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laurence scaduto
laurence scaduto
6 months ago

It’s interesting, apropo of other things, that in all this talk about science-fiction and all these imagined futures, there is no mention of children.

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
6 months ago

Ballard essentially wrote about cults, which used to be postmodern but is now very modern given techno-Gnosticism and the Left´s embrace of both transhumanism and religious war machines.

Richard 0
Richard 0
6 months ago

Ballard was genius. Read him avidly in my twenties. Went back to some of his writing 30 years later. Usually a good test to see if good writing holds up. It did. ‘The Concrete Island’ a modern-day take on Robinson Crusoe held up well and still plays out in my head. And although I haven’t re-read ‘The Crystal World’ it remains strongly with me today.

RM Parker
RM Parker
6 months ago
Reply to  Richard 0

His short stories are dazzling too: sometimes baffling, sometimes unsettling, frequently mordant. If you’ve not yet imbibed, I’d recommend them.

Richard 0
Richard 0
6 months ago
Reply to  RM Parker

Strongly agree with your choice of adjectives. I started out with his short stories and think it’s time to read them again. I belong to a book club and although we have been adventurous in some of our choices I would not recommend Ballard as I think he is an acquired taste. Maybe Empire of the Sun as it might be considered more conventional.

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
6 months ago

That is one dubious picture for UnHerd to put up!

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
6 months ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

Yes, what is it? I want to watch that film!

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
6 months ago

I’m told it’s from Crash, a movie about people who get off on car crashes.

RM Parker
RM Parker
6 months ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

I think that’s correct. The book is vastly more disturbing, brilliant (IMO), and quite the most revolting novel I have ever read.
Recommend it, I do not, for fear of what might be inferred of me for doing so!
But I agree with the thesis that Ballard was an astute observer of humanity. Early years in a Japanese internment camp in WW2 probably fed into that – though I’m told that he opined of prep school, that it reminded him of the camp in many ways, though in school the food was of lower quality and less plentiful.
A writer worth reading, however – sed caveat lector!