly the Murdoch empire, also have no interest in change so would rather feed culture wars to divert the masses.

At the moment, those at the bottom, or even those further up the food chain who don’t really belong to the elite, are OK with hating others who are, really, just like them. But sooner or later, they may realise they have been fooled and who knows what might happen then.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

I think that you underestimate ‘those at the bottom’, perhaps because they are ‘uneducated’, ‘low information’, or some other such category that sounds intelligent and scientific but that functions in much the same way as a racial slur, as a form of in-group/out-group signaling for some reason still deemed acceptable by whoever it is that determines such things, or perhaps out of personal dislike. In either case, I must point out those you broadly paint as ‘those at the bottom’ as ‘hating others who are just like them’ are a diverse and heterogenous group with a variety of different religions, races, and values whose views differ on many issues but who nevertheless share a certain skepticism towards the status quo and the classes, organizations, and individuals who tend to benefit from the status quo. Even the term, populist, has been used variously to refer to groups across the political spectrum on both the left and right who represent insurgent, underrepresented groups against established interests. There is no established populist platform, only a general anti-establishment sentiment accompanied by an amalgam of whatever policies are pursued by those who are tagged with the populist label. The fact that personalities and policy platforms as different as Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and Rand Paul in the US and the even more varied approaches outside the US, such as Orban, Le Pen, Bolsonaro, etc. have been labelled populist speaks to the nebulous and shifting nature of the term. Trump’s particular flavor of populism is unappealing to many, including myself. I personally prefer those who are more soft spoken and libertarian leaning, such as Rand Paul, or whose policies are more specifically targeted at the most problematic policies, individuals, and organizations, such as Bernie Sanders, despite the fact that they come from opposite ends of the political spectrum and differ greatly on most issues. Nevertheless, I can appreciate that Trump’s election did further the cause of populism generally insofar as it delivered the message of disaffection and disapproval to an unsympathetic and largely unaware ruling elite. It isn’t my intent to defend Trump personally. The man’s behavior and personality speaks loudly enough of his general unacceptability. I feel little need to pile on gratuitous criticisms besides. I will, however, speak up for his supporters, many of whom I know personally, against sweeping negative stereotypes such as those which you seem to favor. Accusing ‘those at the bottom’ of mindless hate sounds like a way to dismiss their grievances and arguments as stupid or irrelevant without having to actually address them on an intellectual level, an ad hominem attack applied to a broad group. The poor benighted peasants with their backward ways just don’t know what’s good for them, or some such nonsense. If this was not your intent, I apologize but nevertheless would advise you to choose your words more carefully in the future. We would properly ignore and roundly condemn such arguments were they aimed toward a racial or religious minority. I see no reason why we should accept the same logic for any other group.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Jolly
John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

I guess this is how you operate, twisting the meaning of what someone else said to make some over elaborate point or other
in tedious detail.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Do feel free not to reply to my comments. Save us both the time.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

My reply was intended to be constructive, yours was a hatchet job hence my last comment. No worries, though, I’ve learned my lesson.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

My reply was intended to be constructive, yours was a hatchet job hence my last comment. No worries, though, I’ve learned my lesson.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

aka that you don’t understand?

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Do feel free not to reply to my comments. Save us both the time.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

aka that you don’t understand?

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

In fact, now that we’ve left NYC and moved to the ‘country’ – the locals in our small town are refreshingly honest & intelligent. I don’t miss the neuroticism that pervades NYC.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

I guess this is how you operate, twisting the meaning of what someone else said to make some over elaborate point or other
in tedious detail.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

In fact, now that we’ve left NYC and moved to the ‘country’ – the locals in our small town are refreshingly honest & intelligent. I don’t miss the neuroticism that pervades NYC.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Trump might have been motivated by self-interest but he got lots done especially in abolishing regulations that were hindering economic growth. When he left we had 1.6% inflation versus 6-10% today and gas prices were low compared to today even though Joe Biden’s administration has depleted the Strategic Petroleum Reserve for essentially political purposes, an unwise move in a precarious, warring world. Trump questioned NATO and called for a reassessment- much needed after 70 years; He pressed the Europeans to live up to their obligations before they were forced to faced with Russian aggression. Trump never started nor exacerbated a world conflict whereas Joe Biden ordered what turned out to be a chaotic, death-filled withdrawal from Afghanistan. Trump also had the USA southern border under control: Biden has allowed it to be open. Gotta admit though it’s been amusing watching NYC struggle with housing 50,000 illegals (glad I left the city when Idid).Trump delivered lots and folks know it
.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Trump had, able advisors: his knowledge of economics and markets does not exist: the ONLY benefit Trump had was the he was too ill educated and stupid to read, let alone understand, and certainly not create and implement anything! One of the unrivalled strengths of the US system is that government advisors, not least in the Fed and Treasury are a superbly efficient and highly educated machine, that arguably work far better with Trump in situ, as they can get on with the job without him getting involved, precisely because he does not have the mental capacity to read or understand the necessary voluminous paperwork involved in running a government!

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

What utter twaddle.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Please elaborate in detail, pointing out where you consider my observations to be incorrect?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Please elaborate in detail, pointing out where you consider my observations to be incorrect?

John Corlis
John Corlis
11 months ago

You have characterized the man very accurately! Excellent comment!

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

What utter twaddle.

John Corlis
John Corlis
11 months ago

You have characterized the man very accurately! Excellent comment!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Trump had, able advisors: his knowledge of economics and markets does not exist: the ONLY benefit Trump had was the he was too ill educated and stupid to read, let alone understand, and certainly not create and implement anything! One of the unrivalled strengths of the US system is that government advisors, not least in the Fed and Treasury are a superbly efficient and highly educated machine, that arguably work far better with Trump in situ, as they can get on with the job without him getting involved, precisely because he does not have the mental capacity to read or understand the necessary voluminous paperwork involved in running a government!

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

I think that you underestimate ‘those at the bottom’, perhaps because they are ‘uneducated’, ‘low information’, or some other such category that sounds intelligent and scientific but that functions in much the same way as a racial slur, as a form of in-group/out-group signaling for some reason still deemed acceptable by whoever it is that determines such things, or perhaps out of personal dislike. In either case, I must point out those you broadly paint as ‘those at the bottom’ as ‘hating others who are just like them’ are a diverse and heterogenous group with a variety of different religions, races, and values whose views differ on many issues but who nevertheless share a certain skepticism towards the status quo and the classes, organizations, and individuals who tend to benefit from the status quo. Even the term, populist, has been used variously to refer to groups across the political spectrum on both the left and right who represent insurgent, underrepresented groups against established interests. There is no established populist platform, only a general anti-establishment sentiment accompanied by an amalgam of whatever policies are pursued by those who are tagged with the populist label. The fact that personalities and policy platforms as different as Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and Rand Paul in the US and the even more varied approaches outside the US, such as Orban, Le Pen, Bolsonaro, etc. have been labelled populist speaks to the nebulous and shifting nature of the term. Trump’s particular flavor of populism is unappealing to many, including myself. I personally prefer those who are more soft spoken and libertarian leaning, such as Rand Paul, or whose policies are more specifically targeted at the most problematic policies, individuals, and organizations, such as Bernie Sanders, despite the fact that they come from opposite ends of the political spectrum and differ greatly on most issues. Nevertheless, I can appreciate that Trump’s election did further the cause of populism generally insofar as it delivered the message of disaffection and disapproval to an unsympathetic and largely unaware ruling elite. It isn’t my intent to defend Trump personally. The man’s behavior and personality speaks loudly enough of his general unacceptability. I feel little need to pile on gratuitous criticisms besides. I will, however, speak up for his supporters, many of whom I know personally, against sweeping negative stereotypes such as those which you seem to favor. Accusing ‘those at the bottom’ of mindless hate sounds like a way to dismiss their grievances and arguments as stupid or irrelevant without having to actually address them on an intellectual level, an ad hominem attack applied to a broad group. The poor benighted peasants with their backward ways just don’t know what’s good for them, or some such nonsense. If this was not your intent, I apologize but nevertheless would advise you to choose your words more carefully in the future. We would properly ignore and roundly condemn such arguments were they aimed toward a racial or religious minority. I see no reason why we should accept the same logic for any other group.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Jolly
Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Trump might have been motivated by self-interest but he got lots done especially in abolishing regulations that were hindering economic growth. When he left we had 1.6% inflation versus 6-10% today and gas prices were low compared to today even though Joe Biden’s administration has depleted the Strategic Petroleum Reserve for essentially political purposes, an unwise move in a precarious, warring world. Trump questioned NATO and called for a reassessment- much needed after 70 years; He pressed the Europeans to live up to their obligations before they were forced to faced with Russian aggression. Trump never started nor exacerbated a world conflict whereas Joe Biden ordered what turned out to be a chaotic, death-filled withdrawal from Afghanistan. Trump also had the USA southern border under control: Biden has allowed it to be open. Gotta admit though it’s been amusing watching NYC struggle with housing 50,000 illegals (glad I left the city when Idid).Trump delivered lots and folks know it
.

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

tl:dr

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

Trump?… upper class? ” super wealthy aristocrats”?….!!!!!

David Fawcett
David Fawcett
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

There is something of the carnival barker about Trump. The guy at the door of Barnum and Bailey. You can certainly see it in his pre-presidential TV appearances. That’s very American. The people see it, the people know.

The wisdom of a nation is in its people, to quote a well-known British politician.

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

The people I know who voted for Brexit were voting for change, as they didn’t feel the status quo worked for them or their communities, and things were getting worse not better. The problem was that those who they empowered to deliver Brexit had no interest in changing the status quo, they were just another branch of the same establishment who benefited from the way things were.

For communities left behind in the USA, by globalisation and outsourcing etc., who saw Clinton as the embodiment of the establishment Trump seemed to offer an alternative. But, for the reasons you identified, Trump was motivated only by self interest and, of course, one of his first acts was unfunded tax cuts for the rich and the corporations, the very thing they thought a vote against Clinton would prevent. And Trump governed through grievance politics leaving the US as divided, arguably more divided, than when he arrived, and the status quo still firmly in place.

The people in power, whether left or right, have no interest in change because they are they fear they will lose, and they are greedy. The media, certainly the Murdoch empire, also have no interest in change so would rather feed culture wars to divert the masses.

At the moment, those at the bottom, or even those further up the food chain who don’t really belong to the elite, are OK with hating others who are, really, just like them. But sooner or later, they may realise they have been fooled and who knows what might happen then.

Terry M
Terry M
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

tl:dr

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

Trump?… upper class? ” super wealthy aristocrats”?….!!!!!

David Fawcett
David Fawcett
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Jolly

There is something of the carnival barker about Trump. The guy at the door of Barnum and Bailey. You can certainly see it in his pre-presidential TV appearances. That’s very American. The people see it, the people know.

The wisdom of a nation is in its people, to quote a well-known British politician.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago

I have stated this before on Unherd, so it’s nice to hear it from an actual professional, that Trump’s enemies have always had it backwards. Trump is what he always was, a showman, a salesman, a circus conductor, a flim flam man, a gambler and a dealer. He’s the sort of man who, had he not been born into wealth, probably would have ended up as a used car salesman, a game show host, a mediocre comedian, or some other such profession that relies on the only above average ability Trump possesses, the ability to read people individually and collectively, identify what motivates them, and use that to get them to vote for him, or buy an overpriced jalopy, or just to get a laugh. When he entered politics and started reading the rooms he found himself in on campaign rallies, he suddenly sounded like a populist revolutionary, because that’s what the people wanted. It was not, notably, what the establishment of either party wanted then or now, but Trump did not care because while he was very much wealthy and upper class, he was never accepted by the wealthy and powerful into their innermost circles, for obvious reasons. It was that personal resentment and disregard for the others of his economic class that allowed him to channel the people’s anger. Now let’s all remember the full chorus of that Rolling Stones song.
“You can’t always get what you want, you can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you might find, you get what you need.”
Neoliberal globalism was and is failing. Trump’s message, or more accurately the message of the people sent through Trump’s election, was the vehicle by which the people delivered that message to the establishment and very much analagous to the Brexit vote, a parallel Trump himself astutely identified when he, considerably less astutely, dubbed himself Mr. Brexit. It was a message long overdue. Speaking as someone who dislikes Trump and found the four years of his presidency both miserable and embarrassing, I concede that it, or something very much like it, needed to happen for history to move to the next phase, whatever that may be. It was a message of resentment, both broad and deep, of the powerlessness that the globalist world has brought us. It was a message of anger towards the diminishing power of individuals and elected governments in the face of impersonal economic forces, unelected bureaucracies, huge profit capturing global corporations, and super wealthy aristocrats. It’s a message that needed to be broadcast loud and clear to anyone who has power or influence in this world, and it has, though human nature is a stubborn thing, and hearing the message is not the same as accepting it. The people who hold power would do well to listen, lest they end up suffering the same ultimate fate as those who placed their hopes on Father Gapon to hold back the tide of history.

Sasha Stone
Sasha Stone
1 year ago

This is so good. I don’t find many writers who really seem to be able to understand this moment, what exactly it means, and why the uprisings against the government have been intensifying. They started around Y2K with the WTO protests and have only been getting more urgent. All you have to do is look at the two protests from the Summer and on Jan 6th to see an administration and a government that is in over its head.

Sasha Stone
Sasha Stone
1 year ago

This is so good. I don’t find many writers who really seem to be able to understand this moment, what exactly it means, and why the uprisings against the government have been intensifying. They started around Y2K with the WTO protests and have only been getting more urgent. All you have to do is look at the two protests from the Summer and on Jan 6th to see an administration and a government that is in over its head.

Jim Davis
Jim Davis
1 year ago

Good comments. I’ll throw in on the choice of President Trump’s inauguration music. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” by The Rolling Stones was a message to Hillary Clinton and the Democrats.

Jim Davis
Jim Davis
1 year ago

Good comments. I’ll throw in on the choice of President Trump’s inauguration music. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” by The Rolling Stones was a message to Hillary Clinton and the Democrats.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
1 year ago

If the Dems don’t get him, The Swamp will.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
1 year ago

If the Dems don’t get him, The Swamp will.

R S Foster
R S Foster
1 year ago

…the most astute and intelligent analysis of Donald Trump’s triumph, and role that I have seen…and British readers might note that although the relentless comparison between Trump and Boris Johnson is ludicrous…the men are fundamentally different in every respect possible bar the blonde bombshell hair, and the populist appeal (because the British People are NOT American, even the ones on the populist side of the argument)…Johnson’s role in this one respect is exactly the same…
…so getting rid of him by use of the kangaroo court currently sitting WON’T get rid of his supporters…they will just need a new leader, but one will certainly happen along in due course…and it will be no more Sir Keir Starmer than it is Rishi Sunak…

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  R S Foster

All of the polls indicate that Boris Johnson doesn’t have a lot of support in the country, and we know he doesn’t have much support in the Tory Party in Parliament. The current investigation into whether he misled Parliament was initiated after a vote in Parliament with no dissenting votes. The committee reflects the current composition of Parliament with 4 Tories, 2 from Labour and 1 from SNP. Kangaroo Court? Seriously?

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Yes, seriously. It’s not me saying so, it’s one of our most senior lawyers, and Lib Dem peer, Lord Pannick KC.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/legal-opinion-by-lord-pannick-qc-relating-to-the-privileges-committee

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

Who is representing Boris Johnson at a cost of £220-250k to the taxpayer. Any court of law generally doesn’t make a judgement based only what the defence lawyer said (or there would be a lot more criminals out there).

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago

Who is representing Boris Johnson at a cost of £220-250k to the taxpayer. Any court of law generally doesn’t make a judgement based only what the defence lawyer said (or there would be a lot more criminals out there).

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
1 year ago
Reply to  John Murray

Yes, seriously. It’s not me saying so, it’s one of our most senior lawyers, and Lib Dem peer, Lord Pannick KC.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/legal-opinion-by-lord-pannick-qc-relating-to-the-privileges-committee

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  R S Foster

Prime Minister Nigel Farage?

John Murray
John Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  R S Foster

All of the polls indicate that Boris Johnson doesn’t have a lot of support in the country, and we know he doesn’t have much support in the Tory Party in Parliament. The current investigation into whether he misled Parliament was initiated after a vote in Parliament with no dissenting votes. The committee reflects the current composition of Parliament with 4 Tories, 2 from Labour and 1 from SNP. Kangaroo Court? Seriously?

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
1 year ago
Reply to  R S Foster

Prime Minister Nigel Farage?

R S Foster
R S Foster
1 year ago

…the most astute and intelligent analysis of Donald Trump’s triumph, and role that I have seen…and British readers might note that although the relentless comparison between Trump and Boris Johnson is ludicrous…the men are fundamentally different in every respect possible bar the blonde bombshell hair, and the populist appeal (because the British People are NOT American, even the ones on the populist side of the argument)…Johnson’s role in this one respect is exactly the same…
…so getting rid of him by use of the kangaroo court currently sitting WON’T get rid of his supporters…they will just need a new leader, but one will certainly happen along in due course…and it will be no more Sir Keir Starmer than it is Rishi Sunak…

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago

Trump is praying to be arrested – electoral catnip for his voters.  

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago

Trump is praying to be arrested – electoral catnip for his voters.  

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

This is not all about Trump. DeSantis (or whoever) will suffer from the same anti-republican bias and two-tiered justice system as Trump. Probably worse if they are successful against #45.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

This is not all about Trump. DeSantis (or whoever) will suffer from the same anti-republican bias and two-tiered justice system as Trump. Probably worse if they are successful against #45.

j watson
j watson
1 year ago

Much to be said for keeping Trump out of jail and into pole position for GOP nomination
if you are a Democrat.

Unfortunately for Democrats the legal system is not completely controlled by politicians and the Cogs of the Rule of Law are turning.

GOP will still secretly be hoping Jack Smith does them a real favour.

j watson
j watson
1 year ago

Much to be said for keeping Trump out of jail and into pole position for GOP nomination
if you are a Democrat.

Unfortunately for Democrats the legal system is not completely controlled by politicians and the Cogs of the Rule of Law are turning.

GOP will still secretly be hoping Jack Smith does them a real favour.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago

Whichever side you are on, there is no need to fight Trump or Woke excess: they are zombies, sustained by manipulation and victimhood – let them wither on the vine.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago

Whichever side you are on, there is no need to fight Trump or Woke excess: they are zombies, sustained by manipulation and victimhood – let them wither on the vine.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Why on Earth do you keep saying Trump was the 46th president??? He was the 45th. Whoever is running Biden is the 46th president.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Why on Earth do you keep saying Trump was the 46th president??? He was the 45th. Whoever is running Biden is the 46th president.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Hey, Swedish dude, Trump was the 45th president. Really, just stop writing about American politics.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago

It’s the only way anyone would read his work.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago

It’s the only way anyone would read his work.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

Hey, Swedish dude, Trump was the 45th president. Really, just stop writing about American politics.

Su Mac
Su Mac
1 year ago

Interesting article thank you. The Russian historical figure I did not know and the anecdote about the booing of a self-sustaining, almost symbiotic crowd at Trump rallys were both fascinating

Su Mac
Su Mac
1 year ago

Interesting article thank you. The Russian historical figure I did not know and the anecdote about the booing of a self-sustaining, almost symbiotic crowd at Trump rallys were both fascinating

Davis Erickson
Davis Erickson
1 year ago

If trump committed a crime, it seems he’s committed many going back decades, he should be prosecuted. It shouldn’t matter that he’s famous or was a politician. Laws apply to everyone.

Davis Erickson
Davis Erickson
1 year ago

If trump committed a crime, it seems he’s committed many going back decades, he should be prosecuted. It shouldn’t matter that he’s famous or was a politician. Laws apply to everyone.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago

The important question is – did he commit a crime? Paying a porn star is rather distasteful, but not illegal, paying her to cover-up something that was embarrassing but not illegal is not a crime, however, if he fiddled his finances to cover-up that he made a payment then that is illegal, but this would have to be proved. You could argue that it’s not in the public interest to bring the case, but then this might be interpretated as there being one law for the rich and one for the poor. So, whatever the motivations of those bringing the case, only two points that need to be considered: was a crime committed? Is it in the public interest to bring a case? All else is noise.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago

The important question is – did he commit a crime? Paying a porn star is rather distasteful, but not illegal, paying her to cover-up something that was embarrassing but not illegal is not a crime, however, if he fiddled his finances to cover-up that he made a payment then that is illegal, but this would have to be proved. You could argue that it’s not in the public interest to bring the case, but then this might be interpretated as there being one law for the rich and one for the poor. So, whatever the motivations of those bringing the case, only two points that need to be considered: was a crime committed? Is it in the public interest to bring a case? All else is noise.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

It speaks volumes about American average education, geographical insularity cum addiction to any screen be it phone, cinema or TV, that so many completely fail to see what a ridiculously implausible, farcical ignorant arrogant, creature Trump is? One can dislike and or disagree with any politician, but to have a president who is laughed at and derided worldwide, as some bit player from a Larry David show is dangerously frightening? The man is devoid of intellect, has the vocabulary of a twelve year old, and possesses no actual knowledge or experience of anything of consequence?

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Just substitute Biden for Trump and you might have a valid point and something worth saying.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

please elaborate?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

please elaborate?

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Just substitute Biden for Trump and you might have a valid point and something worth saying.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

It speaks volumes about American average education, geographical insularity cum addiction to any screen be it phone, cinema or TV, that so many completely fail to see what a ridiculously implausible, farcical ignorant arrogant, creature Trump is? One can dislike and or disagree with any politician, but to have a president who is laughed at and derided worldwide, as some bit player from a Larry David show is dangerously frightening? The man is devoid of intellect, has the vocabulary of a twelve year old, and possesses no actual knowledge or experience of anything of consequence?

Mark epperson
Mark epperson
1 year ago

Sad and tragic for America. You can bet the ranch that when the Repubs own the White House and the House, there will be indictments for Biden and his cabinet, Obama and his cabinet, and the same will happen when the Dems are in if we, as a country go down this rabbit hole.
This is being led by the most inept, arrogant, and vindictive people this nation has ever seen. Revenge for EVERYTHING is their motto and since they own the Media, the Education establishment, the bureaucrats, and the National Security apparatus, they will double and triple down because they can.
I have no problem indicting any President as long as there is overwhelming evidence but this is not the case to set that precedent. If we continue to go down this path, the bumper stickers, Eat the Rich and Revolution is the only solution, will tragically come true.
Stand by.

Mark epperson
Mark epperson
1 year ago

Sad and tragic for America. You can bet the ranch that when the Repubs own the White House and the House, there will be indictments for Biden and his cabinet, Obama and his cabinet, and the same will happen when the Dems are in if we, as a country go down this rabbit hole.
This is being led by the most inept, arrogant, and vindictive people this nation has ever seen. Revenge for EVERYTHING is their motto and since they own the Media, the Education establishment, the bureaucrats, and the National Security apparatus, they will double and triple down because they can.
I have no problem indicting any President as long as there is overwhelming evidence but this is not the case to set that precedent. If we continue to go down this path, the bumper stickers, Eat the Rich and Revolution is the only solution, will tragically come true.
Stand by.

elle mernik
elle mernik
1 year ago

He was a great President. Lousy orator.

elle mernik
elle mernik
1 year ago

He was a great President. Lousy orator.