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Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago

Thank you for that brilliant evisceration of the Pax Gallica.

When I read something like this it reminds me that the late Cecil Rhodes Esq was absolutely correct when he said:-
“Remember that you are an Englishman, and have consequently won first prize in the lottery of life.”

Last edited 7 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Bruno Lucy
Bruno Lucy
7 months ago

What a fitting reference Charles
..the very same Rhodes who
.:
Rhodes used his political power to expropriate land from black Africans through the Glen Grey Act, while also tripling the wealth requirement for voting under the Franchise and Ballot Act, effectively barring black people from taking part in elections.
I want more of your unbiased wisdom

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  Bruno Lucy

Vae Victis! And Oriel College will be forever grateful for his munificence, unlike many decidedly ungrateful Rhode’s scholars!

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
7 months ago

The political machinations and corruption is mind blowing. This is the first I’ve heard of any of this.

David McKee
David McKee
7 months ago

This is very interesting. A few hypertext links would have been useful, to substantiate the points made by Mr. Finlator.
What he does not explain is why Ali Bongo chose to downgrade his relationship with France. If it was as lucrative for him as it was for M’ba and Omar Bongo, why would he want to do that? And why would the French have allowed him to do that?
It is good to see that Unherd is branching out from established journalists, writers and academics.

Phil Rees
Phil Rees
7 months ago
Reply to  David McKee

Because China is more ‘rewarding’?

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
7 months ago
Reply to  Phil Rees

Most likely. Articles like this always remind me of how progressive Africa would be today if only it weren’t for those pesky Europeans. Who knows, left all alone for the past 2 centuries, Africa could have become the model for societal evolution?

Peter Buchan
Peter Buchan
7 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees


as if you know the answer to such a complex counter factual. Oh, wait, you’re European; the most flowered branch of the Burning Bush.
Please

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
7 months ago

The trial of Elf was widely reported in the papers and was indeed a veritable sleazefest.

One of the defendants ( a woman) who had decided to rat on others (I think because of a failed ‘affaire du coeur’) started to tear it all down in the witness box, and when questioned about her bedhopping and morals, replied in a manner worthy of Carmen Maura in The Law of Desire ‘je suis la pute de la RĂ©publique’.

Although she later backtracked a bit when there was no longer an audience to play to.

Steve White
Steve White
7 months ago

Here is the deal, we in the West need to figure out where we stand, and we need to move forward in the new multipolar world that exists. Which that means a lot more diplomacy among other things, and also genuine goodwill. Trying to preserve the past is just going to make us all more unpopular than we already are, and so that is a form of isolationism that we can’t afford, one that is thrust on us against our wills. We don’t call all the shots in the world anymore, and doing things the old way is only going to make us smell more rotten to the rest of the world. Really we should try to win nations over with goodwill, and noble and honest efforts. 

Last edited 7 months ago by Steve White
Bruno Lucy
Bruno Lucy
7 months ago

Her name is Christine Devier Joncourt. She used to be the foreign minister Roland Dumas mistress.
But Mike, let me give you this as a refresher : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christine_Keeler
I know that we Gaelic are people of little virtue or principles, but even a body of water called the English Channel, doesn’t change human nature

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  Bruno Lucy

Stop wallowing in self pity, you only demean yourself.

Bruno Lucy
Bruno Lucy
7 months ago

Charles
..there is nothing worse than a poor loser, especially in an argument that isn’t even yours. I suggest you think twice
..well
.a little bit more
.before invariably putting your foot in it.
I’ve got the message ( one would have to be deaf ). reminding me of a quote taken out the last movie version of the 4 feathers where the priest, just before troops are shipped out to Sudan, goes waffling the following:
God has endowed the British race with a worldwide empire, that we may work his will throughout the world”.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  Bruno Lucy

Grow up ! Your last sentence (above), which I repeat:-
“I know that we Gaelic are people of little virtue or principles, but even a body of water called the English Channel, doesn’t change human nature.”
Is simply pathetic, is it not?

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
7 months ago

Surely it’s Gallic not Gaelic as in ‘De Bello Gallico’. I’m reading book 5 and the wicked Caesar is just about to invade our beloved Isles for the second time.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

“Gaelic” is Ms Bruno’s word NOT mine!
My usage was PAX GALLICA, which I think is correct.
Yes Caesar’s account is gripping stuff, as it was meant to be.
I have always liked the account of Aquilifer of the X Legion jumping into the sea and shouting something like “follow your Eagle chaps if nothing else”!

Last edited 7 months ago by Charles Stanhope
Mike Downing
Mike Downing
7 months ago
Reply to  Bruno Lucy

Touché, Bruno.

Of course, our Christine was mortified by the publicity and became a virtual recluse ( not so Mandy ” well he would wouldn’t he?” Rice-Davies who luxuriated in the notoriety).

But your Christine is to be commended for seizing her moment in the limelight with both hands and making me fall out of my chair in a fit of unrestrained giggles.

Bruno Lucy
Bruno Lucy
7 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

My point Mike was to state ( as pointed out to the headmaster above who could reflect on second degree punts) that regardless of the side of the channel we live on, it is a rather risky endeavour to think that one possesses all the virtues the other doesn’t possess. I sometimes feel I am in a muppet show sequel with Statler and Waldorf shouting their abuse from the hip every time France, or Gaelicia

or is it Galicia 
..they lost me
. is the topic of an article.
History is a bi..c

always comes back to bite you in your rear end the minute you start being ahead of yourself. This is something we ALL should keep in mind.
But back to Bongo
.father and son

they might be mother
..rs, but they are OUR mother
..rs, to quote FDR.
Personally, I like to see the military in their barracks and we’ll see how the whole charade turns out. Probably much of the same circus but with different clowns.

Last edited 7 months ago by Bruno Lucy
Mike Downing
Mike Downing
7 months ago
Reply to  Bruno Lucy

I was in a school pantomime when I was little and I’m sure my character was called Ali Bongo. If only I’d known the greatness that lay in store for my bit-part character, I might have taken it all more seriously.

Bruno Lucy
Bruno Lucy
7 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

Mike
I had completely overlooked the following : https://thecommonwealth.org/news/gabon-and-togo-join-commonwealth
it appears Ali Bongo is also your motherfu
r. . Life can be cruel don’t you think ?
What I find bewildering is the article’s author who seems to have overlooked a minor « detail Â».
What did Cecil Rhodes say ? I so very much would like to hear it again.

P N
P N
7 months ago

Sounds like sensible policy from De Gaulle that has served his people well. That was after all his job.
I’m always amused by articles about Africa that assume their oil and minerals could have been extracted by anything other than Western expertise and capital and that the people have therefore been exploited or robbed.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
7 months ago
Reply to  P N

Same with Arabs, Venezuela, Borneo, etc, etc, in fact let’s NOT be modest, EVERYWHERE!

Emre S
Emre S
7 months ago

This is not corruption, this is a glance at a deep state at work. Similar machinations exist elsewhere today, and of course not just for France.

Reginald Duquesnoy
Reginald Duquesnoy
7 months ago

Summa cum laude! What a piece from “just” a student…Plus ça change…
I bet you will have an irresistible offer from the FO or better MI6 upon graduation. Though the CIA pays better!

R Wright
R Wright
7 months ago

“France continued to exploit the country as if it were a colony, in ways more pernicious and systematic than when it exercised real control”
For me is the most interesting aspect of all of this. It turns out the white man’s burden of paternalistic colonialism is far less profitable than partnering with the perrenially corrupt African elite.