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The dawn of the Bohemian Peasants This new class is more than just an aesthetic

The High Priestess of Bopeaism (Taylor Swift, Evermore)

The High Priestess of Bopeaism (Taylor Swift, Evermore)


July 17, 2023   6 mins

It is a drab Wednesday in April and I am sat naked in a transparent plastic shed. Tucked away in a forest near the sleepy town of Uckfield, a woman starts to hit me in the face with some birch twigs, while another incants tales of Sussex’s dragons. “Beware the dragons of St Leonard’s Forest,” she wails. “They’re not like the winged dragons of Wales. These ones are like serpents, slithering and squirting a deadly and smelly slime that torments the people of Horsham.”

The woman thrashing me pauses to throw a ladleful of eucalyptus-infused water onto a sauna stove. There is a hiss, and steam clouds the room. “Beware the puddles, for they are fiery intra-planetary cauldrons, used by the Sussex dragons to travel to Australia,” chants the English siren. Outside, a hip Canadian woman chops wood to sensuous French-Malian rock-kora fusion playing from a portable speaker. Others are busy at work, sweeping and carefully preparing the enchanted sauna ceremony.

My birch-twig attacker is Jamie, the ethereal saunameister of this spa-start-up-cum-pagan-temple. In a previous life, Jamie was a MacBook-using, flat white-sipping hipster photographer from east London, growing slowly disillusioned with the pressure and precarity of the city’s gentrification. Then, one day, while hungover at a music festival, she stumbled upon a sauna. “I came out of the sauna into nature and plunged into a cold lake and was reborn,” she says.

Months later, Jamie left London, moved to Sussex and set up her first sauna venture. After just five years, she’s flourishing: “I’ve created a really beautiful life for myself. I live on the beach, I work in a forest, I run my own business. I’m doing work that feels purposeful and impactful.”

In this, Jamie’s rebirth is far from unique. Quite the opposite: she is part of a vanguard rejecting the refined hedonism of the globalised Brooklyn-Shoreditch urban creative class. Suffocated by the downward mobility induced by our neo-feudal economy and its spiritually malnourished consensus, Jamie is part of an emergent socio-economic class — the Bohemian Peasantry, or Bopeas for short.

The Bopeas are a new paradigm in culture and consumption. They are the descendants of other post-war consumer groups: the Hippies, the Yuppies, and the Bobos of Soho House. However, unlike their predecessors, who grew from the boom of generational upward mobility and urbanisation in the 80 years after the Second World War, the Bopeas are responding to something else: a crisis of what Peter Turchin calls “elite overproduction” — and a diminishing need for everyone to be an urban creative.

For the past year, I have been investigating and decoding the experience of the downward mobility of the elite-aspirant creative class across the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, and China. As part of a collective of social scientists, I have been exploring optimistic alternative responses to widespread disenchantment. Contrary to the depressing “opting-out” tales of global NEETs, hikikomori and the Great Resignation, I studied people and communities finding new ways to live a fulfilling life within society.

Like the rest of their generation, the Bopeas were bred to chase a particular vision of the good life, but they now know they cannot replicate their parent’s lifestyles — waiting until their deaths to inherit. Thomas Piketty calls this the return to the “inheritance society” that has been the norm for most of history. Steve Bannon puts it more bluntly: they are “nothing but 19th-century Russian serfs. They’re better fed; they’re better clothed; they’re in better shape; they have more information than anybody in the world at any point in time, but they don’t own anything.”

Yet rather than succumbing to the doom and gloom or burning themselves out by hustling, Bopeas are developing new ways to build a life. They cultivate meaning and status in ways that expand the ideals of success beyond conventional material accumulation and instantly decaying “cool”. Moreover, while this modern serfdom may not be able to accrue capital, Bopeas are spoiled for choice in a consumer universe built by brands. They can’t buy houses in the city, but they do have disposable income and a clear idea of “how to spend it”.

But what are Bopeas? The Bopeas are diverse in demographics and geography, but united by a shared mindset. Like the creative class that now dominate our culture, they draw inspiration from the bohemian ethos of artistry, non-conformity and self-expression. At the same time, however, they are wary of the narcissistic excesses of bohemianism, and enjoy a neo-medieval peasant worldview rooted in community values, rituals and natural rhythms.

The Bopeas don’t wear a uniform. There is no universal white sneaker choice and craft-beer calling card. Instead, it’s all about the niche, the hyper-local and the mythic. While they might be wearing an expensive French worker’s jacket bought from a nose-to-tail restaurant, they are more easily spotted by their deeds and search for harmony. Unlike their success-obsessed Yuppie and Bobo ancestors, Bopeas want to flourish holistically. They want to feel deeply in tune with their bodies and the world. They are the wild swimmers,  the sauna obsessives, and the knitting, foraging and fermenting revivalists. They’re the ones rewilding our forests and guts. They are already shaping elite culture — they’re the reason the Financial Times wants you to buy £1,225 Givenchy cargo gardening trousers.

In essence, Bopeas opt for enchantment over refinement. In an algorithmic meat market of homogenous aesthetics and lifestyles, Bopeas differentiate themselves through their intentional cultivation of harmony. While Bopeaism incarnates in individuals — Paul Kingsnorth is perhaps the Bopea made flesh — it is also an aspirational mindset. During the Covid lockdowns, for instance, many of us transfigured into sourdough Bopeas.

The Bopeas I studied are essentially united by a desire to nurture genuine connection and finding meaning in life. They care about wider societal issues such as climate change and inequality, but they are rarely overtly political. Instead, they are driven by a small-scale politics of harmony channelling their values into making a positive, sustainable impact in their immediate world through their work, social and family lives. They don’t care for empty virtue-signalling.

Bopeas want to immerse themselves in nature and quirky culture. All of them are tired of trends, off-the-shelf lifestyles, and endless inane scrolling and swiping that leaves them feeling hollow. Instead, they seek wisdom that provides lasting guidance to shape life, even if it comes from ancient practices and traditions — or even (gasp) institutional religion. There is no central inspiration hub for Bopeas. They curate their own constellation of ideas and wisdom from a dynamic fusion of writers, podcasters and micro-influencers who align with their particular Bopea passions.

Most importantly, Bopeas don’t want to do it alone. Frustrated by the loneliness of modern branded “community”, Bopeas seek the comfort of tight-knit fellowships pursuing shared projects and a soulful life comforted by real community obligation and nature. In many ways, then, the Bopeas are a kind of post-internet Arts and Crafts movement. And yet, the dark satanic mills they rebuff are not the soulless Victorian workhouses, but the design agencies and tech start-ups that inhabit the WeWorks that have colonised the very same factories. Indeed, if the Victorian backlash was ideologically led by John Ruskin and manifested by William Morris, then their Bopea spiritual successors are King Charles III and Taylor Swift.

Like Ruskin, Charles III serves as the Apex Bopea philosopher king. With his tireless environmentalism, Perennialist theology, and mystic outlook, Charles has set the agenda for a bohemian neo-medieval revolution that places harmony and ancient wisdom at the centre. As Aris Roussinos writes, as “a Christian mystic, a layer of hedgerows and protector of the soil, there is a mythic quality of identification between our King and his land which we have not experienced for some time”.

Meanwhile, like Morris, Taylor Swift has served as an avatar of the King’s Bopea ideology. In the midst of the lockdowns, Swift used her albums Folklore and Evermore to position herself as the ultimate Bopea vessel. With her knitted cardigans, enchanted forests and magic, Swift catapulted the niche Pinterest-TikTok cottagecore aesthetic community to a global platform. By celebrating the wonders of a simple, traditional lifestyle surrounded by a bucolic paradise and manual crafts, she made the enchanted Bopea worldview sexy.

Elsewhere, Bopeaism continues to be evangelised to the masses through notable Bopea Elders. Jeremy Clarkson’s Clarkson’s Farm is now the most-viewed original series on Amazon Prime in the UK. Nick Cave has transitioned from post-punk enfant terrible to earnest coronation-attending Christian. Tilda Swinton set up a tiny Steiner school in rural Scotland where phones are banned and children must learn to care for bees. Even Carrie Johnson, with her strawberry picking and knitted blankets, has become the nation’s Bopea tradwife. These are clear signals of a subtle re-enchantment of the world — a paradoxically countercultural conservatism.

Beyond the global stage, the internet is awash with Bopea missionaries. One does not have to search too far before getting lost in the world of doomstrolling, Irish water worshipers, entrepreneurs restoring small holdings, fungi activism, and Gladstone’s foraging and wild-swimming chef many-great-granddaughter. Bopeaism is simultaneously everywhere and totally invisible to those that are not looking. Some go full Bopea and are living off the grid. Others are more likely to gentrify semi-urban spaces like Hastings or Polperro — or perhaps Bruton if there’s family money. Financially, most Bopeas often maintain more conventional urban creative industry jobs — in marketing, design or tech — but work remotely from their more affordable homes. However, the most committed enter the Bopea culture production industries, selling Bopea artefacts and services to wealthier Bopea aspirants — like Jamie and her sauna business.

What next? Will Bopeas go the same way as the hippies? Bopeaism certainly seems more robust than its ancestors. It is, after all, more than just a set of aesthetics and practices that you can trade in and out of, but rather a mindset inspired by a hunger for timelessness. It serves as the North Star of a more harmonious post-internet worldview that rises above the digitally mediated pleasure that David Courtright terms “limbic capitalism”. But if it is to survive, it must be nurtured carefully and protected from the trend-market feedback loop, lest it be bled dry and discarded.

When Richard Florida published the The Rise of the Creative Class in 2002 and anointed the Yuppie-slaying “No Collar” hipsters and Bobos, policymakers and corporate brands descended like vampires. Within two decades, the creative class has been drained of all vitality. Investment bankers now wear white sneakers. Wetherspoons sells smashed avocado muffins. Everywhere looks like an Airbnb. In such a world, Bopeaism is surely something that must be nourished and sustained — not for a generation, but for eternity.


Louis Elton is a theological anthropologist, strategy consultant and conceptual artist.


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Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Brilliant. Pure Nathan Barley. I laughed all the way through, in a nihilistic sort of way. You know the end-times are near when someone can call themselves a ‘theological anthropologist, strategy consultant and conceptual artist’ with a straight face.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

“theological anthropologist, strategy consultant and conceptual artist”
Next year’s degree course of choice. Don’t knock progress.

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

When people make these kinds of claims about themselves, we need to ask to see some of their products. Show us one of your strategies, or your art works.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

You’ve got to hope the article is satire. It’s either a brilliant wind-up or something quite different.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Agreed. I was especially enchanted by this one: “By celebrating the wonders of a simple, traditional lifestyle surrounded by a bucolic paradise and manual crafts, she made the enchanted Bopea worldview sexy.”
Nothing like a near billionaire celebrating the simple lifestyle after a mad pursuit of the opposite.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
11 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Be fair!.I’m pretty sceptical as well, but none of the people mentioned kind of dropping out had been billionaires, or anything close to that.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
11 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Be fair!.I’m pretty sceptical as well, but none of the people mentioned kind of dropping out had been billionaires, or anything close to that.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

Agreed. I was especially enchanted by this one: “By celebrating the wonders of a simple, traditional lifestyle surrounded by a bucolic paradise and manual crafts, she made the enchanted Bopea worldview sexy.”
Nothing like a near billionaire celebrating the simple lifestyle after a mad pursuit of the opposite.

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Why should we think he has a straight face?

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Is that really fair tho?
The article puts in a lot of effort to distinguish the new alternative lifestyle movement from shallow hipsters.
Not sure what it really amounts to in the end.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

“theological anthropologist, strategy consultant and conceptual artist”
Next year’s degree course of choice. Don’t knock progress.

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

When people make these kinds of claims about themselves, we need to ask to see some of their products. Show us one of your strategies, or your art works.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

You’ve got to hope the article is satire. It’s either a brilliant wind-up or something quite different.

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Why should we think he has a straight face?

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Is that really fair tho?
The article puts in a lot of effort to distinguish the new alternative lifestyle movement from shallow hipsters.
Not sure what it really amounts to in the end.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Brilliant. Pure Nathan Barley. I laughed all the way through, in a nihilistic sort of way. You know the end-times are near when someone can call themselves a ‘theological anthropologist, strategy consultant and conceptual artist’ with a straight face.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

But if it is to survive, it must be nurtured carefully and protected from the trend-market feedback loop, lest it be bled dry and discarded.

Therein lies the rub. I’ve no doubt those present in Haight-Ashbury in 1967 thought pretty much along the same lines, but at least the Bopeas (a pleasantly unfashionable word) have modern precedents to alert them to the dangers of being engulfed by the forces they’re seeking to evade, if not entirely escape. I wish them well, and can see very little to be critical of in their intentions.
One other aspect of the article draws my attention – the term “creatives”. It’s something bandied about as if everyone has to be “creative” or be nothing. What’s to differentiate someone who thinks of themselves as a “creative” in 2023 from someone who ploughed the tenured fields in 1223 to “create” food or watched over a loom in a dark satanic mill in 1823 to “create” cloth? In any of these cases, is there anything original being brought forth, in a fusion of material or ideas which hitherto hadn’t been conceived of? That’s being creative, rather than artisanal (and nothing wrong with the latter at all). But let’s not debase yet another word by making it mean something that it doesn’t, in the same way that “hate” is now debased. Having said that, it may be the hippies who’re to blame for the start of word-debasement with “love”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

You’re reminding me of that guy in Monty Python’s Holy Grail that didn’t want to marry the woman his father came up with, with ” great tracts of land”, but wanted to sing.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

to be fair, Shein have been doing a pretty good job of bleeding the cottagecore aesthetic dry for awhile now. Shein are the dark satanic mills of today, with their underpaid workers producing fast fashion styles ripped off from small Etsy sellers.

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Isn’t it all just more 70’s recycling ? It’s like a re-working of a commune. We’ve got DM’s, donkey jackets, we’ve had synthpop, I’ve seen Che Guevara posters at the local UNI and everyone’s going on strike. We’re having another green revival with all the apocalyptic chatter and greenwashing. People are wearing political badges again, and workwear. Sainsburys is full of these magazines called ‘Breathe’ and ‘Inspire’ that all have the same washed-out ethniccy look with an article about how to make your own espadrilles. Even the dreaded wedgies and dungarees are having a moment. They’ll all be weaving wallhangings next week. Then when the powers that be realise that the economy is about to collapse, we’ll be off on the next consumer binge all repackaged as progress.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

Yea, this is just another reincarnation of it. Add the Simple Lifestyle trend and/or the Minimalists and it’s just history quickly repeating itself, but repackaged with immense wealth. For heaven’s sake, L.L. Bean created a huge business, selling over one of the previous incarnations.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Downing

Yea, this is just another reincarnation of it. Add the Simple Lifestyle trend and/or the Minimalists and it’s just history quickly repeating itself, but repackaged with immense wealth. For heaven’s sake, L.L. Bean created a huge business, selling over one of the previous incarnations.

Steven Somsen
Steven Somsen
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

“is there anything original being brought forth, in a fusion of material or ideas which hitherto hadn’t been conceived of?”
Agree fully. Writing a good book may be creative but who created the first book, conceived the idea of something which didn’t exist before. So writing a book is in a sense a reproduction. Conceiving Airbnb, Ueber, the pill etc etc is in that sense more creative than many things we call creative. And up till today it is mostly men who conceive the new and create it.

Gayle Rosenthal
Gayle Rosenthal
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Somsen

And yet there are men who yearn to be women …. Creation is in the living of life and reproduction …. even if it is just another book.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Very good point. Gayle.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Very good point. Gayle.

Davina Powell
Davina Powell
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Somsen

“Up til today it is mostly men who conceive ‘the new’ and create it”??! Yeah, you tell that to generations of mothers stretching back to
 oh, but that’s not PROPER creativity, so that doesn’t count?!! Well, they do say history is written by the victors
 (although I swear a load of ‘em are now presenting as victims – go figure ‍♀)
Or, as that ‘marvel’ Ruskin put it, “all women’s art is but pale imitation of men’s”
 As an artist I’m not offended because I know he was talking about ‘art business’
 which is a whole other thing (thanks to the Renaissance) lol

Last edited 1 year ago by Davina Powell
Gayle Rosenthal
Gayle Rosenthal
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Somsen

And yet there are men who yearn to be women …. Creation is in the living of life and reproduction …. even if it is just another book.

Davina Powell
Davina Powell
1 year ago
Reply to  Steven Somsen

“Up til today it is mostly men who conceive ‘the new’ and create it”??! Yeah, you tell that to generations of mothers stretching back to
 oh, but that’s not PROPER creativity, so that doesn’t count?!! Well, they do say history is written by the victors
 (although I swear a load of ‘em are now presenting as victims – go figure ‍♀)
Or, as that ‘marvel’ Ruskin put it, “all women’s art is but pale imitation of men’s”
 As an artist I’m not offended because I know he was talking about ‘art business’
 which is a whole other thing (thanks to the Renaissance) lol

Last edited 1 year ago by Davina Powell
LCarey Rowland
LCarey Rowland
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Methinks the Beatles are responsible for this phenom; they urged us with “All you need is love. . .

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  LCarey Rowland

So true, followed by various gurus.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

But not famed Beat poet and erstwhile “guru” Allen Ginsburg, who disagreed with the Beatles’ mantra saying that “awareness is what you need, because without awareness there can be no love”. I don’t know which is correct but the Beatles definitely had the catchier song title!!

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
11 months ago
Reply to  james goater

..

Last edited 11 months ago by Richard Craven
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
11 months ago
Reply to  james goater

I suspect we need more than love and awareness.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
11 months ago
Reply to  james goater

..

Last edited 11 months ago by Richard Craven
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
11 months ago
Reply to  james goater

I suspect we need more than love and awareness.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

But not famed Beat poet and erstwhile “guru” Allen Ginsburg, who disagreed with the Beatles’ mantra saying that “awareness is what you need, because without awareness there can be no love”. I don’t know which is correct but the Beatles definitely had the catchier song title!!

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  LCarey Rowland

So true, followed by various gurus.

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Little to be critical of? Knackering our river beaches, over – gathering fungi, wild garlic etc and taking chunks of what 200 years ago was usually common woodland and keeping it in private use?

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

You’re reminding me of that guy in Monty Python’s Holy Grail that didn’t want to marry the woman his father came up with, with ” great tracts of land”, but wanted to sing.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

to be fair, Shein have been doing a pretty good job of bleeding the cottagecore aesthetic dry for awhile now. Shein are the dark satanic mills of today, with their underpaid workers producing fast fashion styles ripped off from small Etsy sellers.

Mike Downing
Mike Downing
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Isn’t it all just more 70’s recycling ? It’s like a re-working of a commune. We’ve got DM’s, donkey jackets, we’ve had synthpop, I’ve seen Che Guevara posters at the local UNI and everyone’s going on strike. We’re having another green revival with all the apocalyptic chatter and greenwashing. People are wearing political badges again, and workwear. Sainsburys is full of these magazines called ‘Breathe’ and ‘Inspire’ that all have the same washed-out ethniccy look with an article about how to make your own espadrilles. Even the dreaded wedgies and dungarees are having a moment. They’ll all be weaving wallhangings next week. Then when the powers that be realise that the economy is about to collapse, we’ll be off on the next consumer binge all repackaged as progress.

Steven Somsen
Steven Somsen
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

“is there anything original being brought forth, in a fusion of material or ideas which hitherto hadn’t been conceived of?”
Agree fully. Writing a good book may be creative but who created the first book, conceived the idea of something which didn’t exist before. So writing a book is in a sense a reproduction. Conceiving Airbnb, Ueber, the pill etc etc is in that sense more creative than many things we call creative. And up till today it is mostly men who conceive the new and create it.

LCarey Rowland
LCarey Rowland
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Methinks the Beatles are responsible for this phenom; they urged us with “All you need is love. . .

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Little to be critical of? Knackering our river beaches, over – gathering fungi, wild garlic etc and taking chunks of what 200 years ago was usually common woodland and keeping it in private use?

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

But if it is to survive, it must be nurtured carefully and protected from the trend-market feedback loop, lest it be bled dry and discarded.

Therein lies the rub. I’ve no doubt those present in Haight-Ashbury in 1967 thought pretty much along the same lines, but at least the Bopeas (a pleasantly unfashionable word) have modern precedents to alert them to the dangers of being engulfed by the forces they’re seeking to evade, if not entirely escape. I wish them well, and can see very little to be critical of in their intentions.
One other aspect of the article draws my attention – the term “creatives”. It’s something bandied about as if everyone has to be “creative” or be nothing. What’s to differentiate someone who thinks of themselves as a “creative” in 2023 from someone who ploughed the tenured fields in 1223 to “create” food or watched over a loom in a dark satanic mill in 1823 to “create” cloth? In any of these cases, is there anything original being brought forth, in a fusion of material or ideas which hitherto hadn’t been conceived of? That’s being creative, rather than artisanal (and nothing wrong with the latter at all). But let’s not debase yet another word by making it mean something that it doesn’t, in the same way that “hate” is now debased. Having said that, it may be the hippies who’re to blame for the start of word-debasement with “love”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago

Social scientist studies social science graduates.
It’s not exactly Tom Wolfe.

MĂŽnica
MĂŽnica
1 year ago

A “theological” social scientist, no less.

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago
Reply to  MĂŽnica

Well they certainly don’t have any scientific methods to hand ( their choice – even social science can be rigorous) So blind faith is all they have left.

Last edited 1 year ago by mike otter
mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago
Reply to  MĂŽnica

Well they certainly don’t have any scientific methods to hand ( their choice – even social science can be rigorous) So blind faith is all they have left.

Last edited 1 year ago by mike otter
MĂŽnica
MĂŽnica
1 year ago

A “theological” social scientist, no less.

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago

Social scientist studies social science graduates.
It’s not exactly Tom Wolfe.

Cynthia W.
Cynthia W.
1 year ago

“Bopeaism certainly seems more robust than its ancestors.”
It’s hard to believe someone typed this line unironically, but it’s a weird ol’ world out there.

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Cynthia W.

Yeah, I read this and thought, and precisely how are they different from the first bohemian movement, the arts and craft movement, the hippies and all the folks afterward that did this? I’m not against them. I just don’t think they are new or need a new name at all. Also I think the right name is cottage core, really.
They won’t die out because this instinct is with us.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

It’s hard to be original. It’s the same mindset repackaged.

Cynthia W.
Cynthia W.
1 year ago

I don’t see any reason to believe this iteration will be either more or less “robust” than previous ones.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

It’s hard to be original. It’s the same mindset repackaged.

Cynthia W.
Cynthia W.
1 year ago

I don’t see any reason to believe this iteration will be either more or less “robust” than previous ones.

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Cynthia W.

Yeah, I read this and thought, and precisely how are they different from the first bohemian movement, the arts and craft movement, the hippies and all the folks afterward that did this? I’m not against them. I just don’t think they are new or need a new name at all. Also I think the right name is cottage core, really.
They won’t die out because this instinct is with us.

Cynthia W.
Cynthia W.
1 year ago

“Bopeaism certainly seems more robust than its ancestors.”
It’s hard to believe someone typed this line unironically, but it’s a weird ol’ world out there.

Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
1 year ago

I don’t read anything about marriage and children. So I suppose these whatsits will die out after a generation.

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago

Well we’re all dying out for that very reason. Increasingly, young ‘uns are deciding that having children is not a realistic option. The reasons are well known and widely documented.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Or, perhaps, the ‘having children while still living the Deliveroo, 400 quid p/m for the hybrid Mini and going on weekend breaks to Barcelona dream’ option isn’t very realistic?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Ah yes, the reason the youngsters are struggling isn’t due to the fact house prices are now many multiples the annual salary, and record rents make saving the deposit nigh on impossible, it’s because they order a takeaway now and again and have the cheek to go on a cheap summer holiday. I’m surprised the avocado on toast didn’t get a mention as well to be honest

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Avo on toast is a cliche. The examples I gave came from an article I read the other day by a mortgage advisor exploding some of the commonly held assumptions about Millennial / Gen Z house-buying issues. TL;DR – there is an unrealistic level of expectation around financial sacrifice involved in house-buying. Ditto, I imagine, kids. Which is why so many 30-somethings buy annoying little dogs and dress them up instead.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

It’s not a financial sacrifice for most, it’s a financial impossibility. The older generation love to look down on the young, whilst being completely oblivious to how much easier it was for them to get themselves a foothold in life.
If both my parents and grandparents were young today, and their lives been the same in regards to leaving school and having children none of them would own their own home. In fact they’d all be reliant on government top ups simply to pay the rent

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I don’t look down on the younger generations at all. I have an 18 year old who I’m genuinely worried about for the reasons you describe. This isn’t, however, a binary argument. Yes, life is very tough for too many under 40-somethings. Yes, the property situation is screwed (loads of reasons, but strangely the one concerning the numbers of people entering the country is a bit ‘problematic’ for the Deliveroo generation). OTOH, for a goodly number, getting on the ladder is entirely possible. Sadly, they were hatched into a world where sacrificing creature comforts isn’t a done thing, and so they carry on paying half-a-grand a month on a flash car lease and don’t even thing about where that money might be better spent.

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

I don’t see too many gen z spending half a grand on a car lease instead of saving for a house. However, just for reference, even paying half down, it cost us 325 at 5 years for our Kia. Not a flash car. Way, way back in the day, 25 years ago, buying my late grandmother-in-law’s (so discounted and not new) Saturn cost 200 a month. We had to get the car or my husband would get fired because the other car we had was occasionally unreliable. I expect a similar car & loan would be more now. The repairs certainly would be. We’ve just been through it. They are insane.

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

I don’t see too many gen z spending half a grand on a car lease instead of saving for a house. However, just for reference, even paying half down, it cost us 325 at 5 years for our Kia. Not a flash car. Way, way back in the day, 25 years ago, buying my late grandmother-in-law’s (so discounted and not new) Saturn cost 200 a month. We had to get the car or my husband would get fired because the other car we had was occasionally unreliable. I expect a similar car & loan would be more now. The repairs certainly would be. We’ve just been through it. They are insane.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Pre 1970 a building society required at least 5% if not 10% deposit for a mortgage, the person to have saved with them for 5 years, proof of a steady job and the mortgage was based upon 3.5 times the husbands salary. Consequently the average house was 3.5 average salary plus 10%. Once the woman’s salary , not the wife’s was included in the mortgage this meant the cost of a home up up to 7 times plus 10% the average salary was possible. Then there was the self certified mortgages.
Britain is politically and economically relatively stable so many wealthy people buy homes in London area. When French tax rates reached 75% many moved to London. This pushes up property prices.
There is then immigration from north to south and into the country.
Much of the legislation for Brown Field devlopment has increased costs. People in Britain has historically not wanted to live in flats because of bad behaviour by neighbours. In countries such as Switzerland and Austria bad behavior is punished. Historically various state bodies bought land from the 1850s which was partly used, for example the massive grounds of mental asylums.
Of all the resources in Britain land which is sensible to build homes upon is the most scarce.
Then there is the nature of jobs. Britain has allowed vast increase in humanities degrees which often result in average and where increases greatly reduce after say 5 to 7 years. Jobs which require professional accreditation such as barristers, solicitors, doctors, engineers may have average pay for the first 5 to 7 years but increases greatly after they pass professional exams.
Someone who leaves school at sixteen years of age takes up a high quality apprenticeship say in electrical engineering, achieves a NVQ 4 or 5, by their mid 20s will have saved money, be well paid and have no university debt. If someone applies to an employer with grade B GSCEs in maths, physics, chemistry, english, history is fit, cheerful, glad of rigorous training, will not have a problem getting a good apprenticeship such as in RN, RAF, utilities, top building companies, manufacturers
Those making decisions lack the breadth of experience and knowledge to apprehend how all thes factors inter act.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

..and to round it out…these younger cohorts are increasingly expecting the government (other taxpayers) to come to the rescue with benefits and programs (student loan cancellation) to save the day….hence ‘vote Democrat’ the party that’s keen to purchase votes via handouts.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

I do have some sympathy for them. Since mid 1960s, obtaining a degree has become far more of status symbol as other routes to the professions have dried up.
As I have mentioned in other posts one could become a Chartered Engineer, officer in RN, Merchant Navy, Army, RAF solicitor, barrister, banking, stockbroker, surveyor, provided one obtained Higher Leaving Cert/ A Levels. However, entry to the professional middle class has become funnelled through having a degree.
In Young Winston, his Father tells him to make something of his life otherwise he will just be a public school layabout livin off the family name.
Someone who obtained Grade A in A levels and S2/S1 in S Levels ( Special Scholarship ) in classical and modern languages, history, pure maths, applied maths and sciences has achieved a far higher standard of education than three quarters of of degrees on offer.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

It seems like you have white males in mind when you suggest possible career paths. Apptitude must be taken into consideration as well as personality type (they go hand in hand). What if one has an artistic temperament? Officer in RN, merchant navy, RAF, banking? I think not.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

Historically young people were apprenticed at the age of fourteen years of age. My Grandmother entered an artists studio at this age and started her working life sweeping up and became at artists , later attending St Martin’s Art School as a student attending night school. Michelangelo, Leonardo and Raphael all started their careers as apprentices.
Wht I hve said is that by having a system whereby to enter the professional middle classes one hs to go to university, when three year degrees have become four and then masters are required, means people do not enter the job markets until their late 20s, have massive debts and delay earning money.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

Point well taken. When I was young (centuries ago!) it was so much easier to get jobs in art or photographic studios without having to have a 3 page resume or a degree.I wouldn’t have had the opportunities I had, nowadays.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

Point well taken. When I was young (centuries ago!) it was so much easier to get jobs in art or photographic studios without having to have a 3 page resume or a degree.I wouldn’t have had the opportunities I had, nowadays.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

Historically young people were apprenticed at the age of fourteen years of age. My Grandmother entered an artists studio at this age and started her working life sweeping up and became at artists , later attending St Martin’s Art School as a student attending night school. Michelangelo, Leonardo and Raphael all started their careers as apprentices.
Wht I hve said is that by having a system whereby to enter the professional middle classes one hs to go to university, when three year degrees have become four and then masters are required, means people do not enter the job markets until their late 20s, have massive debts and delay earning money.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

It seems like you have white males in mind when you suggest possible career paths. Apptitude must be taken into consideration as well as personality type (they go hand in hand). What if one has an artistic temperament? Officer in RN, merchant navy, RAF, banking? I think not.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

You mean like the older generations who out nothing aside for their pension costs or end of life care, expecting the youngsters to look after them through higher taxation in their old age?

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

When pensions started in 1905 in Britain there were 7 people working for one person retired. Most men who undertook manual work died by the age of 68 years which was the majority. People now live to their mid 80s and soon it will be two working for one retired.
Actuaries have been pointing this out for decades.
Basically people will have to save more and undertake some sort of paid work after the age of 60 years.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

So it’s been known for decades, yet the current crop of retirees didn’t do a thing about it, simply expecting the youngsters to pick up the tab? Sort of proves my point does it not?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

What could they do?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

As a generation they could have started a superannuation scheme similar to that of Australia’s for one thing, and actually had a pot of money put aside to pay towards their future care

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

As a generation they could have started a superannuation scheme similar to that of Australia’s for one thing, and actually had a pot of money put aside to pay towards their future care

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

What could they do?

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

The sort of career which enabled people to enter the professional middle classes which has disappeared is becoming a Merchant Navy officer. Captain Woodfield OBE , a year at Warsash School of Navigation, joined Port Line for at 16 years for 3.5 years as an indentured apprentice and passing Second Mates examination at 20 which meant he could keep a bridge watch on hs own. We now have people undertaking four year degrees instead of three, masters and time off travelling the World. Consequently people are only entering the job market in their late 20s.
All these off shore windfarms will need ships for repirs which means officers with Masters tickets. People who have a Masters Ticket, are RNR and those RN trained divers who have passed All Arms Commando course will be very well paid. Flabby people with humanities degrees from ex polys will not be demand.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

The future is bleak in everyway, isn’t it.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

No, we are wealthy, there is no threat from Attila The Hun, Genghis Khan, Hitler, Mao, Stalin or The Black Death.
All we need to do is focus on high quality tempering of the mind and body; to produce skilled intrepid resilient and robust people with a sense of responsibility; not flabby effete impractical types; who consider they are entitled to be spoonfed and have their problems solved by others.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

No, we are wealthy, there is no threat from Attila The Hun, Genghis Khan, Hitler, Mao, Stalin or The Black Death.
All we need to do is focus on high quality tempering of the mind and body; to produce skilled intrepid resilient and robust people with a sense of responsibility; not flabby effete impractical types; who consider they are entitled to be spoonfed and have their problems solved by others.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

Your concluding sentence is an absolute gem! Excellent comment, all told.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

The future is bleak in everyway, isn’t it.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

Your concluding sentence is an absolute gem! Excellent comment, all told.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

So it’s been known for decades, yet the current crop of retirees didn’t do a thing about it, simply expecting the youngsters to pick up the tab? Sort of proves my point does it not?

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

The sort of career which enabled people to enter the professional middle classes which has disappeared is becoming a Merchant Navy officer. Captain Woodfield OBE , a year at Warsash School of Navigation, joined Port Line for at 16 years for 3.5 years as an indentured apprentice and passing Second Mates examination at 20 which meant he could keep a bridge watch on hs own. We now have people undertaking four year degrees instead of three, masters and time off travelling the World. Consequently people are only entering the job market in their late 20s.
All these off shore windfarms will need ships for repirs which means officers with Masters tickets. People who have a Masters Ticket, are RNR and those RN trained divers who have passed All Arms Commando course will be very well paid. Flabby people with humanities degrees from ex polys will not be demand.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

When pensions started in 1905 in Britain there were 7 people working for one person retired. Most men who undertook manual work died by the age of 68 years which was the majority. People now live to their mid 80s and soon it will be two working for one retired.
Actuaries have been pointing this out for decades.
Basically people will have to save more and undertake some sort of paid work after the age of 60 years.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

I do have some sympathy for them. Since mid 1960s, obtaining a degree has become far more of status symbol as other routes to the professions have dried up.
As I have mentioned in other posts one could become a Chartered Engineer, officer in RN, Merchant Navy, Army, RAF solicitor, barrister, banking, stockbroker, surveyor, provided one obtained Higher Leaving Cert/ A Levels. However, entry to the professional middle class has become funnelled through having a degree.
In Young Winston, his Father tells him to make something of his life otherwise he will just be a public school layabout livin off the family name.
Someone who obtained Grade A in A levels and S2/S1 in S Levels ( Special Scholarship ) in classical and modern languages, history, pure maths, applied maths and sciences has achieved a far higher standard of education than three quarters of of degrees on offer.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

You mean like the older generations who out nothing aside for their pension costs or end of life care, expecting the youngsters to look after them through higher taxation in their old age?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

They may get in the forces, but increasingly the construction firms want you to have done a pre trade course before they’ll look at you. Very few hire people straight from school these days as was the case when I was 16 and started my apprenticeship.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Look at Switzerland. Basically the progressive education post 1945 and especially massive expansion in humanities courses post 1960s has in the USA andUK has caused many of the problems you speak of; Switzerland has taken a different approach with education and training.
Education in Switzerland – Wikipedia
In addition, competence is increased by National Service and many middle managers are officers in elite units.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Look at Switzerland. Basically the progressive education post 1945 and especially massive expansion in humanities courses post 1960s has in the USA andUK has caused many of the problems you speak of; Switzerland has taken a different approach with education and training.
Education in Switzerland – Wikipedia
In addition, competence is increased by National Service and many middle managers are officers in elite units.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

..and to round it out…these younger cohorts are increasingly expecting the government (other taxpayers) to come to the rescue with benefits and programs (student loan cancellation) to save the day….hence ‘vote Democrat’ the party that’s keen to purchase votes via handouts.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

They may get in the forces, but increasingly the construction firms want you to have done a pre trade course before they’ll look at you. Very few hire people straight from school these days as was the case when I was 16 and started my apprenticeship.

Aphrodite Rises
Aphrodite Rises
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Just after my ex husband and I bought our first house: a two up, two down terraced with the bathroom an extension to the kitchen, the interest rate increased to 17%. We had to find a lodger to be able to make the mortgage payments. We saved for the deposit by living off my salary and never going out.

Last edited 1 year ago by Aphrodite Rises
Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

It requires a smaller percentage of the weekly wage to service a 17% mortgage of 3 years salary than it does to service a current 6% mortgage of the current house prices which are around 10 years salary you do realise?

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago

It requires a smaller percentage of the weekly wage to service a 17% mortgage of 3 years salary than it does to service a current 6% mortgage of the current house prices which are around 10 years salary you do realise?

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

I don’t look down on the younger generations at all. I have an 18 year old who I’m genuinely worried about for the reasons you describe. This isn’t, however, a binary argument. Yes, life is very tough for too many under 40-somethings. Yes, the property situation is screwed (loads of reasons, but strangely the one concerning the numbers of people entering the country is a bit ‘problematic’ for the Deliveroo generation). OTOH, for a goodly number, getting on the ladder is entirely possible. Sadly, they were hatched into a world where sacrificing creature comforts isn’t a done thing, and so they carry on paying half-a-grand a month on a flash car lease and don’t even thing about where that money might be better spent.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Pre 1970 a building society required at least 5% if not 10% deposit for a mortgage, the person to have saved with them for 5 years, proof of a steady job and the mortgage was based upon 3.5 times the husbands salary. Consequently the average house was 3.5 average salary plus 10%. Once the woman’s salary , not the wife’s was included in the mortgage this meant the cost of a home up up to 7 times plus 10% the average salary was possible. Then there was the self certified mortgages.
Britain is politically and economically relatively stable so many wealthy people buy homes in London area. When French tax rates reached 75% many moved to London. This pushes up property prices.
There is then immigration from north to south and into the country.
Much of the legislation for Brown Field devlopment has increased costs. People in Britain has historically not wanted to live in flats because of bad behaviour by neighbours. In countries such as Switzerland and Austria bad behavior is punished. Historically various state bodies bought land from the 1850s which was partly used, for example the massive grounds of mental asylums.
Of all the resources in Britain land which is sensible to build homes upon is the most scarce.
Then there is the nature of jobs. Britain has allowed vast increase in humanities degrees which often result in average and where increases greatly reduce after say 5 to 7 years. Jobs which require professional accreditation such as barristers, solicitors, doctors, engineers may have average pay for the first 5 to 7 years but increases greatly after they pass professional exams.
Someone who leaves school at sixteen years of age takes up a high quality apprenticeship say in electrical engineering, achieves a NVQ 4 or 5, by their mid 20s will have saved money, be well paid and have no university debt. If someone applies to an employer with grade B GSCEs in maths, physics, chemistry, english, history is fit, cheerful, glad of rigorous training, will not have a problem getting a good apprenticeship such as in RN, RAF, utilities, top building companies, manufacturers
Those making decisions lack the breadth of experience and knowledge to apprehend how all thes factors inter act.

Aphrodite Rises
Aphrodite Rises
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Just after my ex husband and I bought our first house: a two up, two down terraced with the bathroom an extension to the kitchen, the interest rate increased to 17%. We had to find a lodger to be able to make the mortgage payments. We saved for the deposit by living off my salary and never going out.

Last edited 1 year ago by Aphrodite Rises
Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

It’s not just the perceived cost though. They might well be hesitant to bring a child into what’s left of a clapped out country that’s only going to get worse.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

As opposed to bringing one into a war-torn medieval society, or Victorian slum with a toxic factory as the only income option? That didn’t stop our forebears from procreating. I find the reason you put forward an absolute aberration.

MĂŽnica
MĂŽnica
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The difference being, of course, that women now have a choice as to when -and if – to procreate.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Our forebears didn’t have a choice in the matter as there was no birth control. You either lived a life of celibacy or you ended up with children, those were the only options

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Well said!

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Well said!

chris sullivan
chris sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

That is a bit OTT – contraception was not available to your examples !!!

MĂŽnica
MĂŽnica
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The difference being, of course, that women now have a choice as to when -and if – to procreate.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Our forebears didn’t have a choice in the matter as there was no birth control. You either lived a life of celibacy or you ended up with children, those were the only options

chris sullivan
chris sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

That is a bit OTT – contraception was not available to your examples !!!

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

‘don’t buy the glass-half-empty view…..

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

It’s not about being optimistic or pessimistic it’s about being realistic.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

It’s not about being optimistic or pessimistic it’s about being realistic.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Or to bring a child into any part of the world.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

As opposed to bringing one into a war-torn medieval society, or Victorian slum with a toxic factory as the only income option? That didn’t stop our forebears from procreating. I find the reason you put forward an absolute aberration.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

‘don’t buy the glass-half-empty view…..

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Or to bring a child into any part of the world.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

It’s not a financial sacrifice for most, it’s a financial impossibility. The older generation love to look down on the young, whilst being completely oblivious to how much easier it was for them to get themselves a foothold in life.
If both my parents and grandparents were young today, and their lives been the same in regards to leaving school and having children none of them would own their own home. In fact they’d all be reliant on government top ups simply to pay the rent

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

It’s not just the perceived cost though. They might well be hesitant to bring a child into what’s left of a clapped out country that’s only going to get worse.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

“it’s because they order a takeaway now and again”
How about everyday? I remain astonished that the youngins’ pay $5 to $7 a day for their lattes… 

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

None of the youngsters I know are buying $5 coffees every day (many older people are though, perhaps they should be putting that money aside to pay for the end of life care they’ll need one day?).
However for arguments sake let’s say they were. A $5 coffee (or around £3.50) 5 days a week is $1300 (£910) a year. The current UK average house price is around £285k, so a 20% deposit is £57k. Therefore by giving up the small piece of pleasure they derive from a morning coffee, they’ll have the deposit saved in a mere 60 years

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

None of the youngsters I know are buying $5 coffees every day (many older people are though, perhaps they should be putting that money aside to pay for the end of life care they’ll need one day?).
However for arguments sake let’s say they were. A $5 coffee (or around £3.50) 5 days a week is $1300 (£910) a year. The current UK average house price is around £285k, so a 20% deposit is £57k. Therefore by giving up the small piece of pleasure they derive from a morning coffee, they’ll have the deposit saved in a mere 60 years

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

Avo on toast is a cliche. The examples I gave came from an article I read the other day by a mortgage advisor exploding some of the commonly held assumptions about Millennial / Gen Z house-buying issues. TL;DR – there is an unrealistic level of expectation around financial sacrifice involved in house-buying. Ditto, I imagine, kids. Which is why so many 30-somethings buy annoying little dogs and dress them up instead.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

“it’s because they order a takeaway now and again”
How about everyday? I remain astonished that the youngins’ pay $5 to $7 a day for their lattes… 

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Particularly since Spain is burning.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Ah yes, the reason the youngsters are struggling isn’t due to the fact house prices are now many multiples the annual salary, and record rents make saving the deposit nigh on impossible, it’s because they order a takeaway now and again and have the cheek to go on a cheap summer holiday. I’m surprised the avocado on toast didn’t get a mention as well to be honest

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Particularly since Spain is burning.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Or, perhaps, the ‘having children while still living the Deliveroo, 400 quid p/m for the hybrid Mini and going on weekend breaks to Barcelona dream’ option isn’t very realistic?

BW Naylor
BW Naylor
1 year ago

Having kids is just an act of narcissism anyway. Maybe they know the carbon footprint of a child is better than recycling your tin cans and offsetting your flight.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

..or ‘responsibility’…other than themselves…

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Yes, giving birth must pose a dilemma. Hippies weren’t deterred by the prospect of the end of civilization.

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago

Well we’re all dying out for that very reason. Increasingly, young ‘uns are deciding that having children is not a realistic option. The reasons are well known and widely documented.

BW Naylor
BW Naylor
1 year ago

Having kids is just an act of narcissism anyway. Maybe they know the carbon footprint of a child is better than recycling your tin cans and offsetting your flight.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

..or ‘responsibility’…other than themselves…

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

Yes, giving birth must pose a dilemma. Hippies weren’t deterred by the prospect of the end of civilization.

Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
1 year ago

I don’t read anything about marriage and children. So I suppose these whatsits will die out after a generation.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Why do we constantly invent new and sillier names for old phenomena. Just call them rich hippies.

Jack Martin Leith
Jack Martin Leith
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

They also used to be called trustafarians.

Jack Martin Leith
Jack Martin Leith
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

They also used to be called trustafarians.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Why do we constantly invent new and sillier names for old phenomena. Just call them rich hippies.

david lee ballard
david lee ballard
1 year ago

After decades of this in Portland through the 90s I started to refer to this bunch as Poverty Poseurs – they cosplay idealist but are still ultimately bourgeois consumerist, using the extremes of wealth and neo-Luddite pretense to distance themselves from whatever “The Man” is for them. The author really studiously avoids class, as he must to make this all palatable. You can present and self-conceptualize as Earthy as you will, but if you’re sporting $10k in ink and other body modification all done in the last few years, your wardrobe is all $$$ vintage consignment mixed with bespoke small batch hand-sewn organic $$$ tshirts and scarfs, you’re daily drinking $10 specialty Chais and nightly drinking $10 specialty beers, your fridge is stocked with Farm2Table organic produce and grass-fed meat and cruelty-free eggs, and you also eat out at restaurants which specialize in all the above. Then there’s the money for yoga, reiki, acupuncture, and those saunas.
“Downwardly Mobile”, indeed.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago

Sounds about right, to me. Deeply enjoyed your comment, a neat counter-weight to the original colourful, but surely over-the-top, article.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago

Sounds about right, to me. Deeply enjoyed your comment, a neat counter-weight to the original colourful, but surely over-the-top, article.

david lee ballard
david lee ballard
1 year ago

After decades of this in Portland through the 90s I started to refer to this bunch as Poverty Poseurs – they cosplay idealist but are still ultimately bourgeois consumerist, using the extremes of wealth and neo-Luddite pretense to distance themselves from whatever “The Man” is for them. The author really studiously avoids class, as he must to make this all palatable. You can present and self-conceptualize as Earthy as you will, but if you’re sporting $10k in ink and other body modification all done in the last few years, your wardrobe is all $$$ vintage consignment mixed with bespoke small batch hand-sewn organic $$$ tshirts and scarfs, you’re daily drinking $10 specialty Chais and nightly drinking $10 specialty beers, your fridge is stocked with Farm2Table organic produce and grass-fed meat and cruelty-free eggs, and you also eat out at restaurants which specialize in all the above. Then there’s the money for yoga, reiki, acupuncture, and those saunas.
“Downwardly Mobile”, indeed.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago

Here we go again – Boho myth-making and the pursuit of the pure, natural, organic and spiritual life. 
Look further back than the post WW2 era to the artists, philosophers and writers of the Ascona, Monte Verita colony in the early decades of the 20th century and you will see we have been down this anti-patriarchal path before. Such cultural luminaries as CG Jung, Herman Hesse, Franz Kafka, DH Lawrence, the von Richthofen sisters, Isadora Duncan, Rudolf Laban, Otto Gross and the unique eccentric Gusto GrĂ€ser all came under the colony’s influence. The colony has even been credited as the founding ‘spiritual impulse’ of the European (and especially German) Green movement.
Let’s not forget The Carmel Monterey Peninsula Art Colony – another bohemian effort which was set up following the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 and still exists today (albeit as a tourist attraction). 
Not so much a Bohemian dawn as the latest iteration of that perennial Romantic urge to escape the mechanistic, materialistic world.

Last edited 1 year ago by N Satori
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

The author isn’t arguing otherwise.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Nor did he mention those cases I referred to – Ascona, in particular, deserves to be better known.
Anyway Murray, try not to be such a bore. As I said the other day, you have an unfortunate tendency to over-contribute. Are you by any chance trying to draw me into some piffling, time-filling argument?

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

No.

Clearly though, you didn’t learn from the vote-spanking you got for your previous attempt at trying it on.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

No.

Clearly though, you didn’t learn from the vote-spanking you got for your previous attempt at trying it on.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Nor did he mention those cases I referred to – Ascona, in particular, deserves to be better known.
Anyway Murray, try not to be such a bore. As I said the other day, you have an unfortunate tendency to over-contribute. Are you by any chance trying to draw me into some piffling, time-filling argument?

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  N Satori

The author isn’t arguing otherwise.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago

Here we go again – Boho myth-making and the pursuit of the pure, natural, organic and spiritual life. 
Look further back than the post WW2 era to the artists, philosophers and writers of the Ascona, Monte Verita colony in the early decades of the 20th century and you will see we have been down this anti-patriarchal path before. Such cultural luminaries as CG Jung, Herman Hesse, Franz Kafka, DH Lawrence, the von Richthofen sisters, Isadora Duncan, Rudolf Laban, Otto Gross and the unique eccentric Gusto GrĂ€ser all came under the colony’s influence. The colony has even been credited as the founding ‘spiritual impulse’ of the European (and especially German) Green movement.
Let’s not forget The Carmel Monterey Peninsula Art Colony – another bohemian effort which was set up following the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 and still exists today (albeit as a tourist attraction). 
Not so much a Bohemian dawn as the latest iteration of that perennial Romantic urge to escape the mechanistic, materialistic world.

Last edited 1 year ago by N Satori
Emre S
Emre S
1 year ago

I must confess it took me by surprise when the article declared Jeremy Clarkson of all people as a Bopea elder. I find it hard to imagine the Shoreditch crowd seeing Clarkson as a fountain of wisdom, but weirder things have happened I guess.

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

Yes, I laughed at that too and made me think this is an unreliable narrator one way or another. His show is popular not because cottage core/granola crunchy but the juxtaposition of that kinda vibe with Jeremy Clarkson (and all that entails) that makes it truly amusing. And provides the conflict. Getting a truck made by lamboghini that is too big for the field, etc. So yeah, I don’t think the so-called Bopea (nice try author) thinks of him as an elder.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

If anything, Clarkson has perceived the moment and is taking advantage of it…there’s a reason why he’s the top paid TV personality in the UK.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

Or quoting Steve Bannon as a source of wisdom!

Narcissa Smith-Harris
Narcissa Smith-Harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

Yes, I laughed at that too and made me think this is an unreliable narrator one way or another. His show is popular not because cottage core/granola crunchy but the juxtaposition of that kinda vibe with Jeremy Clarkson (and all that entails) that makes it truly amusing. And provides the conflict. Getting a truck made by lamboghini that is too big for the field, etc. So yeah, I don’t think the so-called Bopea (nice try author) thinks of him as an elder.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

If anything, Clarkson has perceived the moment and is taking advantage of it…there’s a reason why he’s the top paid TV personality in the UK.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre S

Or quoting Steve Bannon as a source of wisdom!

Emre S
Emre S
1 year ago

I must confess it took me by surprise when the article declared Jeremy Clarkson of all people as a Bopea elder. I find it hard to imagine the Shoreditch crowd seeing Clarkson as a fountain of wisdom, but weirder things have happened I guess.

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago

“What next? Will Bopeas go the same way as the hippies?”

Well, the early 70s oil shock did for the hippies. And this time there are multiple enormous shocks, each at least as big as that oil shock in the pipeline on their way. When the oil price shock came, they all, to the last man, woman and somewhat older leftie student activist, packed their backpacks at the holy mystic ashram for relieving idealistic young western idiots of their money, chopped their hair, shaved their beards, put on a suit, joined a bank, and started voting tory. What’s different this time is that there are no bank jobs left, nor will there be any creative jobs left once Stable Diffusion and the like are in full swing.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

Why would youngsters today start voting Conservative as they age? What with poorly paid insecure employment, unaffordable house prices, record rents, failing privatised utilities and large student debts, what have they been given that’s worth conserving?

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

My very thoughts.

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

On the face of it I agree they won’t, but there is a mitigation. Those younger generations who have been so fond of Blarite type progressive causes all these years, could well flip rightwards en masse as they start inheriting the estates (primarily housing) from the older generations, instead of promptly donating said inherited wealth to the local branch of Momentum Geriatricℱ, and then seeing out their old age in misery in a bedsit. I suspect they might instead show a quivering middle finger to all the left wing causes they used to support with such enthusiasm all the years of their dispossession, and start voting rightwards instead.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

That’s assuming there’s much left to inherit, once various care homes and hospices have had their cut.
Also by the time most get the inheritance they’ll be approaching 60 themselves. I don’t think a one off financial windfall in your twilight years will be enough to offset a lifetime of resentment at the unfair hand you’ve been dealt personally

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

That’s assuming there’s much left to inherit, once various care homes and hospices have had their cut.
Also by the time most get the inheritance they’ll be approaching 60 themselves. I don’t think a one off financial windfall in your twilight years will be enough to offset a lifetime of resentment at the unfair hand you’ve been dealt personally

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

My very thoughts.

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago
Reply to  Billy Bob

On the face of it I agree they won’t, but there is a mitigation. Those younger generations who have been so fond of Blarite type progressive causes all these years, could well flip rightwards en masse as they start inheriting the estates (primarily housing) from the older generations, instead of promptly donating said inherited wealth to the local branch of Momentum Geriatricℱ, and then seeing out their old age in misery in a bedsit. I suspect they might instead show a quivering middle finger to all the left wing causes they used to support with such enthusiasm all the years of their dispossession, and start voting rightwards instead.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  Prashant Kotak

Why would youngsters today start voting Conservative as they age? What with poorly paid insecure employment, unaffordable house prices, record rents, failing privatised utilities and large student debts, what have they been given that’s worth conserving?

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago

“What next? Will Bopeas go the same way as the hippies?”

Well, the early 70s oil shock did for the hippies. And this time there are multiple enormous shocks, each at least as big as that oil shock in the pipeline on their way. When the oil price shock came, they all, to the last man, woman and somewhat older leftie student activist, packed their backpacks at the holy mystic ashram for relieving idealistic young western idiots of their money, chopped their hair, shaved their beards, put on a suit, joined a bank, and started voting tory. What’s different this time is that there are no bank jobs left, nor will there be any creative jobs left once Stable Diffusion and the like are in full swing.

Andrew McDonald
Andrew McDonald
1 year ago

Assuming this is a satire? It reads like Craig Brown, esp the putative links between (say) Clarkson, Kingsnorth and the Bruton Camelot. If not, meh.

Andrew McDonald
Andrew McDonald
1 year ago

Assuming this is a satire? It reads like Craig Brown, esp the putative links between (say) Clarkson, Kingsnorth and the Bruton Camelot. If not, meh.

Jason Smith
Jason Smith
1 year ago

I’m immediately updating my LinkedIn profile to say I’m a “Theological anthropologist. strategy consultant and conceptual artist”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jason Smith
Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago
Reply to  Jason Smith

I’ve decided to go with “Theological artist, Strategy Anthropologist and Conceptual Consultant”.

Prashant Kotak
Prashant Kotak
1 year ago
Reply to  Jason Smith

I’ve decided to go with “Theological artist, Strategy Anthropologist and Conceptual Consultant”.

Jason Smith
Jason Smith
1 year ago

I’m immediately updating my LinkedIn profile to say I’m a “Theological anthropologist. strategy consultant and conceptual artist”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jason Smith
Mark Melvin
Mark Melvin
1 year ago

I tried to read this all the way through but the word salad and combination of random thoughts made it a bit tricky for a great hair like me. However I do not roll my eyes too much for I was chatting with my older brother a short while ago who was talking about Freemason Lodges in the US that have sprung up from Deadheads. Makes me think anything is possible in this really odd world we are living in. Why not?

Mark Melvin
Mark Melvin
1 year ago

I tried to read this all the way through but the word salad and combination of random thoughts made it a bit tricky for a great hair like me. However I do not roll my eyes too much for I was chatting with my older brother a short while ago who was talking about Freemason Lodges in the US that have sprung up from Deadheads. Makes me think anything is possible in this really odd world we are living in. Why not?

Peter Lucey
Peter Lucey
1 year ago

I had to look up “nose-to-tail” as a restaurant description – it was new to me! (It knocks “farm-to,-table” off the #1 spot in the pretentious-foodie-labels hit parade.)

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Lucey

I assumed it meant you had found a dead mouse curled up in your cinnamon swirl.

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Lucey

I assumed it meant you had found a dead mouse curled up in your cinnamon swirl.

Peter Lucey
Peter Lucey
1 year ago

I had to look up “nose-to-tail” as a restaurant description – it was new to me! (It knocks “farm-to,-table” off the #1 spot in the pretentious-foodie-labels hit parade.)

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

I’m an actual artist who draws and paints for clients in exchange for money. What does a “conceptual artist“ do, and who for?

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

They think about drawing and painting then persuade their mates at an online news publication to pay them to write strange articles alluding to it. 4D chess, innit?

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Cool gig, I guess, but chess requires skill, and so does creating art people will pay for. I’d say the most lucid and interesting people posting on these sites are commenters – and we’re doing it for free. Now that’s quite the 4-D chess model!

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Cool gig, I guess, but chess requires skill, and so does creating art people will pay for. I’d say the most lucid and interesting people posting on these sites are commenters – and we’re doing it for free. Now that’s quite the 4-D chess model!

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

They think about drawing and painting then persuade their mates at an online news publication to pay them to write strange articles alluding to it. 4D chess, innit?

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

I’m an actual artist who draws and paints for clients in exchange for money. What does a “conceptual artist“ do, and who for?

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago

It is a drab Wednesday in April and I am sat naked in a transparent plastic shed. Tucked away in a forest near the sleepy town of Uckfield, a woman starts to hit me in the face with some birch twigs, while another incants tales of Sussex’s dragons. 

“No, madam! How dare you!! When I said ‘happy ending’, I meant could you say how the dragon ends up becoming mindfully vegan.”

Simon Neale
Simon Neale
1 year ago

It is a drab Wednesday in April and I am sat naked in a transparent plastic shed. Tucked away in a forest near the sleepy town of Uckfield, a woman starts to hit me in the face with some birch twigs, while another incants tales of Sussex’s dragons. 

“No, madam! How dare you!! When I said ‘happy ending’, I meant could you say how the dragon ends up becoming mindfully vegan.”

Malcolm Webb
Malcolm Webb
1 year ago

What a lovely start to the week. I chuckled at this nonsense from the very first paragraph and when if came to the Jeremy Clarkson reference I had to laugh out loud. Humour truly is the best medicine!

Malcolm Webb
Malcolm Webb
1 year ago

What a lovely start to the week. I chuckled at this nonsense from the very first paragraph and when if came to the Jeremy Clarkson reference I had to laugh out loud. Humour truly is the best medicine!

NIck Brown
NIck Brown
1 year ago

How does Jamie (really?) get from her beach home to undeniably landlocked Uckfield twenty miles north? I’d like to think it’s a broomstick but I imagine it’s probably the simple, traditional lifestyle of the commuter motorist.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  NIck Brown

Good thought. Perhaps a bicycle?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  NIck Brown

Good thought. Perhaps a bicycle?

NIck Brown
NIck Brown
1 year ago

How does Jamie (really?) get from her beach home to undeniably landlocked Uckfield twenty miles north? I’d like to think it’s a broomstick but I imagine it’s probably the simple, traditional lifestyle of the commuter motorist.

Chris Derek
Chris Derek
1 year ago

Good grief – Taylor Swift?? “Taylor Swift has served as an avatar of the King’s Bopea ideology”. And she is about to make an estimated ÂŁ1,000,000,000 from her upcoming tour!
I did laugh 🙂

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Derek

I also note Ms Swift, as soon as the lockdowns were over, put on her sequinned dress and heels and went partying again (good for her).

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Well, if she didn’t meet another bloke, she’d have nothing to write about

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Well, if she didn’t meet another bloke, she’d have nothing to write about

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Derek

I’ve never gotten the Taylor Swift thing. I presume because it’s generational. However, to have her as an example of Bopeaism really confounds me. I can see siteing Gweneth Paltrow as an example.

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Derek

I also note Ms Swift, as soon as the lockdowns were over, put on her sequinned dress and heels and went partying again (good for her).

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Derek

I’ve never gotten the Taylor Swift thing. I presume because it’s generational. However, to have her as an example of Bopeaism really confounds me. I can see siteing Gweneth Paltrow as an example.

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Chris Derek
Chris Derek
1 year ago

Good grief – Taylor Swift?? “Taylor Swift has served as an avatar of the King’s Bopea ideology”. And she is about to make an estimated ÂŁ1,000,000,000 from her upcoming tour!
I did laugh 🙂

JR Hartley
JR Hartley
1 year ago

In other words, the excess children of the Elites have run out of non-jobs to fo, and are making their own.

JR Hartley
JR Hartley
1 year ago

In other words, the excess children of the Elites have run out of non-jobs to fo, and are making their own.

Adam Bartlett
Adam Bartlett
1 year ago

Thanks for an interesting article with some great & inciteful lines, e.g. “Bopeaism is simultaneously everywhere and totally invisible to those that are not looking.”
I disagree that it’s in danger of ceasing without protection from the “trend-market feedback loop”. Like the article suggests, it’s a diverse de-centralised movement. As N Satori nicely observes, it’s an expression of the perennial Romantic urge. Some local intentional communities & other Bopeas culture will wither, but new expressions will swiftly grow up in their place, especially if mainstream society doesn’t solve issues like elite over production. Some of the communities already know what they have to do to avoid said feedback loop. The classic article ‘Geeks, MOPs, and sociopaths in subculture evolution’ is now rather well known.

Aidan Anabetting
Aidan Anabetting
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Bartlett

Well spoken!

ALLEN MORRIS-YATES
ALLEN MORRIS-YATES
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Bartlett

Thank you for that last reference. Hadn’t seen it. Have passed it on to my daughters who I think will both find it useful.

Aidan Anabetting
Aidan Anabetting
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Bartlett

Well spoken!

ALLEN MORRIS-YATES
ALLEN MORRIS-YATES
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam Bartlett

Thank you for that last reference. Hadn’t seen it. Have passed it on to my daughters who I think will both find it useful.

Adam Bartlett
Adam Bartlett
1 year ago

Thanks for an interesting article with some great & inciteful lines, e.g. “Bopeaism is simultaneously everywhere and totally invisible to those that are not looking.”
I disagree that it’s in danger of ceasing without protection from the “trend-market feedback loop”. Like the article suggests, it’s a diverse de-centralised movement. As N Satori nicely observes, it’s an expression of the perennial Romantic urge. Some local intentional communities & other Bopeas culture will wither, but new expressions will swiftly grow up in their place, especially if mainstream society doesn’t solve issues like elite over production. Some of the communities already know what they have to do to avoid said feedback loop. The classic article ‘Geeks, MOPs, and sociopaths in subculture evolution’ is now rather well known.

Fred Bloggs
Fred Bloggs
1 year ago

Surprisingly, I actually enjoyed reading this. Mind you, I did laugh on occasion, too.

Fred Bloggs
Fred Bloggs
1 year ago

Surprisingly, I actually enjoyed reading this. Mind you, I did laugh on occasion, too.

Gayle Rosenthal
Gayle Rosenthal
1 year ago

As long as there is a right of private property and undeveloped land, there are places to go and call one’s own. What challenges this is taxation and the rapacious appetite of those who imagine some need and collect the taxes in order to be creative with other people’s money.

Gayle Rosenthal
Gayle Rosenthal
1 year ago

As long as there is a right of private property and undeveloped land, there are places to go and call one’s own. What challenges this is taxation and the rapacious appetite of those who imagine some need and collect the taxes in order to be creative with other people’s money.

ralph bell
ralph bell
1 year ago

Really insightful about this heart-warming trend. Its so good to hear something that not materialistic, nihilistic, corporate or all three. Lets hope small communities and working together with nature thrives.

N Satori
N Satori
1 year ago