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Who will Biden bomb first? The President-elect's 'global leadership' is a return to the failed policies of Obama and Clinton

Meet the new boss, same as the boss before the old boss. Photo by Leigh Vogel/WireImage

Meet the new boss, same as the boss before the old boss. Photo by Leigh Vogel/WireImage


December 4, 2020   6 mins

“America is back.” So President-elect Biden declared after announcing his cabinet nominations last week, and after the Trump presidency many around the world will at least be relieved that normality has returned. But global joy might be short-lived, because with the new White House appointments, there is no longer any mistaking what we are in for these next four years. Joe Biden is a restorationist, evidently intent on giving America and the rest of the world as faithful a copy of the Obama administration as he can conjure. It might be truer to say that American exceptionalism is back.

All was well before Donald Trump came along and all shall be well again now he is gone. This is the product Biden has on offer, but it is shoddy goods on two counts: all was not well before Trump took the White House, and all will not be well if, as Biden’s appointments indicate rather clearly, our forty-sixth president insists on pretending our forty-fourth had it all right.

Diversity is de rigueur as Biden shapes his administration. He promises “the most diverse cabinet in history,” and his nominees so far are indeed dense with women and people of colour, just as former Obama Secretary of State Hillary Clinton played the diversity card during her 2016 campaign, naming women, black people, Asian-Americans, Hispanics and others to high office.

But now as then, it is diversity of identity that is supposed to count, not diversity of thought, of which one finds none among Biden’s newly-named people. This is a sales job, just as Barack Obama was a salesman — window dressing for an un-pretty foreign policy regime.

And there shall be no diversity among nations, either, as Joe Biden fashions his post-Trump idea of America’s proper place in the world. On this side of the pond, there are headlines about Team Biden’s abiding intention to use foreign policy to reconnect with the global community. “Biden Picks Team Set on Fortifying World Alliances,” The New York Times announced atop page one last week while Democracy Now!, a Democratic Party-aligned radio programme, puts it this way: “Biden’s National Security Appointments Focus on Multilateralism, International Cooperation.”

We Americans love these multisyllabic words. And we love making them mean other than what one finds in our Merriam–Webster dictionary.

The lately prevailing theme — multipolarity, alliances, partnerships, shared responsibilities — is also to be traced back to the earliest days of the Obama administration. The most important of Biden’s newly-announced cabinet and advisory appointments — respectively Antony Blinken to State, Jake Sullivan as national security adviser — sound it routinely: We cannot solve the world’s problems alone, they say with solemn conviction.

It is an excellent thought, as it was first time round. But we had better look carefully at who these people are — both Obama administration holdovers — and listen carefully to what they say. The alliances-and-partnerships bit did not turn out well when Obama tried it, and there is nothing to suggest that, four years on, it will work this time round.

The first thing to note about the administration Biden is introducing to the world is never mentioned in the American press, and certainly not among the foreign policy cliques. Biden’s people are to a man and woman American exceptionalists — true believers in the country’s providentially-conferred destiny to light humanity’s way. There is nothing new or remarkable in this: our chosen-people consciousness goes back to Winthrop’s “City on a Hill” sermon, delivered before the celebrated Puritan set out from Southampton for these parts in 1630.

But as long as this credenda goes unquestioned, nobody is going to change the direction of American foreign policy in a way that responds imaginatively to the realities of the 21st century. Chief among these is parity among nations, notably those of the West and non–West.

To put this question in a useful context, one of Donald Trump’s supposed original sins, committed during his presidential campaign in 2016, was his full-frontal disavowal of our exceptionalist ideology. “I don’t like the term, I’ll be honest with you,” he told a Texas audience. “I don’t think it’s a very nice term: ‘We’re exceptional, you’re not.’” Three years later, when the fight to defeat Trump’s re-election bid was fully joined, the man now named Biden’s national security adviser published a spirited argument “for rescuing the idea of American exceptionalism” in The Atlantic. Jake Sullivan’s was “a case for a new American exceptionalism
 as the basis for American leadership in the twenty-first century”.

All that flows from the White House, the State Department, the Pentagon and the national security apparatus over the next four years will reflect this belief. But how does one reconcile all the talk of partnerships and common cause with “global leadership,” another of the Biden people’s running themes? When the next president declares that “America is back,” you have to read into the statement to grasp the true meaning: “It’s a team that reflects the fact that America is back. Ready to lead the world, not retreat from it. Once again, sit at the head of the table.”

America has long required enemies to maintain its spot at the “head of the table”, the Cold War being the case nearest to hand. So far as one can make out, China and Russia, America’s twin Beelzebubs, are to serve as the Biden administration’s primary organising principles. To be noted in this connection: Strategic rivalries with the Chinese and Russians were the primary topic at a NATO foreign ministers meeting in Brussels this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s last before Blinken replaces him.

Blinken and Sullivan are now preparing to enlist the Europeans, India and numerous East Asian nations as the U.S. conjures a new and dangerous Cold War with China. This is, of course, a straight-out continuation of the ultra-hawkish Pompeo’s cause. But Pompeo hasn’t got very far and neither will Team Biden. None of the Asians, not even the ever-loyal Japanese and certainly not congenitally non-aligned India, wants anything to do with an animated anti–Chinese coalition. Even Taiwan does not want confrontation; it wants protection. None of these countries desire to turn the region into another decades-long flashpoint.

It is now confirmed that Biden will extend the new START accord with Russia, due to expire early next year. This is wise, and one hopes Biden will go further on nuclear-arms reductions. But to the president-elect’s people this is an arms-control question, not a matter of U.S–Russian relations. These will not improve because Biden’s national security team are packed with Russophobes (including Joe himself). Antony Blinken, whose father was a noted advocate of dĂ©tente, is vigorously of the view that ties with Russia can be repaired only if Moscow accepts unequal relations in which Washington sets the terms. Bill Clinton tried the same thing to no avail. Ditto Barack Obama.

Will the Europeans re-enlist in this front in the new Cold War? One seriously doubts it. If Trump’s four years made anything clear in trans–Atlantic relations, it is that the continent no longer wishes to be force-marched into another of Washington’s anti–Russian crusades. Emmanuel Macron has been consistently outspoken on this point over the past couple of years. It is true the French president nurses a de Gaulle complex, but he is simply more forthright than others in expressing what is on a lot of European minds.

It was commonly assumed until last week that, along with the Paris climate pact and the WHO, Biden would also bring America back into the many-sided accord governing Iran’s nuclear programs. The assassination last Friday of Dr. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh complicates things, but it was highly questionable whether Biden and Blinken would have made the move even if Iran’s top nuclear researcher hadn’t been murdered (almost certainly by Mossad). Biden, like almost all other American pols, is simply too close to Israel, which has made its objections to the nuclear agreement abundantly, belligerently clear.

So we’ve now got Sullivan saying “yes, we’ll get back in with other signatories — providing Tehran meets ‘these follow-on agreements’” — which are understood to be an awful lot like Pompeo’s preconditions, please note. This is an intended-to-fail position — and an easy way out for Biden. Net outcome: hostile stalemate in the Persian Gulf, continuing alienation from the European signatories to the accord, more trans–Atlantic drift.

If only America’s leaders understood that, with the emergence of new powers such as China and India and a new generation of post–Cold War leaders in Europe, ours is an age that requires us to accept — no, embrace — a diversity of perspectives. But our policy cliques, lost in nostalgia, travelling on presumption, and with no decisions to make for the past 75 years, simply cannot read the hands on the clock.

Biden’s “global leadership” will be the same as all previous versions — a polite term for American hegemony. Sullivan, Blinken and Biden’s other national security nominees may put themselves forward as vigorous proponents of partnerships, but look closely: they expect America’s allies to fall in line behind America’s we-know-best dictates. Apostles of exceptionalism can think no other way.


Patrick Lawrence is a longtime columnist, essayist, critic, and lecturer.


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Bullfrog Brown
Bullfrog Brown
3 years ago

Mr Lawrence, you state ‘Biden, like almost all other American pols, is simply too close to Israel’. That kind of comment is repugnant.

Israel is far from perfect, but it is a democratic nation, with a free press & human rights that echo those of western nations. It is vilified at the UN General Assembly by corrupt nations whose values and leaders are a disgrace.

Shame on you .. valueless journalism

David Bell
David Bell
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

“It is vilified at the UN General Assembly by corrupt nations whose values and leaders are a disgrace” – spot on. Also remember that charge in the UN was helped along by the Obama administration. Biden was a prominent member of that administration and his administration is Obama Mark 2. I expect the same mindset to be present!

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  David Bell

I don’t. Biden is not flat out anti-Israel. Obama was. I doubt Biden will be a true ally of Israel but he likely won’t attempt to damage it or its security. Same with the UK, btw. Obama made clear that did not like the UK, Biden has no such leanings.

Sarah H
Sarah H
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

I don’t disagree with your statement but you take a phrase out of context to pull out your own sensitivities on some other point. There is no criticism of Israel in there. You have conjured it. It’s a paragraph that makes a series of steps to make a point. That is what paragraphs are for. It is your issue if you forgot the starting point by the time you reached the ending point. Does this précis help?

“It was commonly assumed until last week that…Biden would also bring America back into the…accord…but it was highly questionable whether Biden…would have made the move [as] Biden…is simply too close to Israel [to do so].

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

the comment also seems misguided. Whatever else Joe’s last boss was, friendly to Israel wasn’t it and that sentiment permeates the party today. Joe’s on record as wanting to bolster aid to the Palestinians, which some may rightfully read as Hamas.

Tom Griffiths
Tom Griffiths
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

With a situation like the USA and Israel, there is no need to engage in rhetoric or give anything resembling a value-judgment. The relatively small nation of Israel has received the largest amount of cumulative aid and assistance given by the US to any country since 1948. The cumulative total is (non-inflated) $146bn.

Israel demonstrates some democratic features, but its systematic occupation and effective takeover of another nation bears some resemblance to the antics of the Soviet Union, roundly condemned by the US as dangerous and barbaric.

And the takeover/ occupation of a neighbouring country (Kuwait) by Iraq not so long ago was followed by its being forcibly ejected by American armed forces. Not a phenomenon I have so far noticed with Palestine.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom Griffiths

Occupation of another nation? Lol. What nation might that be? Might it be a piece of terrain that once was in turn occupied by islamist arabs when they repeatedly attacked Israel?? Try practicing another religion in any of the “islamic republics”.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

Agreed. But we’re supposed to like the mullahs, where Hamas and Hezbollah get their money, and where religious police beat women in the streets if they aren’t wearing a proper body bag, and where “lgbt” folks are stoned and thrown off rooftops.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Christin

Can I be the first to come up with ‘Kamala Hamas’?

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Why not. Add it to your collection of childish nicknames about Diane Abbott, Jeremy Corbyn, Cadwalladr. They’re a riot so far.

Joe Blow
Joe Blow
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Refer to her boss as “Bidet”? You’re welcome…

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Bullfrog Brown

Israel is a theocracy governed by The Chief Rabbis of Israel who are the supreme halachic and spiritual leaders of the Jewish people in Israel with legal authority over all Jewish religious arrangements in the country”that is to say the government does nothing without the approval of The Chief Rabbis of Israel

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

I look forward to the media once again ignoring the extrajudicial drone killings of mostly brown people while lecturing everyone else about racism and bigotry. Iran’s gotta be happy if Joe is indeed sworn in, and China sure is. But, hey; no more of that pesky Orange McBadman and his refusal to launch new wars, which is really what’s important here.

robert scheetz
robert scheetz
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

Yes, I too appreciated Patrick Lawrence’s use of “murder” in place of the usual specious legalism, “target killing”. Nothing polemical about it, these are gangsters structurally indistinguishable from the “El Chapo”s of the world, their characteristic MO the application of mind shattering violence.

matthew.smith.7319
matthew.smith.7319
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

Trump didn’t eradicate Obama’s drone program, in fact he increased it.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

‘The president-elect’s ‘global leadership’ is a return to the same old failed policies of Obama and Clinton.’

You forgot to include George W(MD) Bush and, arguably, his father, but that aside we have known this from the moment Biden was ‘fixed’ into the nomination and then fraudulently ‘elected’ president. Anybody who voted for Biden knew they were voting for more bombing and military adventurism etc. Meanwhile Trump – the first president not to start or enlarge a war since Carter – is universally hated by the US media. This is because the US media needs the money of the Military Industrial Complex to survive, and because the Democrat Party is largely funded by the same people.

The only time the US media supported Trump was when he lobbed a few missiles at a Syrian airfield in 2017. Brian Williams, a presenter on MSMBC described the footage of said missiles being fired as ‘beautiful’ – three times. These people are sick.

I think it was the Socialist Jimmy Dore who said, a couple of days ago, that Biden’s mob would be attaching LGBTQ rainbow stickers to the bombs they drop. That more or less sums them up.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

“Meanwhile Trump – the first president not to start or enlarge a war since Carter – is universally hated by the US media. This is because the US media needs the money of the Military Industrial Complex to survive, and because the Democrat Party is largely funded by the same people.”

That is only a very minor factor in the media hatred of Trump. They hate Trump because he is not beholden to the media, having risen against their obstruction, and because he is an unsavory character who upsets their delicate sensibilities and provides opportunities for ‘virtue signalling’ when they denounce his crude, incautious language.

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

Indeed. What a horrid person to actually express his feelings openly. Please, let’s return to poll-tested carefully scripted political speech. Honesty is rare in politicians and Trump’s “lies” were usual huckster exaggerations that the public discounted but confused the press. Few politicians ever address the public without their script. How refreshing to have one talk for an extended period, openly.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Hardee Hodges

Run that by me again. Trump’s lies were all ok, because they were ‘huckster exaggerations’ 🙂
And that’s a good thing in your opinion? A huckster for a president.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

One can hardly complain much of a politician lying when it seems to be the profession’s stock in trade. Certainly not while considering the fabulists of Russiagate.

naomi.miname
naomi.miname
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

They’re all hucksters. Trump was just more open about it.

vince porter
vince porter
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

Trumpism is alive and well and it will come back stronger than before with a more mature leader better able to articulate the ideas so necessary to foreign policy and industrial strategy.

Alex Wilkinson
Alex Wilkinson
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

It doesn’t matter if you start wars and kill millions to the illiberal media, as long as you tick the right diversity boxes and have a bland, inoffensive and ultimately impotent ‘personality’.

Appearance is all to virtu-signallers.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Wilkinson

Interesting that impotent is the word you land on. Does that make Trump ‘virile’ ? Was it his pvssy grabbing skills that impressed you so much?

Stephen Murray
Stephen Murray
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Didn’t you see Bidet in action?

Alex Wilkinson
Alex Wilkinson
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

I didn’t mean sexually impotent. I’m sure you knew that.

Interesting that you’ve jumped on a sexual interpretation.

matthew.smith.7319
matthew.smith.7319
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

We only had his boasting as evidence, which isn’t actually proof of anything. Your boy Clinton was however impeached for lying on deposition about receiving oral sex from an intern, which he brushed off as ‘managing his anxieties’. This has clearly influenced Creepy Joe, who unwinds by feeling up pre-pubescent girls. Classy.

Dan Martin
Dan Martin
3 years ago

One of the policy successes of the Trump administration is the unprecedented peaceful agreements between Israel and some of its Arab neighbors. This was made possible because we actually listened to Middle East leaders and found out what they wanted, which was to stop enabling Iran through a corrupt deal made by Obama and to leave the Palestinians behind if they continued their recalcitrance. That you evidently want to return to what was not working with Iran, and wish to re-establish a Middle East policy in which Palestinians have the veto, tells me that it is perhaps you who should pull the blanket of American exceptionalism from your eyes.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Dan Martin

I don’t believe Biden will be able to return to the JCPOA. For one thing, Israel will continue to remove military and nuclear threats in Iran. The JCPOA isn’t a treaty and it isn’t even an executive agreement. It also was never signed. You are correct that Trump sidelined the Palestinians as the focus of all the problems in the Middle East. That’s too far gone now for Biden to be able to put it back at the top of the list. The Palestinians should have made a deal over the decades they could have. It’s probably too late now. Other countries in the ME are far more concerned about Iran as a threat and Israel as a business partner to worry about the Palestinians.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

How very depressing, that at a moment like this we should see the great Republic slip back into that awful world of mendacious politicians, as personified by Joe Biden Esq, and his cohort
of inadequates, such as Ms Polossi and others too numerous to mention.

For an Englishman attempting to penetrate the miasma of US politics, it was so refreshing to see a maverick, complete outsider like Mr Trump actually triumph against all the odds four years ago. To hear the howls of anguish from the self proclaimed US elite was sheer nectar, and only served to confirm Mr Trumps message of “drain the swamp”! Sadly it is now rapidly refilling.

Off course had all this occurred after a gravure election process, it would be churlish of me to complain. However, as the entire world witnessed, the election has been a national disgrace, (much to the amusement of us in Arcadia, it must be said).

However at least we can look forward to BI Stealth Bombers, and geriatric B 52’s flying over Arcadia in the not too distant future, as they set off to start another mini war.

.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

“To hear the howls of anguish from the self proclaimed US elite was sheer nectar” .

I should start of collection of these expressions when I see them here. It’s a real insight into a particular mindset. One that’s often hidden behind more socially acceptable motives.

(As an aside Mark, how does someone who fawns over every aspect of English elite society get to be so bitter about their American cousins? Is it a nouveau riche thing?)

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

I would hardly call one of the world’s oldest democracies “nouveau riche” would you? However a little schadenfreude is only human.

I’m glad to see you have no illusions about the People’s Republic of China, all is not lost then

If this was the CCP we would both have been liquidated long ago!

joelmellinger
joelmellinger
3 years ago

with the emergence of new powers such as China and India and a new generation of post”“Cold War leaders in Europe, ours is an age that requires us to accept ” no, embrace ” a diversity of perspectives

I don’t think genocide of the Uighurs is a perspective we should embrace.

Peter Branagan
Peter Branagan
3 years ago
Reply to  joelmellinger

The Chinese attitude to the Uighurs was triggered by mass slaughter of Han Chinese by ‘terrorists’ from among the Uighur community. You have clearly bought in to the racist propaganda daily stirred by the the Western MSM at the behest of the military/industrial complex and some governments – mainly the US and the UK. Since 1990 these same Western governments have killed (or cause to be killed, (read Iraq and the wider Middle East) and incarcerated far, far more people than the CCP which leads a much larger population. Not to mention the 10 of millions dead since 1970 due to their insane ‘War on Drugs’
Since 1990, the same CCP is reasonably considered to be the most efficient and capable polity in modern times, if not, in all of human history. 600million people have been raised out of abject poverty and they plan to raise that figure to over 900million by 2035.
The technological progress and improvement in wellbeing in China is simply breathtakingly impressive.
Never before in human history have so few contributed to the benefit of so many in so little time.
And don’t write back about what price freedom. The UK is a virtual police state with more CCTV cameras per head of population than any other on Earth (with facial recognition being rolled out). Every phone call and data exchange monitored by GCHQ and/or the police. The rate of incarceration is nearly as appalling as that icon of liberty – the almighty US of A. Freedom of association is effectively restricted by a plethora of woke laws that effectively mandate who you can hire, what you can say, what you can smoke, No BAME in your intimate circle effectively means you’re classified as a racist and thereby unemployable. Every ad, every drama on film or TV goes through the woke mangling machine.
Freedom my ar*e.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago
Reply to  Peter Branagan

“The Chinese attitude to the Uighurs was triggered by mass slaughter of Han Chinese by ‘terrorists’ from among the Uighur community.” So France is also justified in mass internment, sterilisation and enslavement of its Muslim citizens?

Peter Branagan
Peter Branagan
3 years ago

So, you too have bought into the racist war mongering propaganda spewed out by the Western MSM.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Peter Branagan

How about answering the question?

robert scheetz
robert scheetz
3 years ago
Reply to  Peter Branagan

Yes, nothing could be more demonically absurd than the US pose of moral superiority, …unless it be Israel.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  robert scheetz

Dangerous talk Mr Scheetz, you’ll have Bullfrog Brown on your back and perhaps even Kevin Ryan.

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
3 years ago
Reply to  Peter Branagan

Ah yes, benevolent dictatorships can be excellent at building a society using other people’s money and inventions. They need not be bothered by unions, social safety nets, abiding by international trade rules, minimum wage arrangements. They pick and choose who will be become wealthy prospering from direct state support. And certainly compliant citizens will be happy being happy because alternatives are strongly discouraged often disappearing for awhile or forever.

And when we compare the various wars created by the free world lets not lose sight of how China enjoyed a brief moment of freedom until Mao reformed society. A lot of people have paid an extreme price to allow the Chinese to prosper.

Exactly why does China need all it’s newest armaments and bases around the world? Why is it that they wish to buy many natural resource sources?

I just hope the Biden team are aware of a pending problem.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Hardee Hodges


China enjoyed a brief moment of freedom….’ When was that? It seems to me the Chinese had almost continuous civil war punctuated by foreign invasions from the middle of the 19th century until the Communists finally won in 1949 and fought the US to a standstill in Korea a few years later. War is not freedom.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Peter Branagan

You seriously think that China’s form of government is something we should aspire to? A totalitarian police state where facial recognition is now commonplace and a “social credit system” is being rolled out to ensure 100pc compliance at all times. Where millions of people are placed in internment camps for “re-education”. It’s people already go about in fear of being denounced by their neighbours and technology is making it worse all the time. China is turning into a dystopian nightmare, a land of passive frightened drones.

I thought I’d heard some wacky theories from the head cases on here, but you win First Prize this week.

Obviously you’re right about it’s success in raising it’s people from poverty. And yes it’s a fantastic logistical and technical achievement to be able to maintain such rigid control over 1,4 billion people. But I can admire the efficiency of a chicken gutting machine, without thinking “I want to be a fvcking chicken”.

Don’t get me wrong, some of the points you make about the West are valid. Our democracies are far from perfect and we should rightly be concerned about all moves against our personal freedoms. But the reasoning jump from there to ‘lets be China’ is flabbergasting. What’s next, let’s be North Korea because of how well they do marching ? Get a grip Peter, you think in China you’d even be permitted to say 1/4 of what you say right here?

Christin
Christin
3 years ago

Another one-world globalist heard from. If only we could all just get along. Science is real. Everybody is racist. We’ll tell you what to think. This “author” says Israel “has made its objections to the nuclear agreement abundantly, belligerently clear.” Gosh and golly gee willikers. Imagine the audacity of the only democratic nation in the Middle East objecting to the development of nuclear armaments by Iran, whose state charter calls for the “eradication of Israel”! The nerve of them! Yet the Joe/Blow team will try to immediately start the flow of funds to Hamas and the mullahs. As for the PRC, well, they own Biden and his son. Biden has been feeding at the federal trough for all of his life. Have any of you folks looked at his residences? Anyone wonder how that happened?

William Gladstone
William Gladstone
3 years ago

I dont really recognise this as real division, its a show put on by globalists to pretend there is much difference between China or India’s worldview and US Globalists worldview.

The USA as a country formed in the rational enlightenment with a healthy democracy is a far better way to govern (exceptional) than a human rights defying communist china, a strict identity based caste system such as India or any number of Islamic authoritarian regimes. Unfortunately Biden and his identity politics loving ilk have far more in common with the rulers of china, india or islam than they do with a freedom loving meritocratic liberal democracy.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago

“The USA as a country formed in the rational enlightenment with a healthy democracy” is MY definition of exceptionalism. Most other countries were formed from nationalities or existing borders. The US, almost alone, was formed primarily around the idea of individual liberty.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

The US, almost alone, was formed primarily around the idea of individual liberty.
we’re about at the point where irony burns.

Steve White
Steve White
3 years ago

I do think the author is correct in that the cabal of warpigs are back in office, and no doubt the war drums will continue to beat and the pro-war elites on the left and right are salivating for some conflict where we poor ruled over class can go send our kids over to get their legs blown off in endless meddling all around the world. But I don’t think the author understands the situation here in the US. Much of the middle class no longer believe America is exceptional and should be meddling all over the world. There is an epic level of distrust of the federal government now, and an epic level of distrust between each other on the left and right now. These fools have literally broken America. Things are not going to just move forward the way they think they are. The thing is broken. The will is not there. It’s all forever changed.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Steve White

I would say that it’s more that Americans have become anti-war. Trump ran on bringing the troops home from all over the world and I hope he does as much of that as possible before leaving office. I doubt Biden will continue to bring troops home but at least it will be harder to justify sending them back. We should bring all the troops home.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Steve White

‘Much of the middle class no longer believe America is exceptional and should be meddling all over the world.’

But it was the white, male middle class that elected Biden, massive fraud notwithstanding.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

‘But it was the white, male middle class that elected Biden….’ They were afraid of Trump, too. Biden: foreign war; Trump: civil war. Foreign war preferred because further away.

Daniel Björkman
Daniel Björkman
3 years ago

All perfectly true, and unfortunate. But still a step in the right direction. Any suggestion that Trump is some kind of humble and reasonable everyman is ridiculous. His vision for America is that it should be like himself – a spoiled brat who can do whatever it wants with no consequences. If he doesn’t want world leadership, it’s because leadership requires taking responsibility. Why bother with that, if you can have everything you want without it? I don’t particularly want Biden to be the semi-benevolent God-Emperor of Earth. But it beats having Trump wielding unchecked power when and only when it suits him.

Perhaps after another four years of business as usual, America will be ready to actually consider the possibility of abdicating the throne and being just one country among others. But keep in mind that that will mean following someone else’s lead on occasion. It means admitting that you don’t always know best. Are you even capable of that? Because sometimes I wonder.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

So you would prefer more wars under Biden than no new wars under Trump? You would prefer to see the 200K manufacturing jobs lost under Obama/Biden than the 500K manufacturing jobs created under Trump? (Those figures come from Megyn Kelly, an independent journalist who is no fan of Trump).

A Spetzari
A Spetzari
3 years ago

Whilst I think an isolationist America is a very dangerous thing for the world, when it mattered the Trump administration was far more successful in 4 years on key foreign policy issues than Obama was in 8. I say that as an Obama fan.

The Trump administration:

– Showed Russia/Syria that there are red lines in how they were prepared to wage war.
– Facilitated landmark agreements between Israel and the Gulf States.
– Achieved landmark talks with North Korea, bringing them somewhat in from the cold.
– Ended the farce of trying to appease Iran – which was only expanding its influence across the Middle East

You mention America abdicating the throne – which is more or less what it has been doing under its previous two administrations. Only the last one didn’t start anything new, but made sure America intervened when required. Surely you can begrudge it that, despite not liking the man in charge.

I feel people get caught up in the man and the circus surrounding him (tweets, comments, liberal reactions to both) rather than seeing what was actually done in actions.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  A Spetzari

Yes, Trump probably achieved more in foreign policy terms than the last four or five presidents put together. And, as we have said, he did not start or escalate any conflicts. The problem is that war is good for ratings so the US media eggs on the war machine and downplayed or simply ignored Trump’s successes. And the low-information ‘norms’ who voted for Biden just believe what the media tells them.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

I doubt if it is the ratings that entice the media. Rather, it is the desire of the important people of the media to be close to the other, even more important people; consiglieri to the capo di tutti capi. This has been true for a long, long time.

Andre Lower
Andre Lower
3 years ago

Magnificent comment, Daniel!

Tom Adams
Tom Adams
3 years ago

What an abject comment. If the US ceases to be the pre-eminent power, the CCP will fill the void. Happy with that?

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
3 years ago

“Trump wielding unchecked power” – Impossible given how US government operates. He made a lot of noise but rarely took action that negatively affected the nation.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

In a nutshell. When he won I hoped that ‘loud dumbass’ was only an act, a TV persona . But no, Trump is genuinely dumb to the core.

Frederik van Beek
Frederik van Beek
3 years ago

If it’s true that US-exceptionalism will be the main theme under Biden than the world as a whole will become a less peaceful place (or may be it’s better to say: more agressive) because exceptionalism means that one or more collective enemies are needed to uphold the exception in the propaganda-machine. If you don’t hate there can be no exceptionalism.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

It’s a bit ironic that American exceptionalism (something Obama could never utter) is somehow good, but making America great again is bad.

Mel Shaw
Mel Shaw
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

My reading of ‘ make America great again’ was that it was about rebuilding the economy, not imposing American values (whatever they are) on others.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Mel Shaw

That raises the irony level even further, doesn’t it? The people against the rebuilding are all about exporting American might.

Mel Shaw
Mel Shaw
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

It does. Exporting American might is potentially a short term answer to the rise of China. Regenerating the economy would be harder, but more effective in the long term. But politicians rarely do long term (except in China).

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Mel Shaw

You think MAGA actually meant something? You don’t think it was an empty populist slogan with a stirring but essentially (and deliberately) vague message that enabled people to attribute whatever they liked to it?

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

It’s precisely as ironic as MAGA was somehow ‘good’ but exceptionalism is somehow ‘bad’ (which is what the article claims)

John Ottaway
John Ottaway
3 years ago

From what I am hearing around and about the web, in corners far away from mainstream media, Biden will never actually be inaugerated. Trump will win his legal challenge against the massive election fraud that has gone on across the US swing states. To get a more accurate fix about what is actually going on in the US right now , and nothing in the mainstream about all of this stuff, check out and subscribe to Donald Trumps Youtube channel.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  John Ottaway

There was undoubtedly massive fraud, and this is now being exposed in various courts etc. And we knew there was going to be. As Biden said, a few days before the election: “We have put in place the most extensive voter fraud operation in US history”. It’s on film and it was the only truthful and coherent thing he has said for years.

But whether Trump wins his legal challenge is another matter.

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
3 years ago
Reply to  John Ottaway

Sadly, the die is cast. The fraud will eventually be revealed and may affect the next election. But the train has left the station for Biden.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  John Ottaway

“in corners far away”

John, you use that phrase to indicate your in-depth alternative research, beyond where the gullible sheeple go.

Unfortunately, what it translates to, in the real world, is “way down some wacky conspiracy rabbit hole”

Here’s a very simple reality check. Go to YouTube. Don’t type anything. Scroll down the page. If among the suggested videos you find anything like Pizzagate, flat earth, CIA, lizard-people, deep state, sandy hook cover-up, the algorithms have diagnosed you as a conspiracy nut. Check it and see.

David Bell
David Bell
3 years ago

You mean we are heading back to the old way of doing business.

Unfortunately the best thing Biden can do is quietly slip away and give the next generation the baton.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago
Reply to  David Bell

Um…..Kamala Harris? God, NO.

Mel Shaw
Mel Shaw
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

Biden won’t last four years healthwise, so she is what you will get, probably sooner than you think.

David Bell
David Bell
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

A very unpleasant thought I agree but I’m afraid we may have to put up with her for a year or two. Let’s face can she be any worse than Biden’s Brezhnev impersonation.

JC McL
JC McL
3 years ago

“But as long as this credenda goes unquestioned…”
Such confusing of plural with singular (credendum) jarringly impugns the credibility of the the whole article. It’s like listening to a fundamentalist politician say “this criteria,” or “this phenomena.” A literate editor is in order, here.

Stephen Murray
Stephen Murray
3 years ago
Reply to  JC McL

Seeing the growing trend, particularly among Americans, to confuse past and present, singular and plural, and generally mangle the English language, that’s to be expected.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago

20 years ago the US Presidential election was closely contested. Arguably stolen. The new administration arrived with an aggressive foreign policy that was not fully completed. The ultimate aim of the invasion of Iraq was to use Iraq as a launch pad for the invasion of Iran. For the last 4 years the architects of that policy have suffered a US President elected on policy commitments that included ending foreign wars. Congress was forced to vote to deny the President the right to reduce troop commitments abroad. General Milley said that the US military would ignore instructions from the US President and make its own assessment of overseas troops requirements. During the last 4 years, the US military, US intelligence services, US arms manufacturers and almost all of the US MSM have aligned to remove this President from office and replace him with a man with so many skeletons in the closet that he will do their bidding. An attack on Iran may come sooner than anyone expects. Say 2023.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

Hopefully the US will be able to extract high troop levels from the Middle East prior to Inauguration Day. Troops in Germany should also be reduced and some moved to Eastern Europe. It will be tough for Biden to send troops back which is a good thing.

voodoopolitics
voodoopolitics
3 years ago

“Russophobes”. How Kremlin. It’s impossible to take this “opinion” seriously. It’s all a lot of words to say “Please be nice to Putin”.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago
Reply to  voodoopolitics

This is particularly ironic given the abuse rained on Trump at the merest, unsupported suspicion that he was not sufficiently hawkish to Russia.

Robin Bury
Robin Bury
3 years ago

Yes Obama is back with his pomposity and superior lecturing. Don’t let’s forget both Obama and Biden left unelected Al Malaki in power in Iraq to ethnic cleanse the Shia people. Then they lecture us on human rights. Hypocrisy is their forte.

Adrian Smith
Adrian Smith
3 years ago

Trump was not immune to the disease of meddling in things he did not understand and shooting first and asking questions latter – remember the missile strikes in Syria following the fake gas attack?

I do agree though that Trump was probably one of the least worst post cold war presidents.

Michael Cowling
Michael Cowling
3 years ago
Reply to  Adrian Smith

At least as far as international affairs go this may well be true. And he was right that removing red tape helped the economy grow. But on another topic today there has been lots of gnashing of teeth about the British countryside, and I expect that we’ll here more of that in the US soon, as a result of his removing red tape. I’m not sure about some of the trade-offs.

robert scheetz
robert scheetz
3 years ago
Reply to  Adrian Smith

Under siege by the Deep State his whole term, he tried to reduce the pressure by periodically throwing the dogs of war a slab of raw bloody shit-hole-country human meat. The Trumpean version of blood sacrifice to appease an angry god on the cheap.

voodoopolitics
voodoopolitics
3 years ago

And loving the comments. One would think that America invented war. I guess Obama invaded Ukraine. If not, who invaded Ukraine? One fails to learn the answer from this author. It appears that he believes the world would be a kumbaya peace utopia if ONLY America stopped being so mean. Let’s not forget the Old World Order before World War II and how wars used to be fought. Hint: ethnic cleansing used to be perfectly legal.

Andrew Baldwin
Andrew Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  voodoopolitics

No, Voodoo, Obama didn’t invade Ukraine, but he did help sabotage an EU-brokered agreement that would have led to early presidential elections in Ukraine, almost certainly removing the incumbent president from power. Instead Obama opted to support the unconstitutional removal of Yanukovych from power by the Ukrainian Rada to be replaced by a pro-NATO, anti-Russophone government. This inevitably led, although Obama was too clueless to see it, to the Russian takeover of Crimea and the tragic civil war in Ukraine that persists to this day. The so-called President-Elect’s choice to be Secretary of State looks at all this, the massive number of dead and wounded in the civil war, the ruin of the Ukrainian economy, the huge economic losses to Russia because of economic sanctions and decides that all is good. “NATO was dramatically re-energized by Russia’s intervention in Ukraine, led by the United States.” Let NATO be strengthened, whatever the cost in human suffering. Blinden isn’t a demented old clown like Biden, but he certainly suffers from a warped moral vision.

Lazarus Roth
Lazarus Roth
3 years ago

I’m just still amazed that there would be any preconditions the Iranians would have to meet to restart the JCPOA. They weren’t the one’s who walked away from it. We reneged on the deal.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Lazarus Roth

No, we really didn’t. The JCPOA was not a treaty or even an executive agreement. Nor was it ever signed. Had it been a treaty, I’d agree with you but it wasn’t. Plus, the facts on the ground have changed in 4 years. Most of the Middle East is against Iran, not on its side. Countries have far more at stake now in peaceful dealings, particularly with Israel. Love or hate Donald Trump he vastly changed the Middle East by making the US energy independent as well as by sidelining the Palestinians as the main focus. Lastly, actions taken by the US and Israel, through various sanctions as well as bombing nuclear facilities, targeting military leaders and nuclear scientists in Iran will make it much harder for Biden. Which was, of course, the point of some of them.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Mar a Largo? (Not sure if I’ve spelled that correctly).

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Somehow I don’t see Trump in the Keys.

G Harris
G Harris
3 years ago

For me, this piece started well pointing to the power of words, rhetoric and euphemism, as formerly deployed by the master orator himself, Obama, to devastating effect in order to essentially deceive a nation, or at least the part he knew he reliably could, and then after that it goes all horribly woolly and wonky.

Igor Stankovic
Igor Stankovic
3 years ago

I love the title of this, pretty much intellectual, article. Actually, I don’t, but it is amazing.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

Lawrence ties himself in knots here trying to explain how Trump did the world a favour by abdicating it’s place on the world stage. He pretends that China and Russia are invented ‘required enemies’ when we’ve just watched them take advantage of the power vacuum over the last 4 years. I applaud Trump’s stand on Huawei (Tiktok mystifies me) though I wonder how Lawrence squares that with his story. It’s utter hypocrisy by the Right to now adopt some hippy flower-power position rather than admit that democracy needs to be defended.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

But why only by the United States?

Allan Edward Tierney
Allan Edward Tierney
3 years ago

It appears impossible for Biden or his people to accept the geopolitical realities that are as clear as day. What must inevitably follow on from this heavily blinkered approach is not going to be glory but increasing confusion due to failure and ultimate humiliation. In 2007 Vladimir Putin made a speech to the assembled dignatories of the western world offering cooperation and agreement while stating that the future would herald a multipolar, not a unipolar world. His offers to work with all other nations for the betterment of mankind were ignored while his words regarding the inviolate sovereignty of Russia and the need to embrace the coming multipolar world made him persona non grata for western elites determined to maintain their dominance in perpetuity. Now, 13 years later Biden and his people CONTINUE to push for western elite dominance to the near exclusion of all other powers. This is a tragic mistake. And it will not be China nor Russia that suffers most from it, it will be the United States of America.