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J Bryant
J Bryant
3 months ago

Excellent investigative journalism by Tom McTague and Unherd. I didn’t hear anything that surprised me but it’s important to put some substance behind the widespread suspicions about Tony Blair and his institute (and Ellison’s philanthropy, and the Clinton Foundation, and Soros, and the Gates Foundation, and…yeah, it’s a long list).
Sort of a redundant comment really, but I’m always stunned by the hubris and self-regard by Blair and his like. Somehow they think it’s their appointed role to set the fate of mankind.

Andrew McDonald
Andrew McDonald
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

…..without the tedious/tawdry business of getting elected, or dealing with the little people.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago

…and thus sowing the seeds for the populist revolt which encourages the likes of Blair to get back into politics again.
The term “vicious circle” honestly doesn’t do the phenomenon justice.

Hugh R
Hugh R
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I take it you regard ‘populist’ as a pejorative term.
‘She in glass houses, shouldn’t throw stones’

Paul Curtin
Paul Curtin
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

…messianic self regard.
Do as I say, not as I do and be grateful for me helping myself up the greasy pole whilst making lots of lucre for myself and my friends.
Before his sharp exit BEFORE the inconvenient Iraq report came out he spent his time networking and working the room with his Davos style pals and is reaping the rewards now.
A shadowy man doing shadowy things.

Last edited 3 months ago by Paul Curtin
Alan Kaufman
Alan Kaufman
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

It’s unreasonable to mix in the Gates Foundation with these talk-and-do-nothings. Gates has saved more lives in 20 years than the entirety of Africa’s governments and the West combined.

Mark V
Mark V
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Kaufman

With polio vaccines that spread polio?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

I agree. The truth is that he is going nowhere and is just a part of the New World Order which ultimately will bring suffering to mankind. They are swimming in trillions and are able to bribe all and sundry to get in line. It is our choice to resist it or not.

Phineas
Phineas
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

So true. Look at his inh inhuman attack on Iraq and his never apologizing despite huge Street demonstrations. A narcissist big time

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago

“He flies on private jets and is escorted in armed cars with security always close by.” This is regular behaviour for crime bosses.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Amy Harris

Was he ever convicted of burying the report which told of Blair ignoring advice from top people when, in 2000, led by the EU, he decided to proceed with his plan to get motorists to change from petrol to diesel. Apart from costing motorists £billions, it has probably damaged the health of many and possibly caused deaths. Blair knew that although petrol had higher levels of CO2 , diesel had far higher levels of noxious particulates, which were far more damaging to individuals. If these people were directors of commercial companies they would have been jailed for negligence!
P J Browne

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

Thank you for this information! I had no idea that it was Blair behind the DIEsel scandal!! I will investigate this. I use the example of the diesel scam to wake people up to various nefarious “net zero” schemes and scams that will undoubtedly lead to excessive harm to human beings. There is no conclusive proof that climate change per se will negatively affect the human race (in fact there may be many positive effects) but there IS conclusive proof that actions taken by greedy, power-crazed technocrats WILL!

Last edited 3 months ago by Amy Harris
Melanie Grieveson
Melanie Grieveson
3 months ago

What a good article. How on earth has he managed to schmooze so many leaders with his track record of ruining the UK? It shows how insecure they must feel.
This loathesome individual is bent on tagging and labelling everyone on planet earth and succeeds in making this woman determined to keep off every database that it’s humanly possible to do so. If it means I’m unable to travel then so be it.

As for global health initiatives, if they spent less on trying to vaccinate everyone (which iatrogenic harms probably cause much of the illness in the world) and more on supplying clean water and basic sanitation then they might conceivably be of some use to mankind.

Robert Cattonar
Robert Cattonar
3 months ago

They are Machiavellian, narcissistic, psychopaths with a Jesus Complex.

Glyn R
Glyn R
3 months ago

…and because they – the Blairs, Schwabs, Soroses and Gates of this world – do in fact wield immense power and influence they are extremely dangerous. A danger which is underestimated at our peril.
Their shared agenda is global and is in agreement with WHO and UN goals. Currently we see Blair influencing Starmer, he was in and out of No.10 during the pandemic, no doubt selling the ‘need’ for vaccine passports – which are an essential ingredient of digital governance, Blair’s prize goal. With the coming of a cashless banking system and biometric information passports a Chinese style social credit system with be imposed and all pretence of democracy finally swept away.
Hope i’m mistaken but the signs as to the destination we are hurtling towards couldn’t be clearer.

Last edited 3 months ago by Glyn R
Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Glyn R

Let us not be TOO cruel but for an accident of birth the wretched Blair creature would have been a superlative Tory Wet, alongside the likes of Howe, Hesseltine, Portillo, Clarke, Cameron, May, and last but NOT least Johnson.

Mark Gourley
Mark Gourley
3 months ago

Not an accident of birth but an accident of marriage.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Glyn R

So what is wrong with this agenda? I want to agree but not entirely sure why. Got to resolve!!! Ukraine – Russia conflict first.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
3 months ago

It’s tragic really. He really thinks he can rescue his legacy by doing what he did to destroy it in the first place.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

In the interests of ‘fair play’, Blair’s most egregious crime, the Iraq War needed the votes of over 140*wretched Tory MPs to cross the line.

(* I have the names recorded for future reference.)

Last edited 3 months ago by stanhopecharles344
Gerard A
Gerard A
3 months ago

I should be astonished that the Bungler of Baghdad, who invaded Iraq without a post victory plan leading to rise of IS etc can be taken seriously as an implementor of policy. It is disturbing that I am actually not suprprised. Money and connections are much more influential than ability.

Susan Grabston
Susan Grabston
3 months ago

Great job team. Britain’s WEF, bought to you from the man who hopes to succeed Schwab. The rising kleptocracy is one to watch over the next 10 years. Geopolitical hehemonic tensions, sovereign debt crisis, generative AI applications, ageing demographcs, and soi-disant climate change, mean major changes lie ahead. These organisations are, indeed, poising themselves for a reset.

Last edited 3 months ago by Susan Grabston
Chipoko
Chipoko
3 months ago

Committed UK to War against Iraq without a mandate on the basis of lies about weapons of mass destruction. b*****d! His massive wealth isolates him from the consequences of his disastrous worldview.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Chipoko

Not sure it was thougt to be a ‘lies’ at the time. Hindsight is a wonderful thing!!

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter Lee

It was a load of hyped up twaddle, badged as ‘intelligence’ to serve a pre-set agenda. In any case, a few outdated Scud missiles with alleged chemical warheads, ‘WMD’? As a sovereign nation, Iraq had a perfect right to nuclear weaponry, let alone that sort of crude 1940s-era independent deterrent. Israel, the USSA, Pakistan, India and France were all well known to have nuclear missiles that could ‘hit Cyprus within 30 minutes’: yet that wasn’t treated as an excuse for the UK to invade them.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

I thank the author for updating me on what Mr Blair has been up to. I actually voted for him back in the 90s, as many did, believing he would rid us of what the ‘evil, greedy Tories’ were doing at the time. I used to like his energy and zeal, and what for a while appeared to be a gift for plain speaking.
 But then came the lies and deception of 9/11 and the Iraq War; his anti-democratic meddling in Brexit; and most recently, his garish labelling of those Britons who chose not to take the Covid jab, as “idiots”.
 Given what has been unfolding from this sinister health debacle, his advice and opinion must now be considered dangerous, ill-informed, and possibly even suspect.
I feel the sooner he withdraws from advising the British government, the better. People with his views cannot be trusted.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

Perhaps you would like to shoot him?
Rather like you thought that Ms Ashli BABBIT deserved to be SHOT?

M J Craig
M J Craig
3 months ago

What a daft thing to say. Rather betrays your mode of thinking I suspect.

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
3 months ago

I voted for the b*****d 3 Times. Mea Maxima Culpa.

James Kirk
James Kirk
3 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

You should be ashamed of voting Labour, never mind Blair.

Brenda Holliday
Brenda Holliday
3 months ago
Reply to  James Kirk

That’s a bit harsh. That comment from a true blue Conservative who feels disenfranchised.

Jonathan Nash
Jonathan Nash
3 months ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

I think 1997 was excusable – it was “time for a change”. No free pass on the next two I’m afraid.

Dumetrius
Dumetrius
3 months ago

For my sins I used to work on immigration for a small campaigning body, ‘helped’ by a ‘partnering’ org funded by Blair and Soros.

A lot of the job was keeping them out of our meetings . . . on our issues.

Because it emerged that they didn’t have any issue of their own, well none so much as a permanent need for attention.

Phil Mac
Phil Mac
3 months ago

He’s shallow. I don’t subscribe to the idea of him as some nefarious Great Reset agent, he’s just superficial.
Look at everything he did while PM; fatuous and damaging Constitutional changes, screwing up further education, clueless on the economy to the point he delegated that to Brown and headed off to International Politics as fast as he could.
He’d be deeply at home in a large Corporation redirecting it from the messy business of beating competitors and serving customers and focussing on ESG.
I’ll give him one thing, he’s quite possibly the Worlds leading schmoozer.

Last edited 3 months ago by Phil Mac
Simon Neale
Simon Neale
3 months ago

Such is the life of Blair in “retirement”. Aged 70, he works with the zeal of a man with something still to prove

His innocence?

something perhaps to redeem.

His immortal soul.

Andrew Buckley
Andrew Buckley
3 months ago

The new face of global socialism!

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
3 months ago
Reply to  Andrew Buckley

I assume you’re being sarcastic, but, in reality, as you well know, and primarily for the benefit of e.g. any American readers who may be more inclined to take your comment at face value, Blair is a socially-moderate Tory, who has more in common with e.g., John Major or Michael Heseltine than he does with any traditional socialist Labour person.
For instance, real British socialists detest Tony Blair, and the angry epithets and put-downs used to describe him by the British hard-left are (ironically) very reminiscent to those that a typical Unherd reader would use to describe him:
https://socialist.net/blairism-a-legacy-that-must-be-buried/
Even as far back in 1996, his essential conservatism was noted:
“And Blair agrees with her. He is the first of the Tories’ political opponents ever to concede that they have largely won the argument. An anthology of Blair’s recent reflections speaks for itself.
“I believe Margaret Thatcher’s emphasis on enterprise was right.”
“A strong society should not be confused with a strong state.”
“Duty is the cornerstone of a decent society.”
“Britain needs more successful people who can become rich by success through the money they earn.”
“People don’t want an overbearing state.”
Someone who knows him says, “You have to remember that the great passion in Tony’s life is his hatred of the Labour Party.”
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1996/06/the-paradoxical-case-of-tony-blair/376602/

Last edited 3 months ago by Frank McCusker
polidori redux
polidori redux
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

For the benefit of any Americans viewing, Blair is not a socially moderate anything. He is, and always was, a charlatan. Gordon Brown, a flawed individual admittedly, clearly saw through him.

Last edited 3 months ago by polidori redux
David Harris
David Harris
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

And we all saw through Broon.

Middle March
Middle March
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

This is true. His focus was on the aspirations of individuals. He wasn’t a big-state guy.

The labor unions didn’t like him because he believed that they glorified “working class” status. He understood that most people were acquisitive and aspired to improve financially.

Ian McKinney
Ian McKinney
3 months ago

Treacherous betrayer of Britain, ruination of the nation, now he brings his destruction to the world. It would be better if we had imprisoned him as would have been just.

James Kirk
James Kirk
3 months ago

Global change? To what? Stability in the Middle East? A home for the refugees to return to? An end to the Ukraine confrontation? Rebuilding Ukraine? Curtailing eastern fossil fuel use, if it is in fact even necessary?
Blair still has blood on his hands and no obvious philanthropy to wash it away. His influence is yet to trickle down to 23 Acacia Avenue; or Karachi.
His ilk, the Clintons, Obamas, Trudeaus, Bidens, Arderns, the Oz Labor Party, Scholz, Macron, Rutte must be a severe disappointment to him. They’ll be ousted soon. Leaving him where? The UK Labour Party and their two dimensional mannequin leader?

Neil Ross
Neil Ross
3 months ago

Having read this excellent article one can only appreciate even more why Brexit happened? The sheer conceit of Blair to airbrush the Iraq invasion, David Kelly’s suicide(or murder?) for revealed the WMD lies, the secret plan for mass migration from the EU, the 2008 UK Banking Crash and the immoral home confinements and vaccine mandates out of his past is incredible.
November 1997 Tony Blair “”I think most people who have dealt with me think I am a pretty straight sort of guy, and I am,”
Sadly, so many are still taken in by the fakery!

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago

As a student in the 1990s I was extremely disappointed in Blair. I was never really into politics, but back then many of us believed that Labour being voted in would reverse the trend of growing inequality in Britain. Blair radically transformed Labour from a working class party to a middle-class party. After a few months it was very clear he was more concerned with how he came across and joining the ranks of the rich than actually doing anything useful for the working poor.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago

Really great article – thank you. Full of very interesting information – and even a reference to Goodbye, Lenin…a favourite of mine since I saw it in the cinema in Munich back in 2003.
The bits which particularly leapt out at me were the paragraphs about Blair’s tendency towards going for things he has faith in. I read “My Journey” while on holiday in 2012 and I do recall becoming quite uncomfortable about how closely Blair’s religious faith was tangled up in big political decisions such as Iraq.
While political decisions are never purely rational and have elements of emotion, power-play, moral values and ethics all bound up in them – I think it was the way Blair was so up front about his (religious) faith that made me start seriously questioning his leadership.
Reading this, it appears that this Blairite “faith” isn’t just of a religious bent, but extends to ideas or technological development. This enthusiasm comes across as being a bit childlike in nature. He has a sort of “faith in faith”.
And that’s all lovely for him on a personal level, but when faith comes into contact with big politics, it means that big decisions are being made on the back of something quite intangible, non-transparent and inexplicable…which, unsurprisingly, fails to inspire “faith” in the people who have seen where Blair’s decisions got us previously.
I’m sure that other leaders are guided by their faith too, but the trick is to keep quiet about it. Blair seems to think that he’s some kind of messiah and that talk of faith is a part of the role he has been sent to play.

Last edited 3 months ago by Katharine Eyre
William Shaw
William Shaw
3 months ago

He should be in prison.
My conscious is clear, I never voted for him.

Last edited 3 months ago by William Shaw
Sophy T
Sophy T
3 months ago

Getting to grips with democracy one private jet at a time.

Jaden Johnson
Jaden Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Sophy T

See also Bill Gates. Although that’s more solving the climate crisis, one PJ at a time. (Apparently he has four.)

polidori redux
polidori redux
3 months ago

I admit, to my eternal shame, that in 1997 I voted for this charlatan.

Last edited 3 months ago by polidori redux
Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Don’t worry, we all make mistakes.
I seem to recall millions of the ‘master race’ saying the same thing about Adolph!

Rainer Zuhlke
Rainer Zuhlke
3 months ago

As with all politicians, past and present, opinions on Blair vary. However, your comment is not only unjustified, but grossly inadequate.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Rainer Zuhlke

Could you expand on that please?

As at 12.15 BST you have had two hours to explain yourself? What’s the problem?

Last edited 3 months ago by stanhopecharles344
j watson
j watson
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

At least shows you were right once PR. Hold onto that.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I did in 2001 and 2005 so I’ll dive right into that pool of eternal shame with you.

James Jenkin
James Jenkin
3 months ago

‘But how much of this is actually real? “Do governments really want his strategic advice,” one person who knows Blair put it to me, “or his phone number?”’

So, the obvious question is – what benefit does Tony actually offer? Why do all these VIPs meet him, and give him money?

Simon S
Simon S
3 months ago
Reply to  James Jenkin

The obvious suspicion, weirdly not raised in this article, is the TBI acts as a conduit for corporate / “philanthropic” bribes to government officials and relevant “delivery” leaders to adopt the TBI’s clients’ agendas.

Last edited 3 months ago by Simon S
Kat L
Kat L
3 months ago

Just read an op ed in the Spectator World about Barack Obama’s third term as shadow government in the Biden White House. How these people live in a completely different world but yet exert such influence on ours is truly terrifying.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
3 months ago

Power without responsibility…

Jaden Johnson
Jaden Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Smith

Power without accountability, more like.

Norman Powers
Norman Powers
3 months ago

Pretty good investigation, more like this please!

Andrew H
Andrew H
3 months ago

In a nutshell, he still thinks he’s the messiah.

Barbara Stevens
Barbara Stevens
3 months ago

Their Terrifying Plan written by Vernon Coleman. Sums what is happening in the world by powerful rich people determined to change how we hoi polloi will live in the future.

Campbell P
Campbell P
3 months ago

Bush offered him a place at the top table – money, unaccountable power,etc – for backing him on Iraq. That he was fully prepared to lie to parliament, the country – even himself perhaps? –
shows why no one should trust such a messianic maniac. His hubris and hunger caused hundreds and thousands of deaths.

Phillip F
Phillip F
3 months ago

I can see how Blair and his technocrats might be considered an answer to populism, but in another sense he seems rather like a populist: someone riding his “fatalism” regarding globalization and technology, rather than pining away for values of individualism and the natural. In short, an opportunist. As an American, I recall how attractive Blair seemed to many of us that supported Clinton–a liar, but our liar–when Clinton’s bad boy behavior proved so vulgar so quickly. This fine article helps this American realize that saviors with ID cards are everywhere to be feared.

Peta Seel
Peta Seel
3 months ago

An excellent article, well researched and very sinister. Blair has used exactly the same methods as the WEF to expand his influence, placing people at the heart of the governments and administrations where he wants to exert it.
“and even forming an alliance where necessary to defeat their existential enemy: the “populists” who must never be appeased. I was told Blair was firmly in the latter camp”
The irony of this is that Blair himself was the first truly populist leader in modern times after a certain Austrian gentleman in the 1930s, and using many of the same methods like controlling the media via the Murdoch press and, of course, the BBC.
Talking of “methods”, a true anecdote from 1996. Years ago I was very friendly with a woman whose husband ran one of the PR companies that New Labour used. The central Blair cabal would hold meetings at her home, well away from prying ears and eyes. She herself was a life-long Labour supporter. Gradually she started drinking and eventually became an alcoholic. She told me that she heard things at those meetings that frightened the life out of her – literally – she said that if she ever repeated them her life would be in danger. Even in her most drunken moments she never revealed anything to me, just bursting into tears if I tried to probe. Her marriage did not last and I lost touch with her many years ago due largely to her alcoholism – she would phone me at all hours of the night babbling on incoherently – so I do not know what happened to her. She was a highly intelligent woman, and I wouldn’t have said a weak one either, but her life was ruined by what she learned from that association.

Last edited 3 months ago by Peta Seel
David Whitaker
David Whitaker
3 months ago

Don’t you just know that not a cent of the vast sums of money that the TBI sucks in is paid by anyone from their own pocket: it’s all other peoples’ money.

Jeff Butcher
Jeff Butcher
3 months ago

“I am a sprinter,” Ellison once remarked. “I rest, I sprint, I rest, I sprint again.”

Jesus wept….

William Murphy
William Murphy
3 months ago

Thanks for an enthralling article which made my head spin as I tried to connect all the dots, organisations, governments and people. I kept being reminded of Tom Lehrer’s classic lines:

“Evr’y evening you will find him
Around our neighbourhood
It’s The Old Dope Peddler
Doing well by doing good”.

Tony has been doing well by doing good, at least in his own eyes. I loved his pal Larry Ellison’s island project combining a luxury resort with agricultural research.

Practically all the consultancy work in Africa looks like the dictionary definition of “white saviour” initiatives, helping the benighted natives to achieve what they are too stupid or ignorant or corrupt to achieve unaided. Any independent evaluation of all this consultancy money and effort? I guess you would need another bunch of eye poppingly expensive White Saviours to judge what the first lot achieved.

To be fair to Tony, at least he is not lecturing us on climate change while globetrotting on his private jets. And all those armoured cars must burn more gas than your average family hatchback.

Having done some accountancy training, I know that there’s more to financial reports than boring arithmetic can describe. But Larry alone apparently “committed” 83.2 million bucks to the TBI in 2021 when its turnover was 81 million. As Tony’s fellow lawyer pal Bill Clinton would probably say, it all depends what you mean by “committed” and “83” and “turnover”……

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  William Murphy

Good point about Blair NOT haranguing us about Climate Hysteria!
Perhaps “every cloud has………”

Richard Aston
Richard Aston
3 months ago
Reply to  William Murphy

good point about “creative” accounting . As an accomplished bullshit artist we can assume Blair is bullshitting about his financial power and number of staff…800 !

Tom Hammer
Tom Hammer
3 months ago

Reads like a plot for a scary movie.

Alan Kaufman
Alan Kaufman
3 months ago

Sounds like Meghan Markle with a much larger staff.

David Lindsay
David Lindsay
3 months ago

The Wagner Group of the extreme centre.

Alex Vanderlip
Alex Vanderlip
3 months ago

Great work by Tom as always.
What I find interesting is the maximisation of the trend that politicians move away from being drivers of change to merely implements of change.

In a previous age it was not uncommon to see those who wanted to effect change go and get elected. I was genuinely humbled to hear from (now retired) MPs about their sense of duty to help generate positive change.

But first in the US and inevitably in the UK, it has proven much cheaper and more efficient to remain in the private sector and outsource an agenda via funding private offices & think tanks. Tom’s article outlines how the TBI is worthy of a Harvard Business School case study on just such a transition.

Richard Heller
Richard Heller
3 months ago

Excellent piece. Conveys Blair’s narcissism (“to him the world is an endless parade with himself taking the salute”) and his hatred of politics and political choice. In government, he made many speeches suggesting that there was an optimal, expert policy on everything (his) to which no reasonable, patriotic person could resist, Fascist is too easy a term of abuse, but such a belief really was characteristic of historic capital F Fascism. Blair never takes responsibility for the costs of his “expert” policies when they fail, or the populist revolts against them and against expert elites in general. Instead he doubles down on promoting more expert elitism. Blair’s “expert” speech in 2014 deserves more attention – the one AFTER Putin’s first invasion of Ukraine when he promoted co-operation with him against militant Islam. Why do people go on listening to his self-centred, simpering sanctimony – let alone paying for it?

Last edited 3 months ago by Richard Heller
Mark V
Mark V
3 months ago

“At age 70, he works with the zeal of a man” …in the grip of a Faustian bargain.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago

Hardly surprising, UnHerd has obviously ‘caved in’ to external pressure, and in recent weeks the CENSORSHIP has been awful.

Frankly I’m surprised it hadn’t happened earlier.

polidori redux
polidori redux
3 months ago

I queried why a number of my posts had been removed on one day. I received this reply. Make of it what you will.
“Comments are usually temporarily removed due to multiple flaggings by other community members, random spot checks carried out by the system, or spam checks.”
I assume that anonymous flagging is the main cause.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Yes undoubtedly, a plethora of spiteful little worms who are far too easily offended!

Last edited 3 months ago by stanhopecharles344
Melanie Grieveson
Melanie Grieveson
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

It happened to me recently and when I queried it, was told my posts had entered some sort of Junk Mail box. They were quickly restored.

Janos Abel
Janos Abel
3 months ago

Let us look to the root of this kind of social phenomenon.
The total failure of representative political organisation is reflected here. Calling the system representative democracy would be a misnomer.
Western societies have devolved into various shades of oligarchies in he course latter centuries.
And this process took place, sadly, under the collective eyes of the common people who failed to jealously guard their freedom and sovereignty.

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
3 months ago

Ahh, so now we know why the Party in power are not Conservatives.

Carmel Shortall
Carmel Shortall
3 months ago
Reply to  Andrew Martin

They are ALL WEF stooges. Tories, Labour and the other clowns…

0 0
0 0
3 months ago

“The truth is that Blair is only just emerging from a period of his life when public animosity meant that he rarely ventured out in London and, indeed, felt more comfortable not just out of the city but out of the country itself. Looking back, it is astonishing how quickly his reputation fell after leaving office.”

It would give anyone with an ounce of self-reflection some pause for thought, or at least it should. To understand Blair, one needs to watch “The Ghost (Writer)” starring Euan McGregor, Olivia Williams and Pierce Brosnan.

0 0
0 0
3 months ago
Reply to  0 0

On a more comedic note, there’s also this clip which has aged well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZEav9A801A

Tony Lee
Tony Lee
3 months ago

It seemed to me that becoming PM was never more than a stepping stone for Blair and yet his personal hubris did for him in the end. I used to think that he sees himself as our ‘president’, more than a PM and freer to express his opinions than our head of state. When opinion of him and his reputation suffered in the UK, he simply upgraded his ambition and began to see himself as president of the world, with wisdom and guidance to share on anything and everything. The emperor’s new clothes meets the madness of ‘king’ Blair.

David Whitaker
David Whitaker
3 months ago
Reply to  Tony Lee

I think I can understand how he (TB) might feel himself to be the best person to be president of the world: the calibre of political leadership worldwide is so low – and TB would have seen much of it at first hand – and democracy apparently so little valued. He could do a better job than any of them (he would believe) and so what if he wasn’t democratically elected – nobody much cares about that these days.

Richard Irons
Richard Irons
3 months ago

“The truth, I suspect, lies somewhere in the ambiguous soup of human motivation; in the flawed, frail characters of ordinary human beings with conflicting aspirations, trying to do good in the world and for themselves.”

Excellent. It was worth reading for this gem alone. It is a far more accurate description of why people try to do good, rather than the usual, cynical, catch-all description of ‘virtue-signalling.’

Tim Pitt-Payne
Tim Pitt-Payne
3 months ago

More than anything, this sounds like the pathology that CS Lewis describes in his essay “The Inner Ring”, but lived out on a global scale.

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago

It will come back. There’s just an army of trolls here lately. When comments get a lot of flags they get removed, but they always return after 12-24 hours.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Amy Harris

Not so sadly in my VERY recent experience.

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago

Really? How long has it been? I’ve always seen comments restored if they get removed

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Amy Harris

48 hours ago!
But astonishingly it has JUST returned! Hallelujah! But now far too for late debate.
Still somebody in the Führerbunker is paying attention.

As at: 09.49 BST.

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
3 months ago
Reply to  Amy Harris

It is noticeable how much that is happening. Finding the mindless insults don’t get a rise, and unable to engage in debate, they seem to be going for disruption.

john d rockemella
john d rockemella
3 months ago

Well written and articulated, such a shame time and effort is given to the Kissinger and Schwab puppet who has sold out his country and most of the world for ego and a plight to enslave humanity. The money generated is so clear, the price to pay 100ks of innocent lives in Iraq and then Afghanistan, what him and bush did in Iraq, shocks me to the core.
This was a fake war, and no justification, he is a war criminal.
Putin has done far less than this man yet is branded evil, dictator, yet Blair has done some elements of good supposedly??? NO, this is pure evil and will leave to the end of our empire. Huge suffering to come, Blair is just imposing the will of the very powerful, he is the puppet! The people who run the world must have some intelligence and understanding of humans that us mere mortals have no understanding. This has always been the way, they control their spiders through their web of deceit! I would love to understand how they gain this knowledge.

Middle March
Middle March
3 months ago

He’s one reason we don’t see news stories anymore about children and everybody else being bombed in Northern Ireland. That alone would have been enough.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

Thought the piece was just like Blair. Pure class.

John Turnbull
John Turnbull
3 months ago

The comments below reveal what a sad disallusioned society we are in the UK. No wonder that we are slowly sliding down all the international measures of success. We love to critisice but not to do.

Douglas Hainline
Douglas Hainline
3 months ago

I kept looking for something damning here, but didn’t find it. The closest thing to a criticism in this piece is that Blair’s foundation works with illiberal governments, doing things like bringing solar power to a backward nation, or improving its productive capacity in various ways.
However, this — as opposed to sending in the 82nd Airborne — is exactly the way to advance the cause of liberal democracy in these countries. Economic development means social change: the growth of an urban middle class, who are the bearers of liberal democracy. But the timescale is in multiples of decades, not years.
So good for Blaire and Ellison, contradicting the stereotypical image of the rich as social parasites!

Gerard A
Gerard A
3 months ago

If you define liberal democracy as the rich deciding what everyone else does then you probably won’t find anything damning here.

William Murphy
William Murphy
3 months ago

Blair’s involvement in Africa looks like the continuation of colonialism by other means. Apparently the dim witted locals can’t be trusted to govern themselves unless they have several White Saviours advising them.

Middle March
Middle March
3 months ago

Bravo

j watson
j watson
3 months ago

Fair play to him. A politician who remains interested in politics and in changing lives for the better. Could have sat on a yacht in Monaco. Or maybe phoned up old contacts in Whitehall to get his chums and business associates Covid contracts?
One doesn’t have to agree with his politics and I don’t with everything he might expound. One suspects though his Institute become much more successful than he could have envisaged and the danger in that is one can’t control every decision. That’s the danger for him.

Gorka Sillero
Gorka Sillero
3 months ago
Reply to  j watson

“changing lives for the better”
this is a stretch though. a huge, colossal, biblical stretch

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  j watson

At the time of the Iraq War mk11 I was privy to a scurrilous rumour that was circulating in my Club. For brevity’s sake it goes like this.

1: Israel had been paranoid about Saddam Insane and Iraq for years and in 1981 unilaterally attacked Iraq’s embryonic nuclear plant* at Tuwaitha, a few miles south of Baghdad.

2: In 1990 they became similarly excited about the so called Iraqi ‘super gun’ and despatched Mossad to assassinate its designer in Brussels. (five rounds to the head at point blank range.)

3. With the collapse of the USSR in 1989-91 Iraq became a ‘free radical’ and was skilfully lured into invading Kuwait, and hence Gulf/Iraq War One.**

4: Despite the best efforts of the US Airforce to bomb Iraq “back into the Stone Age” and the subsequent ‘No Fly Zones’, the Israelis were still NOT convinced that Saddam had been neutered.

5: 2001, and the ‘Miracle of 9/11, and the beginning of the insidious and simply fantastic whispering campaign that “ it was Saddam wot done it”!

6: Israel sees its chance and threatens to execute a unilateral nuclear strike on Iraq, killing perhaps six million. However as an alternative if the West promises to execute a conventional land and air based Crusade, killing perhaps only six hundred thousand, Israel will supply sufficient completely ‘bogus intelligence’ material to justify such a Crusade.

7: Faced with this unpleasant scenario both Bush & Blair have little option but to opt for the conventional Crusade. Excruciatingly off course, they CANNOT tell the rest of us and are thus damned for eternity as warmongering criminals. My heart bleeds.

Well it is certainly sounds like a plot worth of Machiavelli or even Otto von Bismarck, and bar a death bed confession we shall never know.
However we should remember Marcus Tullius Cicero’ famous adage when faced with such a conundrum: “Cui Bono?”- “who benefits?”

(* Despite the fact it was incapable of producing nuclear weapons!)
(** Historically a part of Ottoman Mesopotamia until it was grabbed as a British Protectorate in 1899.:

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
3 months ago

Brevity? Thanks for sparing us the long version.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Martin Smith

Thank you, but only about 250 words, what’s the problem?

Last edited 3 months ago by stanhopecharles344
Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago
Reply to  j watson

I’d much rather he did sit on his yacht in Monaco tbh.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
3 months ago

Appalling stuff. Imagine continuing to work, setting up a consultancy, and earning money. Despicable behaviour (even though the word is littered with other right-wing think tanks, which are rammed full of conservative and former conservative politicians, starting with Truss).  All the gnashing Unherd crypto-commie hypocrites will be out in force in the comments lol

polidori redux
polidori redux
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I didn’t realise that you were a fan. Showing your true colours today! Lol.
PS: Frank, what exactly is a crypto-commie hypocrite? You are getting a bit swivel-eyed, if you don’t mind me saying so.

Last edited 3 months ago by polidori redux
Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

He has the misfortune of hailing from Northern Ireland.Sadly there is NO known cure.

Albert McGloan
Albert McGloan
3 months ago

Yourself and ‘j watson’ are UnHerd’s greatest assets: the two halves of the English psyche in Platonic form.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Albert McGloan

Thank you, praise indeed!

Gorka Sillero
Gorka Sillero
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

“gnashing Unherd crypto-commie”

lol, this is a bit harsh coming from someone who simps for Blair

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago
Reply to  Gorka Sillero

*** 5 laughing-until-I’m-crying emojis *** – brilliant!!!

Terry Connolly
Terry Connolly
3 months ago

TB is a force for good – always has been. Appreciated the factual stuff less so the snide comments.

Gerard A
Gerard A
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Connolly

Name me a few “good” things he has done?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Connolly

Wasn’t his late mother, one Hazel Corscadden from Northern Ireland?
You wouldn’t be showing bias here by any remote chance Mr Connolly?

Terry Raby
Terry Raby
3 months ago

He is using his considerable abilities for the good. I see nothing to contradict this in the above. Many of the comments seem rather dyspeptic and silly.

Andy Moore
Andy Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Raby

For the good of who?

Amy Harris
Amy Harris
3 months ago
Reply to  Andy Moore

The COMMON good, of course! The utilitarian golden chalice. Always leads to genocide, it’s so darn good.

Melanie Grieveson
Melanie Grieveson
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Raby

There are many very capable people in prison, which is where Blair would be in a just world.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Raby

You do know who Tony Blair is, right?

Albert McGloan
Albert McGloan
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

He won three General Elections. Not everyone who voted for him has come to hate him (unfortunately).

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Albert McGloan

Thanks to the truly dreadful Tory Party then on offer.
Sadly little, if anything has changed.

David Taylor
David Taylor
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Raby

Totally agree.

The conspiratorial loons are out in force with this one. Frothing out of their mouths, with newspaper clippings covering their walls.

“WAKE UP AND JOIN THE DOTS MAN!!”

Last edited 3 months ago by davidneiltaylor
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0 0
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Raby

I agree. Everyone has some form obligation to the community they inhabit. Most of us do a bare minimum, merely exercising our right to vote. Others do more by degrees. People of intelligence and – yes – power have a greater obligation to a wider community commensurate with their influence and reach. Blair’s reach is global. While some kind of transparency is important, I have no problem with the rich and powerful doing good things for humanity. Indeed, that is the only way they can justify themselves. A messiah complex, possibly, but so what? This is a world in need of saving.

Last edited 3 months ago by 0 0