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The rise of Ireland’s anti-migrant protests Right-wing populism could outflank Sinn Féin

Protestors in Drogheda (Irish Freedom Party)

Protestors in Drogheda (Irish Freedom Party)


February 9, 2023   5 mins

Ireland has an immigration problem. Almost a year after refugees started to arrive from Ukraine, leaving state capacity buckled and local communities unnerved, two very different expressions of civic disorder have emerged. In one, migrants are housed in cubicle dorms in office buildings or, even worse, in tents. In the other, grassroots anti-migrant protests are sweeping across the country, rallying around the slogan “Ireland is Full”. There were 307 anti-migrant protests in 2022, while 2023 has already seen 64. At the latest demonstration in Dublin, on Tuesday, more than 2,000 protestors took to the streets.

The focal point of the protests is Dublin’s East Wall, where, in November, after the government converted a state building into a migrant residence without consulting locals, hundreds of people started to gather week after week. By December, the demonstrations spread to other areas — Drimnagh, Finglas, Ballymun and Fermoy. Rather than losing steam as each month went by, the protests continued to intensify, sprouting across the country. And as they did, it became clear that they were different from other anti-migrant demonstrations in Europe.

Last month, a group of 300 anti-migrant protestors clashed with a smaller counter-protest outside the Shelbourne Hotel in central Dublin. The demographic profile of each faction revealed something curious. As one might expect, the anti-migrant protesters were from the working-class areas where the migrants are being housed, while the counter-protesters were largely middle-class liberals. More surprising, however, was the significant proportion of women among the anti-migrant contingent.

One of the principal motivating factors behind Ireland’s anti-migrant protests concerns a number of reports of migrants mistreating women and even young children. Last week, for instance, a male migrant allegedly walked into Temple Street Children’s Hospital and announced that he wanted to rape children. This week, a migrant was charged by the Gardai with the sexual assault of a teenage girl.

A few days earlier, unfounded rumours circulated about a migrant from a camp in Finglas sexually assaulting a woman. The impact of such incidents is borne out in national polls: in one recent survey carried out by The Business Post, only 38% of women supported building new homes for migrants, compared to 55% of men. As The Irish Independent noted: “The view that Ireland has taken in too many refugees is notably stronger among women in working-class communities.”

If true, the government’s official depiction of Ukrainian women and children fleeing war and persecution doesn’t seem to be taking hold in the minds of voters. And the reason for this seems straightforward: it ignores a surge in non-Ukrainian asylum seekers piggybacking off Ukrainian sympathy. The Business Post recently reported that “the number of international protection applications in the first half of last year had gone up by 200% compared to an average increase of 25% in such applications across the EU”. Elsewhere, the government’s Department of Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth reported that, of the roughly 20,000 non-Ukrainian asylum seekers, 50% are single males. In other words, there is a glaring dissonance between the Government’s official depiction of women and children fleeing the Ukrainian war and the observed reality of suspicious young single men from non-Ukrainian countries rapidly increasing.

In any other European country, such a scenario would be ripe for a Right-wing populist party to make electoral headway. But Ireland’s modern political landscape has no equivalent to Le Pen, Orbán, or Trump. Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael have ruled Ireland for a century. The former positions itself as more traditional and working-class, and the latter as more secular and pro-business — but, by and large, they govern identically. Over the past decade, as any legacy of Right-wing attitudes dissipated from the post-Celtic Tiger Ireland, anti-establishment angst had channelled itself into support for the rising Sinn Féin party — to great success. Under the slogan promising “time for change”, the party’s first-place position suggests it will take control of the government in the next election. Unless, that is, the anti-migrant protests overshadow Sinn Féin’s rising star.

These working-class protesters are the same demographic as Sinn Féin’s reliable voter base. As Dublin City University Professor Eoin O’Malley discovered after polling individual issues, “Sinn Féin support is correlated with anti-immigrant sentiment”. Meanwhile, The Business Post poll referenced above indicates that while 75% of Fine Gael and 71% Fianna Fáil supporters believe that only the far-Right oppose taking in refugees, that figure dropped to 45% among Sinn Féin supporters.

This anti-immigrant sentiment contrasts starkly with the Sinn Féin party leadership, which perhaps explains the three-point drop from its all-time high last June. It is noticeable, for instance, that the East Wall protests were actually located in Sinn Féin leader Mary Lou McDonald’s constituency. A number of placards showed a photo of McDonald with the words “Traitor” written across it. Similarly, protests in Finglas singled out the local Sinn Féin TD Dessie Ellis for condemnation.

Amid such a politically hostile climate, Sinn Féin’s detachment from its anti-migrant working-class base is starting to open the door to something modern Ireland has never experienced: Right-wing populist parties, the most prominent being the Irish Freedom Party (IFP). Led by Hermann Kelly, an ally of Nigel Farage, the IFP has primarily campaigned for an Irish exit from the EU since it was founded in 2018. It should be stressed that it remains on the margins of Irish politics and is yet to register any serious uptick in the polls. But Kelly and the IFP are starting to position themselves as the party of the protestors, and it seems unlikely that they won’t be listened to. At the recent Shelbourne Hotel protest, for example, IFP Chairman Michael Leahy gave a prominent speech, no doubt hoping to encourage former Sinn Féin voters to switch to his party.

For his part, Malachy Steenson, the anti-migrant protests’ unofficial leader, appears willing to give the IFP a chance. Steenson, a solicitor with a history of advocacy in the broad republican movement, has maintained neutrality on any specific party monopolising the protests but frequently speaks alongside IFP members at demonstrations. In 2021, he gave a speech at an IFP demonstration, while last June he attended the IFP Ard Fheis (annual party conference), where he was photographed next to Kelly and Leahy. While Steenson might not officially label himself as part of the IFP, and is always referred to as a “guest” when he appears at their events, he is certainly friendly with them.

Of course, whether this translates into meaningful change remains unclear. The IFP’s challenge will be to turn this spark of popularity into a political machine. Can the IFP recruit the popular Steenson to run on its behalf? Can the party field enough candidates across many localities? Does it have the bureaucratic nous to conduct a campaign and, eventually, state operations? Can it appeal to voters less persuaded by its core objective of leaving the EU to increase its numbers?

These questions are yet to be answered, but it is not inconceivable that the energy of the anti-migrant protests will converge around the IFP. Perhaps the next election won’t mark IFP’s ascendence — but if conditions stay the same or deteriorate, Sinn Féin could find itself staring at an exodus of voters for whom Right-wing populism is suddenly palatable.


Peter Ryan is a researcher of economics, history, and technology with a focus on Ireland. His work is located at Ryan Research.

_PeterRyan

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polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago

I am curious to know why an objection to large scale immigration is automatically classified as populist and right-wing. Perhaps people simply object to having their societies disrupted for no good reason.

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I am equally confused. Meanwhile, citizens of other countries are praised and sympathised with in the fight against imperialism and the erosion of their cultures.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

In what way do you conflate threats to burn immigrants https://www.thejournal.ie/far-right-money-making-5986480-Feb2023/ with a “fight against imperialism”?

Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

56% of people polled last weekend agreed with the sentiment that ireland has taken too many ‘refugees’ over the past 12 months. A further 14% said they ‘don’t know’.
That would suggest that between 56 and 70 percent of Irish are now ‘far right’ if the standards of the establishment media, political and ngo class are to be applied.
Is that realistic on any level? Obviously not. More like between 56 and 70 percent of Irish people have no political representation on this issue (and a myriad of others).
Success in the polls (perhaps even an overall majority in the case of Sinn Fein) awaits any establishment party that steps up and provides leadership in the form of a basic common sense approach to the issue ie no more until such time as sufficient housing and basic services are available to cater to those already here.
If none step up, someone else will step into that space instead.

Last edited 1 year ago by Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

56% of people polled last weekend agreed with the sentiment that ireland has taken too many ‘refugees’ over the past 12 months. A further 14% said they ‘don’t know’.
That would suggest that between 56 and 70 percent of Irish are now ‘far right’ if the standards of the establishment media, political and ngo class are to be applied.
Is that realistic on any level? Obviously not. More like between 56 and 70 percent of Irish people have no political representation on this issue (and a myriad of others).
Success in the polls (perhaps even an overall majority in the case of Sinn Fein) awaits any establishment party that steps up and provides leadership in the form of a basic common sense approach to the issue ie no more until such time as sufficient housing and basic services are available to cater to those already here.
If none step up, someone else will step into that space instead.

Last edited 1 year ago by Mickey The Bags
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

No one is eroding Irish culture.. that is not the issue. The real issue is housing.. there is a serious (govt contrived) housing shortage but these idiots are blaming migrants instead. To be fair, many (most?) actually do blame the govt as well. Of course the fault lies squarely with the govt and the poor migrants merely exacerbate the problem, aided and abetted by the usual Farage types. Yep, we have them in Ireland as well.

Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Look around you at other countries – step one people say it isn’t eroding culture and heritage, step two is inclusivity means not mentioning any idea of national birthright or cultural dominance – Irish culture will then be selectively treated as equivalent to minority culture, which leads to selective plasticity of values. The purpose of this is to remove the threat of the masses to the takeover by capital, where the people will find their position changed from nationals used to the govt pursuing their interests into powerless customers in a state that pursues the property ownership rights of wealth as paramount. Just look at the UK as an example. It has nothing to do with the disgusting and misleading term “anti-immigrant”, coined by Tony Blair, it has to do with the rapid dispossession of the people from their birthright and their nation being replaced by a state. It’s an obvious game.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Demand for housing accelerated by infinity migration

Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Look around you at other countries – step one people say it isn’t eroding culture and heritage, step two is inclusivity means not mentioning any idea of national birthright or cultural dominance – Irish culture will then be selectively treated as equivalent to minority culture, which leads to selective plasticity of values. The purpose of this is to remove the threat of the masses to the takeover by capital, where the people will find their position changed from nationals used to the govt pursuing their interests into powerless customers in a state that pursues the property ownership rights of wealth as paramount. Just look at the UK as an example. It has nothing to do with the disgusting and misleading term “anti-immigrant”, coined by Tony Blair, it has to do with the rapid dispossession of the people from their birthright and their nation being replaced by a state. It’s an obvious game.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Demand for housing accelerated by infinity migration

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

In what way do you conflate threats to burn immigrants https://www.thejournal.ie/far-right-money-making-5986480-Feb2023/ with a “fight against imperialism”?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

No one is eroding Irish culture.. that is not the issue. The real issue is housing.. there is a serious (govt contrived) housing shortage but these idiots are blaming migrants instead. To be fair, many (most?) actually do blame the govt as well. Of course the fault lies squarely with the govt and the poor migrants merely exacerbate the problem, aided and abetted by the usual Farage types. Yep, we have them in Ireland as well.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I am always puzzled by the word “populist” being some kind of Nazi-style problem. It does contain the word “Popular” – have I missed something?

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

Of course the two should not be equated, but Hitler/Nazism was populism writ large. He was hugely popular; antagonistic to the establishment and elites (law, politics, science, military); rose on the promise a brave new world, restored to it’s greatness and cleansed of foolishness & corruption, whilst being a major proponent of fashionable half baked theories (eugenics). And despite all the success, destined to fail.

Jon Barrow
Jon Barrow
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

Yes a progressive movement.

Jon Barrow
Jon Barrow
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

Yes a progressive movement.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

Big difference. Usually populist appeals not to the population as a whole but mainly to the great unwashed who, having little to lose and a great deal of anger and resentment to vent will make their voices heard well beyond their numbers; while the bulk of the population will, sadly, remain quiet.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

Of course the two should not be equated, but Hitler/Nazism was populism writ large. He was hugely popular; antagonistic to the establishment and elites (law, politics, science, military); rose on the promise a brave new world, restored to it’s greatness and cleansed of foolishness & corruption, whilst being a major proponent of fashionable half baked theories (eugenics). And despite all the success, destined to fail.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

Big difference. Usually populist appeals not to the population as a whole but mainly to the great unwashed who, having little to lose and a great deal of anger and resentment to vent will make their voices heard well beyond their numbers; while the bulk of the population will, sadly, remain quiet.

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Because it just is. As JK Rowling is Transphobic and there are calls to cancel her. Good discussion this. I recommend “The British Dream” by David Goodhart on this subject.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Well, in the case of the anti-immigration protests currently happening in Ireland, that’s pretty straightforward – the parties concerned describe themselves as right wing, and, for those of you still clinging to the delusion that these are salt of the earth types, some of them carry swastikas:
https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/spotlight/arid-41063300.html
Ringleaders on the ground include e.g. Philip Dwyer, a former candidate for the far-right (and currently electorally minuscule) National Party. Think an Irish version of a cross between the BNP and UKIP. Unfortunately, they see that Putin’s displacement of Ukrainian refugees gives them a chance to gain a foothold.  

Davy Humerme
Davy Humerme
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Frank . In my view the article you linked has all the tropes of the authoritarian globalist progressive . It also carries some of the twisted hypocrisy of contemporary woke journalists. While they believe that women of the correct class Should be affirmed in cases of sexual assault its different for working class women and girls. They are not to be believed. That is clear in the ongoing rape and sexual trafficking of working class vulnerable women in the UK. SF like all authoritarian progressives will reap the whirlwind. As one who considers themselves rooted in the left i am fed up seeing working class people crushed by the wheels of middle class empathy and virtue signalling.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Hahahaha. Posting that article as a credible source..

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

That reports mentions one person with a swastika.
One.
Just like the Canadian truckers has precisely one person with a swastika hanging around.

Strangely enough, a long stream of terrorists and it’s always “not every muslim is a terrorist, you bigot”

Or an entire Azov battalion, parades commemorating Bandera, etc but we are supposed to give Ukraine a free pass.

And incidentally, the original German Swastika wielders were left wing, not right wing. The clue is in the expansion of “zi”

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Babble

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Davy Humerme
Davy Humerme
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Frank . In my view the article you linked has all the tropes of the authoritarian globalist progressive . It also carries some of the twisted hypocrisy of contemporary woke journalists. While they believe that women of the correct class Should be affirmed in cases of sexual assault its different for working class women and girls. They are not to be believed. That is clear in the ongoing rape and sexual trafficking of working class vulnerable women in the UK. SF like all authoritarian progressives will reap the whirlwind. As one who considers themselves rooted in the left i am fed up seeing working class people crushed by the wheels of middle class empathy and virtue signalling.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Hahahaha. Posting that article as a credible source..

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

That reports mentions one person with a swastika.
One.
Just like the Canadian truckers has precisely one person with a swastika hanging around.

Strangely enough, a long stream of terrorists and it’s always “not every muslim is a terrorist, you bigot”

Or an entire Azov battalion, parades commemorating Bandera, etc but we are supposed to give Ukraine a free pass.

And incidentally, the original German Swastika wielders were left wing, not right wing. The clue is in the expansion of “zi”

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Babble

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Hi, I’ve seen this come up a few times to my article and let me address that. I’m using a neutral / clinical definition of “right-wing populism”, not the hyperbolic pejorative of “far right”. This means I’m objectively describing attitudes into a conventional rubric, not calling anyone mean names. 
For instance, if we review Pew Research Center’s Appendix: Classifying European political parties, what we see is an attempt to categorize different attitudes into a definition of “right-wing populism”. These attitudes include: “1) support for traditional social values, 2) opposition to liberal lifestyles, 3) promotion of nationalism, 4) favorable toward tough law and order, 5) favorable toward assimilation for immigrants and asylum seekers, 6) support for restrictive immigration policies, 7) opposition to more rights for ethnic minorities, 8) support for religious principles in politics and 9) support for rural interests.”
It is not unreasonable to match the anti-migrant protests’ (or IFP’s) attitudes with those of this classification, in a neutral fashion. The protests have noted that they oppose higher amounts of immigration, they want more law and order on crime and immigration checks, they are Irish nationalists, and very pro-family. While not a 100% match, it’s fair to call this movement “right-wing populist” especially in relativity to Irish politics in general. 

Wonder Walker
Wonder Walker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Well done for taking commenters seriously and explaining at an academic political science level why you went with the term Right Wing Populist, that’s helpful to understand. I think that within the realm of polemics…it is a far more vexatious phrase, especially as many in the Irish anti-migrant protests look and indeed even in that Pew definition, are a lot closer to a UK Blue Labour standpoint. Whilst you are technically/clinically correct, that definition, is nevertheless somewhat of a distortion. I think it’s fair to say that political science has never really got it’s head around the deviancy which is working class conservatism. Thanks for the highly informative article!

Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  Wonder Walker

Thanks. Yes I realize the nuances to these word choices. I still think it is apt and it gets at even more so that symbolic feeling occurring that resembles other countries’ pivots to what we call “right-wing populism”.
I even agree “right-wing populism” doesn’t even convey the economic leftist overlap that occur but perhaps are summed up by “populism”. The labour overlap is real. In general, I think right-wing populism is summed up by: socially right and economically left. And left as more so anti-free for all capitalism rather than a marxist thing. Better to call that other left as “protectionist”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Ryan
John Dee
John Dee
1 year ago
Reply to  Wonder Walker

An interesting article and some informative comments, most of which avoided descending into the usual ‘yah-boo’ nonsense of many BTL refuges.

Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  Wonder Walker

Thanks. Yes I realize the nuances to these word choices. I still think it is apt and it gets at even more so that symbolic feeling occurring that resembles other countries’ pivots to what we call “right-wing populism”.
I even agree “right-wing populism” doesn’t even convey the economic leftist overlap that occur but perhaps are summed up by “populism”. The labour overlap is real. In general, I think right-wing populism is summed up by: socially right and economically left. And left as more so anti-free for all capitalism rather than a marxist thing. Better to call that other left as “protectionist”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Ryan
John Dee
John Dee
1 year ago
Reply to  Wonder Walker

An interesting article and some informative comments, most of which avoided descending into the usual ‘yah-boo’ nonsense of many BTL refuges.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

As a grand old Bennite let me tell you that this game is over. You are indeed using the term “right-wing” pejoratively. You might fool yourself, but you don’t fool me .

Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I’m not, I don’t see anything morally wrong with calling something right-wing.

Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Right wing is a meaningless anachronistic term that has a dog whistle left-labelled opposition who blindly regard themselves as morally superior – this rather evil supremacism is at least dismissive and at worst dangerous, as well as strongly undemocratic

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
Michael Berry
Michael Berry
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Right wing populism isn’t a very good envelope for your 9 attitudes listed. I can relate to some but not others.

Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Right wing is a meaningless anachronistic term that has a dog whistle left-labelled opposition who blindly regard themselves as morally superior – this rather evil supremacism is at least dismissive and at worst dangerous, as well as strongly undemocratic

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
Michael Berry
Michael Berry
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Right wing populism isn’t a very good envelope for your 9 attitudes listed. I can relate to some but not others.

Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I’m not, I don’t see anything morally wrong with calling something right-wing.

Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

It may be worth noting also that what you have described above (leaving aside the migration aspect) is more or less the tenets and values of traditional Irish republicanism prior to its recent woke makeover. It’s no coincidence that many of the protesters are carrying posters that say ‘Concerned parents’ which is a code directed at squarely at Sinn Fein. Look up the origin of that phrase from inner city Dublin in the 1980s if it means nothing to you. It will also explain why these protests may be perceived as ‘existential’ for Sinn Fein in terms of where they decide to go from here.

Last edited 1 year ago by Mickey The Bags
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago

Yes true. “Concerned parents against drugs” The commies/stickies infected Scum Fein and flooded inner city Dublin with drugs.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

It is inevitable that a political party of protest (Sinn Féin) will pick up a cohort of extreme protesters (anti everything, except perhaps dole) along the way. It is curious that, given the strong correlation between leftwing and protest these xenophobic racists tend to support the ‘wrong side’: that is until something like migration separates them out and they tesort to type: ie racist xenophobia. They do indeed belong rightly to the IFP (in reality more an Irish Fascist Party!) as there is no place for them in the well-heeled albeit right-wing party which is FG.. and certainly no room for them in internationalist Sinn Féin. I cannot see the IFP growing to the proportions of Nigel Farrage’s UKIP or whatever he calls his nasty outfit these days.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Typical snobbery from the low IQ midwit UCD Arts grad class, assumes everyone with a working class accent is on the dole….

Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Except 56 percent of people polled last weekend were of the view that Ireland had accepted too many people over the past 12 months. Another 14 per cent said ‘don’t know’. 30 per cent were on board with the current approach. I’m pretty sure that between 56 and 70 per cent of people are not ‘fascist’. They are however without political representation on this issue (and possibly others), suggesting that unless the mainstream (Sinn Fein or Fianna Fáil being the most likely) steps up and represents them, someone else most likely will.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Typical snobbery from the low IQ midwit UCD Arts grad class, assumes everyone with a working class accent is on the dole….

Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Except 56 percent of people polled last weekend were of the view that Ireland had accepted too many people over the past 12 months. Another 14 per cent said ‘don’t know’. 30 per cent were on board with the current approach. I’m pretty sure that between 56 and 70 per cent of people are not ‘fascist’. They are however without political representation on this issue (and possibly others), suggesting that unless the mainstream (Sinn Fein or Fianna Fáil being the most likely) steps up and represents them, someone else most likely will.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago

Yes true. “Concerned parents against drugs” The commies/stickies infected Scum Fein and flooded inner city Dublin with drugs.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

It is inevitable that a political party of protest (Sinn Féin) will pick up a cohort of extreme protesters (anti everything, except perhaps dole) along the way. It is curious that, given the strong correlation between leftwing and protest these xenophobic racists tend to support the ‘wrong side’: that is until something like migration separates them out and they tesort to type: ie racist xenophobia. They do indeed belong rightly to the IFP (in reality more an Irish Fascist Party!) as there is no place for them in the well-heeled albeit right-wing party which is FG.. and certainly no room for them in internationalist Sinn Féin. I cannot see the IFP growing to the proportions of Nigel Farrage’s UKIP or whatever he calls his nasty outfit these days.

Wonder Walker
Wonder Walker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

Well done for taking commenters seriously and explaining at an academic political science level why you went with the term Right Wing Populist, that’s helpful to understand. I think that within the realm of polemics…it is a far more vexatious phrase, especially as many in the Irish anti-migrant protests look and indeed even in that Pew definition, are a lot closer to a UK Blue Labour standpoint. Whilst you are technically/clinically correct, that definition, is nevertheless somewhat of a distortion. I think it’s fair to say that political science has never really got it’s head around the deviancy which is working class conservatism. Thanks for the highly informative article!

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

As a grand old Bennite let me tell you that this game is over. You are indeed using the term “right-wing” pejoratively. You might fool yourself, but you don’t fool me .

Mickey The Bags
Mickey The Bags
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Ryan

It may be worth noting also that what you have described above (leaving aside the migration aspect) is more or less the tenets and values of traditional Irish republicanism prior to its recent woke makeover. It’s no coincidence that many of the protesters are carrying posters that say ‘Concerned parents’ which is a code directed at squarely at Sinn Fein. Look up the origin of that phrase from inner city Dublin in the 1980s if it means nothing to you. It will also explain why these protests may be perceived as ‘existential’ for Sinn Fein in terms of where they decide to go from here.

Last edited 1 year ago by Mickey The Bags
Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

In NZ strangely enough it was the opposite. The Ardern Labour government (which was never as far left as it was portrayed admittedly) was very anti immigration whereas the more right leaning opposition wants to open the floodgates of cheap labour for businesses. The median salary has risen by around a quarter in the five years Ardern was at the helm, so perhaps all those who say excess immigration suppresses wages were right after all

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I guess it had more to do with Adhern’s support for poorly paid, minimum wage workers..

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Yet when British voters raised the exact same concerns regarding immigration putting pressure on wages, housing and public services during the whole Brexit process, you amongst many others labelled them as right wing bigots. Why is it caring when Ardern does it, but not working class Britons?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Yet when British voters raised the exact same concerns regarding immigration putting pressure on wages, housing and public services during the whole Brexit process, you amongst many others labelled them as right wing bigots. Why is it caring when Ardern does it, but not working class Britons?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I guess it had more to do with Adhern’s support for poorly paid, minimum wage workers..

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Especially given that large scale immigration of lower skilled immigrants primarily affects working class people.

It’s almost as if modern day “leftists” couldn’t care less or have any affinity for their historical working class base.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

Those two things are rather different don’t you think? You chuck ’em into the same pot as if they were one and the same!

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

That’s why terms like left and right don’t mean much in the modern context. I don’t care if Labour have cut ties with their historical roots. I just want a party to fight back against the very worst abuses and excesses committed by those in the pursuit of profit. It may well be that the current incarnation is imperfect, but the voting choice is binary.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

They don’t

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

Those two things are rather different don’t you think? You chuck ’em into the same pot as if they were one and the same!

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

That’s why terms like left and right don’t mean much in the modern context. I don’t care if Labour have cut ties with their historical roots. I just want a party to fight back against the very worst abuses and excesses committed by those in the pursuit of profit. It may well be that the current incarnation is imperfect, but the voting choice is binary.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

They don’t

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

One reason is simply that it IS right-wing! The great unwashed and the poorly educated.. these types rant and rave at everything. Normally they support SF (who do the same) but on this one occasion, SF doesn’t fit the bill because it takes the usual leftwing view which is supportive of asylum seekers and refugees.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

No it isn’t. And exclamation marks do not make it so. Those who support importing economic migrants, whatever they call them, are simply looking for cheap workers. So let’s not play the game of my morals are better than youra

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

No it isn’t. And exclamation marks do not make it so. Those who support importing economic migrants, whatever they call them, are simply looking for cheap workers. So let’s not play the game of my morals are better than youra

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Free Tibet! always comes to mind. It’s class war, nothing else. Are the Tibetans wicked for wanting to preserve their nation-based culture and heritage?

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I am equally confused. Meanwhile, citizens of other countries are praised and sympathised with in the fight against imperialism and the erosion of their cultures.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I am always puzzled by the word “populist” being some kind of Nazi-style problem. It does contain the word “Popular” – have I missed something?

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Because it just is. As JK Rowling is Transphobic and there are calls to cancel her. Good discussion this. I recommend “The British Dream” by David Goodhart on this subject.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Well, in the case of the anti-immigration protests currently happening in Ireland, that’s pretty straightforward – the parties concerned describe themselves as right wing, and, for those of you still clinging to the delusion that these are salt of the earth types, some of them carry swastikas:
https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/spotlight/arid-41063300.html
Ringleaders on the ground include e.g. Philip Dwyer, a former candidate for the far-right (and currently electorally minuscule) National Party. Think an Irish version of a cross between the BNP and UKIP. Unfortunately, they see that Putin’s displacement of Ukrainian refugees gives them a chance to gain a foothold.  

Peter Ryan
Peter Ryan
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Hi, I’ve seen this come up a few times to my article and let me address that. I’m using a neutral / clinical definition of “right-wing populism”, not the hyperbolic pejorative of “far right”. This means I’m objectively describing attitudes into a conventional rubric, not calling anyone mean names. 
For instance, if we review Pew Research Center’s Appendix: Classifying European political parties, what we see is an attempt to categorize different attitudes into a definition of “right-wing populism”. These attitudes include: “1) support for traditional social values, 2) opposition to liberal lifestyles, 3) promotion of nationalism, 4) favorable toward tough law and order, 5) favorable toward assimilation for immigrants and asylum seekers, 6) support for restrictive immigration policies, 7) opposition to more rights for ethnic minorities, 8) support for religious principles in politics and 9) support for rural interests.”
It is not unreasonable to match the anti-migrant protests’ (or IFP’s) attitudes with those of this classification, in a neutral fashion. The protests have noted that they oppose higher amounts of immigration, they want more law and order on crime and immigration checks, they are Irish nationalists, and very pro-family. While not a 100% match, it’s fair to call this movement “right-wing populist” especially in relativity to Irish politics in general. 

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

In NZ strangely enough it was the opposite. The Ardern Labour government (which was never as far left as it was portrayed admittedly) was very anti immigration whereas the more right leaning opposition wants to open the floodgates of cheap labour for businesses. The median salary has risen by around a quarter in the five years Ardern was at the helm, so perhaps all those who say excess immigration suppresses wages were right after all

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Especially given that large scale immigration of lower skilled immigrants primarily affects working class people.

It’s almost as if modern day “leftists” couldn’t care less or have any affinity for their historical working class base.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

One reason is simply that it IS right-wing! The great unwashed and the poorly educated.. these types rant and rave at everything. Normally they support SF (who do the same) but on this one occasion, SF doesn’t fit the bill because it takes the usual leftwing view which is supportive of asylum seekers and refugees.

Andy Iddon
Andy Iddon
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Free Tibet! always comes to mind. It’s class war, nothing else. Are the Tibetans wicked for wanting to preserve their nation-based culture and heritage?

Last edited 1 year ago by Andy Iddon
polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago

I am curious to know why an objection to large scale immigration is automatically classified as populist and right-wing. Perhaps people simply object to having their societies disrupted for no good reason.

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Harry Phillips
Harry Phillips
1 year ago

My impression is that most people have no issue at all with Ukranians, but have very grave reservations about overwhelmingly male asylum seekers from elsewhere – including many countries that have no conflict – Albania, Pakistan and Georgia being examples. Somalian clan violence has no place in Ireland.

This is in addition to high levels of immigration in recent decades, much of it from Nigeria, which has affected the cohesion of old working class communities – particularly in Dublin. Ireland now is not the same place that many grew up in.

Arrivals can apply for citizenship after 5 years, so are basically here permanently. Deportations are almost unknown.

People should not have to justify their opposition to something they are highly uncomfortable with, but of course they are maligned across the entire media spectrum as racist and influenced by right-wing propaganda. Nothing could be further from the truth – the Irish are among the most welcoming people I have met anywhere.

But they have had enough.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

You would have thought THEY had learnt their lesson after 1169/70*………but obviously not.

(* Arrival of Raymond le Gros and chums.)

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

There have been a few changes since then Charlie.. the world has moved on.. high time you did!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

There have been a few changes since then Charlie.. the world has moved on.. high time you did!

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

Well summed up harry. There are differences between Ukrainians who want to be at home and Albanians who are fleeing nothing except a collapsed state economically which is their own fault. Parts of East London are run by Albanian criminals, Barking and Romford among the foremost.

Thomas Bengtsson
Thomas Bengtsson
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

I very much agree with you about the difference of migrants here in Sweden. The Ukrainian women and children are housed in private families and they want and find work almost immediately and kids pick up on school very easily. They assimilate very easy in contrast to migrants from middle East or Africa.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

True. However I don’t blame an individual for leaving their home and seeking a better life. It’s the political /media establishment in Ireland who open their legs like a clapped out old w***e to anyone who fancies a ride.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

You would have thought THEY had learnt their lesson after 1169/70*………but obviously not.

(* Arrival of Raymond le Gros and chums.)

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

Well summed up harry. There are differences between Ukrainians who want to be at home and Albanians who are fleeing nothing except a collapsed state economically which is their own fault. Parts of East London are run by Albanian criminals, Barking and Romford among the foremost.

Thomas Bengtsson
Thomas Bengtsson
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

I very much agree with you about the difference of migrants here in Sweden. The Ukrainian women and children are housed in private families and they want and find work almost immediately and kids pick up on school very easily. They assimilate very easy in contrast to migrants from middle East or Africa.

Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
Annemarie Ni Dhalaigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Phillips

True. However I don’t blame an individual for leaving their home and seeking a better life. It’s the political /media establishment in Ireland who open their legs like a clapped out old w***e to anyone who fancies a ride.

Harry Phillips
Harry Phillips
1 year ago

My impression is that most people have no issue at all with Ukranians, but have very grave reservations about overwhelmingly male asylum seekers from elsewhere – including many countries that have no conflict – Albania, Pakistan and Georgia being examples. Somalian clan violence has no place in Ireland.

This is in addition to high levels of immigration in recent decades, much of it from Nigeria, which has affected the cohesion of old working class communities – particularly in Dublin. Ireland now is not the same place that many grew up in.

Arrivals can apply for citizenship after 5 years, so are basically here permanently. Deportations are almost unknown.

People should not have to justify their opposition to something they are highly uncomfortable with, but of course they are maligned across the entire media spectrum as racist and influenced by right-wing propaganda. Nothing could be further from the truth – the Irish are among the most welcoming people I have met anywhere.

But they have had enough.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

Ireland has has a serious housing and homeless problem for years, Fianna Gael have been telling voters nothing could be done, then over night thousands of Ukrainians arrive, with no limit on the numbers, and its amazing, they get housed instantly

So many people are arriving now that it won’t be long before the Irish are a minority in our own country. Ireland is full. Dún an doras

Last edited 1 year ago by D Walsh
Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

It will be interesting to see how many of the Irish now complaining about immigrants were the same ones quick to demonise British voters as racist for complaining about their much more substantial immigration numbers, both legal and illegal

Last edited 1 year ago by Billy Bob
D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

How would they be the same ones, if you think your own country should have sane immigration policies, why would you insult people in the UK who want the same

Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Nimbyism is certainly a factor in these debates surrounding the housing of immigrants.

The residents of Martha’s Vineyard were happy to criticise Texan border towns for their unwelcoming attitude, yet when given the opportunity to welcome migrants into their own community, their “open arms” policy became “closed door” pretty quickly

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

I would give Ron de Santis the Nobel Peace Prize for that.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Amen to that.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Ron must have read Rules for Radicals

Make your enemy live up to it own book of rules

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Amen to that.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

Ron must have read Rules for Radicals

Make your enemy live up to it own book of rules

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

Exactly!

Stephen Schwartz
Stephen Schwartz
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

You made that up.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephen Schwartz
Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
1 year ago

Made it up? Really?
Martha’s Vineyard is a proud “sanctuary” jurisdiction in a self-proclaimed “sanctuary” state, ie one which boasts they would never inform on illegal migrants to immigration authorities.
Yet within hours of a mere 50 migrants landing on their shores, this “sanctuary” declared an humanitarian crisis and did whatever they could to rid themselves of the burden.
50 migrants, in a place where 65% of homes sit vacant, awaiting their uber-wealthy owners on vacation, could not find anywhere to shelter these migrants?
Meanwhile the heavily Democrat-leaning residents decry the “callousness” of border towns for not welcoming migrants. El Paso receives between 1200 and 1300 every day.
‘Virtue Signalling’, as an expression, might be overused and hackneyed but it perfectly describes the practice of poseurs promoting their moral correctness whilst failing to live up to their own pronouncements.
Wealthy denizens of Democrat controlled cities wish to advertise their moral superiority without it costing them anything, either in monetary terms, or effort or discomfort. The moment it does, they cry foul and wish to rid themselves of the problem.
De Santis showed them up.
Which part of that is made up? Or is it merely that you – like the MV residents – don’t like facing up to uncomfortable truths?

Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
1 year ago

Made it up? Really?
Martha’s Vineyard is a proud “sanctuary” jurisdiction in a self-proclaimed “sanctuary” state, ie one which boasts they would never inform on illegal migrants to immigration authorities.
Yet within hours of a mere 50 migrants landing on their shores, this “sanctuary” declared an humanitarian crisis and did whatever they could to rid themselves of the burden.
50 migrants, in a place where 65% of homes sit vacant, awaiting their uber-wealthy owners on vacation, could not find anywhere to shelter these migrants?
Meanwhile the heavily Democrat-leaning residents decry the “callousness” of border towns for not welcoming migrants. El Paso receives between 1200 and 1300 every day.
‘Virtue Signalling’, as an expression, might be overused and hackneyed but it perfectly describes the practice of poseurs promoting their moral correctness whilst failing to live up to their own pronouncements.
Wealthy denizens of Democrat controlled cities wish to advertise their moral superiority without it costing them anything, either in monetary terms, or effort or discomfort. The moment it does, they cry foul and wish to rid themselves of the problem.
De Santis showed them up.
Which part of that is made up? Or is it merely that you – like the MV residents – don’t like facing up to uncomfortable truths?

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

I would give Ron de Santis the Nobel Peace Prize for that.

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

Exactly!

Stephen Schwartz
Stephen Schwartz
1 year ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

You made that up.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephen Schwartz
Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Ignorance could be a factor. It’s easy to criticise the opinions of those negatively affected by immigration, same way the middle classes look down on the working class in Britain. However your opinions can soon change when it affects you personally

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Indeed I have found it to be so, sadly. They finally get a chance to put their money where their mouth is and it’s “totally different” then!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Indeed I have found it to be so, sadly. They finally get a chance to put their money where their mouth is and it’s “totally different” then!

Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Nimbyism is certainly a factor in these debates surrounding the housing of immigrants.

The residents of Martha’s Vineyard were happy to criticise Texan border towns for their unwelcoming attitude, yet when given the opportunity to welcome migrants into their own community, their “open arms” policy became “closed door” pretty quickly

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Ignorance could be a factor. It’s easy to criticise the opinions of those negatively affected by immigration, same way the middle classes look down on the working class in Britain. However your opinions can soon change when it affects you personally

Lennon Ó Náraigh
Lennon Ó Náraigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

In fairness, the anti-Brexit folk would also be of an open-borders tendency. They are really just the smug middle-class establishment. For years now, their representative newspaper columnists have been churning out the same opinion piece week after week, having a good old laugh at the Brexiteers. Brexit has been a nice earner for these folk. The same columnists have just changed the ribbon on their typewriters and are now churning out the same opinion piece, week after week, predicting that Ireland is being taken over by the “far roysh”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lennon Ó Náraigh
rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago

Whats a type-writer?

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

It’s like a morse telegraph but more new fangled and with lots more buttons

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

It’s like a morse telegraph but more new fangled and with lots more buttons

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

Fair enough, the perception coming out of Ireland was that most of the country believed that Brexit was a racist idea due to immigration. Perhaps that was skewed by the media as you say

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Brexit for the bulk of Irish commentators was, and is, an economic fiasco. The UK migrant issue is seen by most of us as a mere distraction, akin to the Jewish issue in 1930s Germany.. propaganda to find suitable scapegoats while the economy tanks.

Lennon Ó Náraigh
Lennon Ó Náraigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

In fairness, we have all spent the past seven years watching with amusement as the omnishambles of Brexit unfolds. But I would suggest that conflating Brexit and racism has been a minority sport – mostly played by the columnists at the Irish Times.

Indeed, the only thing funnier than the Honorable Memmber for the 17th Century and his Ministry of Brexit Opportunities, has been the Irish commentariat’s overwrought reaction to same, this being a marvellous case in point:
https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/una-mullally-brexit-chaos-rooted-in-british-lack-of-self-examination-1.3702089

Last edited 1 year ago by Lennon Ó Náraigh
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Brexit for the bulk of Irish commentators was, and is, an economic fiasco. The UK migrant issue is seen by most of us as a mere distraction, akin to the Jewish issue in 1930s Germany.. propaganda to find suitable scapegoats while the economy tanks.

Lennon Ó Náraigh
Lennon Ó Náraigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

In fairness, we have all spent the past seven years watching with amusement as the omnishambles of Brexit unfolds. But I would suggest that conflating Brexit and racism has been a minority sport – mostly played by the columnists at the Irish Times.

Indeed, the only thing funnier than the Honorable Memmber for the 17th Century and his Ministry of Brexit Opportunities, has been the Irish commentariat’s overwrought reaction to same, this being a marvellous case in point:
https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/una-mullally-brexit-chaos-rooted-in-british-lack-of-self-examination-1.3702089

Last edited 1 year ago by Lennon Ó Náraigh
D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

Just take a look at the opinion section of the failing irish times today. The number of articles about the so called “far right”

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago

Whats a type-writer?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

Fair enough, the perception coming out of Ireland was that most of the country believed that Brexit was a racist idea due to immigration. Perhaps that was skewed by the media as you say

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

Just take a look at the opinion section of the failing irish times today. The number of articles about the so called “far right”

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

How do you know there are any? You sound like a lefty of the extreme variety.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

In what way do you assume I’m a lefty? What in that comment gives you any impression of my political leanings? Or was it simply an attempt at misdirection on your part to avoid answering my question in regards to Irish hypocrisy?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

In what way do you assume I’m a lefty? What in that comment gives you any impression of my political leanings? Or was it simply an attempt at misdirection on your part to avoid answering my question in regards to Irish hypocrisy?

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Very, very few Irish are complaining. We have a minority of racist loser ball-bags, same as anywhere, but they do not speak for the vast majority of Irish people. Not one of these far-right groups has a single person elected.  According to the police however, they are in active collaboration with US and British right-wing agitators. Scum finds its own level.  

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Funnily enough I know a few boys who went home to Ireland for Christmas, and they said all their families were complaining about the asylum seekers so perhaps it’s more prevalent outside of your nice middle class circles than you realise?
Also Britain hasn’t elected any far right MPs. They haven’t elected the political wings of any terrorist groups either, unlike in Ireland where they’re the largest party

Geraldine Kelley
Geraldine Kelley
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Fabulous! Here in Derry we vote for the SDLP – Unionists et al-just to keep the murderers out.

Geraldine Kelley
Geraldine Kelley
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Fabulous! Here in Derry we vote for the SDLP – Unionists et al-just to keep the murderers out.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Funnily enough I know a few boys who went home to Ireland for Christmas, and they said all their families were complaining about the asylum seekers so perhaps it’s more prevalent outside of your nice middle class circles than you realise?
Also Britain hasn’t elected any far right MPs. They haven’t elected the political wings of any terrorist groups either, unlike in Ireland where they’re the largest party

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I venture to say a totally different cohort. Think of BNP and their Irish equivalent, ie this new, tiny, unrepresentative IFP and you’ll get the gist of it.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

How would they be the same ones, if you think your own country should have sane immigration policies, why would you insult people in the UK who want the same

Lennon Ó Náraigh
Lennon Ó Náraigh
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

In fairness, the anti-Brexit folk would also be of an open-borders tendency. They are really just the smug middle-class establishment. For years now, their representative newspaper columnists have been churning out the same opinion piece week after week, having a good old laugh at the Brexiteers. Brexit has been a nice earner for these folk. The same columnists have just changed the ribbon on their typewriters and are now churning out the same opinion piece, week after week, predicting that Ireland is being taken over by the “far roysh”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lennon Ó Náraigh
terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

How do you know there are any? You sound like a lefty of the extreme variety.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Very, very few Irish are complaining. We have a minority of racist loser ball-bags, same as anywhere, but they do not speak for the vast majority of Irish people. Not one of these far-right groups has a single person elected.  According to the police however, they are in active collaboration with US and British right-wing agitators. Scum finds its own level.  

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I venture to say a totally different cohort. Think of BNP and their Irish equivalent, ie this new, tiny, unrepresentative IFP and you’ll get the gist of it.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

I sympathise but you did take the Yankee dollar and it does come with strings

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

I took nothing and I voted for none of this

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Same as the rest of us in the UK then

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Same as the rest of us in the UK then

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

I took nothing and I voted for none of this

David Finn
David Finn
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

stay classy Mr Walsh

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

It will be interesting to see how many of the Irish now complaining about immigrants were the same ones quick to demonise British voters as racist for complaining about their much more substantial immigration numbers, both legal and illegal

Last edited 1 year ago by Billy Bob
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

I sympathise but you did take the Yankee dollar and it does come with strings

David Finn
David Finn
1 year ago
Reply to  D Walsh

stay classy Mr Walsh

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago

Ireland has has a serious housing and homeless problem for years, Fianna Gael have been telling voters nothing could be done, then over night thousands of Ukrainians arrive, with no limit on the numbers, and its amazing, they get housed instantly

So many people are arriving now that it won’t be long before the Irish are a minority in our own country. Ireland is full. Dún an doras

Last edited 1 year ago by D Walsh
Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago

Always and everywhere the problem is uncontrolled, mass immigration overwhelming the capacity of societies to house its young people, heal its sick, teach its children and supply its citizens with public goods.
As Milton Friedman put it: you can have open borders or you can have a welfare state.
In the last decade this issue has driven the outcome of elections in Britain, France, Germany, the USA, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Austria, Italy, Australia, Hungary and Poland. And now Ireland will be added to the list.
And yet the politicians don’t address it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
Mick Joyce
Mick Joyce
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Ireland’s population is considerably smaller than it was 200 years ago so it’s hardly a case of the society being overwhelmed.

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

I’m not sure that argument stacks up. The people of Ireland in the 1800s didn’t expect anything like the standard of living that today’s citizens do. A large and rapid increase in demand for a country’s limited supply of housing stock, public services and infrastructure only has one outcome.
There was no Social Assistance in Ireland in 1823, no state pensions, no council housing, no state education, no power stations or transmission lines, very few roads, no railways, no centralised system for providing water or removing waste, no police or hospitals (in the modern sense), doctors were extremely expensive and not used by the common people.
In short, as I quote above – you can have open borders or you can have a welfare state

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M
Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M
terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

The great hunger and emigration soon sorted that problem out.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

Not really

Officially Ireland has a population of 5.033 million, Northern Ireland has a population of 1.885 million, add them together and the island has just under 7 million. if you believe the official numbers

The pre famine population was about 8.5 million

Right now the indigenous Irish birth rate has collapsed, while the establishment have lost their minds regarding immigration numbers, they want to push down wages while pushing up rents and house prices, Kuntz

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

Very true; in fact Ireland being underpopulated is a serious economic problem. Ireland’s (now settled) migrant population has grown to 15% from almost nil in the last 25 years and our prosperity has grown with it!
Generally migrants assimilate better being (until now) far more welcome than in the UK. 90% of Ukrainians will probably return home when NATO permits a negotiated settlement as most will have family there and their own country will have desperate need of them.

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

I’m not sure that argument stacks up. The people of Ireland in the 1800s didn’t expect anything like the standard of living that today’s citizens do. A large and rapid increase in demand for a country’s limited supply of housing stock, public services and infrastructure only has one outcome.
There was no Social Assistance in Ireland in 1823, no state pensions, no council housing, no state education, no power stations or transmission lines, very few roads, no railways, no centralised system for providing water or removing waste, no police or hospitals (in the modern sense), doctors were extremely expensive and not used by the common people.
In short, as I quote above – you can have open borders or you can have a welfare state

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

The great hunger and emigration soon sorted that problem out.

D Walsh
D Walsh
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

Not really

Officially Ireland has a population of 5.033 million, Northern Ireland has a population of 1.885 million, add them together and the island has just under 7 million. if you believe the official numbers

The pre famine population was about 8.5 million

Right now the indigenous Irish birth rate has collapsed, while the establishment have lost their minds regarding immigration numbers, they want to push down wages while pushing up rents and house prices, Kuntz

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Mick Joyce

Very true; in fact Ireland being underpopulated is a serious economic problem. Ireland’s (now settled) migrant population has grown to 15% from almost nil in the last 25 years and our prosperity has grown with it!
Generally migrants assimilate better being (until now) far more welcome than in the UK. 90% of Ukrainians will probably return home when NATO permits a negotiated settlement as most will have family there and their own country will have desperate need of them.

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

I believe a welfare system needs controlled borders.

Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago

Every country needs to control their borders in the manner that best serves its citizens, but an adequate welfare system does need to be adequately staffed – from the bottom to the top.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

It is the control of UK borders that has left the NHS short of 70,000 nurses and a huge number of doctors, porters, cooks, cleaners etc. You seem to assume young, fit, keen migrants simply USE services when in reality they STAFF the services that are currently in dire need of additional people, and being young, fit and healthy use the services far less than say older, frail indigenous people!

Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago

Every country needs to control their borders in the manner that best serves its citizens, but an adequate welfare system does need to be adequately staffed – from the bottom to the top.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

It is the control of UK borders that has left the NHS short of 70,000 nurses and a huge number of doctors, porters, cooks, cleaners etc. You seem to assume young, fit, keen migrants simply USE services when in reality they STAFF the services that are currently in dire need of additional people, and being young, fit and healthy use the services far less than say older, frail indigenous people!

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

I think the immigration problem is more in the realm of social politics rather than economics. In the Nordic countries, immigration has led to a collapse in confidence in the welfare system – people are happy to pay taxes to support ‘their people’, not so much to support incomers. The social contract is under a lot of stress there, as they’ve been very homogenous until recently. Immigrants are less of a drain upon the welfare state than natives, do pay taxes, and often do jobs the natives won’t (often in agriculture and care, helping to keep down the costs of food, care) – though they may well send much back to the home country. Some interesting stats from the UK:
in the last 40 years, the population has gone from 56 to 67 million – an increase of 20%, whilst Dept of Health and Care spending has gone up 400% – in real terms, over the same period.

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

You are probably right about the damage immigration does to the social contract. But I think you are wrong to underplay the economic effect of mass migration. Young, fit, cheap immigrants become couples competing for too few houses, parents needing school places, low paid workers needing Universal Credit and eventually old people with health problems and needed nursing homes. It is an endless cycle – import people to deal with the jobs “Brits don’t want to do” and then import more people to look after the previous wave.

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

You are probably right about the damage immigration does to the social contract. But I think you are wrong to underplay the economic effect of mass migration. Young, fit, cheap immigrants become couples competing for too few houses, parents needing school places, low paid workers needing Universal Credit and eventually old people with health problems and needed nursing homes. It is an endless cycle – import people to deal with the jobs “Brits don’t want to do” and then import more people to look after the previous wave.

Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Take a look at Germany’s migration figures and excess mortality, then compare with the UK. Unfortunately hysteria and not data tends to drive the outcome of elections.

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Annest John

I don’t understand what point you are making. Are Germany’s migration figures higher or lower than the UK? What are excess mortality figures and are they higher or lower in Germany? What are you suggesting is the link between the two?

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Annest John

I don’t understand what point you are making. Are Germany’s migration figures higher or lower than the UK? What are excess mortality figures and are they higher or lower in Germany? What are you suggesting is the link between the two?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Migration is not new. 80 million people around the world call themselves Irish.. we have a mere 5¼ million at home! I guess it’s payback time?

Mick Joyce
Mick Joyce
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Ireland’s population is considerably smaller than it was 200 years ago so it’s hardly a case of the society being overwhelmed.

terence fitzpatrick
terence fitzpatrick
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

I believe a welfare system needs controlled borders.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

I think the immigration problem is more in the realm of social politics rather than economics. In the Nordic countries, immigration has led to a collapse in confidence in the welfare system – people are happy to pay taxes to support ‘their people’, not so much to support incomers. The social contract is under a lot of stress there, as they’ve been very homogenous until recently. Immigrants are less of a drain upon the welfare state than natives, do pay taxes, and often do jobs the natives won’t (often in agriculture and care, helping to keep down the costs of food, care) – though they may well send much back to the home country. Some interesting stats from the UK:
in the last 40 years, the population has gone from 56 to 67 million – an increase of 20%, whilst Dept of Health and Care spending has gone up 400% – in real terms, over the same period.

Annest John
Annest John
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Take a look at Germany’s migration figures and excess mortality, then compare with the UK. Unfortunately hysteria and not data tends to drive the outcome of elections.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt M

Migration is not new. 80 million people around the world call themselves Irish.. we have a mere 5¼ million at home! I guess it’s payback time?

Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago

Always and everywhere the problem is uncontrolled, mass immigration overwhelming the capacity of societies to house its young people, heal its sick, teach its children and supply its citizens with public goods.
As Milton Friedman put it: you can have open borders or you can have a welfare state.
In the last decade this issue has driven the outcome of elections in Britain, France, Germany, the USA, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Austria, Italy, Australia, Hungary and Poland. And now Ireland will be added to the list.
And yet the politicians don’t address it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Immigration will always be a problem so long as the people who profit from it are not the ones who pay for it. This is really what defines the leave/remain cleavage in the UK – but it’s the same in every European country and it will eventually destroy the EU (if their dodgy monetary shenanigans don’t do so first)

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Dodgy monetary shenanigans are about to become more intense as The EU is now embarking on raising its own loans to sprinkle its own fairy dust over (only) compliant states – who will fall in line as they cant raise their own funds.

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

That is a really perceptive comment, because it holds true for a lot of issues – immigration, green policies, trans, even COVID restrictions.
There is a real moral hazard as those pushing for it, benefit financially or through woke “credit points” in their social circles, but do not have to pay for it.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Dodgy monetary shenanigans are about to become more intense as The EU is now embarking on raising its own loans to sprinkle its own fairy dust over (only) compliant states – who will fall in line as they cant raise their own funds.

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

That is a really perceptive comment, because it holds true for a lot of issues – immigration, green policies, trans, even COVID restrictions.
There is a real moral hazard as those pushing for it, benefit financially or through woke “credit points” in their social circles, but do not have to pay for it.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Immigration will always be a problem so long as the people who profit from it are not the ones who pay for it. This is really what defines the leave/remain cleavage in the UK – but it’s the same in every European country and it will eventually destroy the EU (if their dodgy monetary shenanigans don’t do so first)

John Tangney
John Tangney
1 year ago

One way to neutralize these protests might be to locate temporary accommodation for asylum seekers in leafy suburbs from whose vantage point well-to-do bienpensants call working class defenders of their own localities racists and far-rightists, and maybe to commandeer the Shelbourne and Cork’s Imperial Hotel for the increasing number of homeless asylum seekers. Michael McDowell said in the Irish Times this week that since we’re in a crisis there’s no time to consult people about the measures being taken to house refugees, in light of which his erstwhile Dail colleagues could presumably do all this by fiat.

John Tangney
John Tangney
1 year ago

One way to neutralize these protests might be to locate temporary accommodation for asylum seekers in leafy suburbs from whose vantage point well-to-do bienpensants call working class defenders of their own localities racists and far-rightists, and maybe to commandeer the Shelbourne and Cork’s Imperial Hotel for the increasing number of homeless asylum seekers. Michael McDowell said in the Irish Times this week that since we’re in a crisis there’s no time to consult people about the measures being taken to house refugees, in light of which his erstwhile Dail colleagues could presumably do all this by fiat.

D Glover
D Glover
1 year ago

Four hundred years ago the policy of ‘plantation’ settled lots of English and Scots protestants in Ireland. This was done by Elizabeth and by James VI & I. These settlers were topped up in the 17th century with some Huguenot French protestants.
How well have Catholic Ireland and Protestant Ireland integrated?
If you introduce lots of new Muslim settlers how long will it take to integrate them? As I’m English it’s none of my business, but I think the Irish might like to think this through before doing it.

Last edited 1 year ago by D Glover
rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

Your reply is far too logical for Politicians. You may even be branded Racist. However correct it actually is!

Unfortunately for The Irish – immigration is not something over which they (as a so-called independent state) have any control.

Last edited 1 year ago by rob drummond
Fanny Blancmange
Fanny Blancmange
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

IIRC Ireland until quite recently had a good few people prepared to take very direct (often hideous) action against perceived treachery. Did they run away?

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

To be fair, it wasn’t just the religious difference between Protestants and Catholics. Weren’t Catholics back then also denied certain rights, such as the right to purchase and own land or to hold public office? I’m genuinely not sure, but I seem to recall reading that.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

Your reply is far too logical for Politicians. You may even be branded Racist. However correct it actually is!

Unfortunately for The Irish – immigration is not something over which they (as a so-called independent state) have any control.

Last edited 1 year ago by rob drummond
Fanny Blancmange
Fanny Blancmange
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

IIRC Ireland until quite recently had a good few people prepared to take very direct (often hideous) action against perceived treachery. Did they run away?

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  D Glover

To be fair, it wasn’t just the religious difference between Protestants and Catholics. Weren’t Catholics back then also denied certain rights, such as the right to purchase and own land or to hold public office? I’m genuinely not sure, but I seem to recall reading that.

D Glover
D Glover
1 year ago

Four hundred years ago the policy of ‘plantation’ settled lots of English and Scots protestants in Ireland. This was done by Elizabeth and by James VI & I. These settlers were topped up in the 17th century with some Huguenot French protestants.
How well have Catholic Ireland and Protestant Ireland integrated?
If you introduce lots of new Muslim settlers how long will it take to integrate them? As I’m English it’s none of my business, but I think the Irish might like to think this through before doing it.

Last edited 1 year ago by D Glover
Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Of course just as with United Kingdom and other countries the idea these Nations are physically full up doesn’t make sense. Ireland specifically had a much population before the Famine, although arguably then an unsustainable one.

However migrants of course aren’t of course distributed evenly over the entire country and indeed the countryside any more than they arrived on mass in David Cameron’s constituency in the 2010s. Instead they are concentrated in urban already stressed areas.

There are major issues of infrastructure and planning as well as cultural integration at play here which the establishments in almost all European countries have been utterly blithe and uninterested in for decades. Of course at the same time business rather likes a lot of low-skilled labour arriving on its doorstep.

Many liberals and left wingers think a ‘fair’ process is all important – let’s put aside the point as to whether it is actually ‘fair’ or whether various people have their caring thumbs pushed down hard on the scales! However I’d say OUTCOMES are more important. (Isn’t that supposed to be the case in public policy?!). Like, what population is sustainable, what proportion is it reasonable to think should be recent arrivals from very different cultures? What additional schools, hospitals, doctors, housing etc are needed to accommodate this growth and how do we fund that? How do we truly integrate migrants? The lack of attention or even interest amongst much of our political and intellectual class on these issues is staggering.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Of course just as with United Kingdom and other countries the idea these Nations are physically full up doesn’t make sense. Ireland specifically had a much population before the Famine, although arguably then an unsustainable one.

The population of GB (excluding Northern Ireland) was 12 million in 1822 and is 67 million in 2022.
Ireland is a very special case – 8 million in the 1841 census down to 7 million today (if you count the whole island).

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
Jon Barrow
Jon Barrow
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Yes, what is ‘fair’ or ‘kind’ is often very different to what is real or true. So it depends on your priority of values. Unfortunately the former values often take priority now, loss of commitment to reality being a sure sign of collapse.

Geraldine Kelley
Geraldine Kelley
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I reckon we are seeing white flight here in N Ireland judging by the increasing numbers of English people now settling here. Good schools, cheap housing, better quality of life, and an escape from cities which have become alien to their indigenous inhabitants are all reasons given when you talk to newcomers.

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

> The lack of attention or even interest amongst much of our political and intellectual class on these issues is staggering.

Not really, well among the political class anyway. It’s because they are attentive and interested far more in a completely different problem – How to garner more votes.

Whatever motives politicians and their “useful idiot” supporters claim, much of this obtinately maintained liberalism on immigration is solely in pursuit of gratitude votes, for the party in power when the immigrants arrived.

Last edited 1 year ago by John Ramsden
Matt M
Matt M
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Of course just as with United Kingdom and other countries the idea these Nations are physically full up doesn’t make sense. Ireland specifically had a much population before the Famine, although arguably then an unsustainable one.

The population of GB (excluding Northern Ireland) was 12 million in 1822 and is 67 million in 2022.
Ireland is a very special case – 8 million in the 1841 census down to 7 million today (if you count the whole island).

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt M
Jon Barrow
Jon Barrow
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Yes, what is ‘fair’ or ‘kind’ is often very different to what is real or true. So it depends on your priority of values. Unfortunately the former values often take priority now, loss of commitment to reality being a sure sign of collapse.

Geraldine Kelley
Geraldine Kelley
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I reckon we are seeing white flight here in N Ireland judging by the increasing numbers of English people now settling here. Good schools, cheap housing, better quality of life, and an escape from cities which have become alien to their indigenous inhabitants are all reasons given when you talk to newcomers.

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

> The lack of attention or even interest amongst much of our political and intellectual class on these issues is staggering.

Not really, well among the political class anyway. It’s because they are attentive and interested far more in a completely different problem – How to garner more votes.

Whatever motives politicians and their “useful idiot” supporters claim, much of this obtinately maintained liberalism on immigration is solely in pursuit of gratitude votes, for the party in power when the immigrants arrived.

Last edited 1 year ago by John Ramsden
Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Of course just as with United Kingdom and other countries the idea these Nations are physically full up doesn’t make sense. Ireland specifically had a much population before the Famine, although arguably then an unsustainable one.

However migrants of course aren’t of course distributed evenly over the entire country and indeed the countryside any more than they arrived on mass in David Cameron’s constituency in the 2010s. Instead they are concentrated in urban already stressed areas.

There are major issues of infrastructure and planning as well as cultural integration at play here which the establishments in almost all European countries have been utterly blithe and uninterested in for decades. Of course at the same time business rather likes a lot of low-skilled labour arriving on its doorstep.

Many liberals and left wingers think a ‘fair’ process is all important – let’s put aside the point as to whether it is actually ‘fair’ or whether various people have their caring thumbs pushed down hard on the scales! However I’d say OUTCOMES are more important. (Isn’t that supposed to be the case in public policy?!). Like, what population is sustainable, what proportion is it reasonable to think should be recent arrivals from very different cultures? What additional schools, hospitals, doctors, housing etc are needed to accommodate this growth and how do we fund that? How do we truly integrate migrants? The lack of attention or even interest amongst much of our political and intellectual class on these issues is staggering.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

By ‘selling’ itself to the EU. the Kerrygold Republic has brought this on itself, and I for one must admit I am enjoying some delicious, smug, schadenfreude!

No doubt Legions of Plastic Paddies will be outraged, but this was INEVITABLE!

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Well I suppose a little schadenfreude is sometimes understandable and amusing. However this issue goes well beyond the EU as we see from post Brexit Britain.

The reality is that western establishments of all stripes had for decades by the care little about this issue of mass migration or actually wanted to see it increase.

The narrative of an appalling climate catastrophe affecting the ‘Global South’ and forcing millions of people on the move is complete nonsense. This is a political choice. For all our problems there is no serious doubt that the world is richer with, lower family size lower child mortality, and better health outcomes and education than it is ever been.

No, people are just much more aware of how others live elsewhere (or a distorted version of it) they may have existing contacts and family in the West, they are rich enough to pay people smugglers thousands of dollars! And they know they are very likely to be able to stay in practice.

In other words, mass migration is a deliberate western choice. Japan has none, Saudi has accepted precisely zero refugees from the Syrian conflict, despite their having so much in common culturally. China closes its borders when it wishes to. Of course the difference is probably that those countries are a lot tougher with those who have no right to be there. UNCHR or no UNCHR.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

“For all our problems there is no serious doubt that the world is richer with, lower family size lower child mortality, and better health outcomes and education than it is ever been.“

Perfectly put Sir!
For all my admiration for the fabled ‘Pax Romana’, I must concede.

Talking of Rome it does rather remind of the situation in the fifth century when hordes of Teutonic and possibly Slavic thugs broke into, and completely destroyed the Western Roman Empire. An unmitigated catastrophe from which we have yet to fully recover.

Yet we seem hell bent’ on repeating this disaster, when all we have to say is NO!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

No one has mentioned that Ireland has neither history nor experience of immigration of any volume- Why is it somehow ” wrong” for free people in their own country to, and let me use a much maligned word ” discriminate”? We discriminate every day… what we want to eat, which shop we choose to go to, whom we choose as friends or partners, what car we want, where we go on holiday? Are we therefore ” discriminating” in the new sense of the word against all the above whom we decide against? No, so why should this be any different?

Having said that, our governments are soon going to stop us discriminating in favour of non- electric cars, wood burners, cigarettes… where will it end unless we literally, as an electorate take a stand against our totalitarian politics?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Spot on. In fact Lord Jonathan Sumption had the audacity to draw attention to this problem during the great COVID Scamdemic of all too recent memory.
However I think ‘demos’ have now rumbled the Establishment, and it may not be so easy next time!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Spot on. In fact Lord Jonathan Sumption had the audacity to draw attention to this problem during the great COVID Scamdemic of all too recent memory.
However I think ‘demos’ have now rumbled the Establishment, and it may not be so easy next time!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

No one has mentioned that Ireland has neither history nor experience of immigration of any volume- Why is it somehow ” wrong” for free people in their own country to, and let me use a much maligned word ” discriminate”? We discriminate every day… what we want to eat, which shop we choose to go to, whom we choose as friends or partners, what car we want, where we go on holiday? Are we therefore ” discriminating” in the new sense of the word against all the above whom we decide against? No, so why should this be any different?

Having said that, our governments are soon going to stop us discriminating in favour of non- electric cars, wood burners, cigarettes… where will it end unless we literally, as an electorate take a stand against our totalitarian politics?

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Do not ignore the significance that the mobile phone plays in stimulating and assisting mas migration.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Exactly. Probably the most pernicious thing ever invented.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Exactly. Probably the most pernicious thing ever invented.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

“For all our problems there is no serious doubt that the world is richer with, lower family size lower child mortality, and better health outcomes and education than it is ever been.“

Perfectly put Sir!
For all my admiration for the fabled ‘Pax Romana’, I must concede.

Talking of Rome it does rather remind of the situation in the fifth century when hordes of Teutonic and possibly Slavic thugs broke into, and completely destroyed the Western Roman Empire. An unmitigated catastrophe from which we have yet to fully recover.

Yet we seem hell bent’ on repeating this disaster, when all we have to say is NO!

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

Do not ignore the significance that the mobile phone plays in stimulating and assisting mas migration.

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago

A great many plastic paddies, who have always supported Irish independence, support Ireland’s eventual exit from the EU on precisely that basis. I am one myself and I remain confused at the fact that most Irish people are quite happy to surrender their political independence to Brussels, yet are (rightly) proud of their nation’s history in which their ancestors recovered that same independence from Britain.

I am careful of course not to argue directly with Irish voters on this subject because although I’m an Irish citizen, I’m not an Irish resident or voter. The only point I will defend is that a nation cannot be both an EU member and independent: it is one or the other.