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Richardj Parfitt
Richardj Parfitt
2 months ago

That was a good read. The idea that the scene was ‘against rave, hip hop’ is ridiculous. Above all else, it was a live music movement.

Last edited 2 months ago by richardj.parfitt
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
2 months ago

Indeed, it’s revisionism. Most younger people (and even some older ones!) were too busy getting onto the dancefloor to lose themselves to the latest house tunes whilst the Britpop bands strutted about the stage at festivals. Both genres co-existed and were enjoyed, though Britpop died with the cynicism of Blair whilst dance music went global.

Mark Chadwick
Mark Chadwick
2 months ago

Britpop was the musical equivalent of New Labour – completely overrated by the media and managed to take so many people in.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
2 months ago
Reply to  Mark Chadwick

I agree. As a relatively unbiased Irishman who quite liked some of Pulp and Suede’s stuff, in my view, British mainstream pop n rock during the 1960s, and British indie rock n pop during the period 1976 – 1986, both walked all over anything 90s Britpop ever amounted to.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 months ago

The U.K. music of the sixties was far far better.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
2 months ago

There is nothing in Britpop as brilliant or innovative as the subtle modulation in the bridge of I’m Only in Sleeping – and that’s just a minor contribution to the Beatles canon.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Beatles? Also over-rated.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
2 months ago
Reply to  Martin Smith

Over-rated? You mean like Bach and Mozart? What a fatuous thing to say.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Beat combos are not high art, and it’s truly fatuous to suggest that they are or should even try to be. Moreover, as beat combos go, The Stones, The Doors and The Kinks among others, were more exciting, more fun, and more inventive. The four mop heads in their matching suits were a santised version of something better represented elsewhere, and the later hippy/revolutionary phase was really only following where others had already gone.

Last edited 2 months ago by Martin Smith
Ryan Midgley
Ryan Midgley
2 months ago

No mention of “The Stone Roses” or “The La’s”? Boo Radleys “Giant Steps”? “Modern Life Is Rubbish”?

Robert Quark
Robert Quark
2 months ago
Reply to  Ryan Midgley

But why mention them, when none of these things (with the probably exception of Modern Life is Rubbish) were Britpop? It is after all the subject of the article.

polidori redux
polidori redux
2 months ago

Britpop struck me as failed attempt to make something that was very, very boring seem a little bit exciting.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob
2 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Britpop was great. A belly full of Stella and a nose full of Columbias finest, and a collection of anthems that were cynical of Britain yet hopeful at the same time. I genuinely think it was the last time there was optimism

Last edited 2 months ago by Billy Bob
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
2 months ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Actually it was all rather embarrassing don’t you think?

Graeme McNeil
Graeme McNeil
2 months ago

Only for the Jacob Rees-Mogg types who missed the point of the whole thing

polidori redux
polidori redux
2 months ago

I do.

Graffiti Avenue
Graffiti Avenue
2 months ago

No I hated Britpop in the end I only loved The Verve & Oasis & Suede & I thought Elastica was rubbish middle class giddy that had nothing in common with me. Britpop basically became The Spice Girls Steps and all that nonsense & the Full Monty & James Blunt.I feel Trip Hop was total different same with Drum & Bass I feel it never got respected.I was more Into Grunge & Hip Hop & House & what The Prodigy The Chemical Brothers & Trip Hop I don’t want hear anymore Coldplay clones or Cool Britannia again.