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Michael Drucker
Michael Drucker
1 year ago

I hope that I shall one day find myself standing next to Howard Jacobson at a urinal. I shall hold my tongue till we are zipped and tell him how much I enjoyed this superb article.

Malcolm Knott
Malcolm Knott
1 year ago

No, it’s OK to speak up from the word go.

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago
Reply to  Malcolm Knott

Really?
I tend to shrink from conversations started at the urinal while I have other matters in hand.

Tom Watson
Tom Watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Malcolm Knott

Reported. You should be banned from the site for posting such filth. How do you sleep at night?

Ian Burns
Ian Burns
1 year ago

Remember to shake, wash hands, then shake again

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago

Beautifully written and true I think.
Are Howard Jacobson’s books or essays studied at all for English Lit at schools or universities ?
I hope they are.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Claire D

I doubt it. He’s far too white and Jewish for those woke racist turds.

Last edited 1 year ago by Richard Craven
Adam McDermont
Adam McDermont
1 year ago

Anti free speech zealots are unfortunately not confined to the elite. I remember being at university around the time of the Charlie Hebdo attack. I was surprised by the number of people who reasoned that those killed had it coming. Large sections of the public have reached an accommodation with Islamist savagery. The cultural divides in the West are so pronounced. Perhaps it is too much to hope that a peaceful solution to all of this can be found. If some sort of secession occurred, then I think there would be many leftists who would seek refuge in a culturally homogenous state having been scorned by mass immigration and Islamic terror. In this circumstance, I do not think they should be granted succour.

https://theheritagesite.substack.com/

Last edited 1 year ago by Adam McDermont
Maureen Finucane
Maureen Finucane
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam McDermont

I had the same discussion with a “lefty” friend who thought they’d incited it and bought it on themselves.

George Venning
George Venning
1 year ago

I don’t think I have ever seen the word “jocose” used in a critical sense before.

“Drat this novel, it is so playful, so full of jokes and merriment. Should its utterly unserious author ever face threats to his life on the basis of these confounded witticisms, I shall certainly not raise my voice in defence of all this mirth.”

Doesn’t sound like something someone would say.

Am I failing to read something between the lines?

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago
Reply to  George Venning

And to use it twice! Yikes. I recoiled like Woody Allen at the word “jejune”.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago

Maybe he just learned what it means. People often try to use words they’ve just learned to show them off, but use them inappropriately.

Laurence Siegel
Laurence Siegel
1 year ago

I find the use of the word “jocose” to be jejune.
But it is a good word for describing J. K. Rowling’s novels. I haven’t read Rushdie’s, but I admire him for his bravery.

Michael James
Michael James
1 year ago

‘I don’t doubt that a sense of exclusion from a charmed circle of the righteous explains why so many writers who might have been expected to be vocal on Salman Rushdie’s behalf weren’t.’
I do doubt it. I suspect they were just cowards.

Conrad Goehausen
Conrad Goehausen
1 year ago

I must admit, I couldn’t get past the idea that calling Rushie’s novels “jocuse” is even a criticism. They are deliberately humorous, funny, even ridiculous in parts. I suppose one’s values are one’s own, but humor is one of my primary values, so I don’t get the idea that this is even wrong. The problem is that some people, like Islamists, have no sense of humor about many things, and poking fun at them is very dangerous. I get that not everyone likes Rushie’s writings, or they just don’t find him funny. I do, and I wouldn’t want anyone to stop writing simply because people don’t like anyone making fun of “sacred cows” just because they don’t find them funny.
btw, aren’t Jacobson’s own novels “jocuse”?

Last edited 1 year ago by Conrad Goehausen
Richard Hopkins
Richard Hopkins
1 year ago

Absolutely right, Conrad. Howard Jacobson’s novels are playfully funny, insightful and beautifully crafted. They are as humorous and profound as Kundera’s. Jacobson’s radio essays are well worth seeking out too. BBC Radio 4 – Point of View.

Nanu Mitchell
Nanu Mitchell
1 year ago

Jocose, not jacuse (jacuzzi?) has a self conscious Pickwickian weight to it. Ho ho ho I’m being funny- geddit? An astute comment by Jacobson .

Last edited 1 year ago by Nanu Mitchell
Martin Brumby
Martin Brumby
1 year ago

“There are no jokes in Islam”.

Ayatollah Khomeini

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Brumby

It’s a terrifying quote, isn’t it. Thank you for the reminder.

Margaret TC
Margaret TC
1 year ago

Yesterday on Spiked they asked the very pertinent question where is the ‘Je suis Salman’ movement? The silence of the French left has been particularly telling.
https://www.spiked-online.com/podcast-episode/where-is-the-je-suis-salman-movement/?utm_source=Today+on+spiked&utm_campaign=ea4cc8d3f7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_18_05_35&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b6dc1b7df1-ea4cc8d3f7-99520242

Last edited 1 year ago by Margaret TC
Maureen Finucane
Maureen Finucane
1 year ago

No it’s not the same as being stabbed to death but cancellation amounts to destroying someone’s life and career and means of making a living which is the end result that the cancellers seek. Even an abject apology will not be deemed sufficient. Look at the recent case of Kate Clanchy.

David Simpson
David Simpson
1 year ago

“to freely listen” – not so easy, or very common.

Luke Chan
Luke Chan
1 year ago

If Jacobson had only just discovered that the fatwa was simmering instead of snuffed, he is a blind man indeed: Will Lloyd’s piece for this publication is instructive in how western society has, if anything, embraced it.

Gary Miles
Gary Miles
1 year ago

Well said Howard, I hope that this terrible event marks a turning point in the constant attack on free speech. And I hope those dullards at the Pleasance read this. They need to.

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
1 year ago

Thanks Howard, good to see you back.
(if you’ve ever been away)

Kris Beuret
Kris Beuret
1 year ago

It’s nothing new either – I was at a Jerry Sadowitz event in the Green Room in Manchester over twenty years ago and he walked out after 10 minutes due to the audience booing at his ‘upsetting’ jokes. I tried to follow to buy him a drink but he had rushed off.

Roger Inkpen
Roger Inkpen
1 year ago

This would have been even better hearing Howard read it. He is a regular contributor on Radio 4’s Point of View.
Catch up on BBC Sounds – or your preferred podcast platform (whatever that is!)

Robert Devaney
Robert Devaney
1 year ago

Let’s hope they washed their hands prior to shaking them

Jeremy Stone
Jeremy Stone
1 year ago

It is surprisingly difficult to discover what Sadowitz actually did or said. Except that, like Jacobson at the urinal, his member was on display (although in Sadowitz’s case to a slightly more numerous audience, and one which differed from Jacobson’s audience, Rushdie, in not expecting it). Context is important, you see. It does appear that Sadowitz, unlike Rushdie, starts from the intention to offend, and his defence is that the offensive speech is said to be encased in the quotation marks of art. Because the detail is so sparse, it is hard to know if this is true (or whether there are also dis-quotation devices at play, that get the offensive utterances out there all by themselves, after all). I have a nagging sense that when Jacobson defends Sadowitz he is invoking a free-speech defence when free speech is not the point at issue – namely the freedom to express beliefs that people disagree with. Sadowitz’s p***s is not a belief and probably it is not art, either.

Yousuf Hasan
Yousuf Hasan
1 year ago

No I do not agree with h some of the contents of the book. The author must understand the mentality of Salman. Why civilized reader dislike him? No matter Jew, Christian or Muslim that they believe Religion is a very sensitive issue. The respect of Prophet Peace Be Upon Him is an accepted fact. Why to disrespectful? Salman act is intolerance and Fatwa or No Fatwa he will remain most punishable person in Muslim world. The writer favoring remarks do not justify in civilized world.

james goater
james goater
1 year ago
Reply to  Yousuf Hasan

I regret that I have only one down vote to give you.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  james goater

I regret that I have only one up vote to give you.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Yousuf Hasan

“The respect of Prophet Peace Be Upon Him is an accepted fact. Why to disrespectful?”
Because Mohammed was a paedo.

Last edited 1 year ago by Richard Craven