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J Bryant
J Bryant
4 months ago

I will always associate Kissinger with post-WWII America, when the country was by far the dominant power in the world. Kissinger was the clever, ambitious, scheming immigrant who climbed his way to the top, and my impression is his constant worldview, even late in life, was that of super-strategist for the global hegemon.
Sadly, that America has faded. We appear to be in terminal decline. I doubt there’s a place for a new Kissinger. We seem to prefer smiling car salesmen who tell us not to worry, all is well, have another Big Mac.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
4 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

I always thought of Kissinger as an ambivalent personality who I could never figure out. He was reputed to be a man of immense insight and ability. I cannot say because I did not know him but enough people of substance believed it so it looks like it was true.
However having now seen his enemies self-identify my esteem for him has grown and grown.
With enemies like that he must have been man of enormous talent, integrity and courage.
One thing is for certain he was not driven by BS and virtue signalling

Last edited 4 months ago by Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
4 months ago

Someone who saw it through the gap in a swimming suit said Kissinger had an enormous organ of generation, one reason for his success with the ladies.

Stevie K
Stevie K
4 months ago

Like all human beings he was a ridiculous bundle of contradictions. But, what an extraordinary performance, and it appears for the most part he was on the side of the angels. Most of us would be unbearably arrogant with half his achievements.

Peter Samson
Peter Samson
4 months ago

Among all the grand post-mortem pronouncements about Kissinger it was refreshing to have this wry but sympathetic portrait – neither condemning nor praising – by someone who actually knew the man.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
4 months ago
Reply to  Peter Samson

Thus the origin of term “Kosher Nostra”.

N T
N T
4 months ago

why does his religion figure so prominently in every piece discussing him? are we trying to say something about him, or about his theology?
every time there is some detail that is part of the headline or the subtext, one would think it was really, really important to the story – or that whomever wrote it has some weird fetish about the detail.

Amelia Melkinthorpe
Amelia Melkinthorpe
4 months ago

They need to ensure that the lid is nailed down completely on the ghastly thing. He was never, ever “nice”.

Caradog Wiliams
Caradog Wiliams
4 months ago

Kissenger’s life shows that politicians are successful when they lie. Is that unexpected?
His writing shows that he was a great communicator. Maybe he was communicating lies but he did so with great prose.
He was important in an important country and his actions could kill millions. In Britain he would have killed fewer people. Compare Blair and Kissenger perhaps.
Rightly or wrongly, being Jewish probably helped his career, especially when telling about the troubles in Europe.
Knowing what we know, is it surprising that politicians lie and that we blame them for all our ills?

Last edited 4 months ago by Caradog Wiliams
Nardo Flopsey
Nardo Flopsey
4 months ago

If they didn’t lie, they would be replaced with people who told the public the impossible contradictory banalities they wished to hear.

Dermot O'Sullivan
Dermot O'Sullivan
4 months ago

I liked his German accent.

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
4 months ago

He never lost his Upper Bavarian ( Franconia) accent.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
4 months ago

‘A man from Bavaria casts a shadow in the darkest cellar.”

Nardo Flopsey
Nardo Flopsey
4 months ago

Filed for future reference

Greg nagle
Greg nagle
4 months ago

This immediately caught my attention.

Lutwak said this,
“In the coming days, many will lavish praise and blame on Henry Kissinger for what he did and did not do. A prime example is the coup in Chile that removed Salvador Allende in 1973, which Kissinger welcomed but did not cause. With thousands of US academics teaching the falsehood of his guilt as truth, Kissinger just had to live with the calumny.”

Regarding the US role in the 1973 coup in Chile, I asked ChatGPT to give me a summary of US involvement in the coup.

How was the US and CIA involved with the 1973 coup in chile.?

ChatGPT
ChatGPT
The United States, particularly through the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), played a role in the 1973 coup in Chile that resulted in the overthrow of President Salvador Allende. The U.S. involvement in the coup included both overt and covert actions. Here are key aspects of how the U.S. and CIA were involved:
Funding and Support for Opposition Groups:The U.S. government, under President Richard Nixon and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, directed financial support to opposition groups in Chile. This support included funding for political parties, media organizations, and labor unions that were actively working against President Allende’s government.Economic Pressure:The U.S. exerted economic pressure on Chile to create economic instability. This involved influencing international institutions and organizations to limit financial assistance to Chile and restricting loans. The goal was to exacerbate the economic difficulties faced by Allende’s government.Propaganda and Psychological Warfare:The CIA engaged in a propaganda campaign to undermine Allende’s government and shape public opinion against him. This included influencing media outlets, disseminating anti-Allende narratives, and creating a negative image of the socialist government.Covert Operations and Assistance to Military Plotters:The CIA, through its Special Activities Division, provided covert support to Chilean military officers and intelligence operatives who were plotting a coup against Allende. This assistance included training, funding, and logistical support.Project FUBELT (Track II):The CIA operated a covert program known as Project FUBELT, or Track II, which aimed at destabilizing Allende’s government and supporting efforts to facilitate a coup. The agency worked with Chilean military officials who were discontented with Allende’s presidency.Awareness and Approval at High Levels:President Richard Nixon and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger were aware of and approved the efforts to destabilize Allende’s government. Declassified documents and recordings reveal conversations between Nixon and Kissinger expressing a desire to prevent Allende’s reelection and discussing the use of covert means to achieve this goal.On September 11, 1973, the Chilean military, led by General Augusto Pinochet, staged a coup. President Allende died during the coup, and Pinochet assumed power. The military junta that followed implemented repressive measures, leading to widespread human rights abuses and political persecution.
The U.S. involvement in the Chilean coup remains a subject of historical scrutiny and controversy, and it had profound and lasting effects on Chilean politics and society.

Last edited 4 months ago by Greg nagle
Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
4 months ago

I think the best Kissinger story is this from La Wik:
“During the American advance into Germany, Kissinger, though only a private (the lowest military rank), was put in charge of the administration of the city of Krefeld because of a lack of German speakers on the division’s intelligence staff. Within eight days he had established a civilian administration.”
Krefeld is a town of about 250,000 near Duisburg and DĂŒsseldorf.

Last edited 4 months ago by Christopher Chantrill
Jane Davis
Jane Davis
4 months ago

Only two?

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
4 months ago

He was “a dried-up prune?” Such weak-minded characterizations discredit your argument and dignity all the way around.

Alix Daniel
Alix Daniel
4 months ago

I do hope Kissinger’s death signals the end of an era, where diplomacy has only promoted disputes between religions, wars and dictatorships all around the world.

JR Stoker
JR Stoker
4 months ago
Reply to  Alix Daniel

Bizarre remark!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
4 months ago

Do we really need another essay on this man? Surely everything was said yesterday?

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
4 months ago

In contrast to Alistair Dowling and Shane McGowen, I did not see his death mentioned on the main news bulletins

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
4 months ago

Much more important has been the lack of coverage of the recent death*of Colonel Derek Wilford, OBE, formerly Commanding Officer of the First Battalion,The Parachute Regiment.
Wilford commanded the Battalion during the disturbances in Londonderry, sometimes referred to as Bloody Sunday, in January 1972. An outstanding officer he career was be wrecked by the supine behaviour of HMG which continues until the present day.

(*24th November last.)

Amelia Melkinthorpe
Amelia Melkinthorpe
4 months ago

Exactly the right amount of coverage, then.

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
4 months ago

Right, let’s get back to Harry and Meghan.

D Walsh
D Walsh
4 months ago

Wow, Henry Kissinger was Jewish, I never would have guessed

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
4 months ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Watch out or you will have Ms Jane Davis ‘on your back’!

Jane Davis
Jane Davis
4 months ago

Yes, Charles, he will

Jane Anderson
Jane Anderson
4 months ago
Reply to  D Walsh

You said the secret quiet bit out loud. Leftists are keen to state that they are not anti semitic in the slightest.

Stevie K
Stevie K
4 months ago
Reply to  D Walsh

Are we grown up enough to have an adult conversation about cultural propensities and the actual need for skilful deceptiveness as the essential lubricant of those brittle relationships between various borderline psychos who by dint of perennial human nature will always be well represented in the peaks of power. I somehow doubt that we are. Such an exquisitely beautiful and measured article.