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Blackpool’s forsaken children Abused girls are choosing to transition

Sexual predators stalk Blackpool. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Sexual predators stalk Blackpool. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images


January 3, 2023   5 mins

In 2007, I spent time in Blackpool investigating the disappearance of Charlene Downes, a 14-year-old whose body has never been found. She was one of hundreds of girls in the town targeted by sexual predators who would groom and then rape their victims before pimping them to multiple men in exchange for alcohol, cigarettes and food.

During my investigation, I accompanied police officers to an amusement arcade where Charlene had been last seen. The detectives were looking out for any of the men under suspicion for her disappearance. During that two hour visit, over 30 convicted male sex offenders were later identified from CCTV footage. That’s one premises, in one night, in one town.

Blackpool, one of the most deprived parts of England, is rife with child abuse and home to a higher number of convicted child sex offenders than anywhere else in the country. It is thought that predatory men gravitate there to seek out vulnerable children. They don’t have to look far — there are three times the national average of children in care in Blackpool.

The sex trade – both legal and illegal – is rife. The proliferation of lap dance clubs and bars catering to groups of men on stag weekends has given the town a reputation as a haven for sex tourists. Queen Street, which is a focus for Blackpool’s night life, has also seen an increase in underage prostitution. Last year there were 87 visits by police and local authority inspectors to premises where children were believed to be sexually exploited.

Lisa* is a serving police officer in Blackpool and tells me that the town is known as a “safe haven for nonces”.

“They come out of prison and come here,” Lisa tells me. “They know they’ll get a friendly reception in a place jam packed with vulnerable children, and barely any support from social services.” It would be hard to deny that Blackpool can be a miserable place for children, particularly those in low-income families, to be raised.

But there is one thing I didn’t know about Blackpool, which I learned from listening to Inside the Gender Clinic, a podcast  about the much maligned Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) at the Tavistock. The  majority of referrals to the clinic are not, as one might assume, from the South, or from Brighton, but from Blackpool. This is surely the last place you’d expect to see so many trans-identified children. After all, the voices we so often hear on this issue in the media tend to belong to upper middle-class kids raised in liberal families.

So why might this be so?

Claire*, who grew up in Blackpool, is working for a charity that supports female victims of male violence. She tells me that the links between the rise in young females being referred to gender identity clinics and the realities of growing up in places like Blackpool are obvious. She cites high levels of poverty and the normalisation of the exploitation of women and girls in the sex trade.

As a child, Claire, who was raised in Blackpool, was subject to men’s violence and consequently wanted to “opt out of girlhood”. She says: “The option to be removed from the harms of men would be appealing to most survivors. I am furious that we are allowing girls who need care and support to go down irreversible paths.”

I have long argued that the majority of girls presenting as gender dysphoric have experienced childhood trauma. What if the availability of breast binders, puberty blockers and instant affirmation as trans is a handy way for traumatised sexual abuse victims to dissociate from the abused body?

One study, published back in 1994, looked at the issue of transsexualism and the connections with dissociation and child abuse. It found that of the 45 female to male transsexuals interviewed, more than 60% reported one or more types of severe child abuse. The sample group also disclosed symptoms and responses that are known to be typical effects of child abuse, such as fear, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, aggression and suicidal thoughts. The author suggests that transsexualism “may be an adaptive extreme associative survival response to severe child abuse”.

Kirsty Entwhistle is a former GIDS employee who turned whistleblower in 2019 when she wrote an open letter to Polly Carmichael, head of GIDS. Entwhistle was a clinical psychologist at the Leeds GIDS clinic between 2017 and 2018 and was struck by the similarities between some of the disturbed young girls who were demanding puberty blockers with those she had encountered while working in a children’s home in Rochdale in 2003.

Entwhistle became aware that some of the girls were being sexually abused and pimped by gangs of men in what became known as the “Rochdale grooming gang scandal”. At GIDS, she saw much of the same behaviour from some of the girls presenting as trans and demanding puberty blockers, with some threatening to harm themselves if they were refused hormones.

She said: “I knew that the kids would harm themselves to access something that is actually harmful to them. Just because a young person kicks and screams and tries to burn the house down, doesn’t mean it’s the right thing for them.”

Female to male trans teenagers from Blackpool interviewed for the podcast on GIDS speak of teachers giving young girls breast binders without the knowledge of their parents; of a GP prescribing testosterone to a teenage girl who hadn’t even been seen by a counsellor or attended the gender clinic; and a school support worker who helped a young girl change her name by deed poll to that of a boy.

In Blackpool, local LGBT+ support services have been given funding specifically to work with “trans children’ as young as 10. UR Potential runs, Butterfly Trans Youth for ‘LGBTQ+ and non-binary young people’ in Blackpool, plus a trans-only young people’s group.

In June 2016, UR Potential CEO Linda Markey said: “We are receiving more and more referrals about transgender young people from schools, colleges and organisations who work with young people. Some young transgender people are as young as 12. Schools are struggling to meet the demand for support and staff need specific training.”

Many professionals responsible for child protection, such as teachers, counsellors and social workers, seem to be keen to offer support to young people with gender dysphoria, but what of the sexually abused girls? What is happening to protect them from this tsunami of male violence? Could it be that for many abused and neglected girls, presenting as transgender can be a form of attention seeking and validation?

Until recently, Norma* was a secondary school teacher in Blackpool. She tells me she saw transgender ideology creeping in among young girls: “I tried to raise the alarm of the potential harms surrounding gender non-conforming young women and girls to safeguarding leads. This was met with naivety of the realities of the situation and their insistence on using ‘he/him’ pronouns with no scrutiny as to any other issues.”

At one Blackpool school, several students in three consecutive years transitioned around the same time; while kids need support in dealing with the distress of gender dysphoria, immediately affirming them as the opposite sex is not helping.

Abused, damaged and traumatised girls have long self-harmed by cutting or starving themselves in an attempt to escape their bodies. Hadley Freeman has written eloquently about the glaringly obvious links between teenaged girls’ trauma and trans identification. So why are these agencies and charities so ready to suggest puberty blockers rather than properly scrutinising what makes a teenager believe she’s a boy?

Blackpool seems to offer a clear example of how vulnerable, damaged children are being drawn to gender ideology because it offers a “one stop shop” solution to the pain of living as a female in a hellish world of abuse. “These girls have been horrifically betrayed,” says Norma. “Why are we sending them for irreversible, damaging treatment, when what they need is protection from sexual violation and abuse?”


Julie Bindel is an investigative journalist, author, and feminist campaigner. Her latest book is Feminism for Women: The Real Route to Liberation. She also writes on Substack.

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Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

It would seem perfectly obvious to me that a girl growing up in an abusive environment might, out of desperation, simply deny their body – what they see as the reason for the abuse. The real reason being, of course, predatory males.

It’s not so much about wishing to transition, to become male, as wishing to stop being female, and with every passing month from puberty onwards, becoming more obviously female. But instead of these girls being protected, the authorities are choosing to ignore the abuse and instead take the easy option of pandering to gender ideology.

There will be a very small number of young people whose body just feels like its the wrong sex, and the relevant pathways should be available to help them. But i do also wonder how much those involved in trans activism, whether as professionals or as agitators, are pushing the issue of abuse under the carpet. Their stridency may well spring from a subconscious despair with themselves for doing so.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Well said, I agree with you. The “gender ideology” is a much easier option than dealing with the deprivation and unemployment – political will and investment required. As far as more police and a more sensitive and cautious approach from doctors required, there does seem to be some progress here with the closing down of the Tavistock Clinic. There is also a shortage of counsellors and psychologists for talking therapies which would be useful, however, these professionals may well be severely adversely affected by the bill banning conversion therapy if the government are not careful. In fact many psychologists seem to have adopted confirmation therapy instead, MIND certainly have.
There’s a great deal of undoing to be done, shutting Tavistock was a start but there’s a long way to go.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Protecting girls from very wicked men who abuse them, I imagine, is a really tough job for police and social services. It is a priority and it’s a great shame that the trans nonsense is distracting resources from this duty.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Interestingly, most child abuse is committed by women.
https://childprotectionresource.online/mothers-are-more-likely-to-abuse-children-than-fathers-fact/
We should probably deal with the biggest issues first.

Last edited 1 year ago by William Shaw
Andrew E Walker
Andrew E Walker
1 year ago
Reply to  William Shaw

“most child abuse is committed by women.”
This is a misunderstanding of the information provided. It means that more mothers than fathers abuse their own children. It says nothing about the rate of male vs. female abuse of children to whom they are strangers.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
2 months ago

Exactly.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
2 months ago

Exactly.

Betsy Warrior
Betsy Warrior
2 months ago
Reply to  William Shaw

This is a complete misreading of the facts. Since mothers spend about 90% more time with their children, the opportunities of friction are vastly multiplied for mothers. For the comparatively small amount of time men spend with their children, the abuse men inflict is disproportionate as well as the intensity of abuse from fathers: for example: sexual abuse, severe beatings, severe discipline. Whereas women are more likely to be accused of neglect, i.e. leaving the children alone or with inappropriate childcare, failure to provide adequate food, clothing, and hygiene . Interestingly, fathers are rarely accused of neglect even when they contribute nothing to their child’s support or supervision, which if left up to them, the child would not survive.

Andrew E Walker
Andrew E Walker
1 year ago
Reply to  William Shaw

“most child abuse is committed by women.”
This is a misunderstanding of the information provided. It means that more mothers than fathers abuse their own children. It says nothing about the rate of male vs. female abuse of children to whom they are strangers.

Betsy Warrior
Betsy Warrior
2 months ago
Reply to  William Shaw

This is a complete misreading of the facts. Since mothers spend about 90% more time with their children, the opportunities of friction are vastly multiplied for mothers. For the comparatively small amount of time men spend with their children, the abuse men inflict is disproportionate as well as the intensity of abuse from fathers: for example: sexual abuse, severe beatings, severe discipline. Whereas women are more likely to be accused of neglect, i.e. leaving the children alone or with inappropriate childcare, failure to provide adequate food, clothing, and hygiene . Interestingly, fathers are rarely accused of neglect even when they contribute nothing to their child’s support or supervision, which if left up to them, the child would not survive.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Well said, I agree with you. The “gender ideology” is a much easier option than dealing with the deprivation and unemployment – political will and investment required. As far as more police and a more sensitive and cautious approach from doctors required, there does seem to be some progress here with the closing down of the Tavistock Clinic. There is also a shortage of counsellors and psychologists for talking therapies which would be useful, however, these professionals may well be severely adversely affected by the bill banning conversion therapy if the government are not careful. In fact many psychologists seem to have adopted confirmation therapy instead, MIND certainly have.
There’s a great deal of undoing to be done, shutting Tavistock was a start but there’s a long way to go.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Protecting girls from very wicked men who abuse them, I imagine, is a really tough job for police and social services. It is a priority and it’s a great shame that the trans nonsense is distracting resources from this duty.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Interestingly, most child abuse is committed by women.
https://childprotectionresource.online/mothers-are-more-likely-to-abuse-children-than-fathers-fact/
We should probably deal with the biggest issues first.

Last edited 1 year ago by William Shaw
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

It would seem perfectly obvious to me that a girl growing up in an abusive environment might, out of desperation, simply deny their body – what they see as the reason for the abuse. The real reason being, of course, predatory males.

It’s not so much about wishing to transition, to become male, as wishing to stop being female, and with every passing month from puberty onwards, becoming more obviously female. But instead of these girls being protected, the authorities are choosing to ignore the abuse and instead take the easy option of pandering to gender ideology.

There will be a very small number of young people whose body just feels like its the wrong sex, and the relevant pathways should be available to help them. But i do also wonder how much those involved in trans activism, whether as professionals or as agitators, are pushing the issue of abuse under the carpet. Their stridency may well spring from a subconscious despair with themselves for doing so.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve Murray
Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

What’s becoming increasingly apparent is that there is a concerted effort to push children into transgenderism. We need to find out how this movement is being funded and by whom. It is no coincidence that it’s being pushed by so many organizations in so many countries all at once. Where is the money coming from for this large-scale child abuse?

R Wright
R Wright
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Read Inauthentic Selves. The source of trans activist funding is already known. It comes from the Open Society Foundation, Arcus, Tides etc.

Jane Anderson
Jane Anderson
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Take a look at the Pritzker Foundation too. Jennifer Prttzker of the billionnaire pharmaceutical family The Pritzker foundation funds child gender clinics in the U.S and also the propogation of gender ideology.Lots of U.S dollars have gone towards developing LGBTQ+ rights in Pakistan, just recently

Bev White
Bev White
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Jennifer Bilek has done considerable research on the funding of trans lobby groups. Her work can be found on 11th Hour blog

R Wright
R Wright
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Read Inauthentic Selves. The source of trans activist funding is already known. It comes from the Open Society Foundation, Arcus, Tides etc.

Jane Anderson
Jane Anderson
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Take a look at the Pritzker Foundation too. Jennifer Prttzker of the billionnaire pharmaceutical family The Pritzker foundation funds child gender clinics in the U.S and also the propogation of gender ideology.Lots of U.S dollars have gone towards developing LGBTQ+ rights in Pakistan, just recently

Bev White
Bev White
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Jennifer Bilek has done considerable research on the funding of trans lobby groups. Her work can be found on 11th Hour blog

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

What’s becoming increasingly apparent is that there is a concerted effort to push children into transgenderism. We need to find out how this movement is being funded and by whom. It is no coincidence that it’s being pushed by so many organizations in so many countries all at once. Where is the money coming from for this large-scale child abuse?

Muad Dib
Muad Dib
1 year ago

Chilling read in more ways than one.
I do think that we should help everyone live their lives in the way they choose including their gender identity. But having children take irreversible decisions with their body is clearly step to far. The dogma that every gender identity issue is simply because they were born that way and only solution is immediate gender change, doesn’t seem to hold true.
First and foremost we need to prevent the horrific abuses described. If they do happen, let’s give those tortured little souls love, space and time to heal and decide their own future not out of fear, pain and anger, and with benefit of maturity surely needed for such choices.

Muad Dib
Muad Dib
1 year ago

Chilling read in more ways than one.
I do think that we should help everyone live their lives in the way they choose including their gender identity. But having children take irreversible decisions with their body is clearly step to far. The dogma that every gender identity issue is simply because they were born that way and only solution is immediate gender change, doesn’t seem to hold true.
First and foremost we need to prevent the horrific abuses described. If they do happen, let’s give those tortured little souls love, space and time to heal and decide their own future not out of fear, pain and anger, and with benefit of maturity surely needed for such choices.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago

An excellent and much-needed article about something which would normally go unheard.
I criticised Julie Bindel for an article just before Christmas (probably about her apparent hostility to men in general), but noted that she was still needed because she sometimes says something important we need to hear. This article proves it.
It’s also reassuring to see some properr investigative journalism. I hope Julie is able to pass on some of her skills here to the next generation of journalists.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago

An excellent and much-needed article about something which would normally go unheard.
I criticised Julie Bindel for an article just before Christmas (probably about her apparent hostility to men in general), but noted that she was still needed because she sometimes says something important we need to hear. This article proves it.
It’s also reassuring to see some properr investigative journalism. I hope Julie is able to pass on some of her skills here to the next generation of journalists.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago

“During that two hour visit, over 30 convicted male sex offenders were later identified from CCTV footage.” 
This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, 

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

“Now is the winter of our discontent”

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

The truth seems to be there’s always the other side; the more beautiful and glorious one side is, the more hideous and dark the other which lurks in the shadows.

How has Blackpool turned into this den of iniquity or was it always like this? Brighton too, considering Graham Greene’s horrifying book Brighton Rock written in 1938.
Sad to say abuse of all kinds is nothing new but the new option of changing “gender”, involving at least some ongoing personal attention from so-called professionals, must be very tempting to these vulnerable, damaged adolescents.

More and better police needed (no criticism of the police involved in Julie Bindel’s article implied). More and better mental health service provision also essential.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I’m sure there are parts of England that are wonderful. But this story almost has a Dickensian tone about it and to some degree suggests a slow walk back into those dark days. In fact, just thinking about that gives me pause for thought of a possible future unless someone, somehow, grasps the enormity of a society that’s lost it’s way.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

Which society is it, that you’re seeking to compare us with as we all grapple with the issues of the 21st century? Which paragon of virtue are we any worse than?
There are plenty of people whose sole aim in life is to seek to put the UK down, and many of them live here! Best not to assume the majority have “lost their way”, by taking note of only their voices.
Do predatory males not exist in all societies? Correct me if i’m wrong, but the resorts of places such as Thailand are much closer to your neck of the woods than to ours.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Oh, settle down Steve. I’m comparing England today with Dickensian England. Yes indeed plenty of people who live in England put it down, though I don’t think it’s their sole aim, and I imagine it’s genuine concern. Nor do I think it’s the majority, as you suggest, because a large percentage of you are still comfortable compared to others and hoping the ship will right itself. But they may be right. Who knows?
My feelings about England are more and more influenced by what I read here in articles and comments: rapid turnover of Prime Ministers, complete lack of faith in government, inflation, unemployment, race relations, crime, immigration, mental health, drugs and alcohol, overpopulation, poverty, wages, housing dramas and failing health system. It’s not like I’m making these up. Of course predatory males exist in all countries. But you can’t deny the terrible stories regarding the abuse of children that have been reported on. This article is a very dark story, and don’t try and tell me it’s just Blackpool. What Thailand has to do with England I have no idea. Yes we all grapple with the 21st century, but some countries are closer to the sharp end than others. You’re a bit like the Canary in the mine and we’re waiting to see how things work out. But have a read of my comment in “Can Conservatism survive 2023?” if you’re feeling that offended.

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

I suggested the majority of people in the UK (not England, note) may well have a different view to the siren voices, not the other way round. Perhaps if you felt more ‘settled’ whilst reading you’d be able to pay more attention?
I would agree that the UK (again), being the first to industrialise is having to deal with some of the post-industrial issues ahead of other nations too, but that doesn’t make the UK a “Canary in the mine” but rather a crucible for the future – crucibles being rather difficult environments at times – but still, there’s the difference between a negative and a positive outlook.
What i’d suggest is that your view of the UK may be skewed by an overly negative media. I don’t blame you for that, but i would ask that people don’t make assumptions based on stereotypes. My citing of Thailand was deliberate, in that it’s become a stereotype for sexual exploitation whereas i’m sure the majority of the population have a very different view of their lives than that portrayed in Western media.
It may very well be the case that child abuse has always been us – just hidden from view. That’s the true Dickensian moral, if you want to use Dickens as your preferred analogy. The opportunities due to new media and travel have simply brought it more to the fore. In other words, the propensity for males to commit acts of abuse almost certainly hasn’t changed, just the opportunity.

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The kind of abuse that is causing this particular type of child trauma does seem to be predominately prevalent in certain sections of the population who have come to this country rather more recently than others who came here to live & work with the original native population. It was never a known problem with early immigration from India or the West Indies!

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

“the UK (again), being the first to industrialise is having to deal with some of the post-industrial issues ahead of other nations too, but that doesn’t make the UK a “Canary in the mine”
I don’t think these are post-industrial issues. And it’s not just about child abuse, hidden from view. It’s a multitude of failures. These are not issues caused by “being the first to industrialise “, as if that’s the price England is now having to pay for being the first, like it’s some sacrifice made for others. Once again you’re referring to the past to boost the present, as you are by referring to a crucible: so stirring, such grit. “A crucible for the future”; but your not the crucible, you’re the contents. By the way, how are the “warm-banks” working out? That damned industrial revolution.

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

The kind of abuse that is causing this particular type of child trauma does seem to be predominately prevalent in certain sections of the population who have come to this country rather more recently than others who came here to live & work with the original native population. It was never a known problem with early immigration from India or the West Indies!

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

“the UK (again), being the first to industrialise is having to deal with some of the post-industrial issues ahead of other nations too, but that doesn’t make the UK a “Canary in the mine”
I don’t think these are post-industrial issues. And it’s not just about child abuse, hidden from view. It’s a multitude of failures. These are not issues caused by “being the first to industrialise “, as if that’s the price England is now having to pay for being the first, like it’s some sacrifice made for others. Once again you’re referring to the past to boost the present, as you are by referring to a crucible: so stirring, such grit. “A crucible for the future”; but your not the crucible, you’re the contents. By the way, how are the “warm-banks” working out? That damned industrial revolution.

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

I suggested the majority of people in the UK (not England, note) may well have a different view to the siren voices, not the other way round. Perhaps if you felt more ‘settled’ whilst reading you’d be able to pay more attention?
I would agree that the UK (again), being the first to industrialise is having to deal with some of the post-industrial issues ahead of other nations too, but that doesn’t make the UK a “Canary in the mine” but rather a crucible for the future – crucibles being rather difficult environments at times – but still, there’s the difference between a negative and a positive outlook.
What i’d suggest is that your view of the UK may be skewed by an overly negative media. I don’t blame you for that, but i would ask that people don’t make assumptions based on stereotypes. My citing of Thailand was deliberate, in that it’s become a stereotype for sexual exploitation whereas i’m sure the majority of the population have a very different view of their lives than that portrayed in Western media.
It may very well be the case that child abuse has always been us – just hidden from view. That’s the true Dickensian moral, if you want to use Dickens as your preferred analogy. The opportunities due to new media and travel have simply brought it more to the fore. In other words, the propensity for males to commit acts of abuse almost certainly hasn’t changed, just the opportunity.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Oh, settle down Steve. I’m comparing England today with Dickensian England. Yes indeed plenty of people who live in England put it down, though I don’t think it’s their sole aim, and I imagine it’s genuine concern. Nor do I think it’s the majority, as you suggest, because a large percentage of you are still comfortable compared to others and hoping the ship will right itself. But they may be right. Who knows?
My feelings about England are more and more influenced by what I read here in articles and comments: rapid turnover of Prime Ministers, complete lack of faith in government, inflation, unemployment, race relations, crime, immigration, mental health, drugs and alcohol, overpopulation, poverty, wages, housing dramas and failing health system. It’s not like I’m making these up. Of course predatory males exist in all countries. But you can’t deny the terrible stories regarding the abuse of children that have been reported on. This article is a very dark story, and don’t try and tell me it’s just Blackpool. What Thailand has to do with England I have no idea. Yes we all grapple with the 21st century, but some countries are closer to the sharp end than others. You’re a bit like the Canary in the mine and we’re waiting to see how things work out. But have a read of my comment in “Can Conservatism survive 2023?” if you’re feeling that offended.

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

Good point – and good comments below too. There has always been darkness close by, we just assume that progress makes us better and all we need to do is be kind.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

Which society is it, that you’re seeking to compare us with as we all grapple with the issues of the 21st century? Which paragon of virtue are we any worse than?
There are plenty of people whose sole aim in life is to seek to put the UK down, and many of them live here! Best not to assume the majority have “lost their way”, by taking note of only their voices.
Do predatory males not exist in all societies? Correct me if i’m wrong, but the resorts of places such as Thailand are much closer to your neck of the woods than to ours.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

Good point – and good comments below too. There has always been darkness close by, we just assume that progress makes us better and all we need to do is be kind.

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

Sometimes, & unfortunately,, it IS appropriate to blame the police for not bringing such matters to the attention of all instead of merely hiding behind the latest whim & being afraid to challenge it! The police failed the children in Rochdale, et al, because they were afraid to be tagged as racist instead of protective. Even more unfortunately, the senior leaders of the police let this happen by burying any reports that did reach them under the carpet

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago

Indeed, it is important to remember that, but I did’nt want to tar with the same brush the particular police whom Julie Bindel accompanied during her investigation, that would not be helpful.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago

Indeed, it is important to remember that, but I did’nt want to tar with the same brush the particular police whom Julie Bindel accompanied during her investigation, that would not be helpful.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I’m sure there are parts of England that are wonderful. But this story almost has a Dickensian tone about it and to some degree suggests a slow walk back into those dark days. In fact, just thinking about that gives me pause for thought of a possible future unless someone, somehow, grasps the enormity of a society that’s lost it’s way.

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

Sometimes, & unfortunately,, it IS appropriate to blame the police for not bringing such matters to the attention of all instead of merely hiding behind the latest whim & being afraid to challenge it! The police failed the children in Rochdale, et al, because they were afraid to be tagged as racist instead of protective. Even more unfortunately, the senior leaders of the police let this happen by burying any reports that did reach them under the carpet

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

My police detective brother in law once told me that the public would be seriously shocked at the numbers of convicted child abusers living within a couple of miles of them.

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

A couple of coppers I know would tell you the same. Looking at the convictions in Rochdale, Telford, Oxford, etc., most of these scumbags got a few years in the jug. Most were men under 40. They were only the ringleaders and their many clients will have got off scot-free.

So, they’re out in a few years. What’s going to happen? I’m not saying that this will remove the problem from our society, but keeping them behind bars for the rest of their lives would certainly take a great many out of circulation and avoid having 30 of them all hanging around an amusement arcade in Blackpool.

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago

And expelling them from this country back to their original homelands would be a lot better as well as being a lot cheaper since if they are imprisoned, their extended families still remain to burden the people here.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jacqueline Burns
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

I think “hanging” is operative word here, as mentioned in your final sentence!

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago

And expelling them from this country back to their original homelands would be a lot better as well as being a lot cheaper since if they are imprisoned, their extended families still remain to burden the people here.

Last edited 1 year ago by Jacqueline Burns
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

I think “hanging” is operative word here, as mentioned in your final sentence!

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Interesting. My response corroborating your point from my own conversations with serving police has been removed. It also contained the suggestion that longer periods of incarceration would reduce the likelihood of situations such as a critical mass of ‘former offenders’ convening at a Blackpool amusement arcade. I did refer to them using a term for what one skims and discards when making broth, so perhaps it was that.

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

A couple of coppers I know would tell you the same. Looking at the convictions in Rochdale, Telford, Oxford, etc., most of these scumbags got a few years in the jug. Most were men under 40. They were only the ringleaders and their many clients will have got off scot-free.

So, they’re out in a few years. What’s going to happen? I’m not saying that this will remove the problem from our society, but keeping them behind bars for the rest of their lives would certainly take a great many out of circulation and avoid having 30 of them all hanging around an amusement arcade in Blackpool.

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

Interesting. My response corroborating your point from my own conversations with serving police has been removed. It also contained the suggestion that longer periods of incarceration would reduce the likelihood of situations such as a critical mass of ‘former offenders’ convening at a Blackpool amusement arcade. I did refer to them using a term for what one skims and discards when making broth, so perhaps it was that.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

“Now is the winter of our discontent”

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

The truth seems to be there’s always the other side; the more beautiful and glorious one side is, the more hideous and dark the other which lurks in the shadows.

How has Blackpool turned into this den of iniquity or was it always like this? Brighton too, considering Graham Greene’s horrifying book Brighton Rock written in 1938.
Sad to say abuse of all kinds is nothing new but the new option of changing “gender”, involving at least some ongoing personal attention from so-called professionals, must be very tempting to these vulnerable, damaged adolescents.

More and better police needed (no criticism of the police involved in Julie Bindel’s article implied). More and better mental health service provision also essential.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
1 year ago
Reply to  Brett H

My police detective brother in law once told me that the public would be seriously shocked at the numbers of convicted child abusers living within a couple of miles of them.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago

“During that two hour visit, over 30 convicted male sex offenders were later identified from CCTV footage.” 
This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, 

Last edited 1 year ago by Brett H
Sarah Atkin
Sarah Atkin
1 year ago

This is horrific. The rise in young women presenting as trans has been a worrying trend for years and has happened IN PLAIN SIGHT. The link with abuse survival is, I admit, new to me but reading this, it is logical given what survivors have endured. Self-harm is a cry for help. There’s also a correlation with autism and teenage girls in gender distress. Yet, here we are in Scotland with self-ID passed for 16 year olds by a parliament refusing to acknowledge the very real dangers this presents for vulnerable teenagers – those we have a duty to protect.
The reality is that it’s near impossible to challenge this ideology in schools as it’s so cleverly bound up with the ‘rights’ agenda. Changing gender is viewed as ‘coming out’, just the same as you would were you gay, which is so dangerously misguided. An ‘end point’. A solution. Social affirmation/ social transitioning is now the norm for a teenager in gender distress (and yet, Dr Hilary Cass’s interim report on the Tavistock called this a major intervention, which it plainly is.) It is near impossible for professionals to challenge the orthodoxy, although many will know deep down this isn’t the correct course. They rely on government for ‘guidance’ and have little choice but to follow ‘guidance’ heavily influenced by the trans lobby (this is true in Scotland.)
How many more Blackpool’s are there? Where is the mainstream media in reporting this dark side? Some politicians are brave enough to put their heads above the parapet and stand up with integrity against the crowd – I applaud Ash Regan MSP in Scotland – but too few are.

Sarah Atkin
Sarah Atkin
1 year ago

This is horrific. The rise in young women presenting as trans has been a worrying trend for years and has happened IN PLAIN SIGHT. The link with abuse survival is, I admit, new to me but reading this, it is logical given what survivors have endured. Self-harm is a cry for help. There’s also a correlation with autism and teenage girls in gender distress. Yet, here we are in Scotland with self-ID passed for 16 year olds by a parliament refusing to acknowledge the very real dangers this presents for vulnerable teenagers – those we have a duty to protect.
The reality is that it’s near impossible to challenge this ideology in schools as it’s so cleverly bound up with the ‘rights’ agenda. Changing gender is viewed as ‘coming out’, just the same as you would were you gay, which is so dangerously misguided. An ‘end point’. A solution. Social affirmation/ social transitioning is now the norm for a teenager in gender distress (and yet, Dr Hilary Cass’s interim report on the Tavistock called this a major intervention, which it plainly is.) It is near impossible for professionals to challenge the orthodoxy, although many will know deep down this isn’t the correct course. They rely on government for ‘guidance’ and have little choice but to follow ‘guidance’ heavily influenced by the trans lobby (this is true in Scotland.)
How many more Blackpool’s are there? Where is the mainstream media in reporting this dark side? Some politicians are brave enough to put their heads above the parapet and stand up with integrity against the crowd – I applaud Ash Regan MSP in Scotland – but too few are.

Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago

Really interesting article, thank you. This connection had occurred to me, too. It makes sense that a young woman being sexually preyed upon by men might consider un-femaling herself. I wonder if some of these same girls and young women might have become ‘baby dykes’ once?

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Okay, I am an innocent. What is a “baby d**e”?

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Hi, it was (maybe still is) an affectionate term used amongst lesbian feminists for young lesbians.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Thanks. It sounds a tad unfortunate to me. No doubt it was fine, back in the day.
An example, perhaps, of how connotations, like recollections, may vary.

Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

That’s very true. I thought about my wording very carefully but others might put it differently.
My point was that I wondered if some of those young women in the ’80s might be considering themselves as trans if they were that age now.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

I understand.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

I understand.

Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

That’s very true. I thought about my wording very carefully but others might put it differently.
My point was that I wondered if some of those young women in the ’80s might be considering themselves as trans if they were that age now.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Thanks. It sounds a tad unfortunate to me. No doubt it was fine, back in the day.
An example, perhaps, of how connotations, like recollections, may vary.

Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Hi, it was (maybe still is) an affectionate term used amongst lesbian feminists for young lesbians.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Okay, I am an innocent. What is a “baby d**e”?

Last edited 1 year ago by polidori redux
Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago

Really interesting article, thank you. This connection had occurred to me, too. It makes sense that a young woman being sexually preyed upon by men might consider un-femaling herself. I wonder if some of these same girls and young women might have become ‘baby dykes’ once?

Frank Sterle
Frank Sterle
1 year ago

The health of all children needs to be of real importance to us all — and not just concern over what other parents’ children might or will cost us as future criminals or costly cases of government care, etcetera — regardless of how well our own developing children are doing.
A mentally healthy future is every child’s moral right — along with air, water, food and shelter — especially considering the very troubled world into which they never asked to enter.
Perhaps foremost to consider is that during their first three to six years of life (depending on which expert one asks) children have particularly malleable minds, thus they’re exceptionally vulnerable to whatever rearing environment in which they happened to have been placed by often-enough-cruel fate.
Intense trauma from unchecked toxic abuse, sexual or otherwise, usually results in a helpless child’s brain improperly developing. If allowed to continue for a prolonged period, it can act as a starting point into a life in which the brain uncontrollably releases potentially damaging levels of inflammation-promoting stress hormones and chemicals, even in non-stressful daily routines.
It has been described as a continuous, discomforting anticipation of ‘the other shoe dropping’ and simultaneously being scared of how badly you will deal with the upsetting event, which usually never transpires.

Frank Sterle
Frank Sterle
1 year ago

The health of all children needs to be of real importance to us all — and not just concern over what other parents’ children might or will cost us as future criminals or costly cases of government care, etcetera — regardless of how well our own developing children are doing.
A mentally healthy future is every child’s moral right — along with air, water, food and shelter — especially considering the very troubled world into which they never asked to enter.
Perhaps foremost to consider is that during their first three to six years of life (depending on which expert one asks) children have particularly malleable minds, thus they’re exceptionally vulnerable to whatever rearing environment in which they happened to have been placed by often-enough-cruel fate.
Intense trauma from unchecked toxic abuse, sexual or otherwise, usually results in a helpless child’s brain improperly developing. If allowed to continue for a prolonged period, it can act as a starting point into a life in which the brain uncontrollably releases potentially damaging levels of inflammation-promoting stress hormones and chemicals, even in non-stressful daily routines.
It has been described as a continuous, discomforting anticipation of ‘the other shoe dropping’ and simultaneously being scared of how badly you will deal with the upsetting event, which usually never transpires.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago

Such a sad article. Apart from these poor girls in Blackpool is there a wider sense among young women that they are vulnerable, a state to be feared and resented, as an increasing number of men seem to be less constrained by out of date moral conventions?

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago

Such a sad article. Apart from these poor girls in Blackpool is there a wider sense among young women that they are vulnerable, a state to be feared and resented, as an increasing number of men seem to be less constrained by out of date moral conventions?

Harry Bo
Harry Bo
1 year ago

It’s interesting to me that referrals for anorexia/eating disorders in teenage girls has decreased while the referrals for gender dysphoria have increased.

E. L. Herndon
E. L. Herndon
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Bo

“Transitioning” is simply a more drastic and permanent form of self-harm.

E. L. Herndon
E. L. Herndon
1 year ago
Reply to  Harry Bo

“Transitioning” is simply a more drastic and permanent form of self-harm.

Harry Bo
Harry Bo
1 year ago

It’s interesting to me that referrals for anorexia/eating disorders in teenage girls has decreased while the referrals for gender dysphoria have increased.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago

What is truly sad is that n*nces will be drawn equally if not more so to trans boys as that will stand them out as “low self esteem” and “vulnerable”. Not to mention that boys are not immune to abuse.
I follow the train of thought leading to this conclusion but it is flawed on so many levels.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
1 year ago

What is truly sad is that n*nces will be drawn equally if not more so to trans boys as that will stand them out as “low self esteem” and “vulnerable”. Not to mention that boys are not immune to abuse.
I follow the train of thought leading to this conclusion but it is flawed on so many levels.

Alan Gore
Alan Gore
1 year ago

Because my family lived there for a time in the early Fifties, Blackpool was the scene of some of my earliest memories. Seen from the perspective of the life I live now it was a dark and depressed place even then, but for very different reasons. It was a vacation spot for industrial workers – Britain had industries back then – who piled off trains for their one week off, stayed at boardinghouses, and spent their week off eating junk food and complaining about the rain. I liked to toddle for miles along the beach among the fat people sprawled in deck chairs, but was warned against going into the water, which was a fetid mixture of tanker washings and raw sewage that had been released on the last high tide.
I was bullied by my peers for being the weird kid who liked books, but at least I saw no sign of adult predators in those days.

Alan Gore
Alan Gore
1 year ago

Because my family lived there for a time in the early Fifties, Blackpool was the scene of some of my earliest memories. Seen from the perspective of the life I live now it was a dark and depressed place even then, but for very different reasons. It was a vacation spot for industrial workers – Britain had industries back then – who piled off trains for their one week off, stayed at boardinghouses, and spent their week off eating junk food and complaining about the rain. I liked to toddle for miles along the beach among the fat people sprawled in deck chairs, but was warned against going into the water, which was a fetid mixture of tanker washings and raw sewage that had been released on the last high tide.
I was bullied by my peers for being the weird kid who liked books, but at least I saw no sign of adult predators in those days.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago

Well done to Julie Bindel on this, but I do wish she could leave out her dislike of men generally in her framing of it.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

Indeed. She has a story to tell, but manages to distract from it by wearing her anti-man prejudices on her sleeve. It is almost as if she cannot believe that an unreconstructed, straight, old male could possibly be on her side.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

My post has been downvoted. If the person responsible disagrees with me then they can argue their case. Surely that is the whole point of this forum. I have noted an increase in the use of anonymous downvoting. It is cowardly and rather pointless.
I do not downvote anyone – ever – because if I cannot justify my disagreement, then perhaps I should go away.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Precisely!

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

It was’nt me, I’ve upticked it.
I don’t mind downticks, I supported the lockdowns and argued against comparing the UK with Sweden as inappropriate, I’m also unhappy about the enthusiasm of the West encouraging the war between Russia and Ukraine, both these opinions have resulted in hordes of downticks. Fair enough. I think of downticking as a sort shorthand way of showing disagreement without getting involved in a long winded argument.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I didn’t mean to suggest that it might have been you.
Here you are! we are not entirely in alignment, but have an upvote.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Merci.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Merci.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I’m with you on this one. I sometimes wear my downticks as a source of pride!!

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

But it’s precisely that refusal to engage in debate that is so dangerous. Wordless group-think and wordless pile-ons are no substitute for debate. If you find yourself exasperated by someone’s opinion, but unwilling to take the time to make your case, then perhaps that reveals something about the strength of your case?

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

As I said, that’s fine for those who like to debate, but the others don’t have to prove their case. They may not find it necessary to make their case and why should they? They have their ideas about things and live it without finding it necessary to discuss it.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

As I said, that’s fine for those who like to debate, but the others don’t have to prove their case. They may not find it necessary to make their case and why should they? They have their ideas about things and live it without finding it necessary to discuss it.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

The comment threads are often better than the articles in UnHerd.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I didn’t mean to suggest that it might have been you.
Here you are! we are not entirely in alignment, but have an upvote.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I’m with you on this one. I sometimes wear my downticks as a source of pride!!

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

But it’s precisely that refusal to engage in debate that is so dangerous. Wordless group-think and wordless pile-ons are no substitute for debate. If you find yourself exasperated by someone’s opinion, but unwilling to take the time to make your case, then perhaps that reveals something about the strength of your case?

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

The comment threads are often better than the articles in UnHerd.

Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Maybe it’s not a real person?

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Bloomin’ ‘ell!

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Sue Frisby

Bloomin’ ‘ell!

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I thought all up and downvoting was anonymous ? Can you tell who’s up/down ticked ?

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

It is anonymous now, but earlier on on UnHerd when Disqus ran the comments you could see who up/downticked, I preferred that and missed it when it changed, because it added to the sense of communicating with individuals rather than numbers.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter B

It is anonymous now, but earlier on on UnHerd when Disqus ran the comments you could see who up/downticked, I preferred that and missed it when it changed, because it added to the sense of communicating with individuals rather than numbers.

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

To be fair there’s likely to be a lot of readers who would not engage with comments. They don’t comment because it’s not their style or they don’t feel comfortable with copping some of the attitudes here. So they just make their feelings felt with up or down ticks.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Precisely!

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

It was’nt me, I’ve upticked it.
I don’t mind downticks, I supported the lockdowns and argued against comparing the UK with Sweden as inappropriate, I’m also unhappy about the enthusiasm of the West encouraging the war between Russia and Ukraine, both these opinions have resulted in hordes of downticks. Fair enough. I think of downticking as a sort shorthand way of showing disagreement without getting involved in a long winded argument.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Sue Frisby
Sue Frisby
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Maybe it’s not a real person?

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

I thought all up and downvoting was anonymous ? Can you tell who’s up/down ticked ?

Brett H
Brett H
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

To be fair there’s likely to be a lot of readers who would not engage with comments. They don’t comment because it’s not their style or they don’t feel comfortable with copping some of the attitudes here. So they just make their feelings felt with up or down ticks.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

My post has been downvoted. If the person responsible disagrees with me then they can argue their case. Surely that is the whole point of this forum. I have noted an increase in the use of anonymous downvoting. It is cowardly and rather pointless.
I do not downvote anyone – ever – because if I cannot justify my disagreement, then perhaps I should go away.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

It is such an important subject and good for it to be aired, but also short of solutions.

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Terrell

I can think of one very easy solution for the men who sexually abuse young girls. And no, I don’t hate men!

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago

I am sure between us we have a lot of solutions. Julie Bindel identifies a problem, which is necessary, but doesn’t explain how we got here and how we can get out.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago
Last edited 1 year ago by William Shaw
Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago

I am sure between us we have a lot of solutions. Julie Bindel identifies a problem, which is necessary, but doesn’t explain how we got here and how we can get out.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago
Last edited 1 year ago by William Shaw
Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Terrell

I can think of one very easy solution for the men who sexually abuse young girls. And no, I don’t hate men!

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

Indeed. She has a story to tell, but manages to distract from it by wearing her anti-man prejudices on her sleeve. It is almost as if she cannot believe that an unreconstructed, straight, old male could possibly be on her side.

Martin Terrell
Martin Terrell
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

It is such an important subject and good for it to be aired, but also short of solutions.

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago

Well done to Julie Bindel on this, but I do wish she could leave out her dislike of men generally in her framing of it.

Alison Wren
Alison Wren
1 year ago

I wish we could stop saying “female to male” and vice versa it’s impossible but somehow bolsters the lie that this is what happens. I know it’s more unwieldy to say girls who want to identify as boys, or even change gender, but MtF is not what is going on here!!

Persephone
Persephone
1 year ago
Reply to  Alison Wren

girls pretending to be boys and men pretending to be women is what I use.

E. L. Herndon
E. L. Herndon
1 year ago
Reply to  Persephone

Woody Allen, or someone like that, once remarked that having one’s navel obliterated by plastic surgery was the ultimate sign of rejecting one’s parents. Surely self-gelding behavior is the nearest symbolic expression of suicide one can imagine.

E. L. Herndon
E. L. Herndon
1 year ago
Reply to  Persephone

Woody Allen, or someone like that, once remarked that having one’s navel obliterated by plastic surgery was the ultimate sign of rejecting one’s parents. Surely self-gelding behavior is the nearest symbolic expression of suicide one can imagine.

Persephone
Persephone
1 year ago
Reply to  Alison Wren

girls pretending to be boys and men pretending to be women is what I use.

Alison Wren
Alison Wren
1 year ago

I wish we could stop saying “female to male” and vice versa it’s impossible but somehow bolsters the lie that this is what happens. I know it’s more unwieldy to say girls who want to identify as boys, or even change gender, but MtF is not what is going on here!!

Jonathan West
Jonathan West
1 year ago

I can’t believe the tone of much of the BTL. We’re talking about desperate children so abused by mass numbers of skum sex abusers that they seek to swap to another sex and there just seems a general shrug and high falutin’ talk centred on the trans debate. The Mussie grooming gang skum need hanging – the lot of them. I would vote in an instant for that to happen and damn the consequences. To imagine what these girls and boys go through and the sheer incompetence makes any downstream issues irrelevant in my book. There’s most likely a link, duh. We’ve not had the reckoning yet that warrants moving past the mass grooming scandal and into these “intellectual” circle jerks that many seem to engage in BTL. I fervently pray for the very worst to happen to all those that did, do, or ignore & just shrug off what has happened in not just Blackpool but across the whole UK and elsewhere in Europe. Send them back would be option 2: option 1 for me is hang ‘em and make it painfully slow. My heart aches at how pathetic this country now is. And yea they do have somewhere to go back too cos they ain’t Us

Last edited 1 year ago by Jonathan West
Jonathan West
Jonathan West
1 year ago

I can’t believe the tone of much of the BTL. We’re talking about desperate children so abused by mass numbers of skum sex abusers that they seek to swap to another sex and there just seems a general shrug and high falutin’ talk centred on the trans debate. The Mussie grooming gang skum need hanging – the lot of them. I would vote in an instant for that to happen and damn the consequences. To imagine what these girls and boys go through and the sheer incompetence makes any downstream issues irrelevant in my book. There’s most likely a link, duh. We’ve not had the reckoning yet that warrants moving past the mass grooming scandal and into these “intellectual” circle jerks that many seem to engage in BTL. I fervently pray for the very worst to happen to all those that did, do, or ignore & just shrug off what has happened in not just Blackpool but across the whole UK and elsewhere in Europe. Send them back would be option 2: option 1 for me is hang ‘em and make it painfully slow. My heart aches at how pathetic this country now is. And yea they do have somewhere to go back too cos they ain’t Us

Last edited 1 year ago by Jonathan West
mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago

Political desperation – militant socialists (and their far-libertarian foes) use any means to their end. Their one true ideology justifies it. “Genderism” = hate = damage. These people want to damage and replace existing social structures. Child sexual exploitation is for them a price worth paying. There are equivalents at the other end of the spectrum – gun ownership and free speech rights. Its acually quite easy to expose the intellectual paucity of these ideologies Governments and their permittted media seem afraid to do so. EG: How to we test these “one true ideologies”? How can there be more that one? Will they work in the year 4000? Did they work 4000BC? etc. Their ethical deficit is easily shown by comparison with societies where the rule of law holds sway. Sadly this nonsene hides the very few gender dismorphic souls. The far-lefts’ co-option of their harms leaves them worse off than before their cause was hijacked.

Last edited 1 year ago by mike otter
Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  mike otter

How right you are Mike. Unfortunately, not even the Churches seem to feel the need to retain morals & ethics these days…as for teaching them to children, that is what they consider to be child abuse!

Jacqueline Burns
Jacqueline Burns
1 year ago
Reply to  mike otter

How right you are Mike. Unfortunately, not even the Churches seem to feel the need to retain morals & ethics these days…as for teaching them to children, that is what they consider to be child abuse!

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago

Political desperation – militant socialists (and their far-libertarian foes) use any means to their end. Their one true ideology justifies it. “Genderism” = hate = damage. These people want to damage and replace existing social structures. Child sexual exploitation is for them a price worth paying. There are equivalents at the other end of the spectrum – gun ownership and free speech rights. Its acually quite easy to expose the intellectual paucity of these ideologies Governments and their permittted media seem afraid to do so. EG: How to we test these “one true ideologies”? How can there be more that one? Will they work in the year 4000? Did they work 4000BC? etc. Their ethical deficit is easily shown by comparison with societies where the rule of law holds sway. Sadly this nonsene hides the very few gender dismorphic souls. The far-lefts’ co-option of their harms leaves them worse off than before their cause was hijacked.

Last edited 1 year ago by mike otter
Chris Amies
Chris Amies
1 year ago

I’m wondering if abused boys also start to question their gender identity. It would certainly make sense if they dissociate from being male.

Chris Amies
Chris Amies
1 year ago

I’m wondering if abused boys also start to question their gender identity. It would certainly make sense if they dissociate from being male.

Claire Landon
Claire Landon
1 year ago

Great piece. Bayswater Support Group has a very useful graphic that goes well with it.
https://www.bayswatersupport.org.uk/iceberg/

Claire Landon
Claire Landon
1 year ago

Great piece. Bayswater Support Group has a very useful graphic that goes well with it.
https://www.bayswatersupport.org.uk/iceberg/

Michelle Johnston
Michelle Johnston
1 year ago

Julie can appear one-dimensional in her thinking about men but this is a superb article and a perfect example of how confused young people try to deny their gender … not flock to the other one. Pushed away rather than pulled toward. I have known young women who were abused and their route to rejection of their burgeoning womanhood was Anorexia Nervosa.

Michelle Johnston
Michelle Johnston
1 year ago

Julie can appear one-dimensional in her thinking about men but this is a superb article and a perfect example of how confused young people try to deny their gender … not flock to the other one. Pushed away rather than pulled toward. I have known young women who were abused and their route to rejection of their burgeoning womanhood was Anorexia Nervosa.

Dr. G Marzanna
Dr. G Marzanna
1 year ago

I just came here to say how wonderful Unherd is, for publishing this and other articles that lay out the issues coherently. Am presently in Canada and if I had to rely on Canadian press I’d be a zombie. Apart from Quillette the Canadian media is fully captured by the woke brigade. It’s incredibly frustrating.

Dr. G Marzanna
Dr. G Marzanna
1 year ago

I just came here to say how wonderful Unherd is, for publishing this and other articles that lay out the issues coherently. Am presently in Canada and if I had to rely on Canadian press I’d be a zombie. Apart from Quillette the Canadian media is fully captured by the woke brigade. It’s incredibly frustrating.

Valerie Taplin
Valerie Taplin
1 year ago

If one were to look further back, towards the roots of this tragedy, one often finds unwanted offspring born to incapable single mothers. The “care” system attempts to provide the least worst adolescence for them. But even the best care is often an inadequate substitute for a stable home with 2 loving parents. It is hardly surprising that these poor children crave love and affection and are easy prey for manipulative criminals. Surely our policies could better address some of the root causes and reduce the numbers of unwanted children.

Valerie Taplin
Valerie Taplin
1 year ago

If one were to look further back, towards the roots of this tragedy, one often finds unwanted offspring born to incapable single mothers. The “care” system attempts to provide the least worst adolescence for them. But even the best care is often an inadequate substitute for a stable home with 2 loving parents. It is hardly surprising that these poor children crave love and affection and are easy prey for manipulative criminals. Surely our policies could better address some of the root causes and reduce the numbers of unwanted children.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago

Meanwhile we have the Transmaxx crowd transitioning from male to male-but-presenting-as-female in order to take advantage of the easier life afforded to females.

William Shaw
William Shaw
1 year ago

Meanwhile we have the Transmaxx crowd transitioning from male to male-but-presenting-as-female in order to take advantage of the easier life afforded to females.

Rosemary Throssell
Rosemary Throssell
1 year ago

Both the article and comments are utterly depressing. Where to start! Men are responsible for so much harm and I know there are good ones out there but their contribution to so much that is wrong in society is overwhelming.

Rosemary Throssell
Rosemary Throssell
1 year ago

Both the article and comments are utterly depressing. Where to start! Men are responsible for so much harm and I know there are good ones out there but their contribution to so much that is wrong in society is overwhelming.

Andrew Wise
Andrew Wise
1 year ago

Yawn …another article on gender politics .. give it a rest Unherd, there are other things going on in the world as well.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

…which Unherd publishes plenty of articles on. The Comments following this article should better inform you of it’s relevance. Or one can choose to ignore child abuse, as a wellspring of gender identity problems.

Rosemary Throssell
Rosemary Throssell
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

Spoken like a man. Yawn.

Ray Andrews
Ray Andrews
1 year ago

It is quite true that men are responsible for most of the bad things in the world, OTOH they are also responsible for most of the good things. You’ll miss us when we are gone. Actually you will only succeed in emasculating your ‘own’ men, and when the mullahs inform you that from now on you will be wearing a burka when you go outside, you will wonder where your men are, to protect you.

Persephone
Persephone
1 year ago
Reply to  Ray Andrews

With an attitude like this Ray, I can just about guarantee that the women in your life will not miss you when you are gone. Revolting.

Persephone
Persephone
1 year ago
Reply to  Ray Andrews

With an attitude like this Ray, I can just about guarantee that the women in your life will not miss you when you are gone. Revolting.

Ray Andrews
Ray Andrews
1 year ago

It is quite true that men are responsible for most of the bad things in the world, OTOH they are also responsible for most of the good things. You’ll miss us when we are gone. Actually you will only succeed in emasculating your ‘own’ men, and when the mullahs inform you that from now on you will be wearing a burka when you go outside, you will wonder where your men are, to protect you.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

I’ve often got triggered into writing comments after only scan reading articles (a bad habit I need to kick). So I could easily have reacted in the same way.
But I suspect you may agree with much in the article. It’s not really about gender politics.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

…which Unherd publishes plenty of articles on. The Comments following this article should better inform you of it’s relevance. Or one can choose to ignore child abuse, as a wellspring of gender identity problems.

Rosemary Throssell
Rosemary Throssell
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

Spoken like a man. Yawn.

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Wise

I’ve often got triggered into writing comments after only scan reading articles (a bad habit I need to kick). So I could easily have reacted in the same way.
But I suspect you may agree with much in the article. It’s not really about gender politics.

Andrew Wise
Andrew Wise
1 year ago

Yawn …another article on gender politics .. give it a rest Unherd, there are other things going on in the world as well.