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America’s desperate dysfunction Trump is both cause and symptom of the US crisis

An American tragedy (Credit: Jabin Botsford/Getty)

An American tragedy (Credit: Jabin Botsford/Getty)


April 1, 2023   7 mins

In his short story A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, Ernest Hemingway describes a deaf old man who likes to sit in the terrace of his favourite cafe late into the evening drinking brandy, much to the frustration of a young waiter who just wants to go home. “He can buy a bottle and drink at home,” the waiter snaps to his colleague, refusing to give the old man a final top up. “It is not the same,” the older waiter replies. “This is a clean and pleasant cafĂ©. It is well-lighted.”

This exchange captures an atmospheric truth about life: sometimes you come across certain places, and even certain countries, that are clean and well-lighted. They are pleasant and harmonious. They work. It is not always easy to say why, but like the deaf old man you feel that they do. They have a sense of national cohesion; of gentle order and prosperity. “Also, now, there are shadows of the leaves,” the older waiter tries to explain to his sceptical colleague. The point is, it is atmospheric.

What strikes me today is how impossible it is to feel this about the United States. As Robin Williams joked, Canada is like a nice loft apartment, but America is the party raging underneath. That party, though, is turning sour; something is rotten in the state of America. Even Williams later changed his analogy. Canada was still a nice apartment, but America had turned into the nightmare meth lab below.

The news that Donald Trump will be indicted for allegedly paying hush money to a porn star only adds to the mounting atmosphere of dysfunction. Not so much because of the indictment itself but because of the sense of foreboding that comes with it. On the one hand, it shows that no figure is above the law; proof, even, that America remains a great republic. Why shouldn’t Trump be indicted, after all? If he broke the law, he broke the law. There are plenty of other presidents and prime ministers outside the US who have found themselves prosecuted for criminal behaviour without it endangering national cohesion. In France, both Nicolas Sarkozy and Jacques Chirac were prosecuted after leaving office. In the US, Bill Clinton avoided such a fate after striking a plea bargain on his last day in office.

Trump’s indictment, though, plays into existing fears about the future of the Republic: of democratic norms no longer holding; taboos being broken; dangerous precedents being set; even of a late-stage imperial decline becoming entrenched. Columnists wonder whether we are witnessing the kind of constitutional unwinding that doomed the Roman republic when the state became too big for its constitution. Perhaps this is the moment American presidents begin fearing for their liberty after office and start behaving as such. After all, it doesn’t require an overly tragic mind to wonder what lessons Trump will take from this should he somehow take back the presidency. And yet what is the grand jury in New York supposed to do if Trump has broken the law? Ignore it? Trump, as ever, is both a cause and a symptom of America’s great national crisis.

Look around and the signs of dysfunction are everywhere. Just as the scale of the country’s wealth and power are hard to comprehend for those of us outside the imperial homeland, so too is the scale of its violent disorder and dysfunction. Take homelessness. In Los Angeles today, there are approximately 42,000 people sleeping rough at the moment — and some 113,000 in California overall. In the whole of England, by contrast, there are around 3,000.

Or consider the scale of violence. Across the whole of the US, around seven people are murdered for every 100,000. This compares to around one in 100,000 in the UK, France and Germany — and half that number in many smaller countries in Europe. But even this masks the extraordinary ferocity of murderousness that is gripping some of America’s cities. In St Louis, the murder rate is 64 per 100,000. In parts of Chicago, it has reached almost 150 per 100,000. Such violent criminality is almost a social sickness. During the bloodiest year of the Troubles in Northern Ireland,1972, there were 31 deaths per 100,000.

Examples of social breakdown are everywhere. There are the 131 mass shootings in America this year alone, on top of the 647 last year and 690 before that — a form of nihilistic terrorism that has been normalised to the point of acceptance. The opioid crisis in the States is also of a different order to anywhere else. More than 58,000 people died from fentanyl overdoses in 2020, compared with 97 in the EU.

Life expectancy, meanwhile, has collapsed in staggering fashion, in a way that is completely out of line with any other advanced country, down from 78.8 in 2019 to 76 today. This is not simply a case of poor Americans dragging down the overall figure either; all groups in America die younger than their counterparts in similar countries, whether old or young, rich or poor. And American children, for example, are less likely to live to age five than children in Europe. The banality of such failure is difficult to grasp, particularly for anyone who has been to the US and witnessed the extravagance of its suburban prosperity.

It is this tension, between suburban wealth and social breakdown, which catches you off guard when it appears on TV shows and movies. Every American sitcom or box set has some passing reference to prescription drug abuse. It is there in Modern Family; a small joke about popping a Xanax in with the evening glass of wine. And it is there in your face in White Lotus, with the American elite living secretly miserable lives, their children loaded with all sorts of drugs: uppers and downers, edibles and prescription pills.

This is part of the great paradox of our American order. Even as the US grapples with its own social and political dysfunction, it dominates our world culturally, economically and militarily. Right now, the United States is attempting to maintain its global hegemony by protecting both the European and East Asian security orders at the same time. To do so, it must hold at bay both Russia in Ukraine and China in Taiwan. It is easy to forget the scale of this challenge because we have accepted it as normal. And yet it is not. America is the most powerful nation state in history, not the new Britain but the new Rome.

Robert Kaplan argues in The Tragic Mind that America has entered a phase of its life in which it has become so big that it no longer controls its destiny. As a mere republic before the Second World War, it enjoyed a certain freedom. “Democracies and republics,” he writes, “give tangible expression to the idea of human intervention.” In democracies, we believe that the actions of individuals matter, that we have agency over our lives and our world, and are not buffeted by grand impersonal forces or fate. But once democracies become empires, “so many new and vast historical forces come into play that the idea of human agency weakens, and fate again edges in”.

This, says Kaplan, is the American tragedy today. “While the world might be fixable here and there, as America strode into a larger canvas in places like Afghanistan and Iraq, that very same world proved more and more intractable
 suddenly Americans learned that their power to change the world was circumscribed.” For Kaplan, who supported the Iraq war but came to bitterly regret his misjudgement, America then gave up any credibility to lecture the world by electing Trump. “Trump’s effect on our domestic politics laid bare the American system’s tenuousness,” he writes. In despair, Kaplan now wonders whether America’s very system of government is a productmatter of contingency, the creation of 18th-century events and ideas but one destined to disappear like every other empire. “Rather than the cohesion afforded by World War II and its Cold War extension, we now seemed headed into a messy, dangerous world, both foreign and domestic.” The cohesion has gone, impossible to measure, but there in the atmosphere of the Republic.

But, again, the paradox. Today, despite the chaos, the United States is not only maintaining its global power and wealth, but in many ways has deepened its dominance. Its economy is pulling away from Europe, while much of the democratic Western world is clinging ever more tightly to the legs of its big brother protector. Culturally, too, America remains the source of almost everything which defines our world, from its fashions and music, to its movies and even its political ideas. The truth is, even as we look on in alarm, we dress like Americans and think like them too. The progressive Left rails against the American imperial order only to copy almost all of the battle cries and slogans which burst out of the imperial centre.

In the 16th century, the Florentine philosopher and statesman Francesco Guicciardini warned that the process of imperial decline takes far longer than is often imagined. “If you see a city beginning to decline, a government changing, a new empire expanding, or any such phenomenon — and these things are sometimes quite clearly visible to us — be careful not to misjudge the time they will take.” This is the situation we face today. America’s problems are clearly visible, yet so too is its enduring strength.

Guicciardini went on to warn of the dangers of underestimating a declining empire. “To be mistaken in these matters can be very harmful to you,” he warned. “Be very careful, for it is a step on which people often stumble.” This is the lesson that Vladimir Putin is learning today. He declared the American Century over and then found himself bogged down in hell in Ukraine, matched by a country a fraction of its size without a single American boot on the ground.

In Hemingway’s A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, the deaf old man who liked to drink late on the terrace of his favourite cafĂ© did so because he had lost his wife and was lonely. “Last week he tried to commit suicide,” the older waiter explained to his impatient colleague. “He was in despair.” The other waiter asked what about. “Nothing,” he replied. “How do you know it was nothing?” “He has plenty of money.”

This is America today. It is rich, but it is clearly in despair. It is indicting former presidents who may still go on to be future presidents. It is angry and divided, scarred by social breakdown and contagious outbreaks of violence. And yet its very chaos is still part of what makes it great, its riotous public clinging to the belief that they are not bound by fate — but the actions of individuals.


Tom McTague is UnHerd’s Political Editor. He is the author of Betting The House: The Inside Story of the 2017 Election.

TomMcTague

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Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

This author seems not to understand may of the details about his subject matter. For instance, the charges being brought against Trump. In the real world it is a misdemeanor at best with an already expired statute of limitations. Bragg is relying on a very creative interpretation of the law to make it a campaign finance charge. FYI paying off a porn star (who already lost a legal case against Trump and whose lawyer is now behind bars) to avoid embarrassment is not a campaign finance violation. A whiny little Manhattan prosecutor like Alvin Bragg does not even have the authority to go after Trump for campaign finance violations since they are federal crimes. Then again, I seriously doubt progressive New York juries give a damn about the law.
There is another major problem with the Trump prosecution. For the law to mean anything it not only has to be enforced, but the public must believe it is enforced impartially. Now factor in the unprecedented nature of trying to use the legal system to destroy the leading opposition party candidate over stupid crap by a prosecutor who literally campaigned on prosecuting said candidate. Finally, it’s not like Washington is not packed full of people who casually commit worse felonies and misdemeanors all the time simply because they are powerful enough to get away with it. If they American public ever stops believing in the legitimacy of the justice system, then the whole thing collapses as respect for its authority evaporates.
The mass shooting numbers were bumped up by grossly reinterpreting their definition under the Obama administration. That way they could include the local gangs settling their differences in the hood and scaring the American public more. You can see this in action through Mother Jones’ claiming there have been over a hundred mass shootings this year and then arguing that there have been 73 since 1983 by white people (who make up the majority on their chart). They also did this on the same day no less. So yeah
 awkward. This is because extremely high levels of violence are situated in America’s large inner cities. You remove those from the equation and the statistics on American violence drop like a rock. Not just guns either. These places also have a good old-fashioned appreciation for the sharp edge and blunt force classic method of settling scores with the body count to show for it.
Finally, Robert Kaplan really? I have read more than a few articles from him in my time and they have aged about as well as week old sushi. I like McTague’s articles about the U.K. They get into many important details I do not understand as an outsider. Unfortunately, those kinds of details are just as critical when trying to understand other countries.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt Hindman
michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Trump is being prosecuted for paying off a successful blackmail attempt. The blackmailer and accomplice, meanwhile, boast about the prosecution.

michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  michael harris

Furthermore the law could stretch (as it so often expands) to indicting D.A. Bragg for being an accomplice (after the event) to blackmail and certainly to covering it up.
Elsewhere I see that the blackmailer is selling ‘merchandise’, including selfies, online, All publicity is….

Last edited 1 year ago by michael harris
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  michael harris

…indeed; funny old world ain’t it.. like Al Capone going to gaol for tax evasion!

michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  michael harris

Furthermore the law could stretch (as it so often expands) to indicting D.A. Bragg for being an accomplice (after the event) to blackmail and certainly to covering it up.
Elsewhere I see that the blackmailer is selling ‘merchandise’, including selfies, online, All publicity is….

Last edited 1 year ago by michael harris
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  michael harris

…indeed; funny old world ain’t it.. like Al Capone going to gaol for tax evasion!

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Get over your narrow fixation with the moronic old draft dodger. The arrest etc is so advantageous for Trump that I’m beginning to wonder if the entire thing has been orchestrated by his supporters, so spare us your knee-jerk bleating outrage.  

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Who the h*ll are you to tell anyone to “get over” anything? Where do you get the nerve?

Andrew McDonald
Andrew McDonald
1 year ago

The privilege comes free with UnHerd, surely? We’re all allowed to challenge opinion. G*t over it
.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

There’s a difference between challenging an opinion and demanding someone “get over” and “spare us” with dismissive hostility. This is UnHerd, not the Daily Mail.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

Again, get over your fixation with the Orange Loser and stop whining.

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

I suggest you both get over it and refocus on the substantive issue.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

Again, get over your fixation with the Orange Loser and stop whining.

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

I suggest you both get over it and refocus on the substantive issue.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

There’s a difference between challenging an opinion and demanding someone “get over” and “spare us” with dismissive hostility. This is UnHerd, not the Daily Mail.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

1st Amendment not relevant?

Last edited 1 year ago by Liam O'Mahony
Andrew McDonald
Andrew McDonald
1 year ago

The privilege comes free with UnHerd, surely? We’re all allowed to challenge opinion. G*t over it
.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

1st Amendment not relevant?

Last edited 1 year ago by Liam O'Mahony
Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

You are wrong like many who suffer from TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome). Trump did not wish this nor is this good for the American government and its people.

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

In fact, Trump is the crisis the American left is using a an excuse to destroy the Constitution and the rule of law.

We have the FBI paying private companies to censor news the FBI or CIA doesn’t like. Just to be clear, US courts have already ruled, in effect, that it’s unconstitutional for government to even suggest that private companies censor something, even if the company refuses to do it.

Norwood v. Harrison (1973) was about Mississippi supporting unconstiutional race discrimination by funding textbooks for private schools who discriminated by race. The ruling said it is an “axiomatic” principle of constitutional law that the government “may not induce, encourage or promote private persons to accomplish what it is constitutionally forbidden to accomplish.” What that means is that the Feds can’t encourage private companies to engage in censorship, because the federal government itself can’t engage in censorship.

The left’s argument is that it’s OK for the federal government to encourage private companies to censor, as long as the federal government does not directly censor things itself. Mississippi’s argument was it was OK for them to buy books for private schools that were discriminating, as long as the state wasn’t discriminating itself. Mississippi lost. So should the left, as the left’s argument is exactly the same as Mississippi’s. The only difference is that the left is arguing about the 1st Amendment instead of the 14th Amendment.

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

In fact, Trump is the crisis the American left is using a an excuse to destroy the Constitution and the rule of law.

We have the FBI paying private companies to censor news the FBI or CIA doesn’t like. Just to be clear, US courts have already ruled, in effect, that it’s unconstitutional for government to even suggest that private companies censor something, even if the company refuses to do it.

Norwood v. Harrison (1973) was about Mississippi supporting unconstiutional race discrimination by funding textbooks for private schools who discriminated by race. The ruling said it is an “axiomatic” principle of constitutional law that the government “may not induce, encourage or promote private persons to accomplish what it is constitutionally forbidden to accomplish.” What that means is that the Feds can’t encourage private companies to engage in censorship, because the federal government itself can’t engage in censorship.

The left’s argument is that it’s OK for the federal government to encourage private companies to censor, as long as the federal government does not directly censor things itself. Mississippi’s argument was it was OK for them to buy books for private schools that were discriminating, as long as the state wasn’t discriminating itself. Mississippi lost. So should the left, as the left’s argument is exactly the same as Mississippi’s. The only difference is that the left is arguing about the 1st Amendment instead of the 14th Amendment.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

With the state of the electoral rolls and the overwhelming fraud in the US; I doubt that anything will make any difference to the result of the next election.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Lee

Another insurrection might..

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Lee

Another insurrection might..

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

It has nothing to do with Trump, outside of him being the one persecuted. It, rather, has to do with the rule of law. Or, in this case, the lack thereof.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Or Biden law.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Or Biden law.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

It also serves the Dems to be continually prosecuting him for crap that won’t possibly stand up. The truly frightening part is America is such a mess he might actually get convicted in New York. He will win on appeal of course.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Throwing mud at him is a way of getting ready for the election. They will be hoping that some of it will stick in the mind.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

He’s doing a top-notch job of raking the mud on himself all by himself. That will indeed stick in voters’ minds come Nov. 24.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

After what has happened since 2016, with impeachments and hoaxes, you have the gall to say something like that. Shame on you.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago

After what has happened since 2016, with impeachments and hoaxes, you have the gall to say something like that. Shame on you.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

America is really good at regime change so I wouldn’t underestimate the CIA on this one!

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

He’s doing a top-notch job of raking the mud on himself all by himself. That will indeed stick in voters’ minds come Nov. 24.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

America is really good at regime change so I wouldn’t underestimate the CIA on this one!

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Throwing mud at him is a way of getting ready for the election. They will be hoping that some of it will stick in the mind.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I’m surprised your comments drew such a negative response.. the same thought also occurred to me..

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Who the h*ll are you to tell anyone to “get over” anything? Where do you get the nerve?

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

You are wrong like many who suffer from TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome). Trump did not wish this nor is this good for the American government and its people.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

With the state of the electoral rolls and the overwhelming fraud in the US; I doubt that anything will make any difference to the result of the next election.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

It has nothing to do with Trump, outside of him being the one persecuted. It, rather, has to do with the rule of law. Or, in this case, the lack thereof.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

It also serves the Dems to be continually prosecuting him for crap that won’t possibly stand up. The truly frightening part is America is such a mess he might actually get convicted in New York. He will win on appeal of course.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I’m surprised your comments drew such a negative response.. the same thought also occurred to me..

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Exactly. The perception of political persecution and unfairness is very real. Hillary Clinton committed many so-called crimes – keeping a server in her basement without notifying State, her destroying evidence on cell phones and computers, the grift of the Clinton Foundation, etc. but she got off without even a haired being mussed. Similarly, it’s becoming clearer that Joe Biden, his son Hunter are grifting as well- payments from China, the Ukraine and elsewhere just because they are Bidens. Hunter lied on a gun application saying he never took drugs but he’s an addict but he never got arrested. Trumps house was raided by the FBI but when classified papers were found at SiX Biden locations nothing happened. And on and on. This is not sitting well with the American public. Christopher Wray the FBI is also a grifter – used federal planes to fly to his vacation home – and he’s the one perpetrating many of these injustices. The American leadership is corrupt & stinks. The people are suffering from Biden’s high inflation, overspending, wacky support of transgenderism, weirdo political appointees (the trans who worked as a nuclear expert but who also stole suitcases at airports? – Buttigieg the McKinsey Wonder Boy who heads up Transportation but can’t managed his way out of a paper bag). There’s a lot to be concerned and angry about.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Don’t forget Clinton’s National Security Advisor Sandy Berger taking classified documents out of the national archives by stuffing them down his pants.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt Hindman
Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

half of NYC Felonies arrested get sentenced – the rest downgraded to misdemeanor or just let go. These are violent criminals, and these are arrested – and it takes a lot to get arrested in NYC, not just some suspicion.

To me this idiotic phrase of this agenda writer filled me with disgust!

”On the one hand, it shows that no figure is above the law; proof, even, that America remains a great republic.”

Writer – I hope every last time you have speeded in your car, had a glass too much, what ever thing it was – Are you above the law? Or do you think all your old laws broken should be punished? Come ON – TELL US. Do you deserve that every time in your life you broke the law you deserve punishment. To make Britain a great Democracy?

Is it a requirement that you get that speeding ticket every time just as much that a rapist and violent robber gets punished? FFS….

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Yes, and he was “punished” for it. Berger was sentenced  to 100 hours of community service and probation and fined $50,000. He also also had to pay $6,905 for the administrative costs of his two-year probation. He also lost his security clearance and license to practice law. So why should Trump not get the same treatment?

 

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

I love how you try bring that up as a point against me without seriously thinking through the implications of it.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

It is not a point against you… Poor Matt, such a fragile ego.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

It is not a point against you… Poor Matt, such a fragile ego.

Robert H
Robert H
1 year ago

POTUS has original classification authority.

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

I love how you try bring that up as a point against me without seriously thinking through the implications of it.

Robert H
Robert H
1 year ago

POTUS has original classification authority.

Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

half of NYC Felonies arrested get sentenced – the rest downgraded to misdemeanor or just let go. These are violent criminals, and these are arrested – and it takes a lot to get arrested in NYC, not just some suspicion.

To me this idiotic phrase of this agenda writer filled me with disgust!

”On the one hand, it shows that no figure is above the law; proof, even, that America remains a great republic.”

Writer – I hope every last time you have speeded in your car, had a glass too much, what ever thing it was – Are you above the law? Or do you think all your old laws broken should be punished? Come ON – TELL US. Do you deserve that every time in your life you broke the law you deserve punishment. To make Britain a great Democracy?

Is it a requirement that you get that speeding ticket every time just as much that a rapist and violent robber gets punished? FFS….

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Yes, and he was “punished” for it. Berger was sentenced  to 100 hours of community service and probation and fined $50,000. He also also had to pay $6,905 for the administrative costs of his two-year probation. He also lost his security clearance and license to practice law. So why should Trump not get the same treatment?

 

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Laura Jedeed is a fake.
Talks about debate but then joins cancel culture.
“I” am louder than her & she is scared.
Comments
comment image
You are banned from commenting until 100 years from now.
Post

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

What have you been smoking? Whatever it is, I want some!

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Don’t forget Clinton’s National Security Advisor Sandy Berger taking classified documents out of the national archives by stuffing them down his pants.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt Hindman
Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Laura Jedeed is a fake.
Talks about debate but then joins cancel culture.
“I” am louder than her & she is scared.
Comments
comment image
You are banned from commenting until 100 years from now.
Post

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

What have you been smoking? Whatever it is, I want some!

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

You are bang on here, yet the columnist’s larger point holds, I think. Something is clearly wrong in America. What, exactly, is it? The use of the criminal law for political purposes (which some say is the essence of the “f” word)? But it’s liberals doing that, and the essence of liberalism is that every thing is permitted. What would drive a liberal to abandon, in such an obvious way, what he cherishes most of all? Is this the answer: Science, liberalism’s main weapon, provokes the fury to destroy its own liberal reason; it cannot endure science’s victory over morality, a victory sparked by the spirited self-pity of a nonexistent self, a self reduced to zero.”

Bryan Dale
Bryan Dale
1 year ago

The left doesn’t believe in science. We’ve seen that with the climate change and covid hoaxes.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

No to mention gender issues.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Unfortunately it is also affecting the so called right tories who seem to have turned left.

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

UK left has turned right, back towards the centre and the so-called right has turned left, back towards the centre. They are both wise to do so, since only centrist can achieve any sort of electoral consensus from our population.

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

UK left has turned right, back towards the centre and the so-called right has turned left, back towards the centre. They are both wise to do so, since only centrist can achieve any sort of electoral consensus from our population.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Unfortunately it is also affecting the so called right tories who seem to have turned left.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

I would say it slightly differently. They believe in it, but they cannot abide that in which they believe.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

Britain is using the climate deception to hit us over the head and control us. We have had climate scares by the experts for about 80 years and none of them ever came to pass. First the world was going to freeze over and at some stage this changed to global warming the current deception. Many were duped in the past and we are being duped now by the so called experts. The zero carbon policy is destroying our economy and our wellbeing. In the future people will laugh at us but then they will also be facing their mass deceptions and fear mongering.

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

It is very sad to see how the UK, a once shining symbol of liberty, democracy, and freedom, and a bulwark against tyranny that it was in two world wars, becoming a dystopian political morass just like the USA.

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

We’ve been just a few years behind the US for quite some time now.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

Not living in UK anymore, this has come as a complete and unexpected surprise to me!

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

We’ve been just a few years behind the US for quite some time now.

Peter Lee
Peter Lee
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

Not living in UK anymore, this has come as a complete and unexpected surprise to me!

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Are you sure? Based on what – the science? What about Russia”s warmongering effect on post Covid energy prices? For me, it’s not that I dispute that we need to tackle humankind’s effect on climate change, but that we should have effective transitional plans which don’t hit the world’s poorest hard or provoke wars.

Alan Tonkyn
Alan Tonkyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Deb Grant

I entirely agree with your second sentence. Simply screaming ‘Climate Crisis’ and ‘Stop Oil’ is pointless while China builds dozens of new airports, and poorer nations try to catch up with those who have already profited from fossil fuels. We need to manage the transition to other forms of energy and simply cope with the inevitable effects of climate change. Current plans for the use of ‘renewables’ are probably pie in the sky.

Alan Tonkyn
Alan Tonkyn
1 year ago
Reply to  Deb Grant

I entirely agree with your second sentence. Simply screaming ‘Climate Crisis’ and ‘Stop Oil’ is pointless while China builds dozens of new airports, and poorer nations try to catch up with those who have already profited from fossil fuels. We need to manage the transition to other forms of energy and simply cope with the inevitable effects of climate change. Current plans for the use of ‘renewables’ are probably pie in the sky.

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

It is very sad to see how the UK, a once shining symbol of liberty, democracy, and freedom, and a bulwark against tyranny that it was in two world wars, becoming a dystopian political morass just like the USA.

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Are you sure? Based on what – the science? What about Russia”s warmongering effect on post Covid energy prices? For me, it’s not that I dispute that we need to tackle humankind’s effect on climate change, but that we should have effective transitional plans which don’t hit the world’s poorest hard or provoke wars.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

No to mention gender issues.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

I would say it slightly differently. They believe in it, but they cannot abide that in which they believe.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Bryan Dale

Britain is using the climate deception to hit us over the head and control us. We have had climate scares by the experts for about 80 years and none of them ever came to pass. First the world was going to freeze over and at some stage this changed to global warming the current deception. Many were duped in the past and we are being duped now by the so called experts. The zero carbon policy is destroying our economy and our wellbeing. In the future people will laugh at us but then they will also be facing their mass deceptions and fear mongering.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

The democrats are not liberals and the American left are not liberal – not even close.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Your are right. But then no one can “be” liberal to the bitter end, because that end is nothingness. A person who says “everything is permitted” will the first person to repudiate that everything is permitted. No liberal can avoid bigotry. Liberalism is quite literally not survivable.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Your are right. But then no one can “be” liberal to the bitter end, because that end is nothingness. A person who says “everything is permitted” will the first person to repudiate that everything is permitted. No liberal can avoid bigotry. Liberalism is quite literally not survivable.

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago

The Biden Administration’s open borders’ agenda is destroying the USA – some 5,000,000+ people have illegally entered the USA since Jan. 20, 2021, and in the last couple of months, illegal PRC immigration has increased by 900%! How many of these PRC illegal migrants are the “Manchurian Candidates” circa 2023 who will pose a potential terrorist threat to the USA in coming years? Donald Trump is being indicted because he tried to get a handle on illegal immigration, and the Deep State has tried every device, including this indictment, to stop him.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago

Liberalism as implemented by the Liberal Party of the 19 th century died in the 1920s. What we have is vast number of people who though have attended universities are not scholars, under achieving, effete impractical upper middle class people who are defined by their ill grace and are malicious of heart to those who have the grace they lack. Grace is a quality one rarely sees today.

Bryan Dale
Bryan Dale
1 year ago

The left doesn’t believe in science. We’ve seen that with the climate change and covid hoaxes.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

The democrats are not liberals and the American left are not liberal – not even close.

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago

The Biden Administration’s open borders’ agenda is destroying the USA – some 5,000,000+ people have illegally entered the USA since Jan. 20, 2021, and in the last couple of months, illegal PRC immigration has increased by 900%! How many of these PRC illegal migrants are the “Manchurian Candidates” circa 2023 who will pose a potential terrorist threat to the USA in coming years? Donald Trump is being indicted because he tried to get a handle on illegal immigration, and the Deep State has tried every device, including this indictment, to stop him.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago

Liberalism as implemented by the Liberal Party of the 19 th century died in the 1920s. What we have is vast number of people who though have attended universities are not scholars, under achieving, effete impractical upper middle class people who are defined by their ill grace and are malicious of heart to those who have the grace they lack. Grace is a quality one rarely sees today.

Michael Coleman
Michael Coleman
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

McTague clearly has Trump Derangement Syndrome. He ignores the particulars of this supposed crime: not a crime a la Edwards, not a felony, past statute of limitations, wrong venue, etc; while ignoring the fact there is no justice for Democrat criminals: J. Biden, H. Biden, Sussman, McCabe, Clapper, Brennen, Clinesmith.
I want Trump to disappear – this appears designed to do the opposite

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

“This author seems not to understand many of the details about his subject matter”
He seems to understand nothing at all.
“Canada is like a nice loft apartment”?
Has he not noticed that the dictatorial lunatic Trudeau has all but destroyed Canada in recent years?
“Why shouldn’t Trump be indicted, after all? If he broke the law, he broke the law”.
Has he not noticed that this is the nth time the neo-Marxist lunatics, I mean ‘Democrats’, have tried to nail Trump on the most spurious of ‘trumped up’ charges?
Has he not noticed that no one has come close to impeaching Biden for corruption in Ukraine, stealing an election, waging an insane proxy war in Ukraine and looking as though he wants nothing more than to wage another one over Taiwan? Not to mention his possible (probable?) complicity in sabotaging the Nord Stream pipeline? Should I go on?
And what about any attempt at some analysis of the internal social problems the US is currently facing? Reasons for the prevalence of drugs? The far-left riots of BLM? The unequal social and economic devastation of the lockdown madness? The incessant lies from the ‘public health’ activists?
The US, like the UK, is in deep trouble because the fruits of the Long March are coming home to roost and the entire article is nothing but a series of cherry-picked statistics, completely meaningless in the absence of any intelligent commentary to accompany them, by yet another fool with TDS.
ï»ż Otherwise known as empty click-bait.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Well said.

Alan B
Alan B
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

But… …but… …its all because of the gaudy suburbs!

Ginger Lynch
Ginger Lynch
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Matt, thank you so much for your response – I was thinking many of the same things. In fact, this article by McTague is so far off the mark, lacking even the most basic critical understanding of the culture and countless subcultures within our vast country, (not to mention his down-right laughable framing of Canada) that I now wonder about what I have believed from him when reading of the UK. Is he using an AI to create his articles? (that was a joke, but this article is so auto-tuned and tone deaf, it feels mechanical) This article is shallow at best. His perspective on the ‘dysfunction’ in the US is tiresome and predictable and off the mark in every media-fed, trite and hyperbolic way we would expect from an outsider. If he bothered to take a deeper dive outside of the old tropes and lenses, he would discover that the “progressive left” and “extreme right” in the US manifest the same baseline problem of centralized, elitist control and domination that expects all we ‘peasants’ submit to their ‘superior’ plans for our country. Thanks to the corrupt leverage of power for political purposes by bad players like Bragg- many of we centrists will not be swinging our votes to the left for many years to come, if not permanently- no matter who the right throws into the ring. I have confidence in our PEOPLE – we are far less personally divided than the incompetent and corrupt leaders and media elites broadcast that we are. This is what outsiders like McTague don’t see and are seemingly too lazy, or indifferent to figure out. Well, as he fishbowls us – he can brace himself, because what brings us together is much more powerful than what divides us in the United States of America. I have friends on the left and the right and we are all fed up with the divisive fear-mongering that is wholesale BS to wrangle control and $$$ for the establishment elites. So – I’m back in the Trump camp because of what I will be voting AGAINST in 2024. And at a local level – I will continue to love and care for my friends and neighbors from every persuasion, position, and perspective even when we do not at all agree on any given topic. Because I am an American and that is what we, who are living under this massive mess at the top, do. One thing McTague got partially-correct, “clinging to the belief that they are not bound by fate — but the actions of individuals.” While it’s true America is far from ideal, we aren’t “clinging to the belief” like some down-trodden desperado – We The People is a constitutionally protected right over here and we will overcome, self-correct, and remain a stronghold for individual freedom, full stop. In this article, McTague comes off like a brainless disciple of the maximalist, Kaplan. What, did he read the book and just buy into the whole narrative hook, line, and sinker? McTague clearly drank the propaganda Kool-Aid served up by the media talking-heads and simply regurgitated it. Gross treacle with no substance.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ginger Lynch
Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Thank you for providing a good response to McTague. Mr. McTague doesn’t really understand all the issues that are currently in play in the USA. He may have a very good grasp of the UK, but his article reads like some version of the CNN pro-Democrat Party propaganda posing as “news,” i.e., “fake news.”

Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Sorry I missed being here for this mess of an article. A Redneck from a small town in central Alabama, after a week in London, could write a better article on the UK, than this agenda blinded hack can on USA.

Blinded by the TDS, and in fact, by reality, he writes of his biases thinking them truths.

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Gang related murders in inner cities are still murders – and are just as relevant statistically as any other murders. They are purely another symptom and indication of USA’s problems. The stats are shocking to Europeans and Australians or any other western democracy with much smaller populations.

That says two worrying things to me: one, big is not necessarily beautiful, and two, that where the USA goes, our increasingly indulgent societies follow.

Ralph Hanke
Ralph Hanke
1 year ago
Reply to  Deb Grant

Yes, a statistic is still a statistic even when it measures gang related murders.

And what does this statistic tell me? At least two things. First, murders are disproportionately more likely to occur in certain spots of the city—yeah I’m looking at you North St. Louis—and that I had better stay away from them. Second, I can live essentially worry free—relative to murders at any rate—in 97% plus of the rest of the country.

So I went with the 97% because I prefer not to have to carry a gun and spend my whole day—well, night, at any rate, because most murders happen after dark—shooting first.

Ralph Hanke
Ralph Hanke
1 year ago
Reply to  Deb Grant

Yes, a statistic is still a statistic even when it measures gang related murders.

And what does this statistic tell me? At least two things. First, murders are disproportionately more likely to occur in certain spots of the city—yeah I’m looking at you North St. Louis—and that I had better stay away from them. Second, I can live essentially worry free—relative to murders at any rate—in 97% plus of the rest of the country.

So I went with the 97% because I prefer not to have to carry a gun and spend my whole day—well, night, at any rate, because most murders happen after dark—shooting first.

Walter Schwager
Walter Schwager
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Oh gee, there were no school shootings in the US? No Black men killed by police? No fentanyl deaths promoted by large pharmaceutical companies? No attempts by Donald to stack the bureaucracy, the Supreme Court and to cozy to Putin?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

While the points you make are perhaps technically relevant they barely make the cut. The points McTague makes remain far more valid and your protestations I suspect are falling largely on deaf ears, mine anyway.
The US is a basket case no matter how you cook the books. It is proof positive that absolute power (real or assumed) corrupts absolutely. Like big brother bully who forgot his siblings would grow up and be a match for him, not least by joining forces and/or by enlisting the services if the bully next door!
The sad thing is if the US had invested a fraction of it’s military budget in international diplomacy and cooperation.like China it wouldn’t be in the utterly screwed position it now finds itself in.

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

As you say, Trump is prosecuted for paying off some porn actress but Bill Clinton being accused by many women of rape or attempted rape is fake news. Never mind his association with Epstein and “Lolita express”.
Then we have Hilary Clinton use of private mail server while serving as Secretary of State.
What about source of Clinton’s wealth?
What about Biden laptop story and “10% for the big man”?
So Trump, and in uk Johnson drink parties, are main news stories but much bigger crimes and misdemeanours by illiberal left are ignored.
There is an obvious reason why crime in America is so high: black community and mass immigration of low IQ people from South America.
Europe has the same problem with mass immigration from Africa and Muslim countries.
By why to analyse real issues when you can blame Trump and Johnson.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

I think a better article than the one you are replying to.

Victor Whisky
Victor Whisky
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

I am no fan of Trump, however, Trump is anti globalist, anti empire. To him, America comes first, no more wars of empire by neocons that brings death and misery to millions of innocents around the globe, wars that are destroying the US economy, draining American’s wages and destroying the American dream, wars that are only benefiting and making richer the very small minority group of American oligarchy and their corrupt, spineless paid for politicians. This is why they are trying to do their very best to keep him from running. He already is the winning candidate, the overwhelming choice of the people and this is two years before the election. The American oligarchy knows if Trump gets in, the party will be over, they and their globalist agenda and their corrupt politicians will have to account for their ill gotten gains. Free Julian Assange!

michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Trump is being prosecuted for paying off a successful blackmail attempt. The blackmailer and accomplice, meanwhile, boast about the prosecution.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Get over your narrow fixation with the moronic old draft dodger. The arrest etc is so advantageous for Trump that I’m beginning to wonder if the entire thing has been orchestrated by his supporters, so spare us your knee-jerk bleating outrage.  

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Exactly. The perception of political persecution and unfairness is very real. Hillary Clinton committed many so-called crimes – keeping a server in her basement without notifying State, her destroying evidence on cell phones and computers, the grift of the Clinton Foundation, etc. but she got off without even a haired being mussed. Similarly, it’s becoming clearer that Joe Biden, his son Hunter are grifting as well- payments from China, the Ukraine and elsewhere just because they are Bidens. Hunter lied on a gun application saying he never took drugs but he’s an addict but he never got arrested. Trumps house was raided by the FBI but when classified papers were found at SiX Biden locations nothing happened. And on and on. This is not sitting well with the American public. Christopher Wray the FBI is also a grifter – used federal planes to fly to his vacation home – and he’s the one perpetrating many of these injustices. The American leadership is corrupt & stinks. The people are suffering from Biden’s high inflation, overspending, wacky support of transgenderism, weirdo political appointees (the trans who worked as a nuclear expert but who also stole suitcases at airports? – Buttigieg the McKinsey Wonder Boy who heads up Transportation but can’t managed his way out of a paper bag). There’s a lot to be concerned and angry about.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

You are bang on here, yet the columnist’s larger point holds, I think. Something is clearly wrong in America. What, exactly, is it? The use of the criminal law for political purposes (which some say is the essence of the “f” word)? But it’s liberals doing that, and the essence of liberalism is that every thing is permitted. What would drive a liberal to abandon, in such an obvious way, what he cherishes most of all? Is this the answer: Science, liberalism’s main weapon, provokes the fury to destroy its own liberal reason; it cannot endure science’s victory over morality, a victory sparked by the spirited self-pity of a nonexistent self, a self reduced to zero.”

Michael Coleman
Michael Coleman
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

McTague clearly has Trump Derangement Syndrome. He ignores the particulars of this supposed crime: not a crime a la Edwards, not a felony, past statute of limitations, wrong venue, etc; while ignoring the fact there is no justice for Democrat criminals: J. Biden, H. Biden, Sussman, McCabe, Clapper, Brennen, Clinesmith.
I want Trump to disappear – this appears designed to do the opposite

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

“This author seems not to understand many of the details about his subject matter”
He seems to understand nothing at all.
“Canada is like a nice loft apartment”?
Has he not noticed that the dictatorial lunatic Trudeau has all but destroyed Canada in recent years?
“Why shouldn’t Trump be indicted, after all? If he broke the law, he broke the law”.
Has he not noticed that this is the nth time the neo-Marxist lunatics, I mean ‘Democrats’, have tried to nail Trump on the most spurious of ‘trumped up’ charges?
Has he not noticed that no one has come close to impeaching Biden for corruption in Ukraine, stealing an election, waging an insane proxy war in Ukraine and looking as though he wants nothing more than to wage another one over Taiwan? Not to mention his possible (probable?) complicity in sabotaging the Nord Stream pipeline? Should I go on?
And what about any attempt at some analysis of the internal social problems the US is currently facing? Reasons for the prevalence of drugs? The far-left riots of BLM? The unequal social and economic devastation of the lockdown madness? The incessant lies from the ‘public health’ activists?
The US, like the UK, is in deep trouble because the fruits of the Long March are coming home to roost and the entire article is nothing but a series of cherry-picked statistics, completely meaningless in the absence of any intelligent commentary to accompany them, by yet another fool with TDS.
ï»ż Otherwise known as empty click-bait.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Well said.

Alan B
Alan B
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

But… …but… …its all because of the gaudy suburbs!

Ginger Lynch
Ginger Lynch
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Matt, thank you so much for your response – I was thinking many of the same things. In fact, this article by McTague is so far off the mark, lacking even the most basic critical understanding of the culture and countless subcultures within our vast country, (not to mention his down-right laughable framing of Canada) that I now wonder about what I have believed from him when reading of the UK. Is he using an AI to create his articles? (that was a joke, but this article is so auto-tuned and tone deaf, it feels mechanical) This article is shallow at best. His perspective on the ‘dysfunction’ in the US is tiresome and predictable and off the mark in every media-fed, trite and hyperbolic way we would expect from an outsider. If he bothered to take a deeper dive outside of the old tropes and lenses, he would discover that the “progressive left” and “extreme right” in the US manifest the same baseline problem of centralized, elitist control and domination that expects all we ‘peasants’ submit to their ‘superior’ plans for our country. Thanks to the corrupt leverage of power for political purposes by bad players like Bragg- many of we centrists will not be swinging our votes to the left for many years to come, if not permanently- no matter who the right throws into the ring. I have confidence in our PEOPLE – we are far less personally divided than the incompetent and corrupt leaders and media elites broadcast that we are. This is what outsiders like McTague don’t see and are seemingly too lazy, or indifferent to figure out. Well, as he fishbowls us – he can brace himself, because what brings us together is much more powerful than what divides us in the United States of America. I have friends on the left and the right and we are all fed up with the divisive fear-mongering that is wholesale BS to wrangle control and $$$ for the establishment elites. So – I’m back in the Trump camp because of what I will be voting AGAINST in 2024. And at a local level – I will continue to love and care for my friends and neighbors from every persuasion, position, and perspective even when we do not at all agree on any given topic. Because I am an American and that is what we, who are living under this massive mess at the top, do. One thing McTague got partially-correct, “clinging to the belief that they are not bound by fate — but the actions of individuals.” While it’s true America is far from ideal, we aren’t “clinging to the belief” like some down-trodden desperado – We The People is a constitutionally protected right over here and we will overcome, self-correct, and remain a stronghold for individual freedom, full stop. In this article, McTague comes off like a brainless disciple of the maximalist, Kaplan. What, did he read the book and just buy into the whole narrative hook, line, and sinker? McTague clearly drank the propaganda Kool-Aid served up by the media talking-heads and simply regurgitated it. Gross treacle with no substance.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ginger Lynch
Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Thank you for providing a good response to McTague. Mr. McTague doesn’t really understand all the issues that are currently in play in the USA. He may have a very good grasp of the UK, but his article reads like some version of the CNN pro-Democrat Party propaganda posing as “news,” i.e., “fake news.”

Elliott Bjorn
Elliott Bjorn
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Sorry I missed being here for this mess of an article. A Redneck from a small town in central Alabama, after a week in London, could write a better article on the UK, than this agenda blinded hack can on USA.

Blinded by the TDS, and in fact, by reality, he writes of his biases thinking them truths.

Deb Grant
Deb Grant
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Gang related murders in inner cities are still murders – and are just as relevant statistically as any other murders. They are purely another symptom and indication of USA’s problems. The stats are shocking to Europeans and Australians or any other western democracy with much smaller populations.

That says two worrying things to me: one, big is not necessarily beautiful, and two, that where the USA goes, our increasingly indulgent societies follow.

Walter Schwager
Walter Schwager
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

Oh gee, there were no school shootings in the US? No Black men killed by police? No fentanyl deaths promoted by large pharmaceutical companies? No attempts by Donald to stack the bureaucracy, the Supreme Court and to cozy to Putin?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

While the points you make are perhaps technically relevant they barely make the cut. The points McTague makes remain far more valid and your protestations I suspect are falling largely on deaf ears, mine anyway.
The US is a basket case no matter how you cook the books. It is proof positive that absolute power (real or assumed) corrupts absolutely. Like big brother bully who forgot his siblings would grow up and be a match for him, not least by joining forces and/or by enlisting the services if the bully next door!
The sad thing is if the US had invested a fraction of it’s military budget in international diplomacy and cooperation.like China it wouldn’t be in the utterly screwed position it now finds itself in.

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

As you say, Trump is prosecuted for paying off some porn actress but Bill Clinton being accused by many women of rape or attempted rape is fake news. Never mind his association with Epstein and “Lolita express”.
Then we have Hilary Clinton use of private mail server while serving as Secretary of State.
What about source of Clinton’s wealth?
What about Biden laptop story and “10% for the big man”?
So Trump, and in uk Johnson drink parties, are main news stories but much bigger crimes and misdemeanours by illiberal left are ignored.
There is an obvious reason why crime in America is so high: black community and mass immigration of low IQ people from South America.
Europe has the same problem with mass immigration from Africa and Muslim countries.
By why to analyse real issues when you can blame Trump and Johnson.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

I think a better article than the one you are replying to.

Victor Whisky
Victor Whisky
1 year ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

I am no fan of Trump, however, Trump is anti globalist, anti empire. To him, America comes first, no more wars of empire by neocons that brings death and misery to millions of innocents around the globe, wars that are destroying the US economy, draining American’s wages and destroying the American dream, wars that are only benefiting and making richer the very small minority group of American oligarchy and their corrupt, spineless paid for politicians. This is why they are trying to do their very best to keep him from running. He already is the winning candidate, the overwhelming choice of the people and this is two years before the election. The American oligarchy knows if Trump gets in, the party will be over, they and their globalist agenda and their corrupt politicians will have to account for their ill gotten gains. Free Julian Assange!

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

This author seems not to understand may of the details about his subject matter. For instance, the charges being brought against Trump. In the real world it is a misdemeanor at best with an already expired statute of limitations. Bragg is relying on a very creative interpretation of the law to make it a campaign finance charge. FYI paying off a porn star (who already lost a legal case against Trump and whose lawyer is now behind bars) to avoid embarrassment is not a campaign finance violation. A whiny little Manhattan prosecutor like Alvin Bragg does not even have the authority to go after Trump for campaign finance violations since they are federal crimes. Then again, I seriously doubt progressive New York juries give a damn about the law.
There is another major problem with the Trump prosecution. For the law to mean anything it not only has to be enforced, but the public must believe it is enforced impartially. Now factor in the unprecedented nature of trying to use the legal system to destroy the leading opposition party candidate over stupid crap by a prosecutor who literally campaigned on prosecuting said candidate. Finally, it’s not like Washington is not packed full of people who casually commit worse felonies and misdemeanors all the time simply because they are powerful enough to get away with it. If they American public ever stops believing in the legitimacy of the justice system, then the whole thing collapses as respect for its authority evaporates.
The mass shooting numbers were bumped up by grossly reinterpreting their definition under the Obama administration. That way they could include the local gangs settling their differences in the hood and scaring the American public more. You can see this in action through Mother Jones’ claiming there have been over a hundred mass shootings this year and then arguing that there have been 73 since 1983 by white people (who make up the majority on their chart). They also did this on the same day no less. So yeah
 awkward. This is because extremely high levels of violence are situated in America’s large inner cities. You remove those from the equation and the statistics on American violence drop like a rock. Not just guns either. These places also have a good old-fashioned appreciation for the sharp edge and blunt force classic method of settling scores with the body count to show for it.
Finally, Robert Kaplan really? I have read more than a few articles from him in my time and they have aged about as well as week old sushi. I like McTague’s articles about the U.K. They get into many important details I do not understand as an outsider. Unfortunately, those kinds of details are just as critical when trying to understand other countries.

Last edited 1 year ago by Matt Hindman
Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago

I remember growing up during the cold war, Greenham Common, nuclear bombers flying overhead, the constant feeling of threat. Then the Berlin Wall coming down created a moment of euphoria. 1991 onwards had a sense of hope as the thumb of communism was removed from the lives of millions. The Internet ushered in freedoms and connections – live anywhere, be friends with anyone, share and don’t hoard. All while the icky corporations were coming in, carving up space, but it was pretty much all still free, both in money and control. Trolls and flamewars happened, but online was a game, not to be taken too seriously.
The first sign of a turn was the Iraq War. Governments were lying to us, and we could see it and discuss it online, but we couldn’t do anything about it, except watch the armies roll into Baghdad. All that fraternity online and it turned out we could be ignored by the powers that be.
The second turn was climate change. Online discussion of the climate online was frothy and forthright. Online skeptics challenged tenured academics pushing the boundaries of public involvement in science. Then they got closed down. ‘Denier’ was the word. Science had become religious, and the believers would cast out anyone not conforming to the Word. Academia was walling itself in. A modus operandi that would repeat and repeat.
The third was the 2007/8 financial crash. Governments bailed out the big guys and corporations over the heads of voters. Opposition to ‘la casta’ built online, and new parties emerged. And in response government monitoring of online activity increased – no-one was safe, not journalists, not opposition politicians. Snowden, Assange and others had the documents, but the civil servants – the people we were supposed to control – lied to the committees and politicians, and didn’t bat an eye. They had the data and propaganda tools. They were in control now – ‘joined up government’, ‘the interagency’ – unsackable careerists. The internet – that great freedom and fraternity – in the hands of the spies had become the world’s greatest surveillance and propaganda network and they proved their capabilities with the Arab Spring.
The interagency blended into the corporations and financier bailout beneficiaries, connected politicians combined with government administration from secret services up, slowly building networks of well-placed supporters in media and academia. As the climate folk had discovered, when your academic grant and tenure rely on toeing a line, you toe that line or you get pushed out.
The reaction of people who had lost control of their government was to vote in new parties, new politicians, but the system defended itself. Leaks. Smears. Lies. Name calling like ‘populist’, ‘far-right’, ‘islamophobe’, ‘transphobe’, ‘racist’, following the climate change ‘denier’ model was used to close out and ‘other’ opposition. They would choose which laws to prosecute and which to ignore. They would choose which people to prosecute and who could go free. New laws meant you could be jailed for jokes online. Entire groups could be censored online, and chased out of jobs for wrong think. Enough clout that they could suppress news in order to control an election.
With such control and power they can ignore the homeless, the druggies, the violent cities. If you care about those things you are ‘far-left’ or ‘far-right’ or ‘racist’. They have their chorus tuned to chant the names at people they have been conditioned to hate. Even those with intellectual doubt, know they have to chant the mantras to keep their job and money safe – or face being called out by the DEI political officers.
I’d always wondered how in 1930s Germany, principled intelligent people let the country descend into hate, intolerance and murder. We are seeing how as we speak. You call other people names. You shut them up. You drive them out of jobs and make them ‘other’, and you use the tools of government and administration to spread the cancer. They claim to be anti-fascist, and yet can’t recognise how fascist they have become.

Steven Campbell
Steven Campbell
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Excellent. thanks

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Worth a longer essay. Quite a good analysis. Many have become “good Germans” particularly in the pandemic. But truth arrives slowly.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Climate denier, Vaccines work denier, sex change denier. All the same thing in a way.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Conrad
michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

They don’t care how fascist they’ve become.

Steven Campbell
Steven Campbell
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Excellent. thanks

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Worth a longer essay. Quite a good analysis. Many have become “good Germans” particularly in the pandemic. But truth arrives slowly.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

Climate denier, Vaccines work denier, sex change denier. All the same thing in a way.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Conrad
michael harris
michael harris
1 year ago
Reply to  Saul D

They don’t care how fascist they’ve become.

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago

I remember growing up during the cold war, Greenham Common, nuclear bombers flying overhead, the constant feeling of threat. Then the Berlin Wall coming down created a moment of euphoria. 1991 onwards had a sense of hope as the thumb of communism was removed from the lives of millions. The Internet ushered in freedoms and connections – live anywhere, be friends with anyone, share and don’t hoard. All while the icky corporations were coming in, carving up space, but it was pretty much all still free, both in money and control. Trolls and flamewars happened, but online was a game, not to be taken too seriously.
The first sign of a turn was the Iraq War. Governments were lying to us, and we could see it and discuss it online, but we couldn’t do anything about it, except watch the armies roll into Baghdad. All that fraternity online and it turned out we could be ignored by the powers that be.
The second turn was climate change. Online discussion of the climate online was frothy and forthright. Online skeptics challenged tenured academics pushing the boundaries of public involvement in science. Then they got closed down. ‘Denier’ was the word. Science had become religious, and the believers would cast out anyone not conforming to the Word. Academia was walling itself in. A modus operandi that would repeat and repeat.
The third was the 2007/8 financial crash. Governments bailed out the big guys and corporations over the heads of voters. Opposition to ‘la casta’ built online, and new parties emerged. And in response government monitoring of online activity increased – no-one was safe, not journalists, not opposition politicians. Snowden, Assange and others had the documents, but the civil servants – the people we were supposed to control – lied to the committees and politicians, and didn’t bat an eye. They had the data and propaganda tools. They were in control now – ‘joined up government’, ‘the interagency’ – unsackable careerists. The internet – that great freedom and fraternity – in the hands of the spies had become the world’s greatest surveillance and propaganda network and they proved their capabilities with the Arab Spring.
The interagency blended into the corporations and financier bailout beneficiaries, connected politicians combined with government administration from secret services up, slowly building networks of well-placed supporters in media and academia. As the climate folk had discovered, when your academic grant and tenure rely on toeing a line, you toe that line or you get pushed out.
The reaction of people who had lost control of their government was to vote in new parties, new politicians, but the system defended itself. Leaks. Smears. Lies. Name calling like ‘populist’, ‘far-right’, ‘islamophobe’, ‘transphobe’, ‘racist’, following the climate change ‘denier’ model was used to close out and ‘other’ opposition. They would choose which laws to prosecute and which to ignore. They would choose which people to prosecute and who could go free. New laws meant you could be jailed for jokes online. Entire groups could be censored online, and chased out of jobs for wrong think. Enough clout that they could suppress news in order to control an election.
With such control and power they can ignore the homeless, the druggies, the violent cities. If you care about those things you are ‘far-left’ or ‘far-right’ or ‘racist’. They have their chorus tuned to chant the names at people they have been conditioned to hate. Even those with intellectual doubt, know they have to chant the mantras to keep their job and money safe – or face being called out by the DEI political officers.
I’d always wondered how in 1930s Germany, principled intelligent people let the country descend into hate, intolerance and murder. We are seeing how as we speak. You call other people names. You shut them up. You drive them out of jobs and make them ‘other’, and you use the tools of government and administration to spread the cancer. They claim to be anti-fascist, and yet can’t recognise how fascist they have become.

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
1 year ago

Why is Trump the ‘cause’ of US dysfunction?

Andrew Roman
Andrew Roman
1 year ago

Good question. A lot of the things the author mentions like fentanyl deaths, homelessness and mass shootings have been going on long before Trump became President.

Mark Goodhand
Mark Goodhand
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Quite right. I can’t think of much that Trump actually changed, for better or for worse.

His main accomplishment was to highlight how unhinged the leftist Establishment has become, and how desperate ordinary Americans are for real change.

Derek Smith
Derek Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Yes – he stuck his hand in the hornet’s nest and revealed it to be full of hornets.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Derek Smith

The hornet’s nest which Trump runs from MAL…

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Derek Smith

And now they want to sting him.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Derek Smith

The hornet’s nest which Trump runs from MAL…

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Derek Smith

And now they want to sting him.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Ordinary Americans might be desperate for change. That change, according to the results of the last presidential election, is not called Trump. As for the unhinged Left, look at some (a lot) of the Repubs sitting in the House of Reps, and tell me who is unhinged.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

Agreed, the republicans are almost as bad as the democrats – almost.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Not almost. Perhaps 5% as bad?

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

The Establishment GOP is just the other side of the “uniparty” elites who are determined to destroy our country (USA) and our liberties in their quest for total power and absolute control.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Not almost. Perhaps 5% as bad?

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

The Establishment GOP is just the other side of the “uniparty” elites who are determined to destroy our country (USA) and our liberties in their quest for total power and absolute control.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago

All of them. American politics, government, media, CIA police state, military industrial complex, federal reserve, all of it is unhinged. We should leave them to it to sort their issues and give them some space.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

Agreed, the republicans are almost as bad as the democrats – almost.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago

All of them. American politics, government, media, CIA police state, military industrial complex, federal reserve, all of it is unhinged. We should leave them to it to sort their issues and give them some space.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump actually got quite a bit accomplished. He secured the southern border – there were far fewer migrants deaths whereas hundreds have died since Biden has taken over. Trump removed a lot of unnecessary regulations to get the economy moving again. Inflation was just 1.4% compared to Biden’s 6 to 10 percent (this is killing every household budget). Trump did not create the supply line problems of today, Biden did. Trump did not start any conflicts, but Biden jumped in Ukraine, caused a disastrous pullout of Afghanistan
..and there’s so much more Trump did that was positive as well. Read up.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Is that why more than 81 million Americans voted to kick Trump out of office? Because of his amaaaazing accomplishments?!

geoffrey cox
geoffrey cox
1 year ago

81 million Americans voted to kick Trump out? In the words of the Duke of Wellington: ‘By God, sir, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything!’

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  geoffrey cox

By God, Sir, you would of course believe that the election was stolen! I was wondering how long it would take for 2020 election result deniers to creep out of their holes…

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago

Did you follow the 2020 election – Biden stayed in his basement and his rallies were poor attended, so if Biden were as popular as his 81 million votes suggests why weren’t his rallies overflowing with pro-Biden supporters?

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

I think you’re the one who stayed in his/her basement and missed the election. In fact, maybe you’re still there…

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Leslie Smith

I think you’re the one who stayed in his/her basement and missed the election. In fact, maybe you’re still there…

Johann Strauss
Johann Strauss
1 year ago

It is impossible to know whether the election was stolen or not. Remember the end result was a matter of only 30,000 votes in 3 states. But what is for sure is that there were plenty of irregularities and plenty of things that looked mighty suspicious even if they were completely innocent (like kicking out of observers in Georgia at midnight claiming a water leak, and then immediately start counting again once the observers had left, taking sack loads of votes from the under the table). What is also absolutely for sure is that the judiciary which should have heard the various cases brought dismissed them for lack of standing because they didn’t want to touch this with a barge poll. So we are left with half the country believing, not without reason, that some funny stuff was going on, and having to believe that the Department of Justice and the FBI are telling the truth when they claim that everything was above board. These are the same people who claimed that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, etc…. and who mismanaged the Covid response completely, shutting down the economy, pushing people into bankruptcy and poverty, taking years off the future lives of children (who will be poorly educated, and therefore poorer and less healthy), etc…..

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

Was Trump duly elected president in 2016, according to the Constitution? If not, are you an election denier?

There’s less evidence of Russian hacking having any significant effect on the 2016 election than there is of vote fraud in 2020. The election deniers of 2016 have not been held to anything close to the same standards of evidence as those of 2020, and they should be. The Durham prosecutions proved in court that the the Russia Hoax, starting with the Alfa Bank and Steele Dossier, were fabricated lies by the Clinton Campaign. Sussmann and Danchenko were acquitted of lying to the FBI because both their lawyers successfully argued that the FBI knew they were lying.

Ignoring the debunking of the Russia Hoax is delusional. Assuming you can assert Russians hacked the 2016 election without offering any proof whatsoever insults at least half the country. We elected Trump in 2016 according to the Constitution. Stop denying it.

Leslie Smith
Leslie Smith
1 year ago

Did you follow the 2020 election – Biden stayed in his basement and his rallies were poor attended, so if Biden were as popular as his 81 million votes suggests why weren’t his rallies overflowing with pro-Biden supporters?

Johann Strauss
Johann Strauss
1 year ago

It is impossible to know whether the election was stolen or not. Remember the end result was a matter of only 30,000 votes in 3 states. But what is for sure is that there were plenty of irregularities and plenty of things that looked mighty suspicious even if they were completely innocent (like kicking out of observers in Georgia at midnight claiming a water leak, and then immediately start counting again once the observers had left, taking sack loads of votes from the under the table). What is also absolutely for sure is that the judiciary which should have heard the various cases brought dismissed them for lack of standing because they didn’t want to touch this with a barge poll. So we are left with half the country believing, not without reason, that some funny stuff was going on, and having to believe that the Department of Justice and the FBI are telling the truth when they claim that everything was above board. These are the same people who claimed that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, etc…. and who mismanaged the Covid response completely, shutting down the economy, pushing people into bankruptcy and poverty, taking years off the future lives of children (who will be poorly educated, and therefore poorer and less healthy), etc…..

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

Was Trump duly elected president in 2016, according to the Constitution? If not, are you an election denier?

There’s less evidence of Russian hacking having any significant effect on the 2016 election than there is of vote fraud in 2020. The election deniers of 2016 have not been held to anything close to the same standards of evidence as those of 2020, and they should be. The Durham prosecutions proved in court that the the Russia Hoax, starting with the Alfa Bank and Steele Dossier, were fabricated lies by the Clinton Campaign. Sussmann and Danchenko were acquitted of lying to the FBI because both their lawyers successfully argued that the FBI knew they were lying.

Ignoring the debunking of the Russia Hoax is delusional. Assuming you can assert Russians hacked the 2016 election without offering any proof whatsoever insults at least half the country. We elected Trump in 2016 according to the Constitution. Stop denying it.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  geoffrey cox

By God, Sir, you would of course believe that the election was stolen! I was wondering how long it would take for 2020 election result deniers to creep out of their holes…

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago

Few think the election was properly done. Too many anomalies.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Hardee Hodges

Wrong. You should have phrased it this way: Few Republicans do. Most Repulsives don’t because they are either feeble-minded (“you know, people of the land, morons” Blazing Saddles) or sore losers.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago

But every high school student knows that to insult another person’s intelligence is to concede defeat. The debate is over. And yet we’ve got to the point where many reach for the insult as if it were the only option. Why do you think that is?

Last edited 1 year ago by Michael McElwee
Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

But Monsieur, I was insulting no-one. Just quoting from an excellent and very funny film. As for defeat, who is waging a war? Not I, Leclerc!

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago

If your life was at risk, would you want it saved by a Trump supporter?

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago

If your life was at risk, would you want it saved by a Trump supporter?

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

But Monsieur, I was insulting no-one. Just quoting from an excellent and very funny film. As for defeat, who is waging a war? Not I, Leclerc!

Johann Strauss
Johann Strauss
1 year ago

The issue is not what your opinion is or anybody else’s for that matter, but what are the actual facts. It doesn’t matter which side of the political divide one is on, there is no question that “funky” stuff went on with the 2020 election. Whether it was sufficient in the 3 key states to make any difference is another issue. But since nobody is willing to investigate properly we’ll never know and half the country will believe the election was stolen.
For sure it is mighty strange that somebody who couldn’t attract a crowd of more than 20 at any of the few rallies he did (and most of them were his entourage), and spent most of the election hiding in his basement, can garner the largest number of votes in history, vastly exceeding that of the superstar Obama. There is clearly some cognitive dissonance here.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago

But every high school student knows that to insult another person’s intelligence is to concede defeat. The debate is over. And yet we’ve got to the point where many reach for the insult as if it were the only option. Why do you think that is?

Last edited 1 year ago by Michael McElwee
Johann Strauss
Johann Strauss
1 year ago

The issue is not what your opinion is or anybody else’s for that matter, but what are the actual facts. It doesn’t matter which side of the political divide one is on, there is no question that “funky” stuff went on with the 2020 election. Whether it was sufficient in the 3 key states to make any difference is another issue. But since nobody is willing to investigate properly we’ll never know and half the country will believe the election was stolen.
For sure it is mighty strange that somebody who couldn’t attract a crowd of more than 20 at any of the few rallies he did (and most of them were his entourage), and spent most of the election hiding in his basement, can garner the largest number of votes in history, vastly exceeding that of the superstar Obama. There is clearly some cognitive dissonance here.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Hardee Hodges

Wrong. You should have phrased it this way: Few Republicans do. Most Repulsives don’t because they are either feeble-minded (“you know, people of the land, morons” Blazing Saddles) or sore losers.

geoffrey cox
geoffrey cox
1 year ago

81 million Americans voted to kick Trump out? In the words of the Duke of Wellington: ‘By God, sir, if you believe that, you’ll believe anything!’

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago

Few think the election was properly done. Too many anomalies.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Ukraine would not have happened under Trump. He knew how to deal with Russia and China both of whom are now detecting America’s weakness.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Is that why more than 81 million Americans voted to kick Trump out of office? Because of his amaaaazing accomplishments?!

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Ukraine would not have happened under Trump. He knew how to deal with Russia and China both of whom are now detecting America’s weakness.

aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump himself has no idea, still, on why he was elected. It wasn’t because of his policies, but rather that he was a wrecking ball to the clerisy that has taken over the nation, and is grinding it to ruin.
Bad wars, policies that remove jobs and industries, laws that spread violence, disregard of the laws that we do have a la the border, immigration, all of these things hurt the average person, the 70% who didn’t go to college and had falsities rammed down their throats, and they wanted to use the laws that are supposed to protect them to regain some modicum of control. But all we see is the whip effect of a slave questioning his master.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Trump is a populist – a crappy one – and people are fed up with the pathetic elites running the show.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  aaron david

Trump is a populist – a crappy one – and people are fed up with the pathetic elites running the show.

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump resurrected the Tea Party movement calling it MAGA. The desire for effective government remains. Trump was not effective in trying to reform because of his own flaws and inexperience assisted by an army of people who hated any change to their sinecures – of both political parties. His loss in 2020 amplified by the failing winner has created even more frustration with an ineffective government. If anything, the stalemate in government has become even worse.
The handout era in the US must end facing a mountain of debt. The US exporting inflation has reached an end. But it’s productivity can be inspired by better leadership. Whether Trump or someone else, the spirit must be rekindled.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

From my observation all the criminality is coming from the Dems.

Derek Smith
Derek Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Yes – he stuck his hand in the hornet’s nest and revealed it to be full of hornets.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Ordinary Americans might be desperate for change. That change, according to the results of the last presidential election, is not called Trump. As for the unhinged Left, look at some (a lot) of the Repubs sitting in the House of Reps, and tell me who is unhinged.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump actually got quite a bit accomplished. He secured the southern border – there were far fewer migrants deaths whereas hundreds have died since Biden has taken over. Trump removed a lot of unnecessary regulations to get the economy moving again. Inflation was just 1.4% compared to Biden’s 6 to 10 percent (this is killing every household budget). Trump did not create the supply line problems of today, Biden did. Trump did not start any conflicts, but Biden jumped in Ukraine, caused a disastrous pullout of Afghanistan
..and there’s so much more Trump did that was positive as well. Read up.

Last edited 1 year ago by Cathy Carron
aaron david
aaron david
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump himself has no idea, still, on why he was elected. It wasn’t because of his policies, but rather that he was a wrecking ball to the clerisy that has taken over the nation, and is grinding it to ruin.
Bad wars, policies that remove jobs and industries, laws that spread violence, disregard of the laws that we do have a la the border, immigration, all of these things hurt the average person, the 70% who didn’t go to college and had falsities rammed down their throats, and they wanted to use the laws that are supposed to protect them to regain some modicum of control. But all we see is the whip effect of a slave questioning his master.

Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

Trump resurrected the Tea Party movement calling it MAGA. The desire for effective government remains. Trump was not effective in trying to reform because of his own flaws and inexperience assisted by an army of people who hated any change to their sinecures – of both political parties. His loss in 2020 amplified by the failing winner has created even more frustration with an ineffective government. If anything, the stalemate in government has become even worse.
The handout era in the US must end facing a mountain of debt. The US exporting inflation has reached an end. But it’s productivity can be inspired by better leadership. Whether Trump or someone else, the spirit must be rekindled.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark Goodhand

From my observation all the criminality is coming from the Dems.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

The author does not write that the opioid crisis in the US is another of Trump’s innumerable misdeeds… He points out it is yet another symptom of American decline.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

Wrong. Entirely wrong. It’s hard to know where to begin with your comment because you don’t seem to understand what is going on at all.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Such an elightened/enlightening comment… Mais encore?

Jerry Cattelane
Jerry Cattelane
1 year ago

The opioid crisis can be laid squarely at the feet of Big Pharma and milquetoast physicians who listened to them two decades ago when “Pain is the fifth vital sign” was the mantra at every CME conference one could attend. From there, the drumbeat from administrators who were absolutely starstruck by patient satisfactions scores, was to tell physicians to write for opioids as often as possible. And, well, we can see where that has led. I have spent most of my career on this roller coaster and I assure you that this was a problem while Trump was still donating to Democrats and being a TV star. To suggest our nation’s affinity to narcotics started with him in office is simply not true.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

1.I never wrote the US’ affinity to narcotics started with Trump in office. 2. You’re right about Big Pharma. It’s happening again: turn the country into a nation of obese people by adding sugar to all the food, then develop and give them Ozempic. At roughly 900$/month, juicy business indeed.

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

;

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

1.I never wrote the US’ affinity to narcotics started with Trump in office. 2. You’re right about Big Pharma. It’s happening again: turn the country into a nation of obese people by adding sugar to all the food, then develop and give them Ozempic. At roughly 900$/month, juicy business indeed.

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago

;

Last edited 1 year ago by Danielle Treille
Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

On parler francais ici. Tres faux intelligent! Even Montana Cowboys like me speak French. It ain’t that impressive. Manure in any language is still m*rde.

Jerry Cattelane
Jerry Cattelane
1 year ago

The opioid crisis can be laid squarely at the feet of Big Pharma and milquetoast physicians who listened to them two decades ago when “Pain is the fifth vital sign” was the mantra at every CME conference one could attend. From there, the drumbeat from administrators who were absolutely starstruck by patient satisfactions scores, was to tell physicians to write for opioids as often as possible. And, well, we can see where that has led. I have spent most of my career on this roller coaster and I assure you that this was a problem while Trump was still donating to Democrats and being a TV star. To suggest our nation’s affinity to narcotics started with him in office is simply not true.

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

On parler francais ici. Tres faux intelligent! Even Montana Cowboys like me speak French. It ain’t that impressive. Manure in any language is still m*rde.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

Such an elightened/enlightening comment… Mais encore?

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

The fact that the border with Mexico is wide open because Biden is not doing his Constitutional duty to see that immigration laws are faithfully executed seems to have escaped your notice. Similarly, the fact that the vast majority of fentanyl seems to be smuggled over the border seems to be unrecognized by both the author and you.

Recently, Democrats have found that their issues don’t sell very well. Voters aren’t thrilled to open our jails and borders, and close our schools. Voters don’t think their highest priority should be to protect pregnant men from climate change. Most voters even shokingly prefer police, no matter how excessively white, to street gangs, even if the street gangs are really, really diverse.

So Democrats would rather talk about Trump,

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago

Wrong. Entirely wrong. It’s hard to know where to begin with your comment because you don’t seem to understand what is going on at all.

Douglas Proudfoot
Douglas Proudfoot
1 year ago

The fact that the border with Mexico is wide open because Biden is not doing his Constitutional duty to see that immigration laws are faithfully executed seems to have escaped your notice. Similarly, the fact that the vast majority of fentanyl seems to be smuggled over the border seems to be unrecognized by both the author and you.

Recently, Democrats have found that their issues don’t sell very well. Voters aren’t thrilled to open our jails and borders, and close our schools. Voters don’t think their highest priority should be to protect pregnant men from climate change. Most voters even shokingly prefer police, no matter how excessively white, to street gangs, even if the street gangs are really, really diverse.

So Democrats would rather talk about Trump,

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Black carnage in the inner cities has been going on since the 1960’s.

astralplainer
astralplainer
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

In Democrat cities.

astralplainer
astralplainer
1 year ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

In Democrat cities.

Linda M Brown
Linda M Brown
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

The worse cities in the USA (high crime rate, poverty etc) are those run by Democrats, and have been so for years

A Cee
A Cee
1 year ago
Reply to  Linda M Brown

That’s not saying much since Democrats pretty much run all major U.S. cities these days.

The best performing places in America tend to be suburbs and they are roughly split between being Dem-run and GOP-run.

A Cee
A Cee
1 year ago
Reply to  Linda M Brown

That’s not saying much since Democrats pretty much run all major U.S. cities these days.

The best performing places in America tend to be suburbs and they are roughly split between being Dem-run and GOP-run.

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Homelessness and drugs in the streets are mostly the faults of left wing Democratic politicians. Just looking at CA’s cities, where I spend lots of time, it is absolutely obvious, why this beautiful State is so mismanaged on all levels. Homelessness massivley increased under Newsom and the various left wing mayors and officials in CA. Homeless people got “invited” to spend their time here, free drugs for everybody and the cities tolerating their tents for the last 6 years. Major cities like LA and San Fran are so dangerous with drug addicts, that you don’t want to set a foot in the streets, but just drive quickly to your destination to avoid these poor staggering, drug filled human beings. Although in LA they seemed to have cleaned up some of the streets as local elections recently took place. An amazing transformation, since my last stay here and a happy new life for the local population, shop and restaurants owners.
Thousands of businesses are fleeing this State monthly as the local income taxes and red tapes are increasing, and new schemes are recently thought up by councillors in San Fran to give millions of Dollars to African Americans to compensate them for slavery.
So if a journalist wants to write an article about the decline of the U.S., he/she should just take a look at the extreme left wing Democrats, who run the big cities and States, where most of the problems and crimes are taking place.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephanie Surface
Mark Goodhand
Mark Goodhand
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Quite right. I can’t think of much that Trump actually changed, for better or for worse.

His main accomplishment was to highlight how unhinged the leftist Establishment has become, and how desperate ordinary Americans are for real change.

Danielle Treille
Danielle Treille
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

The author does not write that the opioid crisis in the US is another of Trump’s innumerable misdeeds… He points out it is yet another symptom of American decline.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Black carnage in the inner cities has been going on since the 1960’s.

Linda M Brown
Linda M Brown
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

The worse cities in the USA (high crime rate, poverty etc) are those run by Democrats, and have been so for years

Stephanie Surface
Stephanie Surface
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Roman

Homelessness and drugs in the streets are mostly the faults of left wing Democratic politicians. Just looking at CA’s cities, where I spend lots of time, it is absolutely obvious, why this beautiful State is so mismanaged on all levels. Homelessness massivley increased under Newsom and the various left wing mayors and officials in CA. Homeless people got “invited” to spend their time here, free drugs for everybody and the cities tolerating their tents for the last 6 years. Major cities like LA and San Fran are so dangerous with drug addicts, that you don’t want to set a foot in the streets, but just drive quickly to your destination to avoid these poor staggering, drug filled human beings. Although in LA they seemed to have cleaned up some of the streets as local elections recently took place. An amazing transformation, since my last stay here and a happy new life for the local population, shop and restaurants owners.
Thousands of businesses are fleeing this State monthly as the local income taxes and red tapes are increasing, and new schemes are recently thought up by councillors in San Fran to give millions of Dollars to African Americans to compensate them for slavery.
So if a journalist wants to write an article about the decline of the U.S., he/she should just take a look at the extreme left wing Democrats, who run the big cities and States, where most of the problems and crimes are taking place.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephanie Surface
Ken Shersley
Ken Shersley
1 year ago

Exactly – most journalists (both sides of the Pond) invariably make a simple assumption: Trump.Is.Evil. I’ve yet to have explained to me why this is the case. Something of a buffoon, occasionally, yes; eccentric hand gestures, silly comb-over, whatever, sure; no doubt involved in questionable high-finance shenanigans in his day, yes; narcissistic, no doubt. But, er, how do these characteristics not apply to just about every politician of the last thirty-odd years – many of whom (including the absurdity currently in power) are guilty of far, far worse? I just don’t see the xenophobic, child-torturing war-mongerer that everone else does! I see a rather avuncular, likeable, family man who doesn’t drink, comes out with the occasional badly-worded tweet (which I quite agree puts him in a bad light but is in fact perfectly explainable). But what earnest lefties probably hate most about Trump is that he has a sense of humour!
McTague’s contention is that Trump is the “cause and symptom of US dysfuntion”. He then goes on to say precisely nothing to explain his statement. The Assumption continues. These are the references to Trump:
1. “The news that Donald Trump will be indicted for allegedly paying hush money to a porn star only adds to the mounting atmosphere of dysfunction.” Is this really what’s done the damage to the American system? For crying out loud, Clinton (him)? Clinton (her)? Nixon? Biden for God’s sake? Even Kennedy, if they’d had social media back then! It’s not difficult to name dozens guilty of far worse than hush money…
2. “Why shouldn’t Trump be indicted, after all? If he broke the law, he broke the law.” Yep, fair enough, but so what?
3. “Trump’s indictment, though, plays into existing fears about the future of the Republic: of democratic norms no longer holding; taboos being broken; dangerous precedents being set; even of a late-stage imperial decline becoming entrenched.” Plays into whose “existing fears”? Yours, MrTague – yours! Name the “democratic norms” you refer to! The Democrat-favouring MMS are the ones doing such desperate damage to free speech – not Trump.
4. “After all, it doesn’t require an overly tragic mind to wonder what lessons Trump will take from this should he somehow take back the presidency.” I rather think it does, actually, Mr McTague. Feel like evidencing your views, perchance?
5. “And yet what is the grand jury in New York supposed to do if Trump has broken the law?” Well, if the trial is conducted fairly and he’s found guilty, hopefully the grand jury will just do its job! Where does this sort of gormless rhetoric get us?
6. “Trump, as ever, is both a cause and a symptom of America’s great national crisis.” There it is – don’t argue. This really is a facile and empty statement. Evidence please. As I’ve hinted before, it’s not difficult to point to far worse players than Trump.
7/8. “For Kaplan, who supported the Iraq war but came to bitterly regret his misjudgement, America then gave up any credibility to lecture the world by electing Trump. ‘Trump’s effect on our domestic politics laid bare the American system’s tenuousness,’ he writes.” So people were unhappy with the way things were going. They therefore elected someone a bit…different… who promised to shake things up. This is what politicians always say they’re going to do, and then don’t. Trump did. By the time he was outrageously forced out by the transparently rigged ‘election’ of a clownish, gibbering oaf (genuinely up to his neck in corrupt practices), Trump had fulfilled a far higher proportion of his campaign promises than any other president in history (without starting any overseas wars in doing so) and was likely on the way to fulfilli