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The Chechens fighting for Ukraine Ramzan Kadyrov is determined to hunt them down


February 1, 2023   6 mins

“I am here in Ukraine fighting because first the Russians came to my motherland, Chechnya. Now they want to do here what they did to us.” Kazbek has just picked me up from Dnipro station to take me to his base near Bakhmut, where he and his unit are fighting on Ukraine’s bloodiest front. I climb into the back seat, where propped up in the middle is Kazbek’s automatic rifle, the FN SCAR. It’s colossal; and it will set the mood for the next few days.

I first met Kazbek last spring on a Ukrainian military base on the frontline in the Donbas. With his well-tended beard, he looked like a typical Chechen. I was surprised to see him. Chechens in Ukraine were, I thought, all fighting for Russia under orders from their leader, Ramzan Kadyrov, the Kremlin’s psychopathic puppet leader of Chechnya. I was wrong.

Russia’s victory in the Second Chechen War, which ended in April 2000, cemented Putin’s position as President. It also resulted in the levelling of Chechnya’s capital, Grozny. Many of those who had fought the Russians fled abroad, fanning out across Europe and the Middle East. But some were not done, and they eventually ended up in Ukraine, determined to keep battling Moscow wherever they could. Today, there are four dedicated Chechen battalions, at least two of which, the Dzhokhar Dudayev and Sheikh Mansur Battalions, have been fighting since the war began in 2014.

Kazbek is one of around 200 Chechens here. After leaving his home country in the 2000s, he married a Ukrainian woman and had a son, Deni. He considers himself a Chechen-Ukrainian. In the Donbas, the soldiers treat him like a cooler older brother. “He’s a great fighter,” my friend Dima told me. “Really good at tactics.”

That in itself isn’t surprising: Kazbek has been fighting Russians since the first Chechen War broke out in 1994. “Everyone rose up — women, children went to the mountains and the men went to war — every man,” he tells me now. He pauses. “We had no fear of the Russians,” he tells me. “Only rage.”

***

We drive out of Dnipro toward the base. Kazbek’s immaculate beard has grown, in eight months, into a bushy mass with an upturned moustache. His head remains a perfectly shaved, symmetrical dome. Now he is accompanied by his friend Yevgeny (half-Chechen, half-Ukrainian), who puts on some Chechen music. “Bro, first we go to the cemetery, is that ok?”

We pull off the motorway onto a side road and a sea of blue and yellow flags comes into view, surrounding the many rows of headstones. Lines of Ukrainian soldiers stand by the graves, many with their heads bowed in mourning. We drive through the cemetery until we arrive at a gate with a crescent moon on it: the Muslim section.

The favoured style of gravestone is black marble — with a portrait of the deceased. The graves are in rows, with the first line made up of mounds of earth: the latest arrivals have not yet had enough time to get headstones. We walk to one side where Kazbek and Yevgeny pause by a grave marked by a simple headstone with “Amina” written across it.

Amina, Kazbek explains, was the wife of his comrade, Adam, and a famous fighter in Ukraine. She was shot by a gunman: a Kadyrovite not a Chechen, he is keen to stress. (In Ukraine, people only ever refer to Russia’s Chechen units like this, to demarcate them from those fighting for Kyiv.) Kadyrov and the Russian FSB are determined to hunt down all Chechens fighting for Ukraine and have deployed assassins across the country. The gunman was caught and sent to prison, but was then traded in a prisoner swap for Oleg Sentsov, a Ukrainian filmmaker and activist from Crimea.

Kazbek and Yevgeny pose for a photo by the grave. Kazbek raises his finger skywards to show there is only one God, Allah. Religion is on his mind as we leave the graveyard. “Muslims, Jews, Christians, we all have one God. It’s the same school, just different classrooms.” This is Islam, Chechen-style. Religion is central to Kazbek’s life. “But I became a man in war. Before I never prayed to God,” he later told me. “My first weapon was a training rifle. We made Molotov cocktails — we had nothing else. When the sun rose on the second day of war, I had already seen many of my friends and neighbours die; I saw Russian planes in the sky. That was the day I learned how to pray.”

David, Kazbek and the FN SCAR

But his Islam is one that eschews fanaticism and a hatred of other religions. On his uniform he has, among other things, an Israeli flag. “The Israelis have helped Ukraine a lot in this war,” he explains.

Kazbek loves Ukraine but his time here has not always been straightforward. When he arrived, he had to convince many people that, as a Chechen, he was neither a terrorist nor a “barbarian”. Even today, like so many other Chechens fighting for Ukraine, he has not been granted citizenship. They have been promised it, but there are always more bureaucratic hurdles to overcome. It never ends.

“Getting a passport is a big problem because I have a shit Russian passport,” he tells me. “It’s wrong that a soldier cannot get a passport after all these years. I can get documents to fight in the war but not to live here as a citizen. It’s not about the Ukrainian people, who are great, but about bureaucracy.” In that sense, his situation reminds me of the many difficulties that those other fierce and effective soldiers, the Gurkhas, had in obtaining British citizenship.

I ask Kazbek if there is anything the Chechens could teach the Ukrainians. “Most of all,” he says, “we show Ukraine that Russia can be defeated.” He never wants to be seen as boasting, so he adds quickly, “today, Ukraine is teaching the Chechens. Now I am studying how best to fight the Russians here. My unit are my brothers. Brothers in war, brothers in religion. Brothers in heart.”

This is unsurprising. He has been fighting in Ukraine for a long time; he was, he tells me, the first Chechen to do so. Soon after the 2014 Euromaidan revolution, he volunteered to join the army. He knew war was coming. He knew from Chechnya what the Russians would do. “I joined the 34th battalion,” he tells me. “And I went to fight in the East, I fought in Donetsk and Gorlovka. We got up close and saw fear in their eyes. And God helped us to win because truth is on our side.”

Kazbek adores Ukrainian rap and turns up the sound system. “Don’t fuck with Ukraine!” belts out in what has become an official anthem here. “I got ice in my veins/Loaded guns I’m insane/fight for peace in my land.” As we drive, Kazbek downs cans of Red Bull. “Russian Warship, go fuck yourself,” concludes the song. The music is fitting. Kazbek is a stormtrooper; his job is to attack Russian positions and kill as many of them as possible. “David, we take the fight to the Russians and only God knows who will win.”

We drive deep into the Donbas and once more Kazbek is in a thoughtful mood. “The problem is the Russians — they are imperialists in their hearts. Britain and France both had empires, but they passed into history. There is not one day Russia has not had an empire, or tried to have one.” He continues: “The industrial Revolution came, and the French and English realised that they needed to invest in the economy, in diplomacy. But the Russians are exactly like they were 300 years ago — just with gadgets.”

Kazbek’s words hint at something often overlooked in Western Europe and the United States. For Chechens and Ukrainians, as well as Georgians and Kyrgyz and Kazakhs and all the peoples of the Former Soviet Union (FSU), this war is about many things — but at heart it is an anti-colonialist struggle. That is why few here were surprised when, last year, Putin compared himself to Peter the Great; he openly admits to sharing the Tsar’s goal of returning “Russian lands” to a greater empire. When I speak to people from across the FSU, opinions on Ukraine are often mixed, but they all admire Ukrainians for standing up to Moscow. They know it could be them next.

As we close in on the base, Kazbek slows down and looks over at me. “Look, David, we want to live, not die. And we don’t have to die for Ukraine. All we have to do is kill for it.”


David Patrikarakos is UnHerd‘s foreign correspondent. His latest book is War in 140 characters: how social media is reshaping conflict in the 21st century. (Hachette)

dpatrikarakos

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Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago

Good article. Correctly points out that the Ukraine war is largely about Russian imperialism – a desperate attempt to reverse the inevitable decline and break up of the Russian empire (which actually extends to within Russia itself as it currently exists). Correctly notes that Britain and France have largely accepted the dissolution of their empires and in Britain’s case at least had the good sense not to fight it (while France tried and failed in Vietnam and Algeria).
The break-up of the Soviet Union was not actually the final break-up of the Russian empire. That’s still happening. But it will happen. Whether Putin likes it or not.

L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

We did try and fight in Suez. After being soundly beaten, that was enough for us and led to rapid decolonisation.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

Thanks – I forgot that ! The USA was actually a very strong driver in making us decolonise if you think about it – we ended WWII pretty much penniless and they – correctly – forced us to get out of Suez.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Decolonising sometimes against the will of the people in the colonies, too.

L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

No worries, as you say USA forced our hand there; they have not always had our best interests at heart. But neither should they – they are their own country with their interests

Last edited 1 year ago by L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

As to it being correct – in terms of a sovereign nation deciding what they wanted to do with their own resources, that seems true. However, when Iran tried to do the same thing in 50s with their oil, US and UK orchestrated a coup.
We are still living with not so much the colonisation but the decolonisation of European empires IMHO

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

As it was mentioned here — we, Americans are somewhat materialistic. So in a few weeks the US will be like “have a good time Europe cleaning your mess, we’ve got other things to do”. Only one thing concerns us – we need to collect our money and sell new shiny weapons to EU govs.

L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

As to it being correct – in terms of a sovereign nation deciding what they wanted to do with their own resources, that seems true. However, when Iran tried to do the same thing in 50s with their oil, US and UK orchestrated a coup.
We are still living with not so much the colonisation but the decolonisation of European empires IMHO

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

As it was mentioned here — we, Americans are somewhat materialistic. So in a few weeks the US will be like “have a good time Europe cleaning your mess, we’ve got other things to do”. Only one thing concerns us – we need to collect our money and sell new shiny weapons to EU govs.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Britain was bankrupt in 1942.Britain had paid for the Suez Canal which brought much trade and development to Egypt.Eisenhower later realised he had made a mistake in forcing Israel, Britain and France to back down. Nasser replaced monarchy with Arab Nationalism which attacked Israel. When Arab Nationalism was seen to fail post Yom Kippur War, the Muslim Bretheren founded in the 1920s, started to grow immensely. The MB said The West comprised Capitalism and Communism and were a threat to Islam. A MB taught Bin Laden.
Monarchies have been far better at preventing the rise of Islamic Extremism than republican countries.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Decolonising sometimes against the will of the people in the colonies, too.

L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

No worries, as you say USA forced our hand there; they have not always had our best interests at heart. But neither should they – they are their own country with their interests

Last edited 1 year ago by L Easterbrook
Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Britain was bankrupt in 1942.Britain had paid for the Suez Canal which brought much trade and development to Egypt.Eisenhower later realised he had made a mistake in forcing Israel, Britain and France to back down. Nasser replaced monarchy with Arab Nationalism which attacked Israel. When Arab Nationalism was seen to fail post Yom Kippur War, the Muslim Bretheren founded in the 1920s, started to grow immensely. The MB said The West comprised Capitalism and Communism and were a threat to Islam. A MB taught Bin Laden.
Monarchies have been far better at preventing the rise of Islamic Extremism than republican countries.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  L Easterbrook

Thanks – I forgot that ! The USA was actually a very strong driver in making us decolonise if you think about it – we ended WWII pretty much penniless and they – correctly – forced us to get out of Suez.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Yup, Kazbek’s analysis, and his views on religion are spot on.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Stewart
Antony Hirst
Antony Hirst
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

I don’t know why. This is nothing to do with Imperialism. That is just potted notion of Russia.

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Oh those wet dreams to conquer, destroy or break up Russia! Century after century, wave after wave, war after war. Teaching Russians to be cautions and never trust the West. I guess they are finally learning.
Putin’s support within Russia is 83% (was 71% Feb 2022). Good luck wiping out 150*0.83 million people from the planet.

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

They seem to be doing an excellent job of that themselves.
Continuing the work done in the 1930s and 40s, are we?

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

They seem to be doing an excellent job of that themselves.
Continuing the work done in the 1930s and 40s, are we?

L Easterbrook
L Easterbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

We did try and fight in Suez. After being soundly beaten, that was enough for us and led to rapid decolonisation.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Yup, Kazbek’s analysis, and his views on religion are spot on.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Stewart
Antony Hirst
Antony Hirst
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

I don’t know why. This is nothing to do with Imperialism. That is just potted notion of Russia.

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Oh those wet dreams to conquer, destroy or break up Russia! Century after century, wave after wave, war after war. Teaching Russians to be cautions and never trust the West. I guess they are finally learning.
Putin’s support within Russia is 83% (was 71% Feb 2022). Good luck wiping out 150*0.83 million people from the planet.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago

Good article. Correctly points out that the Ukraine war is largely about Russian imperialism – a desperate attempt to reverse the inevitable decline and break up of the Russian empire (which actually extends to within Russia itself as it currently exists). Correctly notes that Britain and France have largely accepted the dissolution of their empires and in Britain’s case at least had the good sense not to fight it (while France tried and failed in Vietnam and Algeria).
The break-up of the Soviet Union was not actually the final break-up of the Russian empire. That’s still happening. But it will happen. Whether Putin likes it or not.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago

Very interesting article. Thank you.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

Yes indeed.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

Yes indeed.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago

Very interesting article. Thank you.

Milton Gibbon
Milton Gibbon
1 year ago

Great article. Well done Unherd.

Very much chimes with the sentiments of Chechens I have known. I think the comparison with Gurkhas is a bit of a stretch and not worthy of the rest of the article. Joining up to fight a war you believe in is not the same as signing up for life-long service to a country whose wars you do not choose, although once promised Ukraine should stick to it.

Milton Gibbon
Milton Gibbon
1 year ago

Great article. Well done Unherd.

Very much chimes with the sentiments of Chechens I have known. I think the comparison with Gurkhas is a bit of a stretch and not worthy of the rest of the article. Joining up to fight a war you believe in is not the same as signing up for life-long service to a country whose wars you do not choose, although once promised Ukraine should stick to it.

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago

Yes, the Chechens who fled Russia after the war were a famously upright bunch. No unsavoury associations whatsoever.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Watson

Unlike the Chechens who fight for the Russians, who are angels?

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Not what I said or implied. If anyone’s trying to tell you there are angels on either side of this war, I say count the spoons because he’s up to something.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Watson

It’s really not a matter of who is or is not an angel, Russia invaded a sovereign nation and that nation is fighting back as hard as it can, as would the UK or USA or any other nation.

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago

It’s really not a matter of what sovereign nation did or did not invade another sovereign nation. Keir Starmer doesn’t know what a woman is.

(See, I can derail people by bringing up true facts that are totally irelevant to what they’re saying as well!)

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago

It’s really not a matter of what sovereign nation did or did not invade another sovereign nation. Keir Starmer doesn’t know what a woman is.

(See, I can derail people by bringing up true facts that are totally irelevant to what they’re saying as well!)

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Watson

It’s really not a matter of who is or is not an angel, Russia invaded a sovereign nation and that nation is fighting back as hard as it can, as would the UK or USA or any other nation.

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Not what I said or implied. If anyone’s trying to tell you there are angels on either side of this war, I say count the spoons because he’s up to something.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Watson

Unlike the Chechens who fight for the Russians, who are angels?

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago

Yes, the Chechens who fled Russia after the war were a famously upright bunch. No unsavoury associations whatsoever.

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago

Wonder how many of them will hold high office in whatever version of Chechnya there is after this war?
Indeed, we will soon see just how diverse and “shatterable” the Russian Federation really is.
The Russian Empire and the Soviet Union both had feet of clay. In each case, it took an ill-conceived war to finish them off.

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago

Wonder how many of them will hold high office in whatever version of Chechnya there is after this war?
Indeed, we will soon see just how diverse and “shatterable” the Russian Federation really is.
The Russian Empire and the Soviet Union both had feet of clay. In each case, it took an ill-conceived war to finish them off.

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago

Poor murderous outlaws never having a chance to go back to their homeland. Mercenaries who will live their short lives pretending that they are fighting for some noble cause. Until they are killed in a combat deep down knowing that it’s for somebody else’s cause.
Google pictures of Grozniy city. It’s marvelous. I have a friend who visited it a couple of years ago, he says it’s something. Alas, the heroes of this article will never see the land of their fathers.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

The Poles also came to the U.K. to fight for a noble cause as their country was destroyed by the Nazis and the Russians. And they didn’t get it back for another 40 years after the war – they couldn’t go back there under the communist tyrants.

But there were lovely cities built after the war in Poland too – and yet they still wanted freedom from the Russian overlords. Not everyone values mere material things like you.

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Where this strong smell of Orwellian history rewriting is coming from? Destroyed by Nazis *and* the Russians? And who exactly liberated Pols from Nazis? UK maybe, while sitting on the sidelines up until mid-1944? I see. There were so many Russians and Belorussians and Ukrainians died fighting for Poland against Germans they could not bring the bodies back. So they had those graves — those the thankful Pols now destroying to clean up the memory.

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Then 400,000 US trucks, 15,000 US aircraft and 15,000 tanks given to Russia during the war liberated Poland. No Russian offensive after 1943 could have succeeded without them.
That’s why Russia won, and why Ukraine will win.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  martin logan

It is like David and Goliath and it wasn’t David who started the war. I wish a peace could be sorted out but I doubt Russia would co-operate under Putin.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  martin logan

It is like David and Goliath and it wasn’t David who started the war. I wish a peace could be sorted out but I doubt Russia would co-operate under Putin.

Aidan Trimble
Aidan Trimble
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Your awkward English suggests to me that your name is a nom de plume and you’re here to troll.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Rewriting history? You do know Russia agreed to carve up Poland with Hitler, and then massacred the officers of the Polish army; then watched the Nazis flatten Warsaw and slaughter the Jews of Warsaw as they ‘waited’ at the gates of Warsaw for the slaughter of the Jews to end?

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Stewart
martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Then 400,000 US trucks, 15,000 US aircraft and 15,000 tanks given to Russia during the war liberated Poland. No Russian offensive after 1943 could have succeeded without them.
That’s why Russia won, and why Ukraine will win.

Aidan Trimble
Aidan Trimble
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Your awkward English suggests to me that your name is a nom de plume and you’re here to troll.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

Rewriting history? You do know Russia agreed to carve up Poland with Hitler, and then massacred the officers of the Polish army; then watched the Nazis flatten Warsaw and slaughter the Jews of Warsaw as they ‘waited’ at the gates of Warsaw for the slaughter of the Jews to end?

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Stewart
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

It appears to me that Putin terrorises Eastern Europe with his threats. Nobody had better help Ukraine or we will start on you. Haven’t they always been like that?

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Where this strong smell of Orwellian history rewriting is coming from? Destroyed by Nazis *and* the Russians? And who exactly liberated Pols from Nazis? UK maybe, while sitting on the sidelines up until mid-1944? I see. There were so many Russians and Belorussians and Ukrainians died fighting for Poland against Germans they could not bring the bodies back. So they had those graves — those the thankful Pols now destroying to clean up the memory.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

It appears to me that Putin terrorises Eastern Europe with his threats. Nobody had better help Ukraine or we will start on you. Haven’t they always been like that?

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

I suspect the Germans would have made Leningrad–or London–into a “marvellous city” if they had won the war.
What’s your point?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  martin logan

How can Nazis build marvellous cities? Nobody would be free.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  martin logan

How can Nazis build marvellous cities? Nobody would be free.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

The Poles also came to the U.K. to fight for a noble cause as their country was destroyed by the Nazis and the Russians. And they didn’t get it back for another 40 years after the war – they couldn’t go back there under the communist tyrants.

But there were lovely cities built after the war in Poland too – and yet they still wanted freedom from the Russian overlords. Not everyone values mere material things like you.

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy E

I suspect the Germans would have made Leningrad–or London–into a “marvellous city” if they had won the war.
What’s your point?

Andy E
Andy E
1 year ago

Poor murderous outlaws never having a chance to go back to their homeland. Mercenaries who will live their short lives pretending that they are fighting for some noble cause. Until they are killed in a combat deep down knowing that it’s for somebody else’s cause.
Google pictures of Grozniy city. It’s marvelous. I have a friend who visited it a couple of years ago, he says it’s something. Alas, the heroes of this article will never see the land of their fathers.

Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago

”MacGregor emphasizes that what the western public are told about the war is not consistent with the reality what is taking place on the ground in Ukraine. The term ‘hybrid warfare,’ which includes the U.S. State Dept. pushing a very specific propaganda message to the media”

Here is Col MacGreggor with Judge Andrew Napolitano half an hour which will give the diametrically opposite story of what we are told. If you read this article watch this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u15kIJint4A

Well worth getting the different view, and one I believe over the MSM and Biden White house and Zalenski story. I have been totally against the West getting involved – I think this is the most insane war the USA has ever caused. The Colonel is a very high placed expert.

”The U.S. led NATO alliance may be winning the narrative, as outlined by media; however, the Russians are winning the actual fighting on the ground in Ukraine. In addition to noting the Russian cultural aspects of the conflict, Col MacGregor gives some somber analysis about how dangerous this is becoming as the U.S. political voices are not willing to concede or admit anything that runs counter to their promoted narrative. ”

This war is evil – it needs ending! PEACE NOW, PEACE, Biden could end it in One Minute if he wishes. This is Biden White House proxy war with Russia for some reason we do not understand. Some corrupt and horrible Globalist thing. Ukraine is destroyed as we use their land and people to be the chess board the globalists are playing this game on. This War may destroy Europe and the Global economy and Will cause a Global Famine, and will basically destroy the nation of Ukraine – listen, google the guy.

Finally, I wonder how much the men in the article above are getting paid, Mercenariesï»ż have fought all wars, and are on every side of this one – plenty of money there – I trust nothing I read of this War, and for good reason – I saw Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Vietnam and more – this is MUCH WORSE.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

This is the same man who was an ardent supporter of the 2nd Iraq war; claimed that there were more Irish than African slaves in the US and called for the annexation of the Donbas, by Russia in 2014?

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

Sorry, just cite the war that was ended before:
A) one side won, or,
B) Both sides were exhausted.
Long way from that, and tears won’t get us there.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

So you think the west should just keep out of it and let Ukraine die? After that it might be Poland, Romania and Hungary etc all to get back the countries that the Soviet Communists ruled. These countries must live in fear with Russia on their doorsteps.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

This is the same man who was an ardent supporter of the 2nd Iraq war; claimed that there were more Irish than African slaves in the US and called for the annexation of the Donbas, by Russia in 2014?

martin logan
martin logan
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

Sorry, just cite the war that was ended before:
A) one side won, or,
B) Both sides were exhausted.
Long way from that, and tears won’t get us there.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Elliott Bjorn

So you think the west should just keep out of it and let Ukraine die? After that it might be Poland, Romania and Hungary etc all to get back the countries that the Soviet Communists ruled. These countries must live in fear with Russia on their doorsteps.

Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago

”MacGregor emphasizes that what the western public are told about the war is not consistent with the reality what is taking place on the ground in Ukraine. The term ‘hybrid warfare,’ which includes the U.S. State Dept. pushing a very specific propaganda message to the media”

Here is Col MacGreggor with Judge Andrew Napolitano half an hour which will give the diametrically opposite story of what we are told. If you read this article watch this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u15kIJint4A

Well worth getting the different view, and one I believe over the MSM and Biden White house and Zalenski story. I have been totally against the West getting involved – I think this is the most insane war the USA has ever caused. The Colonel is a very high placed expert.

”The U.S. led NATO alliance may be winning the narrative, as outlined by media; however, the Russians are winning the actual fighting on the ground in Ukraine. In addition to noting the Russian cultural aspects of the conflict, Col MacGregor gives some somber analysis about how dangerous this is becoming as the U.S. political voices are not willing to concede or admit anything that runs counter to their promoted narrative. ”

This war is evil – it needs ending! PEACE NOW, PEACE, Biden could end it in One Minute if he wishes. This is Biden White House proxy war with Russia for some reason we do not understand. Some corrupt and horrible Globalist thing. Ukraine is destroyed as we use their land and people to be the chess board the globalists are playing this game on. This War may destroy Europe and the Global economy and Will cause a Global Famine, and will basically destroy the nation of Ukraine – listen, google the guy.

Finally, I wonder how much the men in the article above are getting paid, Mercenariesï»ż have fought all wars, and are on every side of this one – plenty of money there – I trust nothing I read of this War, and for good reason – I saw Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Vietnam and more – this is MUCH WORSE.