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Pakistani child sex abuse is an open secret The Rotherham groomers were protected by their own

In Pakistan, more than 12 children are sexually abused every day (ASIF HASSAN/AFP via Getty Images)

In Pakistan, more than 12 children are sexually abused every day (ASIF HASSAN/AFP via Getty Images)


February 23, 2023   6 mins

The first time Rahim* was raped by a family member, he was six years old. In the early Nineties, three of Rahim’s uncles immigrated from Pakistan to the small town in Southern Ontario, Canada where Rahim’s family lived. He was five years old at the time; his elder sisters were nine and 14, and his baby brother was a new-born. The sexual abuse started almost immediately. Rahim says he was raped by one of his uncles “extremely frequently” for five years: two to three times a week, every week. His sisters weren’t spared either.

When he was eight, Rahim told one of his sisters that he had seen their uncle naked on numerous occasions. Both of them realised that they, along with their other sister, were being sexually abused after their daily Quran class with him. “Each day he’d pick who gets to leave and who gets to stay,” Rahim says. “I got the worst of it.”

In the liberal West, just implying that Pakistani communities have high rates of child sexual abuse (CSA) can result in accusations of bigotry. The subject is even more unmentionable in Pakistan itself. The nation has one of the highest rates of child sexual abuse in the world: over half a million children are raped there every year. (That is a conservative estimate.) According to recent reports, children are most at risk from the age of six, with nine being the most common age to be raped.

As the grooming gang scandals erupting in the UK have shown, this permissive attitude towards CSA seems to be spreading. A new documentary by GBNews attempts to uncover why the abuse scandal in Rotherham — in which more than 1,500 underage, often impoverished, white girls were groomed and raped by gangs of Pakistani men — was allowed to go on for decades without the authorities intervening. One obvious reason is that these authorities were afraid of being seen as “racist” for focusing the investigation on the predominantly Pakistani men who are running these rings. But it’s equally important to recognise that these crimes were covered up by the Pakistani community itself, which allowed abusers to continue with impunity. The documentary shows how Pakistani-British policemen and Rotherham city councillors either tried to suppress reports about the scandal, or deny it was happening at all.

To reject the uncomfortable truth is the modus operandi in Pakistan, where more than 12 children are reported to be sexually abused every day. In the tight-knit, working-class communities where it’s most likely to take place, fear of bringing “shame” on the family is prioritised over safeguarding individuals, even if they’re children. A conservative attitude towards discussing topics of a sexual nature doesn’t help. A 2013 report by Save The Children offers an insight into how family dynamics play out when CSA is uncovered in Pakistan, where its prevalence “appears to be high”. Of the 99% of mothers in Pakistan who were aware of CSA, around one-fifth either considered children as compliant, or blamed them for the abuse. Confronted with the grizzly details of such crimes, it is common for Pakistanis to downplay their severity, with men often seeing it as “a part of life”, to use the report’s phrase.

In Rahim’s family, when the eldest sister finally told their mother that an uncle had regularly raped three of the four children in the house, Rahim’s mother didn’t believe her, instead accusing her of “being hysterical and dramatic”. When her siblings insisted that the abuse was, in fact, happening, their mother finally confronted the uncle — but didn’t mention it to Rahim’s father, a marine engineer who was away from home for up to 10 months of the year. The uncle apologised, and the abuse stopped — but just for a few months. It was only when the uncle got married and moved out that the children’s five-year ordeal finally came to an end. By then, Rahim says, the eldest sister’s “problems started manifesting because of the trauma and she started rebelling”, eventually running away from home and telling the authorities about the abuse. When Rahim’s father was told, he didn’t believe any of it was true.

We have to recognise that these attitudes are cultural, if we are to understand what happened in Rotherham. Mohammed Shafiq, chief executive of The Ramadhan Foundation UK, has often commented on the over-representation of Pakistani men involved in grooming gangs in the West: “They think that white teenage girls are worthless and can be abused without a second thought.” In communities where parents are willing to sacrifice their own children in order to “keep the peace”, it’s rare for anyone to stick their neck out to speak up for the rights of poor and vulnerable white girls, who are considered outsiders. The general attitude seems to be: those non-Muslim “white slags” had it coming.

Predators exploit the high-trust environment enjoyed by citizens in more developed nations, such as the UK and Canada. Girls outside the Pakistani community are more accessible to predators because they have greater social freedom; the most accessible are those without reliable carers. One of the eeriest moments in the documentary was when a victim of the grooming gangs described what happened to her as “normal”. The sexual abuse of young girls like her was so commonplace in these towns, they didn’t think it was unusual to be drugged, gang raped, and trafficked by young men who passed themselves off as the girls’ boyfriends. Is this what a multicultural society is supposed to tolerate under the guise of “social cohesion”?

Unfortunately, the Pakistani community is still not ready to talk about CSA — a fact recognised by those few British Pakistanis who have spoken out against it. Shame and honour codes hold too much power, and those codes are hard to change. Shafiq, of The Ramadhan Foundation, notes that “for years some British Pakistanis have deliberately buried their heads in the sand about these predatory grooming gangs”. When family members of perpetrators were interviewed, they described white girls as “filthy”, commenting on their clothing, and saying, “they have no shame, no fear of Allah”. When asked how she would feel if her own daughter were abused, the Pakistani wife of one of the predators replied: “It can’t happen to our children because they are not in the streets. We look after them.”

When Rahim’s uncle was finally arrested, following the revelation that he had abused other children in the neighbourhood, the Pakistani community came together to do damage control. By this point, the abuser had two young children of his own. Rahim’s parents were advised by other Pakistani immigrants not to talk about his crimes because “they didn’t want the family’s image to be tarnished in the community”. They put pressure on Rahim to write a letter to the judge asking for a lighter sentence, their logic being that his cousins shouldn’t be made to grow up without a father.

“I was young at the time,” Rahim reflects. “I just did whatever the adults told me to do, so I wrote it.” His uncle went to prison for two years. When he was released, he and his family moved to Alberta. “His wife never left him, and his kids have no idea,” Rahim says. Rahim’s father forgave his brother, and even flew across the country to meet with him. “When he was in prison, everyone asked where he was, and we just lied and said he got a job up in the Northwest Territories and he’s making a lot of money up there. It was the community convincing my parents to cover it up.”

Tragic as it is, Rahim’s story is not unusual. It illustrates how sexual abuse goes unchecked within Pakistani communities. Rapists know that the community will not ostracise them. They’ll never be without a home or a job. Their mothers, siblings, wives and friends will actually cover for them. Even if they are convicted, they will most likely spend only a few years behind bars before they’re free to re-offend. They may even be encouraged to see themselves as victims of a racist criminal justice system that treats minorities unfairly. In Shafiq’s words: “They believe it is they who are victims of a racist witch-hunt — despite the fact that Pakistani gangs were allowed to rape their way around Rotherham for so long because, in part, politically correct officials were terrified of being accused of racism. They see any of us who try to tackle this problem as siding with the white ‘enemy’.”

Sadly, there is little hope of justice for the victims of grooming gangs in the UK without the cooperation of the Pakistani community. And unless Pakistanis find the courage to shine a light on what is an atrocious open secret within our communities, I fear what happened in Rotherham will continue to happen, devastating the lives of countless children and women, immigrant or otherwise. It pains me to think that what has recently been discovered is just the tip of the iceberg. Right now, there is plenty more abuse taking place across the UK within insular Pakistani communities. And change can only come about if we set aside the tribal instincts that have enabled one of the worst cases of child sexual exploitation in modern history.

*Name changed to protect the identity of the victim.


Hina Husain is a Pakistani-Canadian freelance writer based in Toronto.

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Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

The courage required to write this article shouldn’t be underestimated. The cover-up culture to preserve “honour” will undoubtedly create a backlash against those who speak out, but it’s so absolutely vital that these attitudes and mores are brought into the light of day.
By contrast, the cowardice of authorities in the UK and elsewhere means they’re complicit in these acts, every bit as much as if they were driving around in the flash cars beckoning to the young girls themselves. (Yes, that’s how it often happens, i’ve seen it with my own eyes.) And where the finances came from to buy such cars, driven by young men, is never questioned or investigated either.
Hina writes: They see any of us who try to tackle this problem as siding with the white ‘enemy’.
That’s what we are to the communities that harbour these criminals. The enemy. Note: not my words, but the words of those from within the Pakistani community.
It also appears that Pakistani-British policeman have been able to infiltrate our forces, and i’ve little doubt that at least some of them may have done so as a deliberate ploy to help keep the crimes of their ethnic communities from being properly investigated. Meanwhile, the Diversity sections of police forces will pride themselves on their recruitment, totally oblivious to the insidious effects of their efforts in aiding and abetting serious abuse.
Rotherham is of course, just one of the dozens of communities across the length and breath of the UK where this has happened. I do wonder sometimes whether continually using this town as a reference has the effect of inducing a belief that it’s only a limited number of mainly working class places where the grooming takes place, and that it’s therefore relatively confined. I think when the full extent of this is brought into the open, we’ll find it happening in every single city, town and village with a Pakistani community.
Let me be clear. I’ve known plenty of Pakistanis and worked alongside them during my career. As individuals, they’re often very intelligent and easy to get along with – charming, in fact. It’s the religious and cultural sphere in which they live that causes these issues, plus the refusal of many in their communities to mix with “the enemy”. So i’m not tarring all Pakistanis with the same brush by any means, but those who don’t speak out are complicit. The threat of social or physical harm is extremely powerful though – it’s that which must be overcome. Only through articles such as these will that ever even begin to happen, and the writer demonstrates that it is possible to take that first step.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Albireo Double
Albireo Double
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Good comment. And of course when people complain about cultural change, they are called racist. When people complain about their children being abused – they are called racist.

This country is fast heading for the Reckoning of all time

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

Its not just sex abuse, there is drug dealing, money laundering, fraud, benefit fraud an tax evasion

Paul Devlin
Paul Devlin
1 year ago

Polygamy, child marriage, first cousin marriage etc

Paul Devlin
Paul Devlin
1 year ago

Polygamy, child marriage, first cousin marriage etc

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

They strain at the knat and swallow the camel so to speak.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

Its not just sex abuse, there is drug dealing, money laundering, fraud, benefit fraud an tax evasion

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

They strain at the knat and swallow the camel so to speak.

Jamie Smith
Jamie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Sixteen men including a police officer have been charged with historical sex offences against children aged between 13 and 16 West Yorkshire PC Amjad Ditta, also known as Amjad Hussain, 35, has been charged with sexual touching.He and 15 other men are charged with offences against three girls in the Halifax area, dating from 2006 to 2009.The allegations include several counts of rape, sexual assault, supplying drugs and trafficking. Mr Ditta, who was attached to West Yorkshire Police’s Protective Services Operations, was a serving officer at the time of the offence he has been accused of.”
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-50838823

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jamie Smith

Looks like the police don’t care who they employ. No wonder corruption is endemic in the police. When will the reckoning be.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jamie Smith

Looks like the police don’t care who they employ. No wonder corruption is endemic in the police. When will the reckoning be.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

That is an excellent opening comment. Among many other issues, this timely article poses the question, “Is this (prevalence of Pakistani grooming gangs) what a multicultural society is supposed to tolerate under the guise of ‘social cohesion’?” Pathetically, it seems that the current answer would be “Yes, it is”. But this has to change.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

It is not racist to charge rapists whoever they are.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

It is not racist to charge rapists whoever they are.

Albireo Double
Albireo Double
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Good comment. And of course when people complain about cultural change, they are called racist. When people complain about their children being abused – they are called racist.

This country is fast heading for the Reckoning of all time

Jamie Smith
Jamie Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Sixteen men including a police officer have been charged with historical sex offences against children aged between 13 and 16 West Yorkshire PC Amjad Ditta, also known as Amjad Hussain, 35, has been charged with sexual touching.He and 15 other men are charged with offences against three girls in the Halifax area, dating from 2006 to 2009.The allegations include several counts of rape, sexual assault, supplying drugs and trafficking. Mr Ditta, who was attached to West Yorkshire Police’s Protective Services Operations, was a serving officer at the time of the offence he has been accused of.”
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-50838823

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

That is an excellent opening comment. Among many other issues, this timely article poses the question, “Is this (prevalence of Pakistani grooming gangs) what a multicultural society is supposed to tolerate under the guise of ‘social cohesion’?” Pathetically, it seems that the current answer would be “Yes, it is”. But this has to change.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

The courage required to write this article shouldn’t be underestimated. The cover-up culture to preserve “honour” will undoubtedly create a backlash against those who speak out, but it’s so absolutely vital that these attitudes and mores are brought into the light of day.
By contrast, the cowardice of authorities in the UK and elsewhere means they’re complicit in these acts, every bit as much as if they were driving around in the flash cars beckoning to the young girls themselves. (Yes, that’s how it often happens, i’ve seen it with my own eyes.) And where the finances came from to buy such cars, driven by young men, is never questioned or investigated either.
Hina writes: They see any of us who try to tackle this problem as siding with the white ‘enemy’.
That’s what we are to the communities that harbour these criminals. The enemy. Note: not my words, but the words of those from within the Pakistani community.
It also appears that Pakistani-British policeman have been able to infiltrate our forces, and i’ve little doubt that at least some of them may have done so as a deliberate ploy to help keep the crimes of their ethnic communities from being properly investigated. Meanwhile, the Diversity sections of police forces will pride themselves on their recruitment, totally oblivious to the insidious effects of their efforts in aiding and abetting serious abuse.
Rotherham is of course, just one of the dozens of communities across the length and breath of the UK where this has happened. I do wonder sometimes whether continually using this town as a reference has the effect of inducing a belief that it’s only a limited number of mainly working class places where the grooming takes place, and that it’s therefore relatively confined. I think when the full extent of this is brought into the open, we’ll find it happening in every single city, town and village with a Pakistani community.
Let me be clear. I’ve known plenty of Pakistanis and worked alongside them during my career. As individuals, they’re often very intelligent and easy to get along with – charming, in fact. It’s the religious and cultural sphere in which they live that causes these issues, plus the refusal of many in their communities to mix with “the enemy”. So i’m not tarring all Pakistanis with the same brush by any means, but those who don’t speak out are complicit. The threat of social or physical harm is extremely powerful though – it’s that which must be overcome. Only through articles such as these will that ever even begin to happen, and the writer demonstrates that it is possible to take that first step.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin
1 year ago

Rotherham is the tip of the iceberg. Telford, Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Hull, Dewsbury, Slough, Leicester, Birmingham, London, Oldham, Luton, Manchester, Burnley, Bury, Rochdale, Barnsley, Bolton, Middlesbrough to name but a few, have all had serious incidents of predominately Pakistani/Indian grooming gangs operating with relative impunity raping and abusing mainly young, vulnerable white girls. However, I suspect, in equal measure, girls within their own communities, hidden behind the veil, are also victims, possibly, even more so.
Where are the feminists and the social justice “activists”? Where is the outcry from social services? Why aren’t the identity politics ideologues out in force championing the rights of the thousands of victims subjected to horrendous abuse? They are nowhere to be seen.
Unfortunately, standing up for young white females does not sit very well with their vile, pernicious political narratives; these poor young women are an inconvenience at almost every level for the ‘captured’ warriors of the culture wars, which in itself highlights the extreme threat and dangers the trappings of identity politics and its puritanical doctrines, poses to society as a whole. It’s appalling that so many people have had to suffer at the expense of political correctness.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

The only thing our severely overstretched social services can do is remove the girls from the area. Unfortunately, many of the girls will become habitual absconders in order to return to the area which means (if they’re lucky) they end up in secure units. In effect, we’re more likely to end up imprisoning the victims. Tbf though, often it’s the only way to protect them and ensure they get the help they need.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

I have seen articles on the TV where Pakistani families have been complaining about white prostitutes on the street. Rightly so but it is very hypocritical to cover up the raping of our girls.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

I have seen articles on the TV where Pakistani families have been complaining about white prostitutes on the street. Rightly so but it is very hypocritical to cover up the raping of our girls.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

I’m in Sussex, and in a comment the other day I spoke about multiple situations of this nature I have some personal link to and was accused by one commenter of making it up, because seemingly it is easier for some people to live in denial of the extent of this problem in poor communities than to be confronted with the reality that pretty much everyone in deprived communities knows at least one person who has been subjected to this kind of abuse.

Now in the cases I spoke about, only one of the perpetrators was from the Pakistani demographic, one of the others was from Sierra Leone, which is another region known to have some very serious issues with gender based violence, yet it took years of endless reports being made to police by girls and their families before that predator was removed from the streets, and is now back in the community again, having served around half of the sentence he received.

As usual, the same lessons are not learned by the authorities who are supposed to be keeping our communities and our children safe from these predatory human beings. Cultural norms do have an effect on this kind of predatory behaviour, and sticking our heads in the sand about this is only enabling these predators to access more victims. Time to grow some spines and start prioritising reality over the whims of ideologues who care more for their ideals than the lives of poor children.

Last edited 1 year ago by AL Crowe
Mirax Path
Mirax Path
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

The BBC and the mainstream papers have spent much ink on dregs like Shamima Begam and not spent even a fraction of the time on the very eloquent women survivors of this disgraceful national scandal. Why is that?

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Look at the overall composition of BBC staff members, look at the real ethos of the BBC (not the mealy mouthed claims they make about neutrality), and look at the political leanings of those who support the continued existence of it and the licence fee, and you have your answer.

It is not within their interests to challenge the ideals of their staff members and supporters.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Diversity and inclusiveness trumps all.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

And misogyny. I’m sure boys are trafficked but one wonders if the response would be different if it was predominately young males. The uncle didn’t seem to have a preference but we don’t know how common that is.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

And misogyny. I’m sure boys are trafficked but one wonders if the response would be different if it was predominately young males. The uncle didn’t seem to have a preference but we don’t know how common that is.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Because of institutional anti-white racism.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

You are wrong : anti-white racism is an oxymoron. It doesn’t exist.

Like antipathy between Africans and Asians. That’s not racism either.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

Perhaps the sarcasm didn’t come across? My bad.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

It came across just fine – some people are concrete thinkers, humour confuses them

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

It can be quite difficult to tell on the printed page, seeing as there really are some disgusting woke scum who claim that white people can’t be victims of racism. At any rate, I for one appreciate John Solomon taking the trouble to make it clear that he isn’t one of those our souls.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I wish people wouldn’t use “woke’ as a catch all euphamism for things they are unable to actually articulate, because of laziness or lack of intellect or both. It’s become a meaningless put down word for anything the user dislikes.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I wish people wouldn’t use “woke’ as a catch all euphamism for things they are unable to actually articulate, because of laziness or lack of intellect or both. It’s become a meaningless put down word for anything the user dislikes.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic A

It can be quite difficult to tell on the printed page, seeing as there really are some disgusting woke scum who claim that white people can’t be victims of racism. At any rate, I for one appreciate John Solomon taking the trouble to make it clear that he isn’t one of those our souls.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

Is it our country or theirs? We know we should be friendly to legal immigrants but speaking against the natural race of this country doesn’t help for cohesion. The BBC are too far gone now to bother to critisise them.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

It came across just fine – some people are concrete thinkers, humour confuses them

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

Is it our country or theirs? We know we should be friendly to legal immigrants but speaking against the natural race of this country doesn’t help for cohesion. The BBC are too far gone now to bother to critisise them.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  John Solomon

Perhaps the sarcasm didn’t come across? My bad.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

You are wrong : anti-white racism is an oxymoron. It doesn’t exist.

Like antipathy between Africans and Asians. That’s not racism either.

Vijay Kant
Vijay Kant
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Money. The narrative of Islamophobia generates revenues. There are more than 50 muslim countries in the world to sell their programmes to.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Well that’s the BBC isn’t it. There are better newscasters like GB News for instance.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Because they’re women.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Look at the overall composition of BBC staff members, look at the real ethos of the BBC (not the mealy mouthed claims they make about neutrality), and look at the political leanings of those who support the continued existence of it and the licence fee, and you have your answer.

It is not within their interests to challenge the ideals of their staff members and supporters.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Diversity and inclusiveness trumps all.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Because of institutional anti-white racism.

Vijay Kant
Vijay Kant
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Money. The narrative of Islamophobia generates revenues. There are more than 50 muslim countries in the world to sell their programmes to.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Well that’s the BBC isn’t it. There are better newscasters like GB News for instance.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Mirax Path

Because they’re women.

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

There can be too much ‘diversity’

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

I accused you of making it up. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen you taking the piss before. Im pretty sure your posts are plastic. I can’t prove that. But I can call you out. My mum does come from a council house. You don’t sound like one of me. ‘Whims of idealogues’….. Really. Street.
The Rotherham scandal is disgraceful, but if anyone cared about these girls in the first place this wouldn’t have happened. Yes this is a problem. My problem is people using working class girls they wouldn’t normally think twice about, to have a good rant about races of people they don’t like. And there’s plenty of those on here. And that’s what I think your game is. Thats what I don’t like. Apparently lindsay above thinks imprisoning these girls is the only way to protect them, how. Insane.
Anyway. I’ll leave you to it. Now I’ve made myself clear. I shall leave you alone in future, I won’t bother you again.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

So because I speak like someone who has multiple degrees (and I do have multiple degrees), that must mean I cannot be from a deprived area, and cannot have also grown up as a recipient of free school meals raised by a single parent?

I am disabled, yes, I am well educated, but no amount of education can undo my disability, thus I remain living in a poor area, because nice areas don’t tend to like housing people who rely on disability benefits to top up their part time wages, and tend to be well beyond the price range of those like me.

I do enjoy having random strangers assume I am racist simply because my language use doesn’t fit their own very narrow stereotypes of who does and doesn’t live in deprived areas.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

Don’t you mean that that you “don’t” enjoy random strangers….? By the way you sound awfullu defensive.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

Don’t you mean that that you “don’t” enjoy random strangers….? By the way you sound awfullu defensive.

Howard Gleave
Howard Gleave
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

You’ve made yourself only too clear. What a neat reversal to blame mass rape of “white enemy” working class girls on people who should have “cared” for these girls. The responsibility for these rapes lies fairly and squarely with the, Pakistani for the most part, rapists, and those that cover for them. I’m “calling you out” (yuk) for moral relativism.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Howard Gleave

You assume I have no experience of anything like this and no reason to care. You go with what you like. Call me what you like. Like I say. I’m done.
I’d like to know how many years you have to spend living on a university campus to get ‘multiple degrees’ I have to say.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Howard Gleave

You assume I have no experience of anything like this and no reason to care. You go with what you like. Call me what you like. Like I say. I’m done.
I’d like to know how many years you have to spend living on a university campus to get ‘multiple degrees’ I have to say.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

I would actually prefer the perpetrators to be deported or imprisoned however they have rights too and the wheels of justice is slow. From experience of working in residential childcare, I know that many of these girls DO NOT want to be taken out of area and WILL continually run away to return to area, which results in them being placed under DoLs orders (deprivation of liberty) which often means being placed in secure units, which I think we all agree is better than them returning to their abusers to be trafficked out of our reach. Do you disagree?

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

So, because the ‘wheels of justice’ are failing your alternative is to take these girls, who have already suffered, away from friends, families and their community and when they try and go back home you lock them in a secure unit. Deprive them of their liberty. At a time when they should be out starting their life?
Im not sure I have any words.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

It’s not “my” alternative. What is your alternative? You’re very critical of the system, however you don’t offer any constructive solutions. How do you suggest we protect girls, that in many cases, do not want protection? Do not think that they need it and will go to extreme lengths to avoid it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

I’ve described an alternative above. I feel sure if it was presented as a way out of a life of poverty and abuse the majority would go for it. Whether there would be the money available for these social services is another matter.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

I’ve described an alternative above. I feel sure if it was presented as a way out of a life of poverty and abuse the majority would go for it. Whether there would be the money available for these social services is another matter.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

Families don’t seem to care that much to leave them vulnerable in the streets. A compromise would be a secure unit where they can be kept an eye on.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

I see you are all still going.
First. They would not be vulnerable in the street if we fixed the wheels of justice, if the street isn’t safe that is not their fault. Should we lock our children inside? If you knew anything about the Rotherham scandal you would know one of the girls fathers took it up with the police in the first place.
Next. Equating protection and prison in this way for victims of crime is something I find a very strange concept. You obviously see no value in the girls links to their communities, which I think shows you do not understand or value the community they come from.
Next. Surely it would be better to spend the time money and people and facilities on locking up the criminals not the victims.

Last edited 1 year ago by B Emery
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Just wharehousing people without the opportunity for them to change their lives, is absurd.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

I see you are all still going.
First. They would not be vulnerable in the street if we fixed the wheels of justice, if the street isn’t safe that is not their fault. Should we lock our children inside? If you knew anything about the Rotherham scandal you would know one of the girls fathers took it up with the police in the first place.
Next. Equating protection and prison in this way for victims of crime is something I find a very strange concept. You obviously see no value in the girls links to their communities, which I think shows you do not understand or value the community they come from.
Next. Surely it would be better to spend the time money and people and facilities on locking up the criminals not the victims.

Last edited 1 year ago by B Emery
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

Just wharehousing people without the opportunity for them to change their lives, is absurd.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

It’s not “my” alternative. What is your alternative? You’re very critical of the system, however you don’t offer any constructive solutions. How do you suggest we protect girls, that in many cases, do not want protection? Do not think that they need it and will go to extreme lengths to avoid it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

Families don’t seem to care that much to leave them vulnerable in the streets. A compromise would be a secure unit where they can be kept an eye on.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

Are the wheels of justice even running on this matter let alone slow?

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

The same could be asked of any r@pe case. Early on they’re notoriously difficult to prove so little is done until you have a large number of people saying the same thing and that can take years because so many feel they can’t say anything or there is no point. Then there is police force themselves. The last inquiries into child deaths (Star and Arthur) found the police to be at fault when it came to multi agency sharing of information (basically they didn’t). The police seem to be more adept at following up on social media hate crimes than actual crimes.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Conrad

The same could be asked of any r@pe case. Early on they’re notoriously difficult to prove so little is done until you have a large number of people saying the same thing and that can take years because so many feel they can’t say anything or there is no point. Then there is police force themselves. The last inquiries into child deaths (Star and Arthur) found the police to be at fault when it came to multi agency sharing of information (basically they didn’t). The police seem to be more adept at following up on social media hate crimes than actual crimes.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

Are there only two alternatives. Can’t these girls be taught self-empowerment and self-worth which is obviously lacking. If a residence could be set up to house them and educate them to have self-respect along with job training.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

So, because the ‘wheels of justice’ are failing your alternative is to take these girls, who have already suffered, away from friends, families and their community and when they try and go back home you lock them in a secure unit. Deprive them of their liberty. At a time when they should be out starting their life?
Im not sure I have any words.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

Are the wheels of justice even running on this matter let alone slow?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

Are there only two alternatives. Can’t these girls be taught self-empowerment and self-worth which is obviously lacking. If a residence could be set up to house them and educate them to have self-respect along with job training.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

So because I speak like someone who has multiple degrees (and I do have multiple degrees), that must mean I cannot be from a deprived area, and cannot have also grown up as a recipient of free school meals raised by a single parent?

I am disabled, yes, I am well educated, but no amount of education can undo my disability, thus I remain living in a poor area, because nice areas don’t tend to like housing people who rely on disability benefits to top up their part time wages, and tend to be well beyond the price range of those like me.

I do enjoy having random strangers assume I am racist simply because my language use doesn’t fit their own very narrow stereotypes of who does and doesn’t live in deprived areas.

Howard Gleave
Howard Gleave
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

You’ve made yourself only too clear. What a neat reversal to blame mass rape of “white enemy” working class girls on people who should have “cared” for these girls. The responsibility for these rapes lies fairly and squarely with the, Pakistani for the most part, rapists, and those that cover for them. I’m “calling you out” (yuk) for moral relativism.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

I would actually prefer the perpetrators to be deported or imprisoned however they have rights too and the wheels of justice is slow. From experience of working in residential childcare, I know that many of these girls DO NOT want to be taken out of area and WILL continually run away to return to area, which results in them being placed under DoLs orders (deprivation of liberty) which often means being placed in secure units, which I think we all agree is better than them returning to their abusers to be trafficked out of our reach. Do you disagree?

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
Mirax Path
Mirax Path
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

The BBC and the mainstream papers have spent much ink on dregs like Shamima Begam and not spent even a fraction of the time on the very eloquent women survivors of this disgraceful national scandal. Why is that?

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

There can be too much ‘diversity’

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  AL Crowe

I accused you of making it up. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen you taking the piss before. Im pretty sure your posts are plastic. I can’t prove that. But I can call you out. My mum does come from a council house. You don’t sound like one of me. ‘Whims of idealogues’….. Really. Street.
The Rotherham scandal is disgraceful, but if anyone cared about these girls in the first place this wouldn’t have happened. Yes this is a problem. My problem is people using working class girls they wouldn’t normally think twice about, to have a good rant about races of people they don’t like. And there’s plenty of those on here. And that’s what I think your game is. Thats what I don’t like. Apparently lindsay above thinks imprisoning these girls is the only way to protect them, how. Insane.
Anyway. I’ll leave you to it. Now I’ve made myself clear. I shall leave you alone in future, I won’t bother you again.

Mirax Path
Mirax Path
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

There was a triggernometry interview just last night with one survivor, Samantha Smith, of Telford that was truly inspiring. Very clear and articulate summary of the issue and the establishment’s weaknesses. Also chilling to realise that it is still ongoing and not quite historical.
https://youtu.be/zRuK5wPd_Fc

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Obvious solution is to stop mass imigration, especially from shit countries like Pakistan.
I fail to see how they benefit uk, apart from curry houses.
But none of the political parties likely to form governments is proposing anything to stop these useless, low IQ savages from settling in the West.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew F

The kind of people you describe always misconstrue the term “multicultural society”, blithely assuming that upon resettling in the UK, they can continue with exactly the same cultural practices they “enjoyed” in their country of origin. Sadly, the prevalence of PC/woke attitudes in this country, does little or nothing to disabuse them of that misconception. Thus the horrors proliferate.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

I watch CNN and there is a female Iranian British reporter who wears a higab and reports on the oppression of women in iran. she pisses me off whenever I see her. She’s rather smug, but apart from that it seems so hypocritical to wear a scarf that signifys submission to the brutal patriachy that she’s, apparently, opposed to. It’s seems so cowardly. Bravery is what’s needed to fight the sordid abuses and moral blackmail that Islam inflicts around the world.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

I watch CNN and there is a female Iranian British reporter who wears a higab and reports on the oppression of women in iran. she pisses me off whenever I see her. She’s rather smug, but apart from that it seems so hypocritical to wear a scarf that signifys submission to the brutal patriachy that she’s, apparently, opposed to. It’s seems so cowardly. Bravery is what’s needed to fight the sordid abuses and moral blackmail that Islam inflicts around the world.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew F

The kind of people you describe always misconstrue the term “multicultural society”, blithely assuming that upon resettling in the UK, they can continue with exactly the same cultural practices they “enjoyed” in their country of origin. Sadly, the prevalence of PC/woke attitudes in this country, does little or nothing to disabuse them of that misconception. Thus the horrors proliferate.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Astonishingly you should add Oxford to that list!

Paul T
Paul T
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Why blame feminists for rapes that only-ever men are committing?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul T

EXACTLY!!

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul T

EXACTLY!!

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

The tories have had plenty of time to sort it out but have done nothing.

Sam L
Sam L
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

“have all had serious incidents of predominately Pakistani/Indian grooming gangs”. Clubbing British Indians with British Pakistanis is misleading and very BBC like tactic. BBC calls these criminals as vague ‘British Asians’ in headlines in order to hide their Pakistani muslim identity. Have you seen instances of a British-Indian/British-Hindu involved in grooming gangs ? None as far as i know. If anything, there are instances of Hindu girls themselves being victims of Pakistani grooming gangs. Pakistani grooming gangs also tend to be Islamist gangs and for their mindset any non-muslim young girl is a fair game since they come from ‘enemy group’.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Sam L

Well said: Indian Hindus must and should not be confused with muslims and Pakistanis.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

So who are the men who rape the hundreds of women in india?

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

So who are the men who rape the hundreds of women in india?

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Sam L

Well said: Indian Hindus must and should not be confused with muslims and Pakistanis.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

The only thing our severely overstretched social services can do is remove the girls from the area. Unfortunately, many of the girls will become habitual absconders in order to return to the area which means (if they’re lucky) they end up in secure units. In effect, we’re more likely to end up imprisoning the victims. Tbf though, often it’s the only way to protect them and ensure they get the help they need.

Last edited 1 year ago by Lindsay S
AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

I’m in Sussex, and in a comment the other day I spoke about multiple situations of this nature I have some personal link to and was accused by one commenter of making it up, because seemingly it is easier for some people to live in denial of the extent of this problem in poor communities than to be confronted with the reality that pretty much everyone in deprived communities knows at least one person who has been subjected to this kind of abuse.

Now in the cases I spoke about, only one of the perpetrators was from the Pakistani demographic, one of the others was from Sierra Leone, which is another region known to have some very serious issues with gender based violence, yet it took years of endless reports being made to police by girls and their families before that predator was removed from the streets, and is now back in the community again, having served around half of the sentence he received.

As usual, the same lessons are not learned by the authorities who are supposed to be keeping our communities and our children safe from these predatory human beings. Cultural norms do have an effect on this kind of predatory behaviour, and sticking our heads in the sand about this is only enabling these predators to access more victims. Time to grow some spines and start prioritising reality over the whims of ideologues who care more for their ideals than the lives of poor children.

Last edited 1 year ago by AL Crowe
Mirax Path
Mirax Path
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

There was a triggernometry interview just last night with one survivor, Samantha Smith, of Telford that was truly inspiring. Very clear and articulate summary of the issue and the establishment’s weaknesses. Also chilling to realise that it is still ongoing and not quite historical.
https://youtu.be/zRuK5wPd_Fc

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Obvious solution is to stop mass imigration, especially from shit countries like Pakistan.
I fail to see how they benefit uk, apart from curry houses.
But none of the political parties likely to form governments is proposing anything to stop these useless, low IQ savages from settling in the West.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Astonishingly you should add Oxford to that list!

Paul T
Paul T
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

Why blame feminists for rapes that only-ever men are committing?

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

The tories have had plenty of time to sort it out but have done nothing.

Sam L
Sam L
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

“have all had serious incidents of predominately Pakistani/Indian grooming gangs”. Clubbing British Indians with British Pakistanis is misleading and very BBC like tactic. BBC calls these criminals as vague ‘British Asians’ in headlines in order to hide their Pakistani muslim identity. Have you seen instances of a British-Indian/British-Hindu involved in grooming gangs ? None as far as i know. If anything, there are instances of Hindu girls themselves being victims of Pakistani grooming gangs. Pakistani grooming gangs also tend to be Islamist gangs and for their mindset any non-muslim young girl is a fair game since they come from ‘enemy group’.

Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin
1 year ago

Rotherham is the tip of the iceberg. Telford, Sheffield, Leeds, Bradford, Hull, Dewsbury, Slough, Leicester, Birmingham, London, Oldham, Luton, Manchester, Burnley, Bury, Rochdale, Barnsley, Bolton, Middlesbrough to name but a few, have all had serious incidents of predominately Pakistani/Indian grooming gangs operating with relative impunity raping and abusing mainly young, vulnerable white girls. However, I suspect, in equal measure, girls within their own communities, hidden behind the veil, are also victims, possibly, even more so.
Where are the feminists and the social justice “activists”? Where is the outcry from social services? Why aren’t the identity politics ideologues out in force championing the rights of the thousands of victims subjected to horrendous abuse? They are nowhere to be seen.
Unfortunately, standing up for young white females does not sit very well with their vile, pernicious political narratives; these poor young women are an inconvenience at almost every level for the ‘captured’ warriors of the culture wars, which in itself highlights the extreme threat and dangers the trappings of identity politics and its puritanical doctrines, poses to society as a whole. It’s appalling that so many people have had to suffer at the expense of political correctness.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

I’m much more concerned by the willingness of police and public authorities to enable this activity. It’s just another of the ways that our governing class has been utterly corrupted by relativism.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

In one of the cases in my area I have referenced here and previously in comments, a former mayor of the town involved was implicated in forging documents and lying about the legal status of the predator he rented property to, and for allowing the sexual exploitation of young girls to happen there.

This pattern is repeated across the country, and not just in the “multicultural” abuse rings, the same thing has happened in the care system of this country for decades, where those charged with protecting children have actively enabled abuse, and even been the abusers in some examples. Our government provisions for child protection are like so many other things in our crumbling society not fit for purpose, and in dire need of tangible reform, not more lessons will be learned rhetoric.

AL Crowe
AL Crowe
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

In one of the cases in my area I have referenced here and previously in comments, a former mayor of the town involved was implicated in forging documents and lying about the legal status of the predator he rented property to, and for allowing the sexual exploitation of young girls to happen there.

This pattern is repeated across the country, and not just in the “multicultural” abuse rings, the same thing has happened in the care system of this country for decades, where those charged with protecting children have actively enabled abuse, and even been the abusers in some examples. Our government provisions for child protection are like so many other things in our crumbling society not fit for purpose, and in dire need of tangible reform, not more lessons will be learned rhetoric.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

I’m much more concerned by the willingness of police and public authorities to enable this activity. It’s just another of the ways that our governing class has been utterly corrupted by relativism.

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago

All of this article fills me with disgust, but the worst point is this:

“Unfortunately, the Pakistani community is still not ready to talk about CSA — a fact recognised by those few British Pakistanis who have spoken out against it. Shame and honour codes hold too much power…”

It’s “honour” is it, that makes it possible for these perverts to carry on at almost no risk to themselves?

Last edited 1 year ago by John Riordan
Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

The article links to an article quoting a so-called ‘child rights activist’ who claims 550000 children are sexually abused in Pakistan every year and also claims 1 billion children are abused globally. He provides no evidence for either claim. The entire article is hearsay. No doubt child sexual abuse occurs among Pakistanis but no evidence is provided to show its occurrence relative to other races. Her ‘evidence’ consists entirely of pulling at heartstrings and pandering to prejudices against Muslims and Pakistanis.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

I’m guessing you work in child “protection” somewhere like Rotherham.

Aidan Trimble
Aidan Trimble
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

What on earth are you on about ? Are you wilfully ignorant or is it your default setting ? This vile abuse has been documented in great detail. It’s nothing to do with prejudices against minority groups you fool.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

He really is disgusting isn’t he.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I’m ‘disgusting’ for asking for evidence for her claims?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Do your own reasearch. Become informed.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Do your own reasearch. Become informed.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I’m ‘disgusting’ for asking for evidence for her claims?

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

I am referring to her figure of 550,000 children abused annually in Pakistan. Click on the links she provides, they provide no evidence to back it up.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

Right on!!

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

He really is disgusting isn’t he.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

I am referring to her figure of 550,000 children abused annually in Pakistan. Click on the links she provides, they provide no evidence to back it up.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Aidan Trimble

Right on!!

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

To paraphrase: I regret that I have only one down vote to give you.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

Why? Is it wrong to ask for evidence for her claims?

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Do your own research if you’re genuinely interested in facts and truth, but you seem more interested in the fight.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Do your own research if you’re genuinely interested in facts and truth, but you seem more interested in the fight.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

Why? Is it wrong to ask for evidence for her claims?

Vijay Kant
Vijay Kant
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

To refute the article successfully you need to provide some evidence against it.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Vijay Kant

I have no basis on which to refute her claims. Just as she has provided no basis on which to establish them. She’s relying on pulling at heartstrings and on prejudice against Muslims and Pakistanis to get a response, and it has worked.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

You could educate yourself and then engage in informed discourse instead of just trying to invalidate comments with accusations of racism, which is so easy to do without actually saying anything intelligent.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

You could educate yourself and then engage in informed discourse instead of just trying to invalidate comments with accusations of racism, which is so easy to do without actually saying anything intelligent.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Vijay Kant

Exactly!

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  Vijay Kant

I have no basis on which to refute her claims. Just as she has provided no basis on which to establish them. She’s relying on pulling at heartstrings and on prejudice against Muslims and Pakistanis to get a response, and it has worked.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Vijay Kant

Exactly!

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Nah.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

I’m guessing you work in child “protection” somewhere like Rotherham.

Aidan Trimble
Aidan Trimble
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

What on earth are you on about ? Are you wilfully ignorant or is it your default setting ? This vile abuse has been documented in great detail. It’s nothing to do with prejudices against minority groups you fool.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

To paraphrase: I regret that I have only one down vote to give you.

Vijay Kant
Vijay Kant
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

To refute the article successfully you need to provide some evidence against it.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Bocho

Nah.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

It’s the honour thing when it occures in families.

Jim Bocho
Jim Bocho
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

The article links to an article quoting a so-called ‘child rights activist’ who claims 550000 children are sexually abused in Pakistan every year and also claims 1 billion children are abused globally. He provides no evidence for either claim. The entire article is hearsay. No doubt child sexual abuse occurs among Pakistanis but no evidence is provided to show its occurrence relative to other races. Her ‘evidence’ consists entirely of pulling at heartstrings and pandering to prejudices against Muslims and Pakistanis.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

It’s the honour thing when it occures in families.

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago

All of this article fills me with disgust, but the worst point is this:

“Unfortunately, the Pakistani community is still not ready to talk about CSA — a fact recognised by those few British Pakistanis who have spoken out against it. Shame and honour codes hold too much power…”

It’s “honour” is it, that makes it possible for these perverts to carry on at almost no risk to themselves?

Last edited 1 year ago by John Riordan
Stephen Quilley
Stephen Quilley
1 year ago

Great article – honest and brave. Question: At what point is it permissible for countries to adopt selective immigration policies? The drivers of social-cohesion/fragmentation and of tribalism/integration are pretty clear. If you wanted to design a system that would maximize economic gains, minimize harms and foster integration, then unskilled, rural, working class muslim immigration from Pakistan would be bottom of the list, along with Albanians and Afghans. Ukrainians, Syriac and African Christians and skilled Indian Sikhs/Hindus might move closer to the top. On the other hand, if human rights and responding to need was the primary consideration, then Pakistani Muslims (and especially women) and refugees from Afghanistan might move closer to the top. The other obvious question is who gets to decide? Highly paid, highly educated members of the social policy literati who tend not to live in places like Rotherham and Telford, but Chorlton/Didsbury in Manchester or probably 250 miles south in Islington; or working class people in old mill towns who are routinely cast as the villains in the Brexit/white supremacy/decolonization narrative that has become the default survey course in most university humanities and social science programmes. Should immigration be designed primarily to benefit the country, or to respond to human need.These are legitimate questions which the political class and the mainstream media both seem intent on avoiding. We do need a debate.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago

An excellent analysis of the question as to whom we prioritise in out immigration policy. I think we need to be hard headed about prioritising those that will benefit the UK and those that will integrate best.

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

I upvoted you and Stephen but it is still skirting the main issue.
Even if Indians have higher IQ and are hard working, do we really want to commit ethic and cultural suicide by allowing mass immigration?
Just quick qoogle search would show that India is not without serious ethic problems.
As to Africans in general, please explain how low IQ, violent people would benefit uk?
We already see results on streets of London, daily.

Stephen Quilley
Stephen Quilley
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew F

In general, I agree, Although not with the low IQ piece. Nigerians and Kenyans tend to have much better economic success than media whites in the US and the UK – and for the same reasons as Asians – family cohesion + the case of Africans, Christianity. Most of what you see on the streets of London ethnically quite specific – as it is in Sweden. So the issue relates to culture and religion. I have no problem with secular universalists prioritizing some sense of universal personhood and human rights – as long as they are absolutely unflinching and honest about the difficulties and consequences; and as long as they also enforce policies to ensure that the spatial/geographical burden lands disproportionately on the elite groups that push these policies. Somehow I doubt that when push comes to shove, they will accept these costs. However, if Judeo-Christianity and a virtue-ethical culture is the key to social cohesion – and I believe it is – then conservative responses to immigration (reduction/selection) are only legitimate / coherent to the extent that those same conservatives go back to church, take their kids (and have more kids)… and push Christian (or Jewish) values in the warp and weft of the culture. There is no materialist/market-liberal/libertarian perspective that can legitimately critique immigration. And if Christianity is the key to a culture at peace- then I have much more in common with a Nigerian catholic than I do with either a secular, materialist, Neo-liberal pseudo conservative, a woke-liberal consumer-individualist or a secular , working class nationalist/populist. There is a good case to be made for radically restriction/selection.. but for my money, it’s about Christendom and if it doesn’t start from the Imago Dei – the conviction in Genesis that we are created in the image of God, then it’s pointless. AOC, Richard Spencer , Dave Rubin and the Koch Foundation are all on the same team as far as I’m concerned.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

I wonder about the economic success of Nigerians. The men seem to have a reputation for scaming elderly women out of their life savings.

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago

I wonder about the economic success of Nigerians. The men seem to have a reputation for scaming elderly women out of their life savings.

Last edited 1 year ago by Clare Knight
Stephen Quilley
Stephen Quilley
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew F

In general, I agree, Although not with the low IQ piece. Nigerians and Kenyans tend to have much better economic success than media whites in the US and the UK – and for the same reasons as Asians – family cohesion + the case of Africans, Christianity. Most of what you see on the streets of London ethnically quite specific – as it is in Sweden. So the issue relates to culture and religion. I have no problem with secular universalists prioritizing some sense of universal personhood and human rights – as long as they are absolutely unflinching and honest about the difficulties and consequences; and as long as they also enforce policies to ensure that the spatial/geographical burden lands disproportionately on the elite groups that push these policies. Somehow I doubt that when push comes to shove, they will accept these costs. However, if Judeo-Christianity and a virtue-ethical culture is the key to social cohesion – and I believe it is – then conservative responses to immigration (reduction/selection) are only legitimate / coherent to the extent that those same conservatives go back to church, take their kids (and have more kids)… and push Christian (or Jewish) values in the warp and weft of the culture. There is no materialist/market-liberal/libertarian perspective that can legitimately critique immigration. And if Christianity is the key to a culture at peace- then I have much more in common with a Nigerian catholic than I do with either a secular, materialist, Neo-liberal pseudo conservative, a woke-liberal consumer-individualist or a secular , working class nationalist/populist. There is a good case to be made for radically restriction/selection.. but for my money, it’s about Christendom and if it doesn’t start from the Imago Dei – the conviction in Genesis that we are created in the image of God, then it’s pointless. AOC, Richard Spencer , Dave Rubin and the Koch Foundation are all on the same team as far as I’m concerned.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Australia does that and doesn’t have those kinds of problems.

Andrew F
Andrew F
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

I upvoted you and Stephen but it is still skirting the main issue.
Even if Indians have higher IQ and are hard working, do we really want to commit ethic and cultural suicide by allowing mass immigration?
Just quick qoogle search would show that India is not without serious ethic problems.
As to Africans in general, please explain how low IQ, violent people would benefit uk?
We already see results on streets of London, daily.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Australia does that and doesn’t have those kinds of problems.

Don Gaughan
Don Gaughan
1 year ago

Tribal loyalty and tribal preference is a universal human drive , as well as the typical drive to protect the community’s children from harm.This insightful article reveals much about the destructive effects of the liberal lefts neuroritic obsessive self destructive drive and efforts to impose its racist anti racist solely on one targeted color of western civilisation.
Interesting to note that individual and tribal reputation protection trumps child protection in the Pakistani tribe coming to live in the relatively ptosperous land of ” the enemy” , whose tribal loyalty and preference is demonised and outlawed as racist by the liberal left.
When even the police and authorities fail to act to protect children from such widespread systemic sexual violence because of fear of being accused of racism, the destructive damaging effects of the lefts neurotic obsession with race has reached apocalyptic levels of social destruction and dysfunction.
We know the problem and who.Now, we need to how to address it and act .

Albireo Double
Albireo Double
1 year ago

I don’t think we need a debate. What we need is to stop a self-appointed liberal elite class from importing foreigners as semi-slaves, while paying our homegrown working class kids to sit idle, admiring their pointless degrees and student loan bills.

What a waste of life.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

Huge generalizations.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
1 year ago
Reply to  Albireo Double

Huge generalizations.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago

An excellent analysis of the question as to whom we prioritise in out immigration policy. I think we need to be hard headed about prioritising those that will benefit the UK and those that will integrate best.

Don Gaughan
Don Gaughan
1 year ago

Tribal loyalty and tribal preference is a universal human drive , as well as the typical drive to protect the community’s children from harm.This insightful article reveals much about the destructive effects of the liberal lefts neuroritic obsessive self destructive drive and efforts to impose its racist anti racist solely on one targeted color of western civilisation.
Interesting to note that individual and tribal reputation protection trumps child protection in the Pakistani tribe coming to live in the relatively ptosperous land of ” the enemy” , whose tribal loyalty and preference is demonised and outlawed as racist by the liberal left.
When even the police and authorities fail to act to protect children from such widespread systemic sexual violence because of fear of being accused of racism, the destructive damaging effects of the lefts neurotic obsession with race has reached apocalyptic levels of social destruction and dysfunction.
We know the problem and who.Now, we need to how to address it and act .

Albireo Double
Albireo Double
1 year ago

I don’t think we need a debate. What we need is to stop a self-appointed liberal elite class from importing foreigners as semi-slaves, while paying our homegrown working class kids to sit idle, admiring their pointless degrees and student loan bills.

What a waste of life.

Stephen Quilley
Stephen Quilley
1 year ago

Great article – honest and brave. Question: At what point is it permissible for countries to adopt selective immigration policies? The drivers of social-cohesion/fragmentation and of tribalism/integration are pretty clear. If you wanted to design a system that would maximize economic gains, minimize harms and foster integration, then unskilled, rural, working class muslim immigration from Pakistan would be bottom of the list, along with Albanians and Afghans. Ukrainians, Syriac and African Christians and skilled Indian Sikhs/Hindus might move closer to the top. On the other hand, if human rights and responding to need was the primary consideration, then Pakistani Muslims (and especially women) and refugees from Afghanistan might move closer to the top. The other obvious question is who gets to decide? Highly paid, highly educated members of the social policy literati who tend not to live in places like Rotherham and Telford, but Chorlton/Didsbury in Manchester or probably 250 miles south in Islington; or working class people in old mill towns who are routinely cast as the villains in the Brexit/white supremacy/decolonization narrative that has become the default survey course in most university humanities and social science programmes. Should immigration be designed primarily to benefit the country, or to respond to human need.These are legitimate questions which the political class and the mainstream media both seem intent on avoiding. We do ne