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The Alzheimer’s industry Sufferers are paying over the odds — but do the treatments work?

Is Alzheimer’s becoming optional? Leah Nash for the Washington Post

Is Alzheimer’s becoming optional? Leah Nash for the Washington Post


May 2, 2024   7 mins

In a leafy London suburb, there’s a smart little clinic that promises miracles. Run by Dr Andrew Greenland, an NHS consultant in emergency medicine, the Greenland Centre claims to be able to do something that the drug industry has failed to, despite spending billions on research over several decades: “Reverse the cognitive decline of early Alzheimer’s disease.”

The centre runs a protocol which claims patients can expect to see results within six months. And, according to its website, “to maintain improvements and prevent further cognitive decline, participants should consider the program as a long-term prospect”. This miracle treatment — the Bredesen Protocol — doesn’t come cheap. Patients are charged almost £3,000 for their first three appointments with any additional consultations costing another £475.

But with questions hanging over the effectiveness and harms of the two new Alzheimer’s wonder drugs, lecanemab and donanemab, expected to arrive on the market soon, any treatment that claims to reverse cognitive decline would be worth paying over the odds for. And right now, people are queuing up to pay. There are 21 practitioners and centres across the UK offering the Bredesen Protocol — or treatment plans based on his approach — charging anywhere up to £6,000 for consultations. Two say they are at “capacity”: suffering patients and their families are desperate to find something that might help their loved ones.

Desperation feeds exploitation and the Bredesen Protocol has been described by some scientists as quackery. The Alzheimer’s Society UK told us the regime was “not supported by scientific evidence”, while in Canada it is described as “offering ‘false hope”; and across various medical journals, academics suggest its use and promotion is ethically questionable.

Dr Dale Bredesen, however, claims that Alzheimer’s is “literally becoming optional”. A professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at UCLA, he has identified the 36 multifactorial “contributors” to the disease, and targets them “with a precision medicine type of approach”. This involves regular brain-training exercises, stress reduction plans and a ketogenic diet.

Deborah was diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment aged 49 and told she was likely to develop Alzheimer’s. She had been having difficulty recognising people’s faces and switching words for a few years. After her sister-in-law discovered Dr Bredesen’s protocol, she signed up and was prescribed a plant-based diet, with virtually no red meat and plenty of intense exercise which she does on her Peloton bike. “All of a sudden, my brain started to work clearly. It was like the light went back on,” she says.

But mild cognitive impairment — MCI — is not the same as dementia. It refers to memory glitches which may be noticeable but don’t affect the person’s ability to function. Alzheimer’s Research UK says that about one in 10 people who have been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment develop dementia each year. However, they also say that five in 10 will either stay the same or get better, with their memory returning to normal. Memory problems can be triggered by all manner of things: depression and anxiety, vitamin deficiencies, thyroid disorders — even some types of medication and being generally unwell, for example with a chest infection. Nonetheless, stories such as Deborah’s have been used as the basis of the evidence that the Bredesen Protocol works.

Another is Bredesen’s “Patient Zero”. She was so depressed about her symptoms and prognosis that she had been saving up prescription pills to end her life. “I was so desperate at that point,” she says, “that I just wanted to check out.” She contacted Bredesen anonymously because she was afraid of losing her security clearance in her job. And after three months on the protocol, she noticed a transformative change. “I was just running around the house saying ‘I got my brain back I got my brain back.’ I was just so overjoyed,” she says. Convinced this proved the protocol worked, Bredesen reported her as a case study in a paper published in 2014.

When we wrote to Dr Bredesen saying his protocol had been described as “quackery”, he sent us this case report along with other research papers that he claimed provided the evidence for his treatment plan. He highlighted his medical qualifications obtained from some of the most prestigious establishments, that he’d worked in famous Nobel Prize-winning labs and had more than 230 peer-reviewed publications. “Few clinicians, and no reporters, understand the fundamental science that underpins what we are doing,” he says. “I doubt if any has read all of our publications.”

But according to Rob Howard, professor of Old Age Psychiatry at UCL, Bresenden’s claims are largely based on poor science that no reasonable practitioner would consider indicates efficacy. “He doesn’t really have any data that’s worth debating with him,” he says.

Indeed, the research that Dr Bredesen produced for us highlights problems with the way this sort of material is published and disseminated. He sent links to three studies, which he had previously referred to as “anecdotal reports” — the least reliable form of evidence. Another paper referred to the “trial” that clinics point to when they claim: “84% of the patients showed improvement.” But in fact the paper, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, does not prove the protocol works. The 25 patients studied had a mixture of “dementia or mild cognitive impairment”, and given that many patients with MCI improve by themselves, we would expect to see improvements over time, regardless of treatment.

“He doesn’t really have any data that’s worth debating with him.”

In any case, because the protocol uses multiple interventions, even if we did see genuine improvements, we would not know whether it was the simple advice that “worked” (prioritise sleep; eat a plant-rich diet; exercise for 45 minutes six days a week) — or if it was the complex regime of herbal supplements, “brain training”, “gut healing nutrients and digestive enzyme support” along with, for some patients, naltrexone (a drug used to treat opioid addiction and alcohol dependance). Bredesen’s conclusion that “it is possible to reverse cognitive decline in MCI and early dementia with a personalised, precision medicine” is astonishing, given that the nature of their study design meant they could prove no such thing.

Meanwhile, Bredesen has put these 230 peer-reviewed studies on his CV and is using them as proof that his method works, pushing out lucrative clinics across the country. The trouble is, just as not all studies are created equal, nor are medical journals. There’s a dark underbelly in medical publishing which Bredesen has chosen to exploit, publishing in a section of the medical press that might be best described as “predatory journals”. These journals are best thought of as financial scams, says Dr Richard Smith, former editor of the BMJ and author of the book, The Trouble with Medical Journals. The publishers will publish your study for a fee; there is no peer reviewing or editing involved.

In other words, unwary doctors, journalists, patients and families can easily be misled into thinking a published paper in a medical journal is a sign of quality when it may simply be a sign that the author has paid to be published.

“When predatory journals first appeared more than a decade ago, it was widely assumed that authors published in them because they had been deceived,” says Smith. “But it’s become apparent that many authors chose to publish in them because they know that the paper will be published. The authors can put the papers on their CVs, and appointments committees or grant-giving bodies will not know that the reference is to a predatory journal,” he explains.

This isn’t the only place where the medical establishment has opened a rich seam for people such as Bredesen to exploit. Those complicated financial relationships between dementia charities and the drug companies manufacturing the new treatments have proved useful for Bredesen. He has called out the Alzheimer’s Association for praising the medical treatment aducanumab, after it received a significant amount of money from the drug’s manufacturer, Biogen. As Bredesen phrased it: “Well yeah, they were paid over a million dollars. No kidding they thought it was a good drug. It’s been surprising how incredibly powerful the infrastructure of money making is.”

So, how do patients and families work out who is offering treatment that might be worth the money — especially when clinics are run by bona fide, GMC-registered doctors? As we have seen, medical journals aren’t all sound — just because something has been published doesn’t necessarily mean we should take it at face value — and it also seems that those who are supposed to uphold the integrity of medicine might not necessarily be protecting patients either.

We told the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) about the claims Greenland Medical Centre were making in November 2023, who agreed they should be changed and they referred our complaint to the compliance team. However, six months later, Greenland Medical’s website still says they can “reverse the cognitive decline of early Alzheimer’s disease”.

We also raised our concerns with the General Medical Council, the doctors’ regulator, that false claims were being made to a potentially vulnerable group of patients by a registered doctor. The Council refused to investigate, saying “no information has been provided to show that the treatments offered by the doctor are a danger to patients” or that “patient safety is at risk”. They also said that “It does not seem like the information provided that there is clear indication Dr Greenland has been deliberately dishonest about the treatments and what it offers to patients.”

Instead, the GMC told us to raise concerns with the Care Quality Commission, which we did, in November 2023: they have yet to respond.

Dr Greenland told us: “We are prepared to engage with the Advertising Standards Association to ensure that our communications are in compliance and accurately represent the scientific evidence supporting the protocol.” They also stated that “the Bredesen Protocol represents a novel and evidence-based approach to Alzheimer’s treatment”.

There are people in public health medicine who are providing credible, useful work. Professor Carol Brayne, for example, says that we should have a more holistic approach to looking at Alzheimer’s rather than focus on individual theories. “What the clinics are doing is trying to package all interesting hypotheses that are out there,” she says, “as well as sensible stuff that’s been around for centuries and put them all together as a magical prevention package. There is some reasonable stuff mixed up with speculative stuff.”

But the truth is that there is no magic cure, and we should be honest about this and the ongoing need for high quality research. Considering the potential to exploit people, the lack of effective regulation around highly priced but ineffective interventions for people with cognitive issues is deeply troubling. Caring for patients with dementia should also mean protecting them from false, expensive hope. Our regulators need to proactively step up.


Margaret McCartney is a GP and broadcaster. Deborah Cohen is an award-winning, medically qualified TV, print and radio reporter.


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J Hop
J Hop
22 days ago

There is growing evidence that Alzheimer’s is a metabolic disease. Some are even calling it type three diabetes. In fact, having type two diabetes drastically increases your odds of Alzheimer’s. We know how to reverse metabolic disease with diet and lifestyle. However, there is no money in this so I doubt there will be much funding for research.

Damon Hager
Damon Hager
22 days ago
Reply to  J Hop

The trouble is, everyone has a suggestion that “shows promise” or “may work” or “might lead to significant breakthroughs in five or ten years”.
The bottom line is, clinicians don’t really know. When there’s a demonstrably effective, clinically proven cure, we’ll know.

J Hop
J Hop
21 days ago
Reply to  Damon Hager

Good point, however the dietary and lifestyle changes are free. No harm in trying, unless you’re one of those people who fell for the food pyramid propaganda and think processed carbs are an essential nutrient and dietary fat will kill you.
Also, lifestyle and dietary changes don’t take five or ten years to work. They take weeks and months.

j watson
j watson
22 days ago

On this theme, I’d recommend Venki Ramikrishnan’s book ‘Why We Die?’. It’s dense in places on molecular and cellular biology and the latest science but hugely interesting.
Much as Authors here highlight there are some proper ‘snake oil merchants’ out there. Cellular science and marketing claims about the latest genetic discovery are way out ahead of proper longitudinal, peer reviewed research. One example was the establishment by a certain MIT Researcher of Elixir Pharmaceuticals (yep the name is giveaway you’d have thought) bought by Glaxo-Welcome for c£750m and then the science debunked and the ideas quietly dropped.
The other fascinating insight is the apparent evolutionary cellular development in humans that seems to ‘trade off’ potential cancer vs aging. V simply – development on anti-aging might have some unintended consequences.
The ‘basics’ of what you can do to ‘age well’ remain. Having lucky genes clearly helps too.

Drew Gibson
Drew Gibson
21 days ago
Reply to  j watson

Worth having a look at ‘The Dropout’ mini-series. Based on and sticking pretty close to the true story of a multi-billion medical diagnostic startup, Theranos. The company was essentially based on wishful thinking.

Lancashire Lad
Lancashire Lad
21 days ago
Reply to  j watson

Absolutely correct. Given reasonable genes, the rest is mainly down to lifelong habits, not trying to recover from decades of taking too little care of diet and exercise (both physical and mental) without becoming obsessive over either.

j watson
j watson
21 days ago
Reply to  Lancashire Lad

Indeed LL. Nonetheless were it poss to do something about the complex protein cellular issue that seems to drive Alzheimers the consequences for people and health and social care systems would be immense. The science is less clear whether the classic healthy living choices make much difference in this instance, but you can at least load the dice as much as poss in your favour without making the latest snake oil seller rich at the same time.

jane baker
jane baker
22 days ago

In the 1960s nobody had Alzheimers. The old people in my neighbourhood were sharp as knives. Now the words “old age,” and “dementia” are linked together as securely as the words “old” and “poor” are in 18th century tax documents. I think this is yet another example of “create a problem,tell everyone they have it,then sell them the solution”. It’s basically a pile of horse shit.
It’s natural to lose physical strength as you get older,it’s natural to be a little more forgetful,it’s natural to rest more,human life is about Being not Doing.

Damon Hager
Damon Hager
22 days ago
Reply to  jane baker

Life expectancy was markedly lower in the 1960s. Few very old people meant fewer cases of dementia. Now, we routinely see people living into their late eighties, nineties, and even beyond. (My neighbour is 104.)
I was the sole carer for my two dementia-afflicted parents, so please don’t write that this is a “created problem”. It certainly wasn’t one when my father was unable to remember events from five minutes earlier, when my mother was utterly convinced I was her husband (that was fun), or when she saw snakes, dolls and other creatures “walking across the floor”.
Dementia is a plague, for family members as well as patients. The brain physically shrinks and atrophies. It isn’t going to be fixed by a piece of lettuce and a brisk walk.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
21 days ago
Reply to  Damon Hager

“Life expectancy” is not a universal number. My grandmothers reached their mid-90s, one grandfather was close to 90, and the other was past 70 when he died. I’ve been where you were with my mother, who did not live as long as her mother, and no, it was not pleasant.
Is it created, is it the result of how food has dramatically changed in the past 100 years, or is it something else? I don’t know and the alleged experts don’t know, either. I do know mom’s sister lived to 97 with barely a cognitive slip, so something happened. But it’s not a function of longer lifespans.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
21 days ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

This condition–since sometimes the affected individual does not feel “afflicted”, though family and friends probably will–has certainly become more, both in frequency and (of course) sheer numbers. As you suggest, no one truly knows why, at least yet, and there are probably multiple factors at work. I believe one of those factors is the rising prevalence of living past the age of 80.
You’re anecdotal sample size of one (your aunt) has a measure of evidential validity. My grandmother, who died at 94 in 2020 (pre global outbreak), was quite lucid until about age 90, then declined a great deal, though not totally. My grandfather on the other side was a vigorous farmer until about 80, but once he could no longer work in the same way, then had his truck keys taken away by his own children (with good cause), his decline was swift and he had essentially unraveled in the head by the time he died at 88.
It wasn’t rare for people in times past to go senile, whether that would have earned the modern label of Alzheimer’s or not. Circa 1600, when Shakespeare described “last scene of all” of The Seven Ages of Man as being one of “second childishness and mere oblivion”, he was not taking of a new, or rare phenomenon. Perhaps he was, in a grim sense, fortunate to die at 52.

jane baker
jane baker
21 days ago
Reply to  Damon Hager

Well,both my parents kept their wits to the very end and I’m not waving the White Flag to Compassion Blackmail. That was your problem and trial or blessing if being of service and caring for your parents is a noble blessing. Instead of an irritating unwanted imposition.
Yes,back in the 1960s before electric lights and them horseless carriages you was lucky to make 45.

Kat L
Kat L
21 days ago
Reply to  jane baker

I used to visit my elderly relatives in nursing homes in the early 70’s. There were plenty of dementia patients there. One sad lady took off all her clothes and ran down the hall. My own grandpa passed in 1978 with dementia. It existed.

Saul D
Saul D
22 days ago

Did I just read that people are paying thousands of pounds for a therapy that is just do a bit of exercise and eat healthier food?

Susie Bell
Susie Bell
22 days ago
Reply to  Saul D

The help with all this is available for free on YouTube, via interested doctor’s sites.

Peter O
Peter O
21 days ago
Reply to  Saul D

Might just work. When you pay thousands of pounds, you’re probably more likely to stick to the plan. Free advice is considered worthless.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
20 days ago
Reply to  Peter O

Bingo.

Norfolk Sceptic
Norfolk Sceptic
22 days ago

I’ve found the keto diet, with plenty of green vegetables, that includes meat, oily fish, dairy, but no processed food in cardboard packets :), has cleared my mind, for the better, so I can think clearly and enjoy life, rather than just being grateful for surviving. But that’s just me. People are different, so blanket treatments aren’t always possible.

If the Establishment dismisses investigations made outside their bubble, with the NHS continuing to promote a 30% Carbohydrate diet, for all, while still entranced by the ‘pill for every ill’ mantra so loved by the Socialist MIC, the Medical Industrial Complex, no wonder that alternate treatment, outside the state system, can be priced so highly.

But this irrationality is happening in other areas, like the global medical interventions, the multitude of NET Zero policies, and so many more. Sometimes, the current practice needs to be tested: that what having a Science based approach means.

J Hop
J Hop
21 days ago

I’m a health coach specializing in ancestral lifestyles and I approve of this message. 🙂

Kat L
Kat L
21 days ago

I’m hypoglycemic and if I go no carb I can’t get off the floor the next day. Not everyone is the same.

J Hop
J Hop
21 days ago
Reply to  Kat L

True, one size does not fit all but eliminating processed carbs, sugars and seed oils benefits everybody.

David Dansky
David Dansky
22 days ago

Please avoid using the term ‘suffer/suffering’ in relation to people with dementia. That may be your construing, not every person living with dementia see themselves as suffering

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
21 days ago
Reply to  David Dansky

I’m fairly sure none see themselves as thriving. Seriously, THAT is your point?

Lancashire Lad
Lancashire Lad
21 days ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

But he does have a point. It’s often the view of close relations and the ‘care’ industry rather than the person with Alzheimers – and yes, it does matter.

David Dansky
David Dansky
21 days ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

My point is a general point about how we talk about people with a disability, be it physical cognitive (like dementia), or sensory. It’s not on us to judge how someone feels about themselves. Dementia has many forms and people are affected in different ways. (It’s sometimes the family and carers who ‘suffer’ more than the people with dementia)

I work with people with dementia offering various dementia inclusive activities. I see a lot of joy experienced by people with dementia

Johann Strauss
Johann Strauss
22 days ago

The two so-called “wonder drugs”, lecanemab and donanemab, don’t work and have nasty side effects. i.e. no evidence from randomized controlled trials that these are effective, but they sure cost a fortune, enough to bankrupt the only bankrupt NHS!!. As for the Bredensen protocol who knows. It could easily be tested in a randomized controlled trial. That being said, there is nothing in there that is either harmful or expensive, other than the visits to the clinic which are not needed.

Edward De Beukelaer
Edward De Beukelaer
21 days ago
Reply to  Johann Strauss

Maybe if mainstream medicine would provide the basic help for people to help themselves (give the agency rather than telling them what to do) rather than prescribing tablets, there will be less need for these clinics.
When it comes to evidence, this is still a lure many walk into: there is very little good evidence for the efficacy of modern pills…

Susie Bell
Susie Bell
22 days ago

For ‘high quality research’ read big Pharma new meds. My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2021, given drugs, but became worse and is in a residential facility. She is mostly happy and secure there and the staff try hard to keep residents brains engaged with activities but they will not give my mother the vitamins I want her to have because ‘the doctor didn’t prescribe them’. She must remember to take them herself! I also think the nutrition regime is less than ideal as residents are on a constant diet of sugar. Biscuits, cakes, puddings etc. I know the dopamine hit of sugar gives some contentment but long term it is destructive. My Mother and my Father in law (now dead) are/were anxious stressed types and I believe that has been a large contributory factor for their decline. But no one is researching such matters. I am also interested that both of my family members and all of their fellows in the institutions they lived in were war time children. The wartime rations for children were very good and should have sustained them but often a lot of their ration was consumed by adults in the family with the children filling up on bread and jam. Given the current state of children’s diets in Britain I think it is essential that this possible connection is explored.

Lillian Fry
Lillian Fry
21 days ago

The amyloid plaque theory as cause of Alzheimer’s has led us nowhere. There are other theories – herpes virus and gut bacteria for example, but it’s hard to get funding for further study. I believe we will find that Alzheimer’s has multiple causes and there may not be a single cure. Interesting study:
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-023-01824-1

j watson
j watson
21 days ago
Reply to  Lillian Fry

Agree LF.
Hopefully we’ve passed the ‘magic gene we can correct’ stage of sales pitch.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
21 days ago

Having watched a relative take this journey and hearing anecdotal evidence from others, no, the treatments do not work. Not because of malfeasance or incompetence, but because science is not yet and some things remain beyond its reach.
The sudden explosion of Alzheimer’s and dementia is curious, just like the sudden explosion of weird allergies among young people and the increased prevalence of people found to be somewhere on the spectrum, a number big enough that a word was created for this cohort – neurodivergent.
Years ago, they were socially awkward people who were a bit off but otherwise functioned normally. Of course, this was also when kids when bona fide cognitive and learning issues were in special classes, not the mainstream. Today, we’re drugging kids who are perhaps a bit fidgety, because someone apparently decided that never happened before, with no idea of what the prolonged medication will do.

Andrew Daws
Andrew Daws
19 days ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

Obviously neither you nor anyone close to you is neurodivergent otherwise you wouldn’t make such offensive comments

Mangle Tangle
Mangle Tangle
18 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Daws

His comments are reasonable (though a bit garbled), irrespective of whether one agrees with them (which I don’t). They aren’t offensive. Trying to shut down debate by the use of the ‘offence’ word is not constructive.

Robin Whittle
Robin Whittle
21 days ago

According to: https://fastlifehacks.com/bredesen-protocol/ the Bredesen Protocol aims to a attain at a level of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is perfectly healthy: 50 to 80 ng/mL.  25-hydroxyvitamin D is made, primarily in the liver, by hydroxylating vitamin D3 cholecalciferol. This is what is measured in “vitamin D” blood tests. Multiply by 2.5 to get the units used in the UK: 125 to 200 nmol/L. This is much higher than the 20 ng mL (50 nmol/L) which the kidneys need to regulate calcium-bone metabolism, which is the level governments and many doctors think is adequate for health. However, at least 50 ng/mL 125 nmol/L is needed for proper immune system function.

The daily supplemental quantities of vitamin D suggested in the above page are inadequate to attain 50 to 80 ng/mL.

It would be difficult or impossible to reverse neurodgeneration. The most important step everyone needs to take, to greatly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of neurodegeneration is to supplement vitamin D3 in sufficient quantities to attain at least 50 ng/mL 125 nmol/L circulating 25-hydroxyviamin D. With proper vitamin D3 supplementation, many people have half to 1/10th of this.

As I wrote for https://unherd.com/2024/01/the-false-hope-of-the-new-alzheimers-drugs/ :

Please read the research articles cited and discussed at: https://vitamindstopscovid.info/00-evi/ . Regarding dementia: https://vitamindstopscovid.info/00-evi/#3.3

Ayers et al. 2022 https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2113489119 showed that Parkinson’s disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy (MSA) all involve misfolded (prion) alpha-synuclein tangles and that the structure of the misfolding was different in each of these three diseases.

Ogura et al. 2021, in Japan https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405650221000617 showed that MSA sufferers averaged 10.5 ng/mL (26 nmol/L) circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and that PD sufferers averaged 13.4 ng/mL (34 nmol/L), while healthy controls averaged 27 ng/mL (67 nmol/L). PD does not lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D, so the causality is from low 25-hydroxyvitamin D to neurodegeneration. (p = 0.0001).

The immune system needs at least 50 ng/mL (125 nmol/L) to function properly. This cannot be attained with the UK government’s lousy 0.015 mg (600 IU) a day recommendation for supplemental vitamin D3.

Inadequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the greatest single preventable cause of human disease and other forms of ill-health, in all or almost all countries. Only a fraction of the Earth’s population have the 25-hydroxyvitamin D they need for full immune system function. They get it from UV-B exposure to ideally white skin (only possible year round near the equator, and it always raises the risk of cancer, since it damages DNA) and/or from proper amounts of supplemental vitamin D3 cholecalciferol. There is nowhere near enough vitamin D3 in food to raise 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels to more than a fraction of what the immune system needs.

Most medical professionals are not at all interested in this. Important research which challenges their drug, vaccine and surgery centric view of improving health is like water off a duck’s back. Likewise immunologists.

https://vitamindstopscovid.info/00-evi/#00-how-much includes New Jersey based Professor of Medicine Prof. Sunil Wimalawansa’s recommendations https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/14/14/2997 for vitamin D3 supplemental intake to attain at least the 50 ng/mL (125 nmol/L) circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which the immune system needs to function properly. As he noted in a recent FLCCC webinar, these are ratios of body weight, with higher ratios for those suffering from obesity: https://odysee.com/@FrontlineCovid19CriticalCareAlliance:c/Weeekly_Webinar_Aug16_2023:d?t=3386 This is because people suffering from obesity convert less vitamin D3 into circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D than normal-weight people.

The average daily vitamin D3 intake should be:

70 to 90 IU / kg body weight for those not suffering from obesity (BMI < 30).
100 to 130 IU / kg body weight for obesity I & II (BMI 30 to 39).
140 to 180 IU / kg body weight for obesity III (BMI > 39).

For 70 kg (154 lb) without obesity, this is about 0.125 milligrams (5000 IU) a day. This takes several months to attain the desired > 50 ng/mL circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D. This is 8 or more times what most governments recommend. “5000 IU” sounds like a lot, but it is a gram every 22 years – and pharma grade vitamin D costs about USD$2.50 a gram ex-factory.

Neither vitamin D3 nor 25-hydroxyvitamin D are hormones – they are not signaling compounds. Calcitriol functions as a hormone when it is produced by the kidneys. In immune cells, when calcitriol is produced, in response to the detection of a cell-type-specific condition, in intracrine (within a single cell) signaling, it acts as an intracrine agent, by altering the transcription of genes (and so the protein production and overall behaviour) of that individual cell. This is unrelated to hormonal signaling. The common statement that “vitamin D is a hormone” is completely incorrect – Vieth 2004 https://sci-hub.se/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2004.03.037.

Robin Greenhalgh
Robin Greenhalgh
21 days ago

Regrettably medicine is all about treating symptoms and making money. Big pharma has infiltrated everywhere and sells the idea that only they have the answers, only they are science and everything else is rubbish, quackery or dangerous and doctors follow them like sheep because that is what they’ve been taught to do. Some wake up and realise that big pharma just lie and falsify tests to sell their latest inventions : vioxx is an example. Pr Even and Pr Debre in France published a directory of the 4000+ medicines on sale in France and about 50% are either useless or dangerous but their sales are about 15 billion a year. The placebo effect is almost as strong as the drug itself. What pharma should be forced to do is put a success rate on their packaging so if it’s only got a 30% chance of success and the side effects aren’t too bad you might decide to take the risk, but if death/suicide is one of the side effects you might decide not to.

anna m
anna m
20 days ago

We signed up to a Bredesen practitioner here in NZ to help my father with his rapid onset dementia.
It cost us tens of thousands, but we were desperate to help dad.
We ended up firing the practitioner because we felt fleeced. His knowledge of the research did not appear to exceed what we had already learned from reading widely in the literature.
We implemented a bunch of things ourselves: a clean keto (largely carnivore) diet, hyperbaric oxygen, light therapy, supplements.
A year ago my dad couldn’t hold a conversation and was suffering delusions. Now he still forgets some words, but can converse with clarify. It’s like he is back in the room. It’s wonderful, and hopefully he has some great years ahead of him.
The knowledge required to achieve this should not be so prohibitively expensive. I would feel sick charging desperate people so much. I just don’t understand how they can charge so much. All the information is publicly available in the literature (especially if you use SciHub).
To anyone out there with a loved one suffering from dementia – please consider that there may be a lot you can do with diet and lifestyle. It takes work, but doesn’t need to cost a fortune.

Lindsey Thornton
Lindsey Thornton
19 days ago

What a very strange headline photo but it does reflect the rather dystopian fears surrounding dementia; and why I think more people want to see assisted dying legalised as they’ve given up on Big Pharma finding the magic pill.
When my mother was diagnosed with dementia in 2015 I became her main carer and immediately registered for a series of workshops at the ‘Contented Dementia Trust’ in Burford to learn the SPECAL Method (Specialised Early Care for Alzheimer’s); it was a revelation, no need for drugs, the treatment is designed around the person with dementia having a disability which can be managed successfully with highly personalised care with the family in charge, led by the person with dementia, so no need for medical ‘professionals’ or drugs. And this is why The Alzheimer’s Society hates this small charity and has proscribed the SPECAL Method, even though they initially funded the research. You can find out more on the website: http://www.contenteddementiatrust.org or read about it in Contented Dementia by Oliver James. My Mum lived very well at home with dementia for 5 years after diagnosis before going into a care home where she soon settled in because she had none of the usual anxiety associated with dementia. Here is something that truly works and doesn’t cost a lot, just time and effort for me to get on her wavelength and understand that I needed to change my behaviour towards her because of her disability, rather than carrying on as before waiting for ‘the cure’.

Andrew Daws
Andrew Daws
19 days ago

‘Bresenden’s claims are largely based on poor science…’
is the author also a sufferer?

Lindsey Thornton
Lindsey Thornton
19 days ago

What a very strange headline photo but it does reflect the rather dystopian fears surrounding dementia; and why I think more people want to see assisted dying legalised as they’ve given up on Big Pharma finding the magic pill.
When my mother was diagnosed with dementia in 2015 I became her main carer and immediately registered for a series of workshops at the ‘Contented Dementia Trust’ in Burford to learn the SPECAL Method (Specialised Early Care for Alzheimer’s); it was a revelation, no need for drugs, the treatment is designed around the person with dementia having a disability which can be managed successfully with highly personalised care with the family in charge, led by the person with dementia, so no need for medical ‘professionals’ or drugs. And this is why The Alzheimer’s Society hates this charity and has proscribed the SPECAL Method, even though they initially funded the research. You can find out more on the website: http://www.contenteddementiatrust.org or read about it in Contented Dementia by Oliver James. My Mum lived very well at home with dementia for 5 years after diagnosis before going into a care home where she soon settled in because she had none of the usual anxiety associated with dementia. Here is something that truly works and doesn’t cost a lot, just time and effort for me to get on her wavelength and understand that I needed to change my behaviour towards her because of her disability, rather than carrying on as before waiting for ‘the cure’.

William Edward Henry Appleby
William Edward Henry Appleby
18 days ago

As long as there is someone (with backup) who can give very focused, person-centric care, then I would tend to endorse what you say.

V Solar
V Solar
17 days ago

This is a reply to Jane Baker (the site would not allow me to reply directly for some reason)
‘it’s natural to be a little more forgetful’
How fortunate you are to have had no experience of Alzheimer’s disease.
My mother had it for five years before she died. Clearly you have no idea how serious and how awful it is. Our brains do more than remember people’s names or where we left our keys. Our whole sense of self is made up of long term memories, you need access to them to know who you are, where you are in time and who other people are in relation to you. You need short term memory to orientate yourself real-time in the world around you, i.e to know where you are, what’s happening to you, to keep hold of what someone has just said to you or what you yourself have just said to them. A short term memory that lasts 1 minute gets you nowhere. Brain damage affects all a person’s relationships as ability to recall words to make complete sentences becomes impossible. All parts of the brain can be affected including the brain stem that affects metabolism, leading weird eating patterns or inability to swallow, signals relating to bodily awareness such as bowel movemments and urination are lost which undermines dignity and there can be severe sleep disturbance, people wander around and get lost. In the later stages the symptoms of Alzheimer’s make it impossible for people to express psychological, emotional or physical pain which sometimes causes them to lash out violently.
This kind of mental decline is absolutely nothing like age related forgtfulness. It is more like a slow motion decay of a person’s consciousness. It is devastating for the sufferer and for their family and friends. It’s as if the body of love you share is rotting like a corpse right there in front of you and you’re desperate to stop it happening but you can’t. It is a cruel, horrible illness and the experience of caring for someone undergoing it is hearbreaking. The ignorance of your comment made me want to scream and cry. All I can say is visit a demential ward and see for yourself why people will do anything to stave off this terrible disease.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
13 days ago

Incisive journalism which provides a model example of critical thinking. Thank you.