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Israel is still winning the political war From the West to Saudi Arabia, its days of isolation are over

A protestor in Tel Aviv (JACK GUEZ/AFP via Getty Images)

A protestor in Tel Aviv (JACK GUEZ/AFP via Getty Images)


January 24, 2024   6 mins

Even if its form is military, war is always a political struggle. And in spite of all the anti-Israel demonstrations around the world, Israel is definitely winning the political war — the real one, waged not in the streets but in the foreign ministries of adversaries, neutrals and allies.

How times have changed since 1967, when socialist Israel still enjoyed the enthusiastic support of global “progressives”, but was so diplomatically isolated that it received no support at all from Europe or America when openly threatened with war by Egypt, Jordan and Syria. Before launching its pre-emptive attack, only France had been willing to sell weapons to Israel, but Charles de Gaulle stopped all further sales as soon as the fighting started. In Rome, meanwhile, a cargo of gas masks headed for Tel Aviv was intercepted at the airport, even though Egypt’s occupying force had recently killed many in Yemen with phosgene and mustard gas.

For Israel, however, the greatest penalty of its diplomatic isolation was the inevitability of the UN Security Council imposing a ceasefire as soon as it started to win. In 1967, this came after only six days of fighting. Israeli forces had just fought their way up the steep tracks onto the Golan Heights when they had to stop. I was there myself, eager to visit Damascus when the Soviet Union found itself unopposed at the Security Council in demanding an immediate ceasefire.

It was much the same during the Yom Kippur war of 1973. Caught by surprise by simultaneous offensives from both Egypt and Syria (overconfidence is definitely an Israeli trait), the Security Council did nothing as Israel suffered 10 times as many casualties as in all of the Gaza fighting to date. Moreover, when the US finally agreed to airlift urgent supplies, neither the UK nor France nor Spain would allow its transport aircraft to fly over their airspace. Only Portugal permitted a refuelling stop in the Azores, and even US supplies stored in Europe had to be flown there before being turned around to Israel.

But once again, as soon as Israel was able to overcome initial defeat, the inactive Security Council suddenly became active. With Britain just as vehement as the Soviet Union — which was desperate to stop the rout of the Arab armies it had lavishly equipped and trained for years — the Council powers tried to impose a ceasefire on 22 October. The Israelis tried to fight on regardless, but were forced to stop two days later when Henry Kissinger decreed a nuclear alert in response to Moscow’s threat to intervene with its airborne forces.

At the time, the British and French were fiercely determined to gain the favour of the new oil nabobs who were such good customers for both Bond Street jewellery and jet fighters. As for Washington, whose foreign policy was entirely shaped by Kissinger, nobody wanted to bother with Israel, then still a poor country that had to spend one quarter of its GDP to rebuild its battered forces. This time, 50 years later, it has all been very different. The US, UK and European Union did not try to stop the Israeli counter-offensive against Hamas. The US found itself unimpeded in sending military supplies, while the Italian government came out in full support of Israel.

On the other side, in UN venues highly suited for empty words, Russia and China both ceremonially declared their support for the Palestinians. Yet Moscow has continued to co-operate smoothly with Israel’s air force as it operates over Syria to attack Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, while not one Chinese partner has withdrawn from any joint venture in Israel. Nor did the rising calls to reduce the bombardment of Gaza, led by Belgium of all countries and eventually backed by the White House, have any actual consequence — Israel’s bombing was reduced in any case by the diminishing supply of worthwhile targets.

Likewise, not one of the Arab countries with whom Israel has diplomatic relations has interrupted them in any way, while relations with Egypt have blossomed into a veritable security partnership over Gaza and Sinai. Even more important are the statements of Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister, who has made it clear that normalising ties with Israel will not long be delayed once the fighting ends. Even though intelligence exchanges and multiple technology joint-venture negotiations have been underway for some years without any need for official relations, such assurances cannot be overestimated: they are, after all, definitive evidence that Hamas’s assault on October 7 has failed.

The purpose of that deliberately horrific attack was precisely to stop any alliance between the Saudis and Israelis. That was certainly the goal of Iran, which has every reason to dread the fusion of Israel’s technology with Saudi Arabia’s financial resources: Tehran rightly fears this would entail some form of military co-operation, which in turn might bring Israeli air power within a short distance of its Iranian targets.

For now, though, Saudi Arabia’s declared goals are more prosaic. Just like the world’s venture capitalists, the Saudis believe that joint investments in Israeli tech will be profitable. But far more important is Israel’s proximity, which can greatly facilitate the training of Saudi engineers, technicians and skilled workers — thus achieving progress towards the central aim of putting Saudis to work and ending its reliance on expatriate labour. For Israel, it scarcely matters that the Saudis want a quiet Gaza ruled by reliably corruptible Palestinians, just as in the West Bank, before they start investing their billions; after all, the Israelis themselves obviously need some sort of political arrangement to retreat from Gaza without more rockets being launched the day after.

Israel’s diplomatic success is not just due to its changed economics however: its high-tech military equipment has arguably been more influential. It is the reason, for instance, why India has emerged as a steadfast ally, as it relies on Israeli tactical missiles for both its air and naval forces, along with much else. It is also the reason why the Pentagon does not begrudge military aid to Israel — it benefits from a constant backflow of valuable technology, including famous helmet-mounted display at the core of the F-35 fighters that now equip the Air Force, Navy and Marines.

Of course, such high-tech weaponry did nothing to prevent the October 7 attack, but it has proved itself since. Almost 10,000 Hamas rockets have been intercepted by the Iron Dome, avoiding many deaths and much damage, while a full-scale ballistic missile made in Iran and launched from Yemen was intercepted by an Arrow 3 out in space — mankind’s first instance of space combat. More prosaically, relatively few Israeli soldiers have been killed in Gaza, both a result of their training and their sophisticated equipment.

Nothing could be more extreme than the contrast between Israel’s economic, technological and military strength and the chronic political paralysis afflicting the nation. But in this, modern Israel is also different. The day before Hamas’s attack, Israel was just about the world’s most divided country, torn bitterly between antagonistic camps that could not form a coalition government. But immediately afterwards, an instant coalition mobilised more than 230,000 civilian reservists, only to discover that, at a number of bases, the troop count was distinctly larger, because reservists over the age limits also turned up, some from as far away as Silicon Valley. There was even talk of calling in the military police to send these extras home, surely a first for an institution more usually tasked to return deserters to their units.

Yet no amount of wartime unity will remedy the political tumult — particularly over Gaza and the West Bank — that will return as soon as the fighting stops. Indeed, the Biden administration has been trying to exploit this division to induce the Israelis to accept a ceasefire, counting on the increasingly vocal demands of the hostages’ families to give up all other priorities and liberate them from their agony. Meanwhile, on the other side, an entire battalion of Israeli reservists, who had been withdrawn from Khan Yunis to be demobilised, staged a protest to denounce any reduction in the offensive. They were duly reprimanded for protesting while still in uniform.

Faced with nationwide Israeli support for the war in Gaza, Washington can still take solace in the respect it has earned thanks to the President’s unequivocal backing following October 7. After all, even the hardest of Israeli hardliners knows that US support might again soon be in demand, as it tries to drive back Hezbollah’s forces across the Litani river. Moreover, Biden’s demand that the Palestinian Authority be installed to govern Gaza has much support within Israel as well, simply because of the lack of any other alternative. For now, however, such a conclusion is still a long way off. The necessary ceasefire prelude to every post-war plan is still being held up by Hamas, which demands full control of the entire Gaza Strip, as if it had just won a war. So long as it persists, the Israeli army can continue its war — knowing that, this time, its days of isolation are over.


Professor Edward Luttwak is a strategist and historian known for his works on grand strategy, geoeconomics, military history, and international relations.

ELuttwak

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Chris Whybrow
Chris Whybrow
3 months ago

Maybe Israel would be a lot more isolated by their allies if it weren’t for their nuclear arsenal, and America sending aid to the local military dictatorships and absolute monarchies.

Robert Pruger
Robert Pruger
3 months ago

Excellent article! Right on most points regarding winning the diplomatic war, as opposed to the publicity war. One nit though.
In regards to U.S. foreign policy and the Yom Kippur War, it was a joint affair between President Nixon and Kissinger, with Nixon dominant. Nixon ordered U.S. military aid to Israel over ridding Kissinger’s reluctance. After Nixon made the call for aid, he followed up calling Kissinger to be sure the military weapons were in flight. Prime Minister Golda Meir opened an Israel cabinet meeting with a prayer of thanks to Nixon. Give credit where credit is due.

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago
Reply to  Robert Pruger

Any discussion of the 1967 War and the US’s reaction to it that doesn’t start and end with the USS Liberty atrocity is beyond ignorant. Nixon and Kissinger’s reaction to it proves just what duplicitous, traitorous scum they were – happy to excuse the murder of 34 US crew members and the injury of 171 others.

Marianne Kornbluh
Marianne Kornbluh
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

This attack was a terrible error as Israeli and US investigations concluded.

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago

The immediate investigations were a whitewash. Intercepted Israeli communications show beyond doubt it was their plan to destroy the Liberty.
https://ifamericansknew.org/media/misslib.html

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Sure they were. YOU know the real truth. Got it.

Micael Gustavsson
Micael Gustavsson
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Nixon & Kissinger was not in government in 1967.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Really? That ship (no pun intended) sailed a long time ago, despite the best efforts of hatemongers like you.

Alan Elgey
Alan Elgey
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

LBJ and Dean Rusk? Or was it oppotunuistic comments when out of office which nevertheless saw Nixon elected?

John Riordan
John Riordan
3 months ago

I am very cheered up by the news that Saudi Arabia intends to normalise diplomatic relations with Israel as soon as possible. This triumph has been overdue for years and the greatest tragedy of the 2023 Israel Palestine war would have been the destruction of this prospect, had it happened.

That said, it’s not as if there aren’t enough tragedies involved even without that big one. I continue to pray that Israel wins quickly and decisively as possible, in order to return some sanity to the world.

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
3 months ago

Fascinating article, with much I didn’t know. One note of doubt – 10 x as many Israelis casualties in the Yom Kippur war as currently in Gaza. That would be 250,000.

Really?

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

A quick google search reveals 2600 Israeli soldiers killed and 7,600 wounded. On re-reading, the words could be a comparison of Israeli casualties, but the phraseology leads to a comparison of Israeli and Palestinian casualties then and now.

Makes me doubt the rest of it.

David George
David George
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

“Makes me doubt the rest of it.”
Why? The reference to Israeli casualties is clear enough not “could be”. How does your inability, or unwillingness, to understand call the whole essay into question?

Jonathan Patrick
Jonathan Patrick
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

That caught my eye. The wording is ambiguous but the only way the statement is true is if you consider that he is talking only about Israeli military casualties. I prefer to give the author the benefit of the doubt that he wasn’t trying to deliberately mislead – just a little less than clear in his wording.

Simon S
Simon S
3 months ago

Does the IDF ever deliberately mislead? Just asking…

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

That’s absurd.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

 ‘casualties’ = propaganda

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter Lee

Ridiculous, pull yourself together Lee old chap, you’re letting the side down.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Of course he meant Israeli troop deaths. Don’t be ridiculous.

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago

More neoconservative drivel from the Professor.
“How times have changed since 1967, when socialist Israel still enjoyed the enthusiastic support of global “progressives”, but was so diplomatically isolated that it received no support at all from Europe or America when openly threatened with war by Egypt, Jordan and Syria.”

In 1967 the Israelis attacked the USS Liberty – killing dozens of US sailors – some by straffing their lifeboats. The US government covered this up and punished their own traumatised survivors over the following 4 decades. No support for Israel? I can’t think of a more craven and cowardly example of just that support Professor. I think you need to explain yourself.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Precisely, well said sir.

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago

Thank you Charles. I’d be very interested to know what it is about my comment that leads some around here to think it worthy of a downvote. I wonder if any of them even knew anything about it or whether they think demonstrable, murderous false-flags are just dandy.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Probably as case of :-
“Where ignorance is bliss, ’tis folly to be wise“.*

(*TG.)

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

Try keeping quiet for a bit, it’ll do the world of good.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

Why?
You people rise so easily, and offer such excellent ‘sport’, it must be said!

Thank you so much Mr Storm.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Perhaps it’s the fact that you sound like a conspiracist moron.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago

Agreed
The author’s explanation of Israel’s motives for starting the 1967 war is misleading
Even Israel subsequently acknowledged that it was a war of conquest admitting that Israel wasn’t expecting to be attacked when it initiated hostilities against Egypt.
Mordechai Bentov, an Israeli cabinet at the time, conceded “This whole story about the threat of extermination was totally contrived, and then elaborated upon, a posteriori, to justify the annexation of new Arab territories”
Subsequently Israeli Prime Minister and former terrorist, Menachem Begin, conceded in a speech in August 1982 that “in June 1967 we had a choice. The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai approaches did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.”
In fact, Israel received reports from the United States to the effect that Egyptian deployments were defensive and anticipatory of a possible Israeli attack (how right they were), and the US assessed that if anything, it was Israel that was pressing to begin hostilities.
Also in the same vein as USS Liberty is Operation Susannah (oka the Lavon affair). Israel recruit 10 Egyptian Jewish citizens, trained them in terrorist skills and then deployed them in 1954 to plant bombs inside Egyptian, American, and British-owned civilian targets including cinemas, libraries, and American educational centres in Egypt.
The intention was that the attacks would be blamed on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian communists, “unspecified malcontents”, or “local nationalists” with the aim of “undermining Western confidence in the existing Egyptian regime by generating public insecurity and actions to bring about arrests, demonstrations, and acts of revenge”.
After attacks on a US library and a British owned theatre, the plot was uncovered and the terrorists arrested. Two committed suicide, two were hanged and the rest were jailed.
ï»żThe Israeli authorities immediately denounced the arrests as an Egyptian frame-up, a position that they maintained for many years before eventually honouring the surviving terrorists in 2005.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

And yet many still think that it was Al- Qaeda that DID
9/11! Incredible.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

OK, with this post you’re definitely deserving of every down vote.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Ever heard of “CUI BONO”?*

(*MTC.)

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

and lots of contempt.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

Of course they didn’t. It was the Jews, dontcha know.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

Well Mossad certainly have the Chutzpah and expertise to pull off such an audacious stunt, don’t you agree?

And look at the results

a completely unprovoked attack on Iraq! 


..QED.

Burke S.
Burke S.
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Punished our traumatized survivors? The Captain of the Liberty was awarded the Medal of Honor and the Israelis offered an apology and restitution within 48 hours.

We shot down an airliner full of civilians in the Gulf a couple decades later, and that wasn’t even a war. Oops!

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago
Reply to  Burke S.

Firing a missile to down one plane is not the same level of ‘oops’ as flying over a clearly identified ship, systematically destroying it’s communications equipment and then following up with torpedo boats.

Oh and you do know that Captain McGonagle’s Medal of Honor was the only one ever to be awarded in secret, not at the White House, by the Secretary of Defence and not the President himself? The punishment of the crew were the orders – on pain of imprisonment – of ever talking of the murdered and maiming of their comrades.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Agreed
The author’s explanation of Israel’s motives for starting the 1967 war is misleading
Even Israel subsequently acknowledged that it was a war of conquest admitting that Israel wasn’t expecting to be attacked when it initiated hostilities against Egypt.
Mordechai Bentov, an Israeli cabinet at the time, conceded “This whole story about the threat of extermination was totally contrived, and then elaborated upon, a posteriori, to justify the annexation of new Arab territories”
Subsequently Israeli Prime Minister and former terrorist, Menachem Begin, conceded in a speech in August 1982 that “in June 1967 we had a choice. The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai approaches did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.”
In fact, Israel received reports from the United States to the effect that Egyptian deployments were defensive and anticipatory of a possible Israeli attack (how right they were), and the US assessed that if anything, it was Israel that was pressing to begin hostilities.
Also in the same vein as USS Liberty is Operation Susannah (oka the Lavon affair). Israel recruit 10 Egyptian Jewish citizens, trained them in terrorist skills and then deployed them in 1954 to plant bombs inside Egyptian, American, and British-owned civilian targets including cinemas, libraries, and American educational centres in Egypt.
The intention was that the attacks would be blamed on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian communists, “unspecified malcontents”, or “local nationalists” with the aim of “undermining Western confidence in the existing Egyptian regime by generating public insecurity and actions to bring about arrests, demonstrations, and acts of revenge”.
After attacks on a US library and a British owned theatre, the plot was uncovered and the terrorists arrested. Two committed suicide, two were hanged and the rest were jailed.
ï»żThe Israeli authorities immediately denounced the arrests as an Egyptian frame-up, a position that they maintained for many years before eventually honouring the surviving terrorists in 2005.

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago

@Ethniciodo – great comment. The Israelis have a long and ignominious history of using such ‘terrorist’ front-groups. They did so in the early 80s in Lebanon with the Front for the Liberation of Lebanon from Foreigners (FLLF) whose car-bombs killed hundreds and stirred unrest that led to further carnage there. And yet every year is a year zero for the Israeli supporters – nothing is remembered and all responses are decried as unprovoked acts of barbarism by their wide-and-dewy eyed apologists. I’d love to see Spielberg do a ‘Munich’ on Operation Susannah or the FLLF.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

oh look. the three idiots are having a piss-on-Israel party now.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

Who’s writing this history?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Ms Claudine GAY (Harvard.)?

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Well you could try this Wiki page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controversies_relating_to_the_Six-Day_War for the Bentov quote or this link for a more detailed analysis https://carnegiecouncil-media.storage.googleapis.com/files/v16_i009_a009.pdf
You could try this contemporary record from the NYT for the Begin quote https://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/21/world/excerpts-from-begin-speech-at-national-defense-college.html
I do not believe anyone disputes the fact I set out concerning the Lavon Affair but see https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0096340213493259 and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavon_Affair

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

Quotes Wiki and NYT. I’ll pass thanks, just how low can you go.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago

The NYT was form 1982 an there are plenty of other records. Wiki leaks was just the most convenient.
Funny how far some will go to avoid facing the truth

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

It’s turtles all the way down with these guys.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

That is utter rubbish. Nasser ordered UNEF troops out. He blockaded the Straits of Tiran, much like what the Houthis are trying to do now. These were acts of war.
And Israel NEVER acknowledged it was a war of conquest, because it wasn’t. Israel begged King Hussein not to enter the war, but he had received false info from Nasser that the Egyptians were winning, so he entered the war and lost East Jerusalem and the West Bank.
This pathetic attempt to rewrite history is just that: pathetic.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

There’s a dead horse that still needs beating. Go to it.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
3 months ago

Not quite Comical Ali, but definitely a close second. The opening paragraph, in its distain for democracy, gives the game away.
When I was a small lad in 1967 we had a newspaper board on the wall of the gym and I still remember the older boys pointing out the map of the middle east and the unanimous support for ‘tiny little Israel.’
Remember the Vietnam war, another one with a Goliath and a David? That war came to a conclusion in no small way because of the popular protests throughout the US.
Israel has lost much credit by its actions over the past decades and, while it is never too late, drastic new thinking is required to repair the damage.

El Uro
El Uro
3 months ago

to repair the damage by surrender to Hamas because no one like you offers any other option.
I said somewhere here that representatives of humanitarian jobs are characterized by excessive emotionalism and weak intelligence

A D Kent
A D Kent
3 months ago
Reply to  El Uro

Of course there were other options. One might have been to rebuild the wall, re-double their more surgical attacks on Hamas in Gaza & elsewhere & increase diplomatic pressure at home & abroad for the release of the hostages and punishment of the perpetrators. That wouldn’t have sated the blood-lust at home I suppose, but would have been a more viable path to ultimate security than what we have now. Trouble was that without the slaughter next door, more attention may have been paid to what really happened on October 7th and that wouldn’t have helped the Netanyahu regime & his number one goal of staying out of chokey.

Benjamin Dyke
Benjamin Dyke
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Let’s blame a Jew as it’s easier than the other alternatives as always. You’ve no idea what would have happened if Israel hadn’t replied to the Hamas attack the way it has. No idea what it would have meant for the hostages, for individual IDF soldiers, for Hamas, for Hezbollah, for Iran and how it would have panned out. It’s not cops and robbers in the back garden.

El Uro
El Uro
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Look, bro, why don’t you go to a pro-Palestinian demonstration and give advice to Hamas supporters? Probably because there you will most likely get hit in the face

Jae
Jae
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Armchair generals, especially ones driven by emotions only, are the worst.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Presumably you have the relevant experience to make such a snide remark?

Where did you gain such insight, Vietnam, Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan or perhaps elsewhere?

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  A D Kent

Yeah of course it was dem Jews what done it, right? A hole.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
3 months ago
Reply to  El Uro

by surrender to Hamas because no one like you offers any other option.

I don’t know how you work that out as it is not my opinion, in fact, nowhere close to my opinion. Jaw-jaw not war-war.

chris sullivan
chris sullivan
3 months ago

Am reading robert Fisk right now – a must do for all – it seems clear that the Israelis have been pushing the Palestinians out since 1948 and much of their response is caused by that constant violence – bull dozers, settlements 10;1 death ratios etc etc. IE most people have the chicken confused with the egg – and now the final cleansing push is happening. damned fishy that the Israelis left their defence wall unguarded when they knew Hamas was planning an attack – or is that just way too cynical – is it even possible tto be too cynical these days – when ethnic cleansing is happening right under the West’s noses – with just the tough little Belgians standing up for the Palestinians – just as they did for the Jews in WW2 – more endless irony !

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

Just another Irish Jew-hating shmuck.

Walter Schwager
Walter Schwager
3 months ago

Public opinion polls have repeatedly and consistently shown that support for Israel among young Americans, including young American Jews, is waning fast. That doesn’t bode well for Israel in the future.And let’s just wait for the verdict of the ICJ.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

That’s because young people in universities have been brainwashed by Marxism into thinking that anyone who achieves success and overcomes adversity is an “Oppressor.” And any group like Hamas and Hezbollah whose only goal in life is to murder said “Oppressor” is the “Oppressed.” They’re Idiots on the streets chanting “From the River to the Sea” or “Gas the Jews” when they don’t have a damn clue about anything.

Wyatt W
Wyatt W
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

True. Most of them wouldn’t be able to name the river they’re chanting about.
I think it’s more virtue signaling than anything, no different than putting a Ukraine flag or black square on their social media. It’s just people who want to think they’re making a big difference in the world without actually sacrificing anything of their own.

Doug Mccaully
Doug Mccaully
3 months ago

Israel will struggle to maintain good relations with much of the world, whatever the official govt. lines are. A huge part of the world now despises Israel for what its doing in Gaza.

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

What has been revealed since October 7th is that a huge part of the world is still genocidally antisemitic, and has a hissy fit at the spectacle of Jews organizing effectively to defend themselves against those who have vowed to exterminate them.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

That’s just not true.
However many think that a kill ratio of about 25:1 is enough.
Perhaps you beg to differ and would prefer something like 500:1?

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
3 months ago

The kill ratio (of non-combatants to terrorists killed in Gaza) is actually around 2:1, a smaller ratio than in any comparable armed conflict, where it is typically more like 9:1. Israel has air supremacy and could obliterate every single building in Gaza very easily if it wished. Instead, IDF soldiers’ lives are effectively being sacrificed by Israel to save the lives of Gazans, 75% of whom (according to recent polls carried out by Palestinian Arabs themselves) approve the October 7th massacres, tortures and rapes.
Israel continues to be the most ethical and principled state that has ever existed, in the face of the most despicable and savage provocation from its genocidally antisemitic enemies, and the chorus of finger-wagging from genocidally antisemitic observers all across the globe.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

It appears that the word AR*B is verboten!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

So the figure of 25K Ar*b dead of which 8K were children is completely incorrect?

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

Where are you getting your numbers, Hamas spokespersons? The UN gets their numbers from them.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

That paragon of virtue otherwise known as the BBC.

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
3 months ago

Completely incorrect: just Hamas propaganda, which you, the BBC and the UN just recycle endlessly.
It was actually 25K Gazans dead of whom 8K+ were Hamas operatives. That is a ratio of non-combatants to terrorists of around 2:1, just as I said. Far smaller than any comparable armed conflict since 1945. This is because Israel, surely the most ethical state which has ever existed, is extremely careful not to kill any more non-combatants than is absolutely necessary to achieve its legitimate war aims: namely defence of its people against an enemy who has declared – and repeatedly proven – its intention to exterminate that people. Hamas on the other hand continues to do everything it can to increase the number of non-combatants killed, in order to generate photo-opportunities which are then lapped up by passive antisemites and the terminally gullible (usually the same people btw) across the globe.
It is not Israel but Hamas – and the large proportion of the Gaza population which sustains Hamas in power – who is to blame for the non-combatant Gazan deaths; meanwhile Israel is simply doing what is has, not simply the right, but the absolute obligation, to do.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

So 25K minus 8K still leaves 17K n’est pas?
How many Israelis were killed 1.2K?
So the ‘score’ so far is 1:14, no doubt that will increase.
What do you regard as an acceptable level of retaliatory violence? 100:1 or perhaps 300:1?

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
3 months ago

Hamas is to be destroyed, just as the Nazis were to be destroyed in 1944. And just as all German civilian deaths in 1944-5 were the responsibility of the Nazis and of all those Germans who sustained them in power, so the fault for all the Gazan civilian deaths now are the responsibility of Hamas and all those Gazans who sustain them in power. Israel is conducting a necessary campaign of self-defence against those who have sworn to exterminate all Israeli Jews. That is why Hamas is to be destroyed, whatever it takes.
As for “levels of retaliatory violence”, you clearly do not understand what proportionality means in the context of international laws applying to the conduct of war. Had Hitler succeeded by 1945 in turning every single German into a fanatical Nazi willing to fight to the death, there would have been no Germans left in 1946, but thankfully this was unnecessary: he was after all in power for only 12 years. Hamas has had 18 years to raise an entire generation and indoctrinate them with genocidal Jew-hatred; so obviously a much greater proportion of them will have to die than did Germans in 1944-5. No doubt there will be some innocents among them, but the blame for their regrettable deaths will ie entirely with Hamas and their supporters and cheerleaders (including the very many passive antisemites in the West).

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

We know you wish more Jews died, but tough, the Jews disagree.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
3 months ago

There is no valid independent count of casualties in Gaza. How could there be? We cannot even distinguish between Hamas and Gazans, between propaganda and fact. Instead we argue about whether babies were dead or not before being decapitated. We make up stories about genocide and blockades. There is zero truth emanating out of Gaza.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

It’s all on Hamas for putting them and keeping them in harm’s way, despite the warnings. And for putting military HQs and missile launch sites near or in schools, hospitals, residences, mosques etc. They know suckers like you will eat this stuff up, and they’re right.
You give Vera a bad name.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

You would have preferred more Jews die then, would that make you feel better?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Of course not!
What a simply astonishing remark, I fear you may need counselling or whatever it is called these days.
Good luck!

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

Charles, why are you playing the moral relativism (stupid) card over and over. You know you don’t believe in it, so are you just becoming a troll?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

I certainly believe that the Israelis have every right to defend themselves, but now over 100 days into this with 25K dead enough is enough.

Have they never heard of -“moderation in all things”?

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

Hamas et al needs to surrender and return hostages

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

LOL war and moderation do not go together ever

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

Nonsense!
I’m surprised and disappointed at your ignorance.

James Love
James Love
3 months ago

Hamas is solely responsible for the deaths of their civilians by using them as humanity shields. Hamas can end the bloodshed by releasing the hostages and surrendering. Israel is following the rules of war … for now. If Hamas and their supporters persist in provoking Israel and The West with actions contrary to the rules of war then lawlessness will ensue; the gloves will come off. Hamas’s rhetoric that ‘there are no civilians in Israel’ will be reciprocated with ‘then there are no civilians in Gaza’.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

Oh it’s true all all right and you’re proving to be an excellent example of it.

Doug Mccaully
Doug Mccaully
3 months ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

Jews kill, bully, steal from West Bank Palestinians who accepted Israel’s right to exist decades agon. Now that’s worth having a hissy fit about.

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

A huge part of the world has now been revealed as having despised Israel all along.

Doug Mccaully
Doug Mccaully
3 months ago

How have they been thus revealed?

Ron Kean
Ron Kean
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

The people in Israel are grateful for all the support although there is absolutely no alternative than to continue the elimination of Hamas whether there’s support or not. Disregarding public opinion and disregarding the opinion of other governments might have been seen as arrogance but when has the fight for survival ever been seen as arrogant?

Doug Mccaully
Doug Mccaully
3 months ago
Reply to  Ron Kean

If Israel wants security then ditch Netanyahu, that’ll help clean up Israel’s international image as well.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

Yes. Fk democracy – especially when it is the only country in the ME to actually have one. I’m starting to realize that people with O’something and Mcsomething are more of a problem than those bobbing over in the boats.

Kevin Godwin
Kevin Godwin
3 months ago

I’m beginning to think that Charles Stanhope and Champagne Socialist are two sides of the same coin, left and right wing agent provocateurs to stimulate discussion. The CS initials, a coincidence, or not!

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

Ignorant as F.

Eleanor Barlow
Eleanor Barlow
3 months ago
Reply to  Doug Mccaully

What ‘huge part of the world ‘ are you referring to? There is a shouty, antisemitic and aggressive minority of citizens who have protested and are demanding a ceasefire, but most people have other priorities and couldn’t care less if Israel turns Gaza into a car park.
You need to get out of your echo chamber and explore the world a bit more.

Doug Mccaully
Doug Mccaully
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

Tut tut, you can have a conversation without being rude you know. I wasn’t referring to the matter of a ceasefire [or the matter of possible genocide] more the matter of letting Gazans have food, water, electricity, medical facilities etc, the lack of which can very reasonably be presented as a war crime. Most of the world that isn’t the US seems to be reaching the point where they might reduce or cut their links with Israel. If I were an Israeli, I’d be concerned. Look at what happened to the West’s ‘war on terror,’ that didn’t turn out well, Israel’s treading the same path.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

“couldn’t care less if Israel turns Gaza into a car park”

Most Germans and particularly Austrians couldn’t have cared less about Auschwitz and Zyclon B, but that doesn’t make it right does it Ms Barlow?

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

The nazi comparisons were bound to surface eventually, and here we are.

0 0
0 0
3 months ago

Never saw more preposterous claims here or anywhere else.

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
3 months ago

Half a century ago, I spent several very hot and uncomfortable weeks in a Royal Navy force clearing the Suez Canal of ordnance left behind after the Yom Kippur War. At the time I was blissfully unaware of the geo-political aspects of our deployment, so it was interesting to read this article.
The achievement of the Egyptian military engineers in successfully attacking the Israeli defences on the East bank of the canal – essentiall, huge articial sand dunes – was very impressive, as was the Israeli response. The use of hand grenades by Egyptian soldiers as a means of fishing in the canal was not appreciated by our divers!

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

The argument put forward that Hamas and Hezbollah could depend upon Arab support was always a Red Herring.
Whilst Israel was never going to receive Arab support neither would it meet with active enmity
Now the truth is out in the open Arabs regard Iran as apostate non Arabs intent on meddling in Arab affairs
Wheras Israel although also non Arab they are not apostates and only ever meddle in Israeli affairs !

Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
3 months ago

The complexities of Mid East politics have been a challenge for decades to any casual observer trying to make sense of it all before the eyes glaze over and the brain goes numb. The rinse and repeat cycle of rocket attack, Israeli response, ceasefire was usually sufficient for those of us without the stamina or interest to do a ‘deep dive’ into the situation.
However, it seems Oct 7 has changed the game, specifically Netanyahu’s steadfast declaration that Hamas will be eliminated once and for all. Of course this approach will have an effect on Bibi’s future political prospects but it seems the biggest fallout will be international and one wonders where that will lead.
The systemic moral relativism and anti-Semitism in much of the Western liberal establishment is no longer hiding in plain sight. The rats are in the spotlight and they don’t much like it. They’ve been forced to tip-toe through the same moral minefield they intended a a trap for their ideological opponents. Can they recover from this?
Then there’s the geo-political reality of the Mid East. That Iran finances Hamas, Hezbollah and the Houthis seems clear enough. The Saudis attempted to take out the Houthis with apparent limited success but it appears that the other Arab states tolerate Hamas and Hezbollah as long as they direct their venom towards Israel. If Netanyahu persists is there a point at which political and economic expediency will force Iran and the Arab states to disavow, de-fund and de-fang these groups? Will that make things better or worse?
And what of the Palestinians? Israel has declared the Two State fantasy dead. Netanyahu took heat for this “shocking” announcement but the Palestinians never wanted it in the first place and the idea always had the faint odour of imperialist pie-slicing about it, like it was a ‘do-over’ of Sykes-Picot. So what happens going forward? Will the Palestinians ever realize that their future depends on proving they no longer represent a threat to Israel?

Eleanor Barlow
Eleanor Barlow
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Unfortunately, I think the Palestinians are too dumb to ever realise that their future depends on proving they no longer represent a threat to Israel. They still have yet to admit defeat, and have no more interest in a 2 state solution than Netanyahu does. Even if Hamas is wiped out, another bunch of terrorists will arrive to take its place. They seem to spring up like weeds.
It’s short-sighted of the other Arab states to tolerate Hamas and Hezbollah as no country in the region will ever be safe whilst terrorism is left to flourish. One would have thought that they would have learnt their lesson from when Isis ran amok across Iraq and Syria.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

Silly me, I forgot the word AR*B is strictly verboten!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

David Ben-Gurion Is reputed to have said:-
“ Never expect the Ar*bs to give up! WE wouldn’t!”

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

Fortunes may turn

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

They are dumb, but their western supporters are much, much dumber.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

As I understand it, the Israeli populace support Bibi’s actions now, if not the man himself.

Paul Hemphill
Paul Hemphill
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Good comment Particularly: “The systemic moral relativism and anti-Semitism in much of the Western liberal establishment is no longer hiding in plain sight. The rats are in the spotlight and they don’t much like it. They’ve been forced to tip-toe through the same moral minefield they intended a a trap for their ideological opponents. Can they recover from this?”
The jihadi tail is now seen wagging the leftist dog”.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Hamas is sponsored by Qatar, which is an outlier among the Sunni Arab states.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 months ago

Yet no amount of wartime unity will remedy the political tumult — particularly over Gaza and the West Bank — that will return as soon as the fighting stops.
And there remains the issue. Hamas will never not be Hamas. The same applies to like-minded groups. Until that changes, nothing else can or will.

Dorrido Dorrido
Dorrido Dorrido
3 months ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

End the Israeli occupation and blocade, end settler rampage in the West Bank, and there will no longer be a need for a resistance group. A Palestinian State will enable both israel and Palestine to have security. Tho note that Likud party manifesto claims all the land from the river to the sea, illegal

Andrew Morgan
Andrew Morgan
3 months ago

Will there be rainbows and unicorns also?

Eric Sheldon
Eric Sheldon
3 months ago

In the Judeo-Christian world, relations between non-family members are understood to be contractual, and one good turn deserves another. The Islamic world is different: there is no such thing as a tactical retreat or a gesture of goodwill within an argument. It’s seen as weakness. Ending the Israeli ‘occupation’ would just encourage more violence. The irony of the situation is that Israel is having to fight like an Arab country.

Dick Barrett
Dick Barrett
3 months ago

I am sorry that attempts, if they existed, by the West to halt Israel’s campaigns for Lebensraum were not more successful in the past. In any case, everyone who opposes racism and genocide needs to ensure that Israel continues to be treated as a pariah state until there is justice for the people of Palestine.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago
Reply to  Dick Barrett

Idiot post. There is no “genocide”, it’s called war which was started by Palestine and Hamas. You denigrate the millions who have died in actual genocides with facile and utterly wrong thinking. So please stop spouting this nonsense driven by your emotions rather than any reality, anyone with any intellect sees through it, you’re only making a fool of yourself. Which you may not care about because oftentimes this sort of thinking is only done to be seen as virtuous.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago
Reply to  Jae

Throws around the word ‘racism’, but doesn’t even know that many Jews are brown people.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

Didn’t YOU use to call them coloured? As in Cape coloured etc.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

That’s what they call themselves in South Africa. Education is your friend.

Ron Kean
Ron Kean
3 months ago
Reply to  Dick Barrett

I’ve said it before but as long as the d**k Barretts of the world exist it’s not a problem saying it again. By ‘people of Palestine’ you means Muslim Arabs who live in Israel. These Muslim Arabs have it good and they know it or they’d join the millions of their fellow Muslims who’ve moved to Germany, Sweden, Michigan, etc. Muslim Arabs in Israel are MDs, nurses, business owners, bus drivers, construction workers, salesmen, you name it. They raise families and send their children to colleges. They use the same hospitals, bathrooms, light rail, airplanes, buy the same cars, use the same electricity, gas, water, sewage, internet and more. They have a political party in the Israeli parliament. What you’re repeating is jihadi claptrap. It’s Islamic teaching that Islam rules. They’re told to conquer, convert or tax or kill those who won’t convert. They’ll make up stories for sympathy or propaganda and that’s what you’ve been told to think. Hopefully now you should know better.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Ron Kean

They’re suckers for this stuff because they want to be.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Dick Barrett

Yawn. Same old, same old.

Brian Thomas
Brian Thomas
3 months ago

What an excellent article. Thank you sir.

Jae
Jae
3 months ago

This is a great article. For me no one has written about the wars in the Middle East in such succinct and informed language before now.

One point. Much of the cause of this war lies at the feet of Biden and his administration. They have enabled Iran to set the Middle East on fire – again. So thanking this administration seems sycophantic in light of that. But diplomatically necessary for sure.

In a just world, and please no screeching Trump hate on this it’s just a fact, Trump and his cabinet members including the first openly Gay member, Richard Grenell, would have been given a Nobel Prize for Peace for the Abraham Accords, which had been stymied under previous administrations.

Jeff Carr
Jeff Carr
3 months ago

Excellent article. It gives me pleasure to hear that the future normalisation of Saudi/Israeli relations may still be possible.
I think it might be useful to understand the input from the Trump administration in this.
And, as a juxtaposition, the influence of Sir Anthony Blair as Middle East envoy.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

Enjoyed the article, which stands out in the recent swollen tide of Israel/Hamas journalism for its unique thesis. Novel perspective is always an intellectual stimulant.

Dorrido Dorrido
Dorrido Dorrido
3 months ago

https://www.jewishvoiceforpeace.org/2024/01/24/gaza-genocide-four-months/

This piece is out of line with reality, Orwellian in its doublespeak, at a moment when Israel and its backer the US are isolated on the world stage over the slaughter in Gaza; the majority of the world wants an end to the war, countries in the UNGA voted overwhelmingly for a ceasefire in December (153 countries voted in favour); Saudi Arabia has just ruled out normalisation of relations with Israel until the Palestinian issue is resolved, and criticised Israel’s actions in Gaza. South Africa has filed a genocide case in the ICJ against Israel. The world is looking aghast at the brutal desqtruction and starvation of Gazans, while militant armed settlers are on the rampage in the West Bank, terrorising and killing Palestinians. Israel has become a pariah state

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

Because ‘South Africa good and clever’!

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

The ANC SA government has always relied on useful idiot supporters.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

wishful dumb thinking. wow, the general assembly voted for a ceasefire. That should do the trick. As for Israel being a pariah state, tell it to all the countries doing massive trade with it and (tacitly at worst) supporting it. But hey, you’ve got the 20 year olds on your side.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

And people think this is a decisive outcome. I’m wondering what reality they live in


Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

As at 20.33 GMT, no less that 25 posts are in the ‘Sin Bin’.
Not a good report.

Simon S
Simon S
3 months ago

Are you surprised?

Paul Hemphill
Paul Hemphill
3 months ago

Good comment from Walter Lanz. Particularly: “The systemic moral relativism and anti-Semitism in much of the Western liberal establishment is no longer hiding in plain sight. The rats are in the spotlight and they don’t much like it. They’ve been forced to tip-toe through the same moral minefield they intended a a trap for their ideological opponents. Can they recover from this?
The jihadi tail is now seen wagging the leftist dog”.

Paul Hemphill
Paul Hemphill
3 months ago

Not a bad analysis. the powers that be appear to be happy letting the progressives and the U.N. vent their indignation and powerlessness whilst apart from the mess and the carnage, it’s high level diplomacy as usual.

Dorrido Dorrido
Dorrido Dorrido
3 months ago

So Israel is free to continue its genocide of the Palestinian people? Its continued settler militant violence againsyt Palestinians in the West Bank, driving them from their land? This article is Orwellian its double speak; Saudi Arabia has just announced that there will be no norrmalisation with Israel until the Palestinian issue is resolved; the majority of the world voyed in the UNGA in December for a ceasefire, and is looking aghast at Israel’s inhuman, brutal attack on civilians and of all infrastructure needed to sustain life, starvation, (war crimes and crimes against humanity); South Africa genocide case against israel is ongoing. Security can’t be achieved through constant war. Israel and its US backer are isolated on the world stage. The population of Gaza is facing imminent famine, and death from disease as Israel has cut off food, water, medicines, fuel, and has displaced 85% of the poplation, then bombs them along the route or in the so-called ‘safe areas’, in death and destruction not sice since the Nazi’s blitz. We are reminded of Primo Levy’s image of an emaciated man
Under netanyahu, Israel has become a pariah state

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

No need to repeat yourself!

Kolya Wolf
Kolya Wolf
3 months ago

To be fair, Israel has been forced to start harvesting the blood of Gazan children, because of the diminishing availability of Christian children. Needs must.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

It was stupid enough the first time.

Sensible Citizen
Sensible Citizen
3 months ago

To the degree I understand the article (I need a history lesson…), I agree that Israel is in the strongest diplomatic and geopolitical position. I can’t fathom why any country interested in regional stability and economic expansion would side with Hamas. It is difficult to understand how Palestine is entitled to a homeland to begin with. History doesn’t really matter, does it? Should every country relinquish its sovereignty to its indigenous peoples? Of course not. The winners of wars get the spoils. At the end of the current conflict, let’s hope there is a clear winner and a clear loser, and the world accepts that the winner take greater Israel.

Thomas Kent
Thomas Kent
3 months ago

I agree with everything other than the fact that “indigenous” is doing a bit of heavy lifting in this particular case

Chauncey Gardiner
Chauncey Gardiner
3 months ago

“The purpose of that deliberately horrific attack was precisely to stop any alliance between the Saudis and Israelis.”
Precisely.
We had earnest efforts for a “two-state solution” in the 1990’s. That ultimately did not go anywhere, and the government of Ariel Sharon initiated unilateral “disengagement” from Gaza (which included the uprooting of 21 settlement) as well an effort to create “new facts on the ground” (new settlements in the West Bank!). Hamas, meanwhile, got on with its unilateral campaign of shooting rockets; blaming Israel for any retaliation; calling for BDS. But, then we had the Abraham Accords. That brought the focus of attention back to getting Arab nations to recognize Israel. (The US itself had given up on such efforts as of 1991.) And, an amazing thing happened: everyone stopped fetishizing the BDS effort, but with Saudi Arabia about sign on to the program, Hamas launched the October 7 attack. The “two-state solution” has now edged out formal recognition of Israel as a focus of attention the West. But, really, the focus of Hamas is the traditional one-state solution: drive the Israelis into the sea.
One can imagine the Saudis getting back to the program.

Walter Schwager
Walter Schwager
3 months ago

So the ICJ rules that there is a plausible case that Israel engaged in genocide. Nearly unanimous. PR victory?

Simon S
Simon S
3 months ago

As usual Israel has pulled a brilliant counter attack, on UNWRA, monopolizing headlines

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
3 months ago

A nothing burger
 ICJ is just kicking the can down the road.

Robert B Macdiarmid
Robert B Macdiarmid
3 months ago

Interesting. Here in Canada the Government says nothing at all like this.

Göran Rosenberg
Göran Rosenberg
3 months ago

So, if Israel had been allowed to conquer Damascus and Cairo and who knows what, what had been won by that? I doubt that Israel is winning this war, neither in Gaza nor elsewhere. This essay by clever Luttwak is at best a piece of wishful Israeli thinking.

Marcus Corbett
Marcus Corbett
1 month ago

Retired US diplomat Chas Freeman provides a calm sober voice in all this. He points out that Israel is a hindrance to the US now; a moral expensive quagmire.
The technological research referred to he said could as well have been done in Illinois.
This article makes it clear that the real battle is not where 30000 people, probably half of which were children have been blown to smithereens by ‘animals’ to quote the Israel president, I can imagine the yawn of the author’s face, but over trade and diplomatic tables.
The retired diplomat referred to above has described Israel’s strategy against the Palestinians as genocide, in plain and as simple a tone as he thinks the evidence obvious.
This article basically advances the argument that might is right.
Yeshayahu Leibowitz remarked on this attitude writing that Israel’s conduct in the occupied territories was ‘Judeo-Nazi’.
Israel IS now a pariah state. It’s too late. All credit has been used and abused. This is the concluding legacy of Netanyahu’s crew.
The author fits the bill.

Marcus Corbett
Marcus Corbett
1 month ago

This is an article which avoids any ethical scruple.
As retired US diplomat and lifelong foreign service wallah Chas Freeman has observed Israel is of less and less value to the US. The technological research, which the US paid for could just as well been done in ‘Illinois’.
Freeman also prosaically described the ongoing onslaught as genocide.
The author’s view seems be given the above that might is right.
Yeshayahu Lebowitz, a revered sage like figure and Israeli zionist described Israel’s conduct in the occupied territories as ‘Judeo-Nazi’. I see nothing on the article’s general direction that confounds his description.
Unherd censors pls check the references.