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Francis MacGabhann
Francis MacGabhann
1 year ago

The trend is false, mainly because it’s the Democrats who are pushing it. They’re simply making a strategic withdrawal to regroup, knowing that even Californians won’t put up with this forever. They still assume themselves to be the anointed, are still determined to shove their BS down peoples’ throats, and still don’t see a thing wrong with any of their actions. It’s the people who are too stupid to understand, so they have to be “managed”.

Last edited 1 year ago by Francis MacGabhann
Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago

As you say a tactical retreat.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago

That could be said of the UK

Warren T
Warren T
1 year ago

And so goes life on earth, sadly. I’m not aware of a time throughout history when people were NOT too stupid and needed to be managed.

Francis MacGabhann
Francis MacGabhann
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren T

Who by?

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren T

Excepting yourself, obvs!

Warren T
Warren T
1 year ago

You mean certain residents. Hard to believe that the residents at the lower end of the spectrum are benefiting.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

‘Strategic withdrawals to regroup’ are the very essence of liberal democracy. The Tories after 1945 for example. Most Democrats and certainly most of the voters, are not ideologues. We don’t know yet how it will play out, but yours is an ‘essentialist’ argument that says political positions ocan never change, when history shows they constantly do. Conservative parties now support democracy after all, which was largely anathema to them in the 19th century. And ‘socialists’ accept capitalism.

Electoral democracy, which is very vibrant in the US, is a powerful force. The Democrats will lose power if they continue down the far woke Left rabbit hole. Offsetting that, those who support Trump, who to say the least is an extremely divisive figure, as the next Presidential candidate, will do their best to ensure the Republicans lose the next Presidential election as well, but I expect we disagree on that!

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Malvin Marombedza
Malvin Marombedza
1 year ago

This has dismayed the city’s progressives, who complain that she is “pandering to affluent Westside and Valley voters at the expense of black, Latinx and working-class ones”, as two Black Lives Matter activists put it in a recent column.

I have often always wondered: Where do the far left radicals get this idea that a working-class background is one which is a sign of dirtiness, disorder and helplessness? Maybe somebody out in the West can spell it out for me.

Richard Parker
Richard Parker
1 year ago

I think the bien pensants have always had this condescending view of the poor as the “great unwashed” – Orwell had to fight this after writing “The road to Wigan pier”, when he was apparently quizzed on whether the working class were “smelly”.
I also cherish (true) the tale of the matriarch who, the morning of final departure from the family’s terraced house, scrubbed and waxed the doorstep before the bulldozers moved in, because “I’m not having people think we live like pigs”. Importantly, she wasn’t seen as at all odd for doing so.
Money may, as Spike Milligan famously said “buy you a better class of misery”, but it’s not an essential prerequisite of pride and never has been, at least not that I’ve ever noticed.

Linda Hutchinson
Linda Hutchinson
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Parker

When I was a child Saturday mornings, as well as seeing the women of our street cleaning and waxing door-steps, would see them washing the pavements outside; they didn’t have to, but they wanted where their children played to be clean.

John Barclay
John Barclay
1 year ago

Come and visit the council estate near where I live in Victoria. You won’t need anyone to spell it out for you.

Jane Watson
Jane Watson
1 year ago
Reply to  John Barclay

Are you sure you are talking about ‘working class’ people here? In my experience, there is a massive difference between those who work and those who never have (and don’t intend to).

In the UK, a big factor in the swing to Conservatives in Northern towns is the growth of a ‘benefit class’ whose income exceeds that of working families. Many of these are economic migrants attracted to the UK by a profligate welfare state.

I read that homeless people move to California because they receive the most generous benefits and that some are actually put on buses by social workers in other states? The weather also allows for more comfortable street living.

Left wing policies fail because they are idealistic and deny realities in human nature. A small proportion of any population is criminal but a larger group will take advantage of others and contribute as little as possible.

Overly generous benefits systems encourage the growth of a ‘non-working’ class, with entirely predictable results. Every civilised person wants to protect the vulnerable, especially children, but the road to Hell and all


Hardee Hodges
Hardee Hodges
1 year ago
Reply to  Jane Watson

Which is why every commune has failed. Once those who work become disgusted by those who won’t the workers leave. The commune collapses, every time, without fail. CA has become a large industrial scale example of that situation.

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
1 year ago

Left wing middle class have never done dirty difficult work in arduous conditions and finished the day exhausted stinking and know tomorrow and the following days will be the same. If one makes it worse by living where there is a lack of water to clean body and clothes, when one does finally wash and place a freshly laundered shirt on, it is a near spiritual experience.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Absolutely. Many so called ‘progressives’ have a veiled but decidedly ‘reactionary’ disdain verging on contempt for actual working class and poor people, and even black people (the latter can’t be expected not to commit crime, be punctual etc etc).

In reality – rather than their empty words – they support some form of neo-feudalism, whereby many ‘woke’ individuals and institutions are extremely wealthy.

J Bryant
J Bryant
1 year ago

Part of me thinks this is an encouraging trend, and part of me thinks it’s too little too late. So long as much of big tech remains headquartered in California the state will have enough tax revenue and job growth to maintain its foolish and wasteful ways. And if big tech leaves then California really will be a third world country.

Philip Stott
Philip Stott
1 year ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Big tech are already starting to relocate to Texas. Oracle & Tesla immediately spring to mind.

Alexei A
Alexei A
1 year ago
Reply to  Philip Stott

And some Texans are not altogether enthused by the numbers of Californians moving there, as they anticipate the new arrivals will tend to transform Texas politically into the place they left.

Nicolas Jouan
Nicolas Jouan
1 year ago

I always thought that the disaggregated, dirty, grotesquely unequal, multi-cultural, unsustainable dystopian California pictured in Blade Runner was the most consistent and fact-based depiction of what our near future will likely be. It’s well on track.

Rob C
Rob C
1 year ago
Reply to  Nicolas Jouan

Except it won’t be nighttime and rainy all the time and there won’t be Japanese people wearing straw hats riding bicycles around.

Warren T
Warren T
1 year ago

Why is it that when Conservatives warn of the impending repercussions of far left policies, which actually come to fruition, they are jeered for being “conspiracy theorists”?
But when the Left conjures up outrageous accusations about Conservatives, which don’t actually come to fruition, it becomes national head line news?

Ray Zacek
Ray Zacek
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren T

Because the purveyors of the News are operatives for and enablers of the Democrats.

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
1 year ago

Now if only we could build a wall to trap them inside…

Amanda Marks
Amanda Marks
1 year ago

I’ve lived in Los Angeles for 30 years and he failure here isn’t JUST liberal policies
 It’s INCOMPETENCE. Our mayor Eric Garcetti had few qualifications for such a huge job when he first got it other than a well-known name (his father was a DA with a name affiliated with the OJ Simpson trial), minor local experience, a handsome, young face, an ability to speak some Spanish, and belief in his own political inevitability. But he has proven a TERRIBLE manager unable to tackle just about any problem I can think of. And IMO it’s not just his ideology that has sent the city spiraling, it’s his suckiness.
He fundraises well for the Dems and I think that he thought he was a shoe-in for a big position in the Biden administration, but fortunately they realized he sucked too and have given him an ambassadorship instead of the cabinet post he clearly wanted.
He cannot leave office soon enough. LA is a really, really hard city to run–it’s physically massive, extremely diverse etc. I’m pretty darn liberal, but taking a serious look at Caruso not because he’s more conservative, but because he is capable of leading an organization that is so huge and complex.

chris sullivan
chris sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Amanda Marks

Did no-one learn anything from the Arnie experiment. People’s functional memories (or ability to read ) seem shockingly flawed.

John Barclay
John Barclay
1 year ago

Why was Soros funding these hyper-woke officials?

Liz Runciman
Liz Runciman
1 year ago
Reply to  John Barclay

Insidious creep. So weird to use his wealth to undermine the values that underpinned his country’s release from Nazi slavery

Richard Slack
Richard Slack
1 year ago
Reply to  John Barclay

what is Soros’s role? I didn’t see his name in the article

Regan Best
Regan Best
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Slack

His money has bankrolled the campaigns of many progressive DA’s across the country.

Emre Emre
Emre Emre
1 year ago
Reply to  John Barclay

It’s because focusing on identity based issues distracts the Left from focusing on income inequality which is a lot more troublesome.

Perry de Havilland
Perry de Havilland
1 year ago

Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.
– H. L. Mencken

Emre Emre
Emre Emre
1 year ago

Yeah, seeing the disastrous state of Switzerland should give everyone shudders who would consider democracy to be a good thing.

Chris Eaton
Chris Eaton
1 year ago
Reply to  Emre Emre

You know apples? You know oranges?

R Wright
R Wright
1 year ago

The only way to fix that nightmare is to let Judge Dredd loose on it.

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
1 year ago

Southern California is Northern Mexico now. We cannot judge it by First World standards.

Mo Brown
Mo Brown
1 year ago
Reply to  Jerry Carroll

Certain small parts of it come pretty close. Otherwise, no.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
1 year ago

Getting rid of the lawyers and politicos is one thing, but solving the problems created…? Still, first things first.

Mo Brown
Mo Brown
1 year ago

In California’s two biggest cities, the signs of progressive retreat are everywhere.” Not true. San Diego is showing few such signs as it has not gone total apeshit left. San Francisco is the third biggest city in CA if I’m not mistaken.

Tom Krehbiel
Tom Krehbiel
1 year ago

It seems the author believes that San Francisco is still the 2nd biggest city in California. It’s not, but rather 4th. LA is 1st, San Diego 2nd, and San Jose 3rd.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Krehbiel
Howard Ahmanson
Howard Ahmanson
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Krehbiel

Think in terms of metropolitan areas, not incorporated cities.

Tom Krehbiel
Tom Krehbiel
1 year ago

Yes, but San Fran isn’t the biggest city in its metro area, the aforementioned San Jose is. Besides, does either LA or SF’s actions really say that much about their respective areas? The other cities and suburbs may have entirely different policies.