by Peter Franklin
Monday, 24
October 2022
Reaction
11:30

This is not a globalist coup

There is no need to dip into conspiracies to explain the return of Rishi Sunak
by Peter Franklin
Not a WEF puppet. Credit: Getty

I bet he wishes he hadn’t bothered now. Over the weekend Boris Johnson flew back from the Caribbean to take part in a Tory leadership contest that had started without him. But having come all that way, he abruptly withdrew from the race — despite claims he had enough MP support to get through to the next stage. 

His most fervent supporters are apoplectic. Nadine Dorries insists that “it will now be impossible to avoid a GE [general election]”. The logic here is that only Boris has a democratic mandate because only he was leader at the last election. But as Dorries knows very well, ours is not a presidential system — it is the MPs who make up the parliamentary majority who have the  mandate. 


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However, some Right-wing commentators are taking the democracy argument to a whole new level of wrong-headedness. For instance, here’s Martin Daubney attacking Steve Baker for backing Rishi Sunak instead of Johnson: 

https://twitter.com/martindaubney/status/1584111983258873856?s=61&t=A7MORG4EPtriHEtRb-DhXQ

The WEF is the World Economic Forum — often referred to as “Davos” (the Swiss ski resort where the organisation holds its highly exclusive annual conferences). I’ve written about the Forum before (for instance, here, here and here) and it should be obvious I’m not a fan. 

However, the idea of a “WEF coup”, whether against Boris Johnson or Liz Truss, is ridiculous. More to the point, it is utterly redundant. We simply do not need a shadowy conspiracy to explain the downfall of the last two Tory leaders, we just need to realise that Conservative MPs are able to read opinion polls.

Furthermore, the collapse in Conservative support was clearly self-inflicted. No one forced Downing Street to hold a series of drink-sodden parties in the middle of lockdown. And as for the Truss government, no one compelled it to spook the markets with a long list of unfunded tax cuts.   

Of course, the establishment’s usual mistake with conspiracy theories is to take them literally but not seriously — when it should be the other way round. Thus loose talk of a “WEF coup” ought to be interpreted as shorthand for the ability of the global money markets to bring down a Prime Minister. Surely this is an affront to democracy?

Paul Embery — neither a Right-winger nor a conspiracy theorist — is concerned that “the belief that financial markets cannot be challenged… will become embedded in our politics.”

It’s a reasonable point, but a democratic mandate does not entitle a Prime Minister to unlimited credit. If a government doesn’t want to be subject to the verdict of global financiers, then it shouldn’t borrow from them. He who lends to the piper calls the tune.  

If conservatism can be summed up in just three words, it is these: “there are limits”. But neither of our last two Prime Ministers are conservatives. Like the liberalists they are, they believe in the unbounded self, unconstrained by reality. Each of them, in their own way, applied this philosophy to their time in government — which, ultimately,  is only reason for their successive downfalls. 

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Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 month ago

Morgan Stanley and many other market commentators are this morning predicting lower interest rate hikes by the Bank of England than previously forecast. This is due to Hunt’s tax and energy support u-turns “providing space for a less aggressive move”. Dealing with inflation via tax hikes and spending cuts creates different winners and losers than doing so via interest rate increases. This is not a market move. This is an institutional decision, which will objectively protect highly geared asset owners. The BoE has been able to sidestep responsibility for its abject failure to manage inflation in line with its supposed mandate, and has managed to pass the buck, and the bill, to the UK government and households.

Last edited 1 month ago by Stephen Walshe
Aaron James
Aaron James
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

BoE Created this inflation, they are wrong 100% of the time.

The choice is destroy the workers by inflation, or destroy the equity and Bond market by QE. Both bad – but I would say cause the recession to attack inflation although it means massive job loss – because UK Spent the Money, and now it needs paying back. If the Debt is not addressed the crash ahead just gets worse. UK is staring a ‘Sovereign Debt Crisis’ (hyperinflation) in the face, now is time to tighten.

David Giles
David Giles
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

“Highly geared asset owners”. You mean like every hard-working man and woman with a mortgage?

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 month ago
Reply to  David Giles

Inflation is running is 10%, wage inflation is at 6%, and the bank rate is just 2.25%. Meanwhile, the tax measures announced by Hunt has left the UK with one of the least competitive tax systems in the OECD. The only tax cut left in place – to stamp duty – will prop up property values. Go figure.

j watson
j watson
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

It’s v debatable whether UK tax rates are so out of kilter with other developed nations, esp in western Europe. We still compare well with Germany for example. The difference in productivity warrants much more considered and thoughtful analysis. Germany, just as an example, has many problems but some things we can learn too.
It will no doubt irritate but Brexit and the suppression of trade with our nearest and biggest trading bloc has had much more impact on us than tax rates. The drop in tax take from GDP reduction a much bigger issue.
But you know it takes a long time for folks to appreciate they bought a pup and usually a hardcore double down and remain in denial pretty much for ever. Nonetheless gradually we are waking from our stupidity.

Paul Walsh
Paul Walsh
1 month ago
Reply to  j watson

I am pretty much borderline on Brexit, slightly in favour of it until the federal constitution is agreed by the electorate. When did the tax take go down, apart from the financial crisis and lockdown?

Aaron James
Aaron James
1 month ago

”However, the idea of a “WEF coup”, whether against Boris Johnson or Liz Truss, is ridiculous.”

It is pure Globalist WEF that got Boris to bankrupt the nation over a treatable flu (with regular medications – which they also forbade using to force the vax)

”Sunak was previously appointed as UK’s Chancellor of Exchequer from 13 Feb, 2020 to 5 July, 2022”

Don’t you fools see that all this economic woes are caused by Sunak? Hunt, Boris and Sunak did it – you mad Brits – appointing your abusers to rule you again. Stockholm syndrome? Your savings are toast – your pensions wrecked – so its ‘Thankyou sir, may I have another’? You people are crazy!

j watson
j watson
1 month ago
Reply to  Aaron James

The decision was made by 357 Tory MPs. Arguably not a v representative cohort currently.
Now if us Brits were actually given a chance…

martin sanders
martin sanders
1 month ago
Reply to  Aaron James

What gives you the idea that we had any choice at all in the appointment of Truss or Sunak? Why the f*** we ever chose Johnson, I’ll never know… What difference do you think the Starmer opposition would have on UK politics? They’re all puppets to the same globalist masters.

Mike Michaels
Mike Michaels
1 month ago

The clip of Rishi extolling the virtues of CBDC’s is widely available on the internet. Couple him with CCP asset Hunt and it’s social credit system, health passports and you in a digital prison. Good night.

Richard Reeve
Richard Reeve
1 month ago

The World Economic Forum (WEF) is not hiding its plans for the future, it’s not a conspiracy theory. Anyone can go and read their globalist plans for 2030 and beyond. Even respected news publishers have suggested that Rishi Sunak should try a technocratic system of governance. He is a huge believer in a national digital currency which will usher in a Chinese-style social credit score. This plan should never be allowed to happen because it gives Government far too much power over the individual and society as a whole. Personal liberties can’t exist hand-in-hand with an all-powerful government. This here is the main ambition of the WEF with each nation being a partner. If you want a better vision of what the world will look like when these elitests have taken control, go and watch any of ‘The Hunger Games’ movies.

shaun campbell
shaun campbell
1 month ago

This was indeed a Coup d’etat. The only solace I take from all this is that the Tories will never see power again. Hopefully, in time, they weed out the Lib Dems that have infiltrated the party and get back to being an actual Conservative party.

M. M.
M. M.
1 month ago

Peter Franklin wrote, “However, the idea of a ‘WEF coup’, whether against Boris Johnson or Liz Truss, is ridiculous.”

The idea is ridiculous, but Rishi Sunak (who just won the intraparty election to become the next prime minister) will betray the British majority, which voted for Brexit. He supports expanding immigration to supply labor to multinational companies. Expanding immigration is diametrically opposed to the core reason for Brexit.

Also, Sunak will yield to demands (from the Indian government) to open the border to Indian citizens as a condition for completing the free-trade agreement.

Of course, Sunak will refuse to take steps toward distancing the United Kingdom (UK) from the United States.

By 2040, the United States will cease being a Western nation, due to open borders. By 2040, most Americans will reject Western culture, and Hispanic culture will dominate. In California, 40% of the residents are currently Hispanic. Most residents of the state already reject Western culture, and Hispanic culture dominates.

Just as Sunak will betray the British majority, the non-Western American government will betray the British government (along with the British people).

Making Sunak prime minister is tantamount to returning the UK to the European Union.

Get more info about this issue.

Jean Davis
Jean Davis
1 month ago
Reply to  M. M.

The US will not go down without a fight. Don’t count us out yet. I believe the reporting of the red wave you may have heard about will surprise many. And we are just getting started.

Richard Reeve
Richard Reeve
1 month ago
Reply to  Jean Davis

You’ve just answered the question without realising it. Did you know that most Hispanic communities vote conservative? It helps to explain the Red Wave.
Just because crackpot Biden might have let them in, it doesn’t mean that all Hispanic’s will now only vote democrats. Especially when the democrats want to sexualise children and make all kids Trans and when democrats want abortion to be a contraceptive.

Ralph Hanke
Ralph Hanke
1 month ago
Reply to  M. M.

Careful, now. Hispanic is very much a western culture. Just not Caucasian. Which may be good or bad. Hard to say, I think, as I’ve met some nasty white chicks and some pretty decent ones too …

Paul Walsh
Paul Walsh
1 month ago

Agreed, it is just our political system. The Conservative party is thrashing around to find a leader that won’t lose them too many seats. Global lockdowns caused bond markets to rise in early 2020 and they have carried on up. This leads to increased interest rate rises on top of the inflation that also comes with lockdowns. Turns out that recessions aren’t that popular. Someone must be blamed.

Last edited 1 month ago by Paul Walsh
Aaron James
Aaron James
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul Walsh

Agreed, it is just our political system”

But that is because the political system is 100% Captured by the Corporatocracy Oligarchs WEF. They are going to take all your wealth so you become state clients and have to vote for them to get your bowl of State gruel.

Paul Walsh
Paul Walsh
1 month ago
Reply to  Aaron James

That is a different subject, by conspiracy or idiocy they haven’t done great. I just agree that we don’t vote for a president, but a party. I am not inspired by any of our lot, would be happy with an energy policy that doesn’t involve unicorn power for starters.

martin sanders
martin sanders
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul Walsh

They haven’t done great? Sh*t, where aren’t you looking? And how can it be a conspiracy theory? They openly state their plans, and the WEF membership contains by far the majority of power and wealth. You’d have to be an absolute fool not to take them seriously at their own words.

  1. The WEF are openly proud that they’ve infiltrated and captured many western governments.
  2. They have strict overt and covert, blanket censorship of social and mainstream media, of anything that threatens the going narrative, and easily cancel any voice of dissent, including, during the health pandemoniemic, the most internationally respected, rational, ethical, medical professionals in several relevant fields of frontine healthcare.
  3. They’ve captured world health, and are currently tightening their grip on it.
  4. They’re attacking farmers and vital agriculture.
  5. They’re behind the de-industrialisation of the West.
  6. They’re the only answer as to who is pulling the strings of EU/Western sanctions on energy, fertiliser and grain, not only with the obvious intent to impoverish their own populations, but to also create widespread famine by also sanctioning the shipping of all grain or fertiliser to the 3rd world.
  7. An obvious prediction is that these famines will have the heavily spun narrative of being the result of climate change, as they progress with their sick plan.

Haven’t done great? Their idea is to totally collapse us, to make life and society f***ing appalling for the vast majority. How else could they make us receptive to their great reset agenda. It’s the ever classic, but elaborate array of, problems, reactions, solutions.
The problem is, that many just won’t wake up until the end game, even despite the momentum it’s already showing. At least it’s showing to anyone who’s prepared to drop their preconceptions and genuinely look at what’s going on as a whole.

Mike Michaels
Mike Michaels
1 month ago
Reply to  Aaron James

Somebody gets it.

Hendrik Mentz
Hendrik Mentz
1 month ago

The Naked Emperor argues differently in his most recent Substack, worth a read I believe >> https://open.substack.com/pub/nakedemperor/p/wef-king-to-appoint-the-wef-prime?r=520ll&utm_medium=ios&utm_campaign=post

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 month ago

YES!!!

martin sanders
martin sanders
1 month ago

I really don’t think you’re viewing the gloabalist coup broadly enough. . . . . The WEF has many leaders and cabinet ministers schooled as “WEF Young Global Leaders of The World”, and they have an abundance of power in politics, business and finance.
The European sanctions of fertiliser and grain being shipped to the 3rd world is causing shortages in parts of Asia, South America and Africa. This is going to cause massive famine and kill milions, if not billions of people. Why? Well it’s based on the lie that it will hurt Russia, and slow down its military machine.
Not only is the idea that it’s morally justifiable to starve entire 3rd world nations, to slow down the enemy in a war that the entire US led West have provoked and fueled, by empowering and fully backing [email protected], all kinds of wrong, and insanity, from every possible angle, it has to be seen for what it is.
The narrative will be that these famines will be caused by climate change, and used to further push their agenda on us. Anyone speaking against the narrative? Well we know what happens to them. Conspiracy theory? Well let’s bear in mind that it’s turned out of late, that many conspiracy theories have ended up being pretty accurate spoiler alerts to actual conspiracies.
Please dispute this if you can, I’d love to be wrong, but not by avoiding the fact that the West is intentionally starving much of the 3rd world. The reckless attacks by many gov’ts on farmers and agriculture, or the intentional energy supply sanctions that is clearly going to kill people, crash societies, and collapse economies.
The globalist coup is not about displacing any individual leader, except perhaps Corbyn, as they all serve the corporate interests with equal vigour, because those that don’t, like Corbyn, are taken out of the equation. The Right and the Left in UK politics, as in the US, is utterly meaningless. We all have a common enemy in the globalists. “You will own nothing and be happy”, “You will have no privacy, and be happy”, there will be masses of “useless eaters”. Seriously, we need to wake the f*** up!
My personal feeling is that the WEF is just another arm of the US deep state, as is the EU, NATO, and to a large extent, the UN. The US is too powerful, and if the WEF were a threat, or even just didn’t suit US interests, the CIA would have collapsed it a long time ago.
The globalist agenda is, I feel, just the next level of US/elitist hegemony, but whatever or whoever is/are the main string pullers, I don’t comprehend how anyone that’s looking, can call the notion that we’re in the midst of a globalist take over attempt, as a conspiracy theory.
The usual answer to all of these interconnected woes is down to political incompetence. This is a ridiculously weak excuse just on a national level much of the time, but when it’s seen unified across the West? C’mon, 8yr old school kids could work a lot of this out for themselves. Starve Africa to weaken your enemy in Russia? There’s only one sane answer to that question, but the whole of the Western alliance is choosing the opposite insanity.
This is extreme fascism. “Oh, I didn’t think about all the black and brown people starving to death in their millions, I was righteously focused on Russia’s economy to bring a halt to their ‘unprovoked’ and ‘illegal’ invasion” . . . . No, that doesn’t wash at all. The sanctioning of wheat and fertiliser to the 3rd world is the worst war crime imaginable, and is set to kill far more people through famines, than will ever die in the Ukraine conflict itself.
Edit – Oh, and “an affront to democracy”? What democracy?

Last edited 1 month ago by martin sanders
Iris C
Iris C
1 month ago

“Drunk-sodden parties”!
They were staff parties for colleagues’ birthdays and before breaking up for Christmas which, I am sure, was happening in offices all over the country. It is a tradition. Also catching a virus and having a party is a conflation of two different facts. One has no influence on the other.
That is why I believe the different media outlets need to have licences with a code of conduct attached, so that it is unable to peddle political bias to the extent it did in this case, bringing down the elected Prime Minister..
Nevertheless, Boris had had his day and, I believe, his support for Liz Truss (who was completely unsuitable) showed a lack of judgment – friendship trumping ability.
I doubt if he got more than 53 votes from sitting MPs, and his claim (out of the blue) to have more than a hundred backers was only a case of saving face.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 month ago

Sense at last!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 month ago

oooh dear ! what will all those Kent and intra M25 toylitories do neow? A breown man… without cruets, and settees? .. Thank God for Rishi!!

Rick Hart
Rick Hart
1 month ago

We had a “breown man ” as Chancellor of the Exchequer briefly. Stop gaslighting.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 month ago
Reply to  Rick Hart

Gaslighting? I have no gas lights?!

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 month ago

A bit of a straw man exercise here. The world depicted in “Send for the fish knives, Norman as Cook is a little unnerved” has long since vanished. Indeed there are probably only a small section of the population who would recognise my quote left. Even when I worked within M25 some years ago any sane Tory had no problem with people of different skin colour. Indeed the only time I heard John Major speak was at a dinner I was invited to by an Indian solicitor.

Last edited 1 month ago by Jeremy Bray
Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 month ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Betjeman?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 month ago

Yes! a hero of mine!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 month ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Not Bryan Strawman.. yes… know him from the golf club… works at Aon Re… see him on the train up from Bromley….!!!!!

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 month ago

Good! that bait cast into veritable toylitte settee leounge waters.. 33 bites! .. I have the fishes, all I need is the loaves.. and then its lots of knives held like pens “Oops pardon me”?!!!!