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Whose Great Reset is it anyway? When the Davos elite speak of remaking the world post-Covid, the very online hear a conspiracy

People are rightly suspicious of grand plans that limit their freedoms. Credit: Tayfun Salci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

People are rightly suspicious of grand plans that limit their freedoms. Credit: Tayfun Salci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images


January 1, 2021   5 mins

In the past couple of years, the idea of ‘the bugman’ has become common currency among those who spend way too much time in the wrong parts of the internet.

Put simply, the bugman is slang for a default, normie consumer, who imbibes uncritically the great narratives of today’s power structures: the kind of person who mistakes the basic bitch hedonism that Western society offers in abundance for a source of deep meaning.

Accordingly, the bugman enjoys Netflix and Deliveroo; Marvel franchises and Blue Apron. The bugman probably thought The Last Jedi was pretty cool for its feminist messages. It is an article of faith for him that BeyoncĂ© is a queen who slays. In fact, the bugman’s opinions are so tediously orthodox they can be widely shared on social media without any fear of payback.

The bugman’s original etymology (and entomology) refers to how he lives in a kind of honeycomb of similarly indistinct humans — a block of flats, say, probably in a major metropolis. But in recent years, the bugman has taken on another origin story. It can now mean ‘he who would gladly eat the bugs’. A global citizen, primed for the coming age of deep ecology proposed by XR and Greta, in which cows are banned, and protein is dispensed from reconstituted insect matter with far lower carbon footprints.

It’s the future in which we no longer own cars but merely rent space in self-driving taxis; the one in which we have to apply for our annual flight credits from the National Carbon Register. In its most extreme version, it’s the world of pod people — where the joyous citizen takes on the awesome planet-saving responsibility of limiting his housing to the necessary few square metres of dormitory space. After all, the bugman is instinctively a globalist, deeply trustful of international institutions, and their high-level plans for his future.

Which brings us neatly to an international institution, and its high-level plan for our future. It takes us into the heart of a conspiracy that isn’t, but a tendency that most certainly is. It is in the spaces between this non-existent conspiracy and the thriving tendency that a new war to control meaning is now raging.

In June of this year, the World Economic Forum hosted a video seminar called The Great Reset, to promote a book, also called The Great Reset. It was a crushingly tedious time for all concerned. Bookended with the mitherings of Prince Charles, the event mainly involved a panel of worthies — who all had that NGO tan that comes from endlessly staring at discussion documents about third world poverty from a luxurious Alpine apartment — sharing their thoughts on ‘sustainability’, ‘green jobs’ and ‘the global south’.

Their Great Reset, as unveiled in their seminar, proposes a generational shifting of the track-lines of our economic development. It calls for de-carbonising, with the help of massive government stimulus; it wants an internationalist approach that clamps down on tax-dodging companies, paid for by new taxes on the wealthy. Lame, perhaps. But on the face of it, hardly sinister.

The stronger thesis of The Great Reset was best stated by the former Vatican ambassador to the US, Archbishop Carlo Vagano, who in November of this year wrote an open letter to President Trump:

Mr. President, I imagine that you are already aware that in some countries the Great Reset will be activated between the end of this year and the first trimester of 2021. For this purpose, further lockdowns are planned, which will be officially justified by a supposed second and third wave of the pandemic. You are well aware of the means that have been deployed to sow panic and legitimize draconian limitations on individual liberties, artfully provoking a world-wide economic crisis. In the intentions of its architects, this crisis will serve to make the recourse of nations to the Great Reset irreversible, thereby giving the final blow to a world whose existence and very memory they want to completely cancel. 

This is the Great Reset as it now exists within the conspiracy world: the premise that life as we knew it is being flattened so as to be re-forged into the bugman’s paradise — with special emphasis on Covid-19 being essentially fake, or at least wildly overstated.

Clearly, these two Great Resets — the lame version and the conspiracy version — are very different propositions. Yet there is also a sense in which they talk to each other, feed off each other. Above all, each provides an excellent strawman for the opposing team to attack.

Take the case of Justin Trudeau, who became a viral sensation in Great Reset (lame version) circles in September, when he used his speech to the UN General Assembly to talk about using Covid to pursue more of the politics he already enjoys:

“Building back better means getting support to the most vulnerable while maintaining our momentum on reaching the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development”

Agenda 2030, often spoken of in the same breath as the Great Reset, is the UN’s “sustainable development goals”, a long list of platitudes about the environment and inequality of such aching tedium that it makes The Great Reset (lame version) look like The 120 Days Of Sodom.

In the moment, Trudeau was saying no more than what the Trudeaus of this world tend to say. But then, the beauty of the Great Reset is that it has become a framework for connecting the dots between all the world’s Trudeaus and their mandarin class. These are all the people Steve Bannon used to call The Party Of Davos. And in the battle to define what comes after the Jahr Null of Covid, so far, it’s this Davos crowd and these ideas that are winning every skirmish.

For the very online Right, it hasn’t escaped notice that, whether it’s voiced by Biden, Trudeau or Johnson, ‘building back better’ always seems to mean pinning the individual under the state, in service of an open-ended, easily-redefined ‘common good’. Boris Johnson’s great green reset is one of the more curious cases in point: a moment where a leader went over the heads of his working class, northern balance of power, to play to a gallery of internationalists. The Prime Minister has bet our future on untested heat pump technology and expensive electric cars.

Of course, Klaus Schwab’s annual talking shop is hardly the only organisation vying to turn the crisis towards their agenda. The problem, it seems, was that they were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off; the title was just too good, too on-the-nose, to be ignored. The Great Reset was accidental over-sell, but only in the way that lighting striking the highest conductive point is ‘accidental’. By November, when the phrase really took off, societal disquiet was already rumbling, looking for an obvious point-of-contact with reality. Suddenly, a vague unease had a name.

But at the same time, both sides also refuse to concede that the term has multiple meanings. For the WEF and its allies, any opposition to their policies must therefore come from wackos. This kind of queasy duality is a standard part of the modern playbook. By 2017, the term ‘alt-Right’ had come to mean both ‘card-carrying Neo-Nazi’ and ‘young people slightly to the right of Douglas Carswell who own a modem’. In debate, the distinction was deliberately elided to de-platform and defame. Ever more, the term ‘climate denier’ performs a similar function.

On the other side of the fence, those who deal in the fantasies can deploy their own motte and bailey. They point to the WEF’s actual plan as a safe harbour in reality — a stout Christmas tree of genuine fact, on which they can then hang their madder baubles. As one YouTube commenter beneath the WEF video had it: “When we warned of a reset, we’re [sic] were called conspiracists. Now what idiots?”

Between them lies the real argument, unloved and untackled. The crisis has already put down several waymarkers towards a world few of us signed up for: from the steamrollering of mom-’n’-pops in favour of Amazon, to the truly cashless society, to credit scores based on your Google history to the oft-floated ‘vaccine passport’. The bugman is always figurative: a kind of platonic ideal pointing towards the dangers of a technocratic 2020s. To take it literally is always to miss the point.

The WEF case rests precisely on explaining why we won’t end up in that future. But tackling the unease fuelling The Great Reset’s wide spectrum of critics would also mean addressing the sentiment underlying both strands of opposition: that however buttery the buzzwords, human beings are rightly suspicious of those who make abstruse high-level plans for their ‘welfare’. Especially if they’re designed by pointy-heads from Davos with no skin in the game — whether they come bearing a thought, a plan, a scheme, or an outright conspiracy.


Gavin Haynes is a journalist and former editor-at-large at Vice.

@gavhaynes

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Alison Houston
Alison Houston
3 years ago

If you wish to understand the future, look to the past. At school in the 80s during the reign of Mrs Thatcher we used to learn in our geography lessons, and later in economics that Britain’s economy was going to change over the next ten to twenty years to become one based on services and leisure. This was revealed to us in set up debates in which we had to discuss whether industry such as quarrying should be allowed to set up in National Parks, in order to create jobs. Jobs were thought less important than the natural beauty of the landscape so the correct answer to the question was no.

At the same time we were taught about the ridiculousness of the Soviets with their five year plans, in our history lessons and learnt that it was silly to think you could prescribe for the future with any degree of precision.

The old industrial world described so beautifully by Arthur Mee in his introduction to the Yorkshire volumes of The Kings England, continued to disappear, the City grew in strength, the shell suit and casual wear became the height of fashion among ordinary folk while the city types donned their striped suits and red braces. Now, in former mining country we have golf courses where men once toiled underground. We have a zoo, in Doncaster, we have a huge ski slope with all year round snow, in Castleford. Where the miners strike had started at Cortonwood in Rotherham there’s the usual collection of B and Q, Matalan, Boots, Asda, Morrisons, TK Maxx etc. Men who once did hard, tiring work can now sell coffee or cheap, Chinese tools or stack shelves with women’s sanitary products in the supermarkets.

Yet we are supposed to believe Western capitalists don’t have plans and that any one who suggests otherwise is mad.

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
3 years ago
Reply to  Alison Houston

In the 80s the National Economic Development Office still existed to make longer than five year plans! It did seem a good thing to look further than the next election and to provide a forum where management, unions and government could meet.

Kiran Grimm
Kiran Grimm
3 years ago
Reply to  Judy Johnson

Sounds as fabulous as Camelot!
Sorry to be so cynical but do such gatherings actually achieve anything more than providing a forum for the well-intentioned to express pious hopes and the politically shrewd to manipulate those hopes to their own advantage?

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Judy Johnson

I knew someone who, as I recall, worked for that particular public sector waste of space. He was quite young and there when it was disbanded in 1985.

John Stone
John Stone
3 years ago
Reply to  Judy Johnson

My recollection is that Thatcher closed the National Economic Development Council on entering office in 1979. It wasn’t where economic planning was to take place from thence on (if it ever did).

Teo
Teo
3 years ago
Reply to  Alison Houston

No more jobs for life only transient precariousness, funny how the powers that be secured the future not only for their trustafarian offspring but their grandchildren.

The UK is probably further into the ‘Great Reset’ than any other European nation thanks to MrsT, but some conservatives deploy the useful idiot of the left charge against anyone who questions the legacy of the Great Leader’s neoliberal agenda.

Giles Toman
Giles Toman
2 years ago
Reply to  Teo

I wonder if I’d rather had a “job for life” (and a guaranteed early death from lung disease!) or an easy job in a supermarket.

Richard Lustemberg
Richard Lustemberg
3 years ago
Reply to  Alison Houston

Beautifully put!

Kiran Grimm
Kiran Grimm
3 years ago
Reply to  Alison Houston

At school in the early 60s we still had a belief in British techical prowess. Job prospects for school leavers were good. There were still high-tech industries doing good business in Britain. In my area there were aerospace companies offering apprenticeships and very high-skilled jobs. One of my siblings was employed by a company doing pioneering work with flight-simulators.

All that began to change with the election of a Labour government in 1964. Harold Wilson’s blatherings about the white heat of technology proved to be hollow and his assertion that the British elites were “natural Luddites” wilfully misdirected ““ the true Luddites were most definitely the trade unionists. By the time we reached the end of the 1960s many British industries were over-manned and in terminal decline ““ but we were told not to worry because Britain was still a world leader with its financial services.

All of this led to the (then notorious) “Brain Drain” ““ highly qualified and skilled workers seeking better paid and fulfilling work abroad, many in the US.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago
Reply to  Alison Houston

Thatcher’s policies were inspired by a hatred of the working class, probably because she originated so close to them. It’s no coincidence that our lords and masters are now encouraging the same sort of contempt for those who cherish family and community.

Lucy Smex
Lucy Smex
3 years ago

Or: she was driven by a hatred of trades unions that had a stranglehold on industry, and believed they should be running the country rather than the elected government. Too many union officials were trying to get the UK to resemble Soviet Russia.
Have a watch of the Sky programme, Chernobyl. That was the UK in the seventies, with useless management and obstructive unions who’d go on strike at the drop of a hat. The UK was known as the sick man of Europe, and it was precisely why Margaret Thatcher was elected.

Pete Rose
Pete Rose
3 years ago
Reply to  Lucy Smex

So that’s why she deregulated the pound, which then led to the decimation of manufacturing and thereby put 3 million people on the dole, many for decades.

Still, at least the avaricious in the City made a fortune while philanthropist Thatcher was doing us all a favour.

I believe the term “the sick man of Europe” was a term coined by the editorial boards of the Tory press for obvious self interest, and wasn’t used much outside of those circles.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago
Reply to  Lucy Smex

The abuses by trade union leaders explained the trade union reforms. They do not explain why Thatcher adopted a monetary policy that drove sterling to $2.40 and bankrupted much of British manufacturing industry with the resulting regional economic divergence. Britain has never recovered from this economic vandalism.

Keith Payne
Keith Payne
3 years ago

The ‘Great Reset’ – neoliberalism cloaked in the fears of the present to allow the rich to continue getting richer and the poor getting poorer while we all get increasingly controlled by the tech wielding elite pushing us towards their commercialise utopian world.

robert scheetz
robert scheetz
3 years ago
Reply to  Keith Payne

Yes, the apocalyptic thesis is pretty convincing (“Planet of the Humans”) . If true it means within the neoliberal structured world that the rebalance will occur as it would naturally: i.e., when a species exceeds the ability of its environment to sustain it there occurs a natural kill-off until equilibrium is regained. Of course the elites are not going to allow this thesis to be aired, and, have to provide against being included in the kill-off. Therefore, their survival programme has to be couched in a soothing bugman narrative.

Otto Christensen
Otto Christensen
3 years ago
Reply to  Keith Payne

Turn off your tv, internet; pull your earbuds and get a bite of the reality latte. Crawl out of the soup. Wake up. The great “we” you refer to is yourself giving into lazy delusions where there is zero accountability. Like my mother used to say, “you get going!”

Lorraine
Lorraine
3 years ago
Reply to  Keith Payne

Keith, I love this concise description, although I have noticed an awareness among elite ‘think tanks’ and NGO-government-type partnerships of the need for mitigation against the worst excesses of the system. It seems to me the WEF strives to be a vehicle to facilitate the process you describe, and at the same time create means to promote social cohesion by limiting the ensuing chaos/destruction.

Bill Brewer
Bill Brewer
3 years ago

COVID has shown we badly need a reset. But not Klaus Schwab’s supported by major corporations and career politicians who have no care for anyone and seek more profit, power and an elite position for themselves. We need an injection of honest logic, challenge, stress testing of ideas and leadership based on delivering benefit for the majority. It needs to start with the media who have largely become an abhorrent, evil and dangerous political party that avoids being accountable for the damage it does. We need to look more to democratising ideas such as Opensource and Crowdsourcing for inspiration. We need to educate children to think for themselves and not just accept what they are told at face value. Validate and verify our leaders and teachers before trusting them.

John Stone
John Stone
3 years ago
Reply to  Bill Brewer

What we should not be doing as a democratic nation is deferring to global interests which offer patronage and hospitality to our political class. What we should be doing is trying to hold unelected bureaucracies and strange alliances to account. Since time immemorial US politicians have been elected to “drain the swamp” or whatever the jargon used to be in times past: they never do – or a few make gasping attempts – but that is the project. We need accountable democracy.

Russ Littler
Russ Littler
3 years ago
Reply to  Bill Brewer

You are correct. In my generation we were taught “how” to think, instead of “what” to think.

Richard Lustemberg
Richard Lustemberg
3 years ago

As the evidence accumulates of a collusion between governments, supranational organisations and globalised corporations in the shaping of a post-neoliberal world order, for some, it seems that doubling down on a narrative where everything which happens is just accidental is the way to go.
Nothing more than positivism going wrong. Of course, we are not lead by reason alone and primarily, but by intuition. All of us do , including the author. Intuition is the starting point to explore our context and predict outcomes. Skepticism is the method we apply to our intuition and the expected outcome of that is empirical evidence guiding us to the ultimate and probably unattainable Truth, this Truth being a sort of mathematical limit.
Official documents and declarations regarding geopolitical moves are always ‘lame’. NATO activities in the Middle East on the last 20 years were declared as the ‘drive to spread democracy’. Extremely ‘lame’. The ‘reset’ applied to the former Republic of Yugoslavia by western economists was also very lame.
The current ‘Great Reset’ seems also a very lame initiative, but its consequences, like in the previous cases, would be catastrophic.
I would go further and say that to even consider the signals coming from Davos as ‘lame’, you need to do a very shallow and naive reading of whats being stated on their media outlets. Because when analysed through the technique of economics, it’s clear that a great deal of pain suffered by a great deal of people is what’s required to put this plans into action. Even further analysis would indicate that the economics of the Great Reset are nonsensensical and whoever will implement them would be the loser.
The facts seems to indicate that this ‘Great Reset’ is anything but lame. Government officials and supranational bureaucrats are gathering, coordinating efforts, following central guidelines and timelines of transitioning to the ‘New Normal’. A reshaping of neoliberal globalism into regionalised neoliberalism is the direction things are taken. This can be found doing the appropriate research. This is an herculean effort which is why it’s now in the open.
This reality might be hard to swallow. I would sleep better if I would think like the author

Brett
Brett
3 years ago

What he said. Very well put thank you. I could never have written that but it expresses well what I think.

Will give the author a bit of slack. I note he is a former editor of Vice. He’s not there, but he’s on the right track.

I enjoy watching these “awakenings” we’ll see where he is next year. I doubt myself from 10, 15 years ago would even talk to present me. It takes time to unravel it all but he’s got a pretty firm hold of the thread I think.

Russ Littler
Russ Littler
3 years ago

This is the kind of bullshit we’re up against folks. Another out-of-touch journo who thinks we’re all conspiracy nuts, for saying NO to the great totalitarian reset and a vaccine we don’t need. If he’d do the bloody job he was supposed to do (as a journalist), he’d be asking these people some very awkward questions about our rights, liberties, and freedom, but NO, once again, the perpetrators of the Covid scam, all get a free pass from this myopic journalist. It’s the fault of those who investigate it. Unbelievable.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Russ Littler

That is why he has this ‘BUGMAN’ word, it allows him to be above the people, they bugs, him and his ilk, real thinking humans.

By disrespecting the individual you do not have to think of rights, liberties and freedom of them, they are just bugs wanting games, drugs, sex, and a warm kennel. Abusing and herding them about is natural, they do not mind, and they do not matter. A very different take of how the citizen was thought of by the Great men who wrote the US Constitution.

blanes
blanes
3 years ago
Reply to  7882 fremic
Robin Banks
Robin Banks
3 years ago
Reply to  7882 fremic

I’ve been reading news via the internet for many years and have never heard or read the term BUGMAN.

Wayne Eagle
Wayne Eagle
3 years ago

The author references Trudeau as someone who is speaking for the great reset. He either knows nothing of who Trudeau is and who pushes his buttons or he is terribly uninformed. Trudeau and his handler are rapidly dismantling The Canada we knew and has taken advantage of the current pandemic to shut down parliament and bankrupt the country for the foreseeable future. That’s not conspiracy that sadly cold hard fact. Hard hard times are coming. Anyone seen Blade Runner?

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Wayne Eagle

Trudeau is also a China tool. Canada is selling its self bit by bit to China so they can have these Californian type of social programs and all be well off, wile not doing much producing.

I used to hang out in Richmond, a suburb of Vancouver. It turned about 90% Chinese over the decades. Real estate went nuts, the suburban houses each bought and demolished for building a McMansion to another rich Chinese immigrant. (Canada sells residency, tracking to citizenship, to Chinese)

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Wayne Eagle

Most of the Worlds Premiers Mantra include ”Build back better” sound familiar..Trudeau should continue to ‘Blacken up’ & shut up..

stephen f.
stephen f.
3 years ago

How many cameras are in London? That is the future for many…

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  stephen f.

I think the future is in smart phones. Almost everyone (I will not) carries these tracking and eavesdropping devices, they soon will be your wallet and social credit, and passport and the right one will open doors and the wrong one will not.

Guy Haynes
Guy Haynes
3 years ago

I can see a few pointers to the way we are headed.

Anybody questioning the wisdom of lockdowns is censored and their reputation trashed. The highly qualified authors of the Great Barrington Declaration found their personalities and careers assassinated. Anybody questioning the US election result is censored. The last US president was hamstrung for years by phony investigations. Brexit was (for once unsuccessfully) thwarted at every turn. Anyone opposing the central tenets of AGW climate change found their careers under threat and censored. Potentially an election in the leading country in the free world was fraudulent. Those alleging fraud were not able to have their cases heard in court. Lawyers representing the Trump team were threatened and bullied into withdrawing. The supreme Court in the UK ruled against Boris Johnson’s government proroguing Parliament despite nobody at any point being able to point to what law they had broken. Citizens pointing out inconvenient facts are hassled by the police and the law. People associated with Donald Trump get done for process crimes while those who spied on the incoming administration get off scot free. Police brutality against the yellow vests and Basque separatists is de rigueur but nobody must touch violent BLM protestors or go too hard on gangs of child rapists. Trump’s character is assassinated (although in fairness he may well be a bit of a d**k) while accusations of rape and his family selling out to overseas interests are ignored, and covered up. Brazil’s right wing president is excoriated for taking the same decisions as Bolivia’s left wing leader, who in turn is completely free of criticism. Policies are pursued that ruin small businesses but benefit multinational corporate behemoths.

Meanwhile we are told by our betters to stay locked down while our betters eat out where they want. We are told we are running the planet by people flying around in private jets and buying houses on the same coasts that they assure us should be underwater by now.

All of this is enabled by an activist press which is almost entirely owned by the same people who are pushing the lockdowns, phony elections, double standards and two tier justice systems.

You know what, I’ve no idea what their final goal is, and furthermore these people might be right about all of these things, but the fact they’re doing everything in their power to silence any dissenting voices makes me very suspicious indeed about their intentions, and their rectitude, moral or actual.

John Stone
John Stone
3 years ago

World Economic Forum video ” The Great Reset – 8 Predictions for the World in 2030 (World Economic Forum)” 1st Statement “You’ll own nothing. And you’ll be happy”. Image of a beaming, glossy young man. No doubt the global oligarchs will be even happier. What we are talking about is nations heavily in hock to global institutions and their citizens largely bankrupt. Check out Event201 sponsored by WEF, World Bank, WHO, Bill and Melinda Gates etc, forecasting in October 2019 the economic outcome of a Coronavirus pandemic.The politics on this model will be Techno-Feudalism. I am not saying this will come to pass but it more likely will if we do not focus on the possibility. It is really of no account whether Gavin Haynes is bored or not: this is what they say they are going to do and it should be the subject of careful public consideration. If Prince Charles is involved he should take another look at what is being said in his name.

anthonybmurphy
anthonybmurphy
3 years ago

This “essay” would give essays a bad name. A stab in the dark!

klmayes605
klmayes605
3 years ago
Reply to  anthonybmurphy

Yeah, I never really got his point. Too many obscure terms.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  klmayes605

you got it nailed. But these kind of self loving counter intellectual political stuff are good in they may not actually mean anything, but help us improve out vocabulary and keep up to date.

Andrew Baldwin
Andrew Baldwin
3 years ago

Gavin might have noted that since his September speech to the UN General Assembly, Justin Trudeau has pretty much confirmed the worst suspicions of the alleged conspiracy theorists who distrusted his “Great Reset” rhetoric. The pandemic and the lockdowns by themselves entailed a very substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (GGE). While Opposition parties on the right called for Trudeau to postpone or cancel the increase in the Liberal backup tax on GHG emissions from $30 to $40 per tonne in April 2021. Instead of this, the Liberal government announced in December that it would raise the backup tax to $170 per tonne by 2030, although it was originally slated to peak at $50 per tonne as of April 2022. Although it had been obvious for some time that the existing environmental measures were not going to allow Canada to reach its Paris target for GHG emissions, Trudeau had denied he had any firm plan to raise the tax during the 2019 federal election, instead having the world’s loveliest Environment Minister, Catherine McKenna, promise a limited plastics ban, tree planting and similar measures that couldn’t possibly get Canada to its target.
Given that our partners in the USMCA, have either no federal tax on GHG emissions, like the United States, or a very modest one, like Mexico, this amounts to a suicidal economic policy. This is all the more so since the Liberal backup tax is poorly designed, not replacing regulatory measures, but pasted on top of them, with new ones, even possibly a ban on non-electric vehicles, on the way. The backup tax is not revenue neutral, as it is billed, and it approaches revenue neutrality through the so-called Justin bucks, lumpsum payments to households, rather than through reductions of existing taxes, like payroll taxes, as Trudeau’s own Ecofiscal Commission had called for.
This has rightly been seen as a direct attack on the economies of Alberta and Saskatchewan, and could, in a worst-case scenario, lead to the breakup of Canada.

Lyn Griffiths
Lyn Griffiths
3 years ago

I did enjoy the essay, but smiled when thinking we can’t keep a Europe organised with all the infighting and leaving due to an imbalance of power and input. But one paragraph I found interesting:
“Which brings us neatly to an international institution, and its high-level plan for our future. It takes us into the heart of a conspiracy that isn’t, but a tendency that most certainly is. It is in the spaces between this non-existent conspiracy and the thriving tendency that a new war to control meaning is now raging”
I read this several times and the wording is how I see the wording in a lot that I read in the media. It should make sense but to figure out what is being said and repeated to condition the mind to accept what is written, confounding and one needs to step back and take a deep breath and think. 🙂

John Stone
John Stone
3 years ago

Arrogant, superior waffle masking many problems.

davidmstokes87
davidmstokes87
3 years ago

Wasters all of them, good for nothings. When did Boris Johnson or Trudeau or any of those other university-weaned idlers ever climb into a sewer pit to clean a deposit so as the flow wouldn’t block , or stay up all night on a tarmac gang to keep a road opened, or get stuck to the ground from a power surge unravelling power-lines, or be cut to the bone from concrete shards in a tunnel essential to our infrastructure? Workers keep these complex societies going, keep the gas and the water and the oil and the sewerage and the electricity flowing. Without us you have nothing. When we are crushed to death in a tunnel or electrocuted or die from asbestos in the lungs or die from a fall we are ignored. Labour politicians mock us for having white vans with England flags in the windows and hate our coarseness. Great reset my hole. In this life there are the workers and the parasites who live off the workers. The rest is bollocks.

blanes
blanes
3 years ago
Sean Arthur Joyce
Sean Arthur Joyce
3 years ago

“The greatest tyrannies are always perpetuated in the name of the noblest causes.” “Thomas Paine. If you want a sophisticated analysis of what the Great Reset is really all about, look to commentators such as Catherine Austin-Fitts, a former assistant secretary of housing in the US government. According to her this is a move into a transhumanist, all-digital currency on the Chinese social credit style system, which will make the fictional tyrannies of Orwell and Huxley look tame. She explains how the lockdown was a pretext for a giant real estate grab and wealth transfer to the global billionaire elite. Even the BLM and Antifa riots served a purpose in the plan”distraction from the real agenda. Yet people organizing peaceful rallies to advocate for our constitutional civil liberties and rights are being fined in Canada right now. In Toronto a small business owner who defied lockdown by opening his barbecue restaurant was first fined then arrested, while just a few blocks away a corporate big box store remained open without hindrance. Austin-Fitts evokes Naomi Klein’s model of “disaster capitalism”: First create the crisis, then swoop in to pick up the pieces. If that’s all it were, it wouldn’t be half as bad as what these psychopaths have in mind. See Austin-Fitts explain it all here: https://torchesandpitchfork

Terence Fitch
Terence Fitch
3 years ago

The Great Reset seems to me to be the pivot point where apparently deep thinking is revealed as unthinking overthinking.

Chad Smith
Chad Smith
2 years ago

Pretty! This has been a really wonderful post. Many thanks for providing these details.

Gunnar Park
Gunnar Park
1 year ago

Very well presented. Every quote was awesome and thanks for sharing the content. Keep sharing and keep motivating others.

Mariana Tanner
Mariana Tanner
1 year ago

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Mariana Tanner
Mariana Tanner
1 year ago

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