Under-reported: Change in Saudi Arabia
The focus on Daesh and other conflicts within the Middle has meant that the unprecedented changes in Saudi Arabia have gone largely unnoticed (Credit Image: via common dreams.org)

Having long campaigned to bring Daesh to justice for their genocidal crimes, the UN resolution in September committing to investigate and prosecute Daesh was very welcome.

The next stage is ensuring that the international community does actually work together to hold these terrorists to account, and the eyes should now be on how each individual country responds to the terrorists returning to their home countries, including to Europe.

Saudi Arabia’s shift in its politics, economics and interpretation of Islam will have repercussions within the region.

The focus on Daesh and other conflicts within the Middle has meant that the unprecedented changes in Saudi Arabia have gone largely unnoticed. The statement from the Saudi Crown Prince that he plans to return the country to a liberal Sunni Islam has set the country down a path to modernisation and liberalisation.

From small steps such as allowing women to drive, to major infrastructure projects like the $500 billion economic zone along the Red Sea, the changes afoot in Saudi Arabia will shift the power balance within the country and the region, from the ultra-conservatives to those who want to see it fit for a future where it isn’t reliant on oil.

Saudi Arabia’s shift in its politics, economics and interpretation of Islam will have repercussions within the region. In the West, that could be seen a positive, but in the Middle East it could lead to further tension and conflict.

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Introduction to this Under-reported series.

Summary guide to all under-reported articles in this series.

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