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David McKee
David McKee
5 months ago

Talk tough, and do nothing… it’s the complete inversion of Theodore Roosevelt’s advice to talk softly and carry a big stick. Oh, my apologies – Maron did do something. He apologised for colonising Algeria. And much good did it do him or France.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  David McKee

Do you mean MACRON or MORON?

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
5 months ago

I think either would be equally appropriate.

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
5 months ago

Great article showing the self-same problems that I imagine are bubbling up in virtually every W European nation.

I remember watching a TV program in my youth about the use of gastarbeiter (temporary foreign workers) in the German car industry in 1980. They were all imported from Turkey and were expected to live in Portakabins, never interact with the locals and just go home after a few years with a lot of money. And even then, the commentator was asking whether that was really how things would pan out.

Helmut Kohl was very busy at the same time making sure Turkey never joined the EU as it was a Muslim country. How muddle-headed can you get ?

Now there’s 4 million Turks in Germany I think. But at least then they were actually coming to work and had jobs to come to.

We likewise have relied on a never-ending supply of cheap labour while more and more of our own opt out of work altogether. Things have just gone downhill from there until we’ve ended up with completely ghettoised communities of all sorts with no real links to each other or any interest in any kind of assimilation into the original host population.

Talking about one’s Anglo-Saxon roots nowadays seems rather quaint, even prehistoric, not to mention racist or exclusionist of course.

Are we really witnessing the slow collapse of Western Culture or will something we can’t yet see come and save the situation?

Lone Wulf
Lone Wulf
5 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

Nearly 1.3 million Turks but more than 5.5 million muslims.

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
5 months ago
Reply to  Lone Wulf

Cheers.

Martin Butler
Martin Butler
5 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

Do you believe in the free market? What I find odd is those who are ‘anti -immigrant’ in one breath are often free market fundamentalists in the next. The two are diametrically opposed.

Andrew R
Andrew R
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

And visa versa with the Left

Lone Wulf
Lone Wulf
5 months ago

The République has evolved from and in a christian environment of values. Islam is completely incompatible with laïcité. Insisting on the contrary is political blindness or stupid naivity.

Yoram Mimoun
Yoram Mimoun
5 months ago
Reply to  Lone Wulf

In reality, Islam is incompatible with laicity as any other religion is, historically the Republic has been founded on the blood of the Church. The real shift is not between religions (Christianity-Islam) but between a secular state of mind that was common in France thanks to the Enlightenment and a religious way of life courant among Muslim migrants.

Lone Wulf
Lone Wulf
5 months ago
Reply to  Yoram Mimoun

Alright then give to the Republic what belongs to the Republic, and to Islam what belongs to Islam!

Juan Manuel Pérez Porrúa
Juan Manuel Pérez Porrúa
5 months ago
Reply to  Lone Wulf

The “République” systematically dispossessed the Church, persecuted (and even put to death) thousands of both the clergy and the laity, arbitrarily dissolved religious orders, at times prohibited the public profession and practice of the faith in France, prohibited teaching the faith to children, and executed the Rex Christianissimus. The “République” destroyed Christianity in France, not without destroying countless individual Catholics along with it. It replaced it with a neopagan worship of the State, the civil religion of the murderous République itself. Not that such tendencies were not there before, with the absolutism of the (initially Protestant) Bourbon dynasty, whose statism already before the Revolution, dictated the persecution of the Society of Jesus. France is long gone, I’m afraid. There is nothing left to mourn there.

Elizabeth Hamilton
Elizabeth Hamilton
5 months ago

That is true Juan Manuel but the Enlightenment, the Révolution, laïcité and the République are nonetheless inspired by Christian values. And so is wokism with it’s emphasis on victims and suffering (our God is on the cross).

Juan Manuel Pérez Porrúa
Juan Manuel Pérez Porrúa
5 months ago

I cannot agree.
Mostly because, in order to be able to credibly blame Christianity (specifically, the Catholic Church) for the Enlightenment, the French Revolution (and the revolutions inspired by it around the world that tried to imitate it in the 19th century), and the French Republic(s), one would have to accept incorrect interpretations and distortions of Christianity which (some of the “Philosophâtres” and revolutionaries themselves held. And all the while doing what they did with respect to the Church and to Catholicism. Interpretations and distortions which the Church itself rejected at the time and has continued to reject ever since.
I understand that there is a line of moderate liberalism that prefers to make that same claim, enabling it to tolerate Catholicism to a large extant, but such claims should be taken for what they are, polite fictions, pious myths (or impious myths, I suppose), or social conventions that allow the coexistencd of liberalism and Christianity and make social peace in liberal societies with large numbers of Catholics.
And there are also ideologies, mostly nationalistic ideologies, that would prefer to take the credit for their nation (usually incorporated as part of the mythology of the neopagan civil religion of the nation in question, such as France or Spain) of the achievements (such as they were) of pre-revolutionary, Christian Europe (the Europe, the France destroyed by modern political ideologies and systems so brutally effectively). Claim the credit for social systems (the so-called “Ancien Régime”) it is (or should be) obvious are utterly incompatible with the ideologies espoused. This kind of even basic intellectual dishonesty is (or should be) unacceptable even to non-Catholics, and indeed for the exponents of these ideologies themselves.

Last edited 5 months ago by Juan Manuel Pérez Porrúa
Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
5 months ago

The inertia of the political class is replicated on this side of the Channel. The difference being that the British equivalents of the Melechonistas will soon be in power, even if under a leader – for now – who is not to their liking.

Rob N
Rob N
5 months ago

There is only 1 real solution – the mass expulsion of the non native citizen sections of society. But that is something none of the West’s weak (politically and individually) politicians will do. Easier for them to just let their countries implode and say it wasn’t their fault.

Katalin Kish
Katalin Kish
5 months ago

“Mind your own business!” – seriously? Isn’t terrorism everyone’s business? I wouldn’t be fighting organised crime in Australia either via making posts and comments on every possible platform if Australia had functional law-enforcement. Silence is consent.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
5 months ago

The Islamists are killing the globalist dream. That’s why the globalists in the French (and British) establishment are so keen to tell us ‘nothing to see here’ after one of the worst atrocities of modern history.

alan bennett
alan bennett
5 months ago

Macron is not the only useless leader, is there one anywhere in Western Europe that has the real citizens interests at heart.

Ray Andrews
Ray Andrews
5 months ago

Anyone not labeled an Islamophobe by the left is in fact suicidal.

Steve Jolly
Steve Jolly
5 months ago

Globalism is failing under strain for a number of reasons. The ‘End of History’ narrative is falling apart and anyone still clinging to the crumbling wreckage is bound to be a bit frazzled at this point. Even the staunchest true believers have to be riddled with doubt by now. I honestly wonder whether Macron is lying or if he actually did hear the comment about how they wouldn’t be in this situation with Le Pen as president, despite nothing of the sort actually being said by anyone present. It’s quite possible for a stressed mind to contort one statement into something completely different, maybe whatever phantom was haunting his subconscious mind at the time. Like a Freudian slip, maybe Macron has inadvertently revealed his actual fear that voters will draw the same conclusion

Last edited 5 months ago by Steve Jolly
Simon Neale
Simon Neale
5 months ago

A failed state, you say? Goodness, I pity any countries involved in a protectionist customs union and hyperstate-building adventure with it, then.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
5 months ago
Reply to  Simon Neale

Ha, yeah!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  Simon Neale

I have just returned from a three week French odyssey and can report that it seems to be in perfect working order.

The horror of their gross over reaction to Covid is now forgotten and the recent catastrophic defeat in the Rugby shrugged off. I am sure that Gallic pragmatism will soon ‘sort out’ Islam one way or the other.Vive la France!

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
5 months ago

I take it you didn’t hear many Sirens then?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Gers is a long way from Arras!

Yoram Mimoun
Yoram Mimoun
5 months ago

The big problem is that little by little French peoples begin to understand the catastrophic situation in which they are and the reaction of the crowds to such a defeat of the elites never ends in a smooth and seamless transition from one way of governing to another, but rather in a manifestation of anger which is totally unforecastable and generally dangerous. The will of politicians to stem a legitim global critic the dominating ideology strengthen it in a way that make it unmanageable. In France, in the will to fight alt-right, centrists have forgotten that Nazism has blossomed because countries silenced the idea that Germany has not been treated properly after WW1 and by not treating these arguments rationally, they explode to the face of the world. I fear that is what is going on in Europe in an analogous way although the illegitimate repression is not toward a country but a way of seeing the world.

Peter Mott
Peter Mott
5 months ago

It can migrate to UK. France’s colonial connection to North Africa produces more militants than ours to India/Pakistan. But the process is the same and our institutions are no fitter to resist than the France’s as far as I can tell. Perhaps I should say it is migrating to UK.

Noah Ebtihej Sdiri
Noah Ebtihej Sdiri
5 months ago

France is a failed nation with a State. Somalia is a nation with a failed State.

J. Hale
J. Hale
5 months ago

The only reason France might become a “failed state” is because they naively allowed immigrants to come to France from their former colonies, such as Algeria. Common sense suggests that if the Arabs kick you out of their country, then you’d be an idiot to let them come to your country.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago

Perhaps the French will have to return to the tactics of 1961?

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Last edited 5 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Peta Seel
Peta Seel
5 months ago

Superb article, thank you.

Rob Britton
Rob Britton
5 months ago

Seems like France is not that much different from Britain in the direction the country is taking.

Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
5 months ago

Macron is a tool of the oligarchs who also run the WEF. Just look at the WEF website for all you need to know about him.

John Riordan
John Riordan
5 months ago

I’m no fan of Emmanuel Macron but it is worth pointing out that the neuralgic problem of Islamist activism in the West is a problem that no politician has managed to deal with effectively while still protecting the cherished principle of individual liberty.

And this is, of course, exactly the gauntlet that has been thrown down by political Islam: our tolerance is to be deliberately pushed past the point where we are expected to tolerate the intolerable.

Last edited 5 months ago by John Riordan
Mike K
Mike K
5 months ago

Un paye de merde

Champagne Socialist
Champagne Socialist
5 months ago

Always amusing to see this writer’s cut-and-paste predictions of catastrophe for France. Maybe one day the publications who print this drivel will realize that she hasn’t the faintest idea of which she speaks.
Funny for me though! Vive la France!

Martin Butler
Martin Butler
5 months ago

Interesting that the dogmatic universalism in France seems to have bred a more extreme islamism. In effective this has meant ignoring the problem. The UK doesn’t have the same problems because we have confronted the problem, and although not perfect by a long way, most immigrant populations in the UK do have a stronger sense that they are part of Britain and by and large feel at home here. Far less alienation.

Rob N
Rob N
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

As you say the UK is in a much better position. Only 20% of our Moslems have sympathy for ISIS and only 4% would actively support ISIS.

Great position to be in.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  Rob N

Numerically how many is that 4% you speak of?
How many forthcoming ‘outrages’ will that translate into over the next few years ?

Last edited 5 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Martin Butler
Martin Butler
5 months ago
Reply to  Rob N

Sources for those stats?

hayden eastwood
hayden eastwood
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

Since you ask, Martin, I was just reading the below the other day:
https://www.icmunlimited.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Policy-Exchange-ICM-Muslims-Survey-web.pdf?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

Core findings include:
– Only 53% of British Muslims want ‘to fully integrate with non-Muslims in all aspects of life’. That means more than 2 million muslims do not want to fully integrate with their surrounding culture.
— 37% would like to integrate on some things but favour separation from the non-Muslim majority in schooling and law.
— 7% ( 266,000) admit to wanting ‘a separate Islamic life as far as possible’, or ‘a fully separate Islamic area in Britain subject to Sharia Law and government’. 
— 7% support the aim of ISIS in setting up a caliphate. A quarter of a million people who would be arguably recruitable to an extreme group.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago

So that 7% who loathe us, ironically represent a city the size ROCHDALE.

Anthony Rice
Anthony Rice
5 months ago
Reply to  Rob N

Does that not mean 120,000 in UK support ISIS, not good news.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
5 months ago
Reply to  Rob N

And there are only 8000 known terrorist sympathisers on the watch list …

Martin Butler
Martin Butler
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

Not sure what all the down ticks are for. Is it that what I say is not true? Thought it was a positive point. We are a relatively successful multi-cultural society. Some might wish we were white homogeneous and Christian but we’re not. And there is for the simple reason for this. We have a history that involved running countries all over the world. Daren’t say colonialism here!

hayden eastwood
hayden eastwood
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

Pay no attention to them Martin, some people on this forum are a little rude and don’t like to hear alternative thoughts. Keep up the comments, I appreciate them even if I don’t always agree with them.

Anthony Rice
Anthony Rice
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

We are NOT a successful multi-cultural, society, NO society can be multi-cultural but multi- fragmented. Most of those not of indigenous white European back ground do NOT integrate nor intend to do so. Desecrate our Cenotaph, they ain’t for us but a trojan horse in our midst. Future major trouble makers.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  Anthony Rice

Seconded.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
5 months ago
Reply to  Anthony Rice

Anthony, I agree with you, and the developments I have been observing for 20+ years now, are very troubling indeed.

Carl Valentine
Carl Valentine
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

I thought your point was fair.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

I appreciate your comment, and, of course, I defend your right to write/state/say whatever you want, but I disagree with the premise that we are a successful multi-cultural society. I suspect that the people who downvoted your comment share my viewpoint, but may have not wanted to take the time to respond. We have an increasing number of cities, towns, and boroughs where Western values are no longer lived; places where many of our laws only exist on paper, but have no impact on the people who reside there.
They do not support the equality of men and women; they don’t believe in the rights of the individual, but instead favour collectivism; and they dismiss religious freedom, and actively persecute members of their own community who do not want to abide by their rules. Honour killings are an extreme form of that, but I am personally familiar with a case where a young woman was disowned, threatened, verbally and physically abused by her family, because she no longer wanted to wear religious garb and desires to live her life outside the limitations and restrictions imposed by her community.
It’s still possible to do that, and to permanently escape the confines and influence of these enclaves, but it is becoming more difficult as their reach broadens. I find that very troubling, and in my view it’s definitely not a sign of successful integration.

hayden eastwood
hayden eastwood
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

We may have less problems for many reasons, many of which we don’t fully understand.
But the universal assumption among the left-leaning apparatchiks that run these countries is that the fault is always with the host country for “being horrid” to newcomers.
The rationale is that once we simply accommodate their needs and give them more welfare and more opportunities and “make them feel more welcome” then they’ll all become doctors and engineers and productive members of society.
The organ harvesters and child traffickers have just had their feelings hurt. Once we organise enough gender non-binary poetry slams for them they’ll become invaluable players in the Human Resources departments of large multinational companies, working tirelessly to remove the stigma associated with organ harvesting so that more HR jobs can be created.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

Aren’t you forgetting the French had a merciless ‘little’ war in Algeria between 1954*-62?
By comparison our ‘little’ war in Ireland 1969-1997, pales into insignificance.
However, even here in our benighted island, there was considerable anti-Irish feeling resulting in at least two spectacular ‘miscarriages of justice’, and even the late Lord Denning thought we should ‘have hanged the Guildford Four’ without more ado!

(* Corrected thanks to Ms Isabelle Dubois.)

Last edited 5 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Isabelle Dubois
Isabelle Dubois
5 months ago

Just for the sake of accuracy: the war in Algeria actually started in 1954. Merciless is the word. Atrocities were committed on both sides. It was also called the “Troubles” at the time, like in Northern Ireland.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
5 months ago

Yes 1954, the year the Western Region reintroduced ‘The Bristolian’, and Dien Bien Phu, how silly of me, I thank you.

I find that Irish euphemism ‘The Troubles’ to be absolutely absurd. It was a very nasty little war, that had its share of atrocities, and is still NOT quite over.

However one very unusual aspect of it was that a fairly random bunch of ‘Council House killers’ other known the IRA did twice try to emulate the fabled ASSASSINS of the 11th century AD, even if unknowingly.

Their attack on the Grand Hotel in Brighton very nearly decapitated the British State, and must rank as one the most spectacular ‘bomb plots’ of the century, rivalling that of July 1944, against Adolph.
The subsequent use of a mortar against No 10 Downing St during nice Mr Major’s residence was somewhat similar.

The Assassins would have been proud.

Last edited 5 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Kayla Marx
Kayla Marx
5 months ago
Reply to  Martin Butler

The UK has not confronted the problem. Mass migration continues, and it seems no one can stop it. A good portion, if not most, of this migration is Muslim.