X Close

How France fell for QAnon The land of Descartes fizzes with conspiracy theories

AntiSemitism often characterises French anti-vax protests. Credit: Gerard Bottino/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

AntiSemitism often characterises French anti-vax protests. Credit: Gerard Bottino/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty


September 2, 2021   6 mins

For years I knew Benoßt as the sweet, unassuming man who sat behind the counter in our Parisian bank branch. Eventually he was made redundant. Before he disappeared, he started to alert my wife (in whispers) to a worrying state of affairs.

The Egyptian pyramids had been built by extraterrestrial beings, he said. The aliens were still among us, secretly running the world. Their existence was being covered up by the political and business “elites”.

France might be the country of Descartes, one of the fathers of logic and rationalism. But it is second only to the United States among western countries in its vulnerability to fantastic and fact-free deviations from conventional wisdom. Only three years ago, one survey found that 79% of French adults believed in at least one elaborate conspiracy theory. One in three believed in four of them.

What exactly did they believe? More than half said that they thought the CIA had assassinated President John F. Kennedy, while a similar proportion suggested that the French government was working with the pharmaceutical industry to conceal the fact that all vaccines are dangerous. One in three French people thought that the AIDS virus had been “created in a laboratory and tested on Africans before spreading to the rest of the world”. One in five thought that the “Americans never reached the moon”.

Against this background, it is no surprise to discover that the preposterous but destructive QAnon conspiracy — that Satan-worshipping, liberal elites are trafficking children into sexual slavery and Donald Trump has been sent by God to stop them — is spreading steadily in France.

Earlier this month, Christian Maillaud, a former gendarme and paratrooper, was arrested in the Loire dĂ©partement of central France and accused of trying to foment a military insurrection. Maillaud, 53, also known as “Stan” or the “white Zorro” by his followers, is a leader of the “Conseil national de transition”, which has adopted “Qanoniste” ideology and wants to destroy the Satanist politicians and institutions that (he claims) control France. “He wants to bring together the extreme Right and the extreme Left, the Gilets Jaunes and various conspiracy theorists to create a new world,” explained the local state prosecutor, Eric Neveu.

Maillaud may or may not be a dangerous person. Most probably he is harmless but crazy. He is, however, a symptom of a wider pattern of half-plausible conspiracy theorising — “complotisme” in French — which some people, including the Government, fear may eventually pose a threat to French democracy.

“It’s become a big issue in this country,” says Professor Antoine Bristielle, a researcher into conspiracy theories for the Fondation Jean-JaurĂšs, “even if we’re not yet at the level of the United States where 56% of Republicans say they believe in QAnon.”

“The problem is that people who come to believe in one conspiracy theory tend to swallow all of them
 You see an increasing number of people, not just in the US but also in France, who reject the legitimacy of elections
 That could cause a big problem for the Presidential elections here next year.”

Rejection of politicians is one thing; rejection of democracy and democratic institutions is another. Criticism of successive governments is, of course, perfectly normal — as are suggestions that French governments sometimes cover up the truth. Certainly, French voters have had plenty of legitimate gripes against their political leaders in the last four decades.

But the last few years have revealed a pattern of contempt and paranoia in France which goes beyond political opposition or traditional populism — and plunges into elaborate theories of treachery and plots against “The People”. Some of the theories are modern (they blame Bill Gates, Big Tech and Big Pharma) and others are very old (it’s the Jews). All are rapidly propagated online, but they cannot be explained by social media alone.

The Covid pandemic — a phenomenon imperfectly understood and explained by “official sources” — has been an El Dorado for conspiratorial thinking in every country. But France seems to be more susceptible than most.

The original Gilets Jaunes movement of 2018 was partly a rational revolt by rural France against years of limp government and the insolent success of the big cities. It was also accelerated by absurdly inflated allegations, spread on social media, of stolen elections and self-enriching politicians. (“Brigitte Macron gets 500,000 Euros a year from the tax-payer,” was one of the more popular claims.)

Over the past six weeks, it has been much the same with the street demonstrations against the French government’s proposed “health pass”. Some of the protesters have reasonable, or at least rational, arguments against rapidly developed vaccines or assaults on personal freedom. Others carry banners accusing capitalism (Big Pharma) or “the Jews” of exploiting or even inventing the Covid pandemic.

At the same time, the growing QAnon movement in France has been encouraged by — and also now threatens to supplant — more traditional and indigenous purveyors of paranoia.

Alain Soral, a former official of the far-Right Rassemblement National, runs a website called ÉgalitĂ© et RĂ©conciliation, which has tried for years to unite white working class people and migrants with extravagant allegations of a Jewish plot to control the world. He is closely associated with the comedian, DieudonnĂ©, who has several convictions for making anti-Semitic jokes and baseless accusations.

Several months ago, Alain Soral embraced QAnon. So did what’s left of the once-great French evening newspaper, France-Soir, now reduced to a website without journalists which propagates conspiracy theories about Covid. It is supplemented by another website, DĂ©Qodeurs, which spreads QAnon fantasies.

The people who visit these sites — les Qanonistes  — are described by a French police investigator as a sponge for a range of other conspiracy theories and theorists. “They exist in a plot-obsessed bubble which includes radical Gilets Jaunes and Covid-deniers,” my source said. “Their profile now overlaps closely with the word of DieudonnĂ© and Soral”.

One of the leading online propagators of QAnonist ideology in France is a man who calls himself Leonard Sojli, who posts an online debate each week featuring conspiracy-theorists of the extreme Left and extreme nationalist and racist Right. The “debate” also sometimes extends to the most abstruse QAnon allegations, such as a “conspiracy” by the satanic “elites” to extract the blood of children to create an anti-ageing drug called “adrenochrome” (actually just a form of  adrenalin).

Tristan Mendùs France, a French writer and filmmaker who studies and combats conspiracy theories, says the French branch of the “Q” movement remains marginal but is still “toxic”.

And it has gained a foothold. Marie Peltier, a Belgian writer and lecturer on “complotisme” believes the proliferation of outlandish conspiracy theories in all democratic countries is a symptom of a 21st century crisis of identity and belief. “The old 20th century ideas (both political and religious) no longer have the same hold on people,” she said. “We are struggling to find a new overarching narrative which brings people together. Conspiracy theories fill the vacuum.”

Antoine Bristielle makes a similar point. He says the key is the collapse of confidence in democratic institutions — from parliaments to the media. “There is a kind of logic in all this,” he says. “If you’ve lost confidence in such institutions, you are no longer ready to believe what they tell you and you seize on alternative narratives which reject and blacken the institutions.”

There is, however, a French exceptionalism – even in conspiratorial thinking. In the United States, conspiracy theories are mostly associated with devout religious belief and radical forms of patriotism. They are mostly confined to the far political Right.

In France, they range from the far-Left to the far-Right and sometimes unite them. They are a symptom of the collapse of widespread religious belief and observance, but also the collapse in support for traditional political ideologies and parties from Communism to socialism and Gaullist conservatism.

The relationship between populism and “complotisme” also differs from country to country. In the United States, Donald Trump aligned himself with and even promoted belief in “plots against the people”. In Britain, the Johnson government – though not always scrupulous with the truth – does not indulge in such fantasies. It promotes other populist themes – Brexit, migration – to help retain the support of many of the kinds of people attracted to wilder, anti-establishment narratives in France.

In France, even the “official” extremes of far Right and far Left – represented by Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc MĂ©lenchon – have been wrong-footed by the rise of conspiratorial populism such as the Gilets Jaunes and parts of the Anti-Pass Movement. They try to shun the wilder theories while praising the protests. That is a difficult balance to maintain. The “complotistes” increasingly reject them as part of the “political establishment”.

In the United States, large parts of the population now appear to exist in separate realities. France is not yet at that point. But as Antoine Bristielle points out, France is also divided between people who may be critical of the Government but accept the democratic system and those who believe that elections and democratic institutions are a farce or a plot.

Their numbers are perhaps not yet great enough to undermine or skew next year’s presidential election. But the longer-term trend is, as the junior interior minister Marlùne Schiappa says, “deeply worrying”.


John Lichfield was Paris correspondent of The Independent for 20 years. Half-English and half-Belgian, he was born in Stoke-on-Trent and lives in Normandy.

john_lichfield

Join the discussion


Join like minded readers that support our journalism by becoming a paid subscriber


To join the discussion in the comments, become a paid subscriber.

Join like minded readers that support our journalism, read unlimited articles and enjoy other subscriber-only benefits.

Subscribe
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

42 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
2 years ago

I’ve noticed a disturbing trend lately where even questioning government policy and/or motives is considered bigotry or conspiracy theory. When governments start telling people that men can be women and laws are created to reinforce that lie, public trust in institutions begin to crumble.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

WWG1WGA, And actually this likely has automatically been picked up by some web crawler and it gone into my dossier. One I happen to know exists.

Last edited 2 years ago by Galeti Tavas
J Bryant
J Bryant
2 years ago

I struggled to fully understand this article and I think that’s because of the examples of conspiracy theories provided by the author.
The author notes that many people believe the US did not really land on the moon. I think most of us would regard that as a mistaken belief and perhaps a conspiracy theory. But the author also quotes Professor Antoine Bristielle: “The problem is that people who come to believe in one conspiracy theory tend to swallow all of them
 You see an increasing number of people, not just in the US but also in France, who reject the legitimacy of elections
 That could cause a big problem for the Presidential elections here next year.”
Surely it has been established beyond doubt that there are real reasons to question the validity of the most recent US national election. There was strong evidence of collusion between big tech, the mainstream media, and the Democratic party to suppress stories harmful to the Democrats. The alleged threat to democracy is not the wacky beliefs of a few conspiracy extremists, it’s the real conspiracies between non-elected and unaccountable organizations to sway elections.
The article also notes that alleged conspiracy theorists are increasingly being monitored by French police. That’s reasonable if these people are planning violence, but how soon will it be before people expressing reasonable doubts about the validity of an election are branded conspiracy theorists who might be charged with a crime?
Pity the true but harmless conspiracy theorists. As the article notes, they struggle to rationalize an increasingly irrational world. But don’t let their delusions distract us from the real conspiracies.

Max Price
Max Price
2 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Your second paragraph perfectly sums up the issue. You can’t blantanly lie to the public, game elections, censor information, then attempt to gas light people and expect them to trust our democratic institutions. Of course people will go looking for conspiratorial explanations.

Lizzie Scott
Lizzie Scott
2 years ago
Reply to  Max Price

What does ‘gas light’ mean?

Roger Inkpen
Roger Inkpen
2 years ago
Reply to  Lizzie Scott

Whatever you want it to mean!

Richard Gasson
Richard Gasson
2 years ago
Reply to  Lizzie Scott

Gas light is the name of an old film in which a husband manipulates a wife by moving things to make the wife question her sanity. In modern vernacular it’s become used to deny something, an issue like culture wars for example. The NT might attempt to view the heritage of the UK through a prism of social justice but then claim that they are doing nothing other than updating their artifacts and any critics are reactionary, racist or xenophobes, idiots or Dail Mail readers. So it’s changing something and making the observer question their perception. I don’t know whether this will help

Susan
Susan
2 years ago
Reply to  Richard Gasson

Great explanation. Thank you Richard.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Very well put J Bryant.

Just take the Tudor Monarchy, each had all these hugely important people under them trying to get the country to flip Anglican, Protestant, Catholic – all conspiring away like crazy – and the people who then got destroyed by it – well they would have been people holding conspiracy theories, but were crushed by what they saw coming as that is how it tends to go. It was money, power, revenge, faith, and so on – and it was just as now…..

The writer of this article, if he was doing this in 1587, say, would have said it all was silly, and people were just making these conspiracy theories up…. except for the odd beheading or burning, and priory being sacked, and some stuck in the tower to recant and their lands and money confiscated… that except for those few – there was nothing going on at all, and Mary being beheaded was nothing to do with any one conspiring……

Same in Rome where the court intrigues (Conspiracies) would change Emperors, and thus all the world – and so many were going on at the end the typical Emperor lived less than a year before some brutal death, and the next taking his place as yet more conspired to replace him….. But as the writer says, ‘nothing to see here’.

And that was before the internet and Globalism…..

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
2 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Yes, this was my takeaway. There was little nuance in this piece.
Am I far right? No. Am I a far right conspiracy theorist believing in every lunatic conspiracy? No. Am I a covid passport sceptic? Yes. Am in lockdown sceptic? Yes. Am I Covid vaccine hesitant? Yes. Do I question and call out the motivations and cynical actions of Big Tech and Big Pharma? Hell yes, it has been proven time and again.

Franz Von Peppercorn
Franz Von Peppercorn
2 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

As another example. Pizza gate is a crazy theory. The idea that there was under age sexual activity on Epstein’s islands is not. The latter is worse by the way, and implicates more people. So yeh, American elites were engaging in Pedophilia or at least ephebophilia.

And let’s not forget that the state itself pushed Russia gate. I don’t know about the most recent claims regarding the ejections – there is something there but probably only local shenanigans which didn’t affect the overall election – but Russiagate is total nonsense.

It’s was a (deep) state conspiracy theory, though.

Last edited 2 years ago by Franz Von Peppercorn
steijnberg
steijnberg
2 years ago

Why do people still scratch there head about buggerall. Nothing on earth is new … only different.

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

I struggled a bit too. What I do not understand is why France is more vulnerable than, say, the UK. Is the US more or less vulnerable than France?

Francis MacGabhann
Francis MacGabhann
2 years ago

Having had a religious education myself, the first thing I learned was that the devil never reveals himself like in horror novels. If he did, the churches would be full to bursting. It’s like that movie, The Usual Suspects — the greatest trick he ever pulled was to convince the world he didn’t exist.

The governments of the west — particularly in Europe — ARE satanic, although not in the sense of being devil worshippers. That would be unthinkable for them. None of these people are capable of conceiving of anything more powerful than themselves. That’s the Achilles heel of pure materialism — it severely limits the imagination, which is why the west is paralysed and dying. No faith equals no ideas.

Last edited 2 years ago by Francis MacGabhann
Saul D
Saul D
2 years ago

“It’s become a big issue in this country,” says Professor Antoine Bristielle, a researcher into conspiracy theories for the Fondation Jean-Jaurùs, “even if we’re not yet at the level of the United States where 56% of Republicans say they believe in QAnon.”
A conspiracy theory in itself, since it doesn’t match with opinion polls from the US where Democrats are more aware of Qanon than Republicans. https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2021/01/19/democrats-are-more-likely-than-republicans-to-have-heard-of-qanon

A Spetzari
A Spetzari
2 years ago
Reply to  Saul D

Yes it’s hard to believe that all 56% of degree educated have both heard of QAnon and believe in it.

Terence Fitch
Terence Fitch
2 years ago

Pre internet, slow limited news plus reading paper books gave our monkey brains a chance to mull over ideas. Education was a slog and required effort. An idiot in a pub muttering was heard by a few. The internet is a double edged sword- a billion shouty voices in a crazed kaleidoscope. China’s response to the net is, in that context, rational. Of course their ideas are heinous but they see that chaos and paralysis of the nation is the result if unchecked. The West is founded on debate and individuality- but the paradox is that we will founder in self doubt. How to refresh and agree on our central tenets without losing our freedom will take some doing.

Bob Pugh
Bob Pugh
2 years ago

In the United States, large parts of the population now appear to exist in separate realities.” and in the UK too, and a lot of them are in government drinking the zero carbon coo-laid and believing twitter is real.

Julian Rigg
Julian Rigg
2 years ago

Critically, it’s not just what we are told, it’s what we are not told.
We are lied to so much by government, big business, MSM etc, it is little wonder that may conspiracy theories exist. Some may even be true. Who knows?

Franz Von Peppercorn
Franz Von Peppercorn
2 years ago
Reply to  Julian Rigg

Pravada mostly told the truth. Factories doubling capacity in Minsk during the famine. Probably true. It didn’t mention the famine though.

Now how much gave you heard of Afghanistan until recently, and how much of Yemen now.

Diana Durham
Diana Durham
2 years ago

“It promotes other populist themes – Brexit, migration – to help retain the support of many of the kinds of people attracted to wilder, anti-establishment narratives in France.” Brexit was fuelled by a desire to limit population influx into Britain. The word ‘populist’ is banded about in articles like this one, along with many other generalities and clumsy conclusions, without being well defined. Brexit was voted in by a majority of the population. Most of them believe in the value of the history and legacy of Britain. Is that a vainglorious or toxic ‘populism’? I don’t think so. As to conspiracy theories, you might want to remember that only 18 months ago, ‘experts’ jumped on the bandwagon/witchhunt of that terrible ‘conspiracy theory’ which pointed out there was a level 4 security lab in Wuhan messing about with Bat viruses. Turns out, as common sense could have told us at the time, this is the most likely source of the outbreak. So it might be worth asking whether some elements of other conspiracy theories have roots in reality, ie, in some of the other large lies that governments have told us along the way. Like, for instance, how well (or badly) the Afghan military had actually been trained during the 20 years of the ‘war’.

Marcus Scott
Marcus Scott
2 years ago

“
while a similar proportion suggested that the French government was working with the pharmaceutical industry to conceal the fact that all vaccines are dangerous.”

How can people believe such nonsense? If it were the case that pharmaceutical companies demanded governments the world over indemnify the companies so that individuals who believe they have been harmed by a vaccine cannot litigate, that would be extremely suspicious. Especially if governments did not provide an indemnity against harm caused by any other medications the companies produce.

Do the uneducated oinks actually believe that could happen? These hillbilly’s probably also believe that one day our government will use the Public Health Act (1985) to destroy small businesses in order to enrich Jeff Bezos by hundreds of billions of dollars.

My friends and I sit around our Islington dining tables and bemoan the fact that people who are the products of white, working class incest are allowed to vote.

Something must be done! My friends and I are very cross. Every crosser than we were when the Russians stole the election and prevented the most qualified candidate in history from becoming President.

Pass the Stinking Bishop and ethically sound Malawian Chardonnay would you Persephone? I’m so pleased to hear that you gave the Ocado driver a piece of your mind for delivering a packet of ripen at home Kumquats when you have neither the time nor the inclination to ripen at home. He likely didn’t understand English. What do you expect from a member of the Far Right named Jerzy?

Michael Richardson
Michael Richardson
2 years ago
Reply to  Marcus Scott

I was about to write a scathing reply ….. but instead: Bravo, Sir!

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
2 years ago

The author hasn’t even mentioned the most ridiculous conspiracy theories. Such as that the central banks print money electronically that is then lent to banks at zero per cent so that they can lend money to people to drive up the price of assets that the rich already owned.

Or that citizens and organisation in Saudi Arabia funded 9/11 but the US invaded Iraq instead.

Or that the US invaded Afghanistan, installed the brother of a drug trafficker as President, spent trillions that was either embezzled or went into the pockets of arms manufacturers and then withdrew leaving all of their military hardware to be taken by the people who had supported 9/11.

Who would believe such silly theories?

Michael Richardson
Michael Richardson
2 years ago

Q: What is the difference between Covid conspiracy theories and Covid facts?
A: About six months.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
2 years ago

56% of Republicans say they believe in QAnon? Is this true? Do they believe it exists or do they ascribe to it?

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
2 years ago

No, it’s not true, as can be seen in the post by Saul D linking to an Economist survey.
It’s odd that the writer did not query this even odder “statistic”.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
2 years ago

Yes!
Thanks for information on Saul D – he posted after me, so hadn’t seen it.

Last edited 2 years ago by Lesley van Reenen
Norman Powers
Norman Powers
2 years ago

The American left has lots of conspiracy theories but they mostly control the media so they get presented as truth, e.g. the belief that Russian bots are manipulating people through Twitter is a pure conspiracy theory (and laughably wrong). It’s totally suckered academia and the left wing press though.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
2 years ago
Reply to  Norman Powers

To be fair the Russian bots do exist, the Chinese use these to good effect as well. However they tend to sow discord and cause arguments amongst the population, spreading extreme opinions amongst left and right rather than coming down trying to help either side of a debate. They’re essentially troublemakers rather than an attempt to undermine democracy as such, just aiming to divide an already divided population

micah christian
micah christian
2 years ago

Q was a carefully crafted intelligence operation. Why do we hear nothing of Q in any of the Statist corporate media? If they were so powerful and determinative on January 6th, then where are they? Where is the discussion of them? Where is their popular support? At best, it was a classic AstroTurf movement to give cover to the operation. The author has little understanding of this dynamic- or of American politics regarding it. He is peddling corporate, carefully curated, “facts”.

Last edited 2 years ago by micah christian
Kathryn Dwyer
Kathryn Dwyer
2 years ago

It’s hardly surprising that the more extreme conspiracy theories have flourished, particularly concerning covid, when open debate about ALL scientific evidence, viewpoints, alternative strategies and treatments has been actively suppressed both by governments and big tech. This lack of openness and discussion and attempted control of information, treating both the public and highly respected scientists who question the official narrative with scorn and derision leads to more people trying to find their own version of the truth. Some are considered misguided or mad, but those who see an even more polarised world emerging with the poorest getting poorer and the the pharmaceuticals and big tech making obscene profits don’t need a conspiracy theory to question the existing policies.

Gary Baxter
Gary Baxter
2 years ago

Do you remember the time when coronavirus originating from a lab was condemned, with thundering wrath, as a conspiracy theory by scientific communities, BigTech and MSM? Now, how can one not expect that folks are suspicious that scientific communities, BigTech and MSM were conspiring to suppress critical information, for their own selfish and maybe evil purposes. The shameless behaviour and worsening corruption of the elites is a major reason of the growth of conspiracy theories.

Last edited 2 years ago by Gary Baxter
mike otter
mike otter
2 years ago

Maybe QANON needs to be seen as a signal like left wingers’ support for grooming gangs and sending male sex offenders into womens’ prisons. I have nothing against Satanists per se as long as their devil worshipping is safe, sane and consensual, but do have something against leftists and their signals (see above). In the absence of a legal system and transparent elections it makes sense to equate them with really bad people eg child sex offenders if it helps neutralize them . They do exactly the same thing – but not as well it seems – remember Tom Watson, Nonce Finder General – accused a load of Tory politicians but turns out it was all hokum. If we had a legal system in place imagine the libel and slander damages he would have to pay!

Last edited 2 years ago by mike otter
Franz Von Peppercorn
Franz Von Peppercorn
2 years ago

By the way I have a meta conspiracy about QAnon. It’s a deep state operation to discredit Trumpism – the alphabet agencies had a deep hatred of Trump.

The reason I believe that is because, despite QAnon being described as a major threat to democratic society, the rule of law, and blamed in part for Jan 6 etc etc etc, there’s been no substantial effort to find out who it is. Nobody is anonymous on the internet. People are arrested everyday for posts , anonymous or not, on social media, whatsapp, Facebook etc. And if you really wanted to find out where it’s been posted from then the records are out there somewhere. If he’s using a VPN then you can get the records of the VPN provider.

Nothing would discredit QAnon more than a flabby 300lb incel being paraded about in pink prison jumpsuits.

Nothing happening there though.

Last edited 2 years ago by Franz Von Peppercorn
Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago

my guess is an umbrella tip laden with ricin was jabbed into his leg wile out shopping, and so……

Matthew Baker
Matthew Baker
2 years ago

It is fascinating that France and the US, the two countries whose national identifies are most formed by Enlightenment thinking, are most prone to conspiracy. I have some theories but haven’t thought them all through yet. Perhaps there is something to the eradication of the past and of tradition, the leaving life’s mysteries and great purposes to rationalism alone which is behind some of this thinking.

Mark McKee
Mark McKee
2 years ago

It was hard to find anything redeemable about this piece; just a half-baked set of mainstream media put-downs for anyone who has a brain to question anything. Vive la France!

Troy MacKenzie
Troy MacKenzie
2 years ago

“In the United States, conspiracy theories are mostly associated with devout religious belief and radical forms of patriotism. They are mostly confined to the far political Right.”
I think the author has forgotten about 9/11 truth or the more recent Russia-gate conspiracy.

Susan Marshall
Susan Marshall
2 years ago

The trouble here is that people feel powerless; that democracy is broken. And, not unreasonably, they think that those in power wish them to be powerless. This breeds all sorts of conspiracy theories.
How do we know that they are not right?
By dismissing every idea are we missing something?

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
2 years ago

Most politicians demonstrate a conspiracy against common sense, so people believe in conspiracies.
When people base their thoughts and actions on common sense ( proven experience ) they are treated as heretics.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
2 years ago

Q Anon… straight out of Monty Python or Harry Enfield!!!