by Seth Barron
Wednesday, 17
August 2022
Reaction
10:23

Liz Cheney’s neoconservatism is dead

Her defeat in Wyoming marks the end of an era
by Seth Barron
Off you go now (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Liz Cheney’s thumping defeat in her bid for renomination for Wyoming’s sole seat in the House of Representatives signals again the utter and total defeat of the Bush-Cheney-Romney era of the Republican Party. The neoconservative period of GOP dominance ended when Donald Trump trounced the field during the 2016 primary season. But the avatars of that political tendency — in favour of military adventurism and “free markets” — keep appearing like ghosts at the feast to rattle their chains and insist on being seated above the salt.

Reliably Trump-y until the January 6 riot at the Capitol, Representative Cheney about-faced to embrace every jot of the Democrats’ narrative regarding Trump’s alleged attempt to ignore the election results, dispense with the Constitution, and establish himself as a Caesar on the Potomac. After House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejected the Republicans named to serve on her special committee to investigate the riot, she named Liz Cheney as a minority representative to preserve the appearance of bipartisanship. Cheney cheerfully accepted appointment as committee co-chair and embraced her role in the inquisition.

Cheney relished the opportunity to sit before cameras and playact as the last patriotic Republican, a defender of the nation and its democratic values. Her performance on the January 6 committee was read by all members of her party — outside the province of certain op-ed writers whose primary audience is each other — as purest perfidy. Her bland recitation of the most absurd Democrat claims about Trump’s disloyalty were taken as an outrage.

That said, why did Cheney even bother running for re-election, in a state that voted more heavily for Trump than any other, twice? What is characterised in the press as a “split” in the Republican Party — between Trump’s supporters on one hand, and conventional Republicans on the other — in fact is not a schism or factional matter at all. It more closely resembles an ice floe upon which the decrepit and useless remnant of the party has been set adrift.

The neoconservatives who proudly announced that they would vote for Biden in 2020 because they put “country over party”, now await smugly in their splendid palace of principle for the rest of the Republicans, having come to their senses, to slink shamefully back, asking for guidance. But they wait in vain. Mainstream Republican voters, even if they don’t especially love Trump, embrace the program of the new GOP: no new wars, law and order, an end to Wokeness in public schools, and sensible pro-family policies that don’t include intentional immiseration of the middle class through exponentially inflated energy costs.

But that doesn’t mean the Bush-Cheney-Romney cohort will disappear. They can still make noise and wave their tattered battle flags, even threatening to mount rear-guard challenges at national conventions. Dick Cheney, in a cartoonish commercial in support of his daughter’s campaign, glowered at the camera, insisting that “there has never been an individual who was a greater threat to our republic than Donald Trump”. But “our republic”, like “our democracy”, must always be heard with a stress on the possessive: when Cheney or Pelosi say “our” they mean theirs. Trump’s threat to established power is less ideological than proprietary.

Liz Cheney’s concession speech included a grandiose citation of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address — the part where he said “we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain” — with the bizarre implication that she, like the martyred saviour of the Union, plans to rescue her daddy’s party by running for President. But the problem for Liz Cheney, Dick Cheney, the Bushes, and their comrades-in-exile, is that they aren’t wanted by their own party, the other party has little use for them, and they lack the most important element for power in an electoral system — a constituency.

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Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago

The Democrats have become utterly loathsome to the majority of Americans. It has become the party of indoctrinated, racist, lying technocrats who really really really hate ‘the people’. It’s almost like the US has been taken over by an occupying hostile force that will do everything it can to destroy the US by attacking the notions of family, independence and free will.
Trump isn’t going away, especially not now that the FBI has raided his home. This act, in conjunction with others, has made it very clear that federal agencies have become highly politicized.
Like many others who have lost their connection with everyday people, Liz Cheney acted from the safety of her own political bubble completely unaware of how much damage she was doing to her brand by siding with the Democrat party.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“The Democrats have become utterly loathsome to the majority of Americans.”
Really?
How do you square that statement with the reality that the GOP guy tends only to get in due to the US electoral colleges system, whereunder candidates who score less votes can still prevail?
https://edition.cnn.com/2016/12/21/politics/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-popular-vote-final-count/index.html
Can you count? 

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I’m afraid CNN can no longer be viewed as an impartial source. Much like the FBI it has become highly partisan and only ever has a pro-Democrat viewpoint.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

And yet the FBU is always run by lifelong republicans and the vast majority of its agents are republicans. You really are completely disconnected from reality.

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

I guess you didn’t read the article since it explains the difference quite clearly.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

Perhaps. I might be totally wrong. To be honest. It’s like there’s two totally different realities to choose from. While I don’t particularly like the Republican platform (it really needs to bring in the young), I at least understand it to a large extent. In comparison, I really abhor the kind of world the Democrats want to bring about – one resting on the authority of experts who ‘benignly’ manage the workers while using the media, entertainment and education system to turn them into sexually-deformed LGBQT eunuchs who need large corrupt bureaucracies to promote their interests and recruit the young.

Terry Bryant
Terry Bryant
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Haha you are a CNN junkie I think. The Democrats have been shut down numerous times already by many Democrat leaning judges trying to rig the electoral college system in their favor. Wednesday, the New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, struck down congressional and state Senate district maps, which heavily favored Democrats, as “drawn with impermissible partisan purpose.” So save us your fake outrage over electoral college lies and focus on the real problem with voting in dumbocrats. Gerrymandering.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  Terry Bryant

“drawn with impermissible partisan purpose.” BDoing this is illegal in democrat run states and is legal in republican run states.

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Can you read?

Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

I’m not American but my understanding is that about half the population are supporters of the democrats.

Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
3 months ago

I take it back. 1% of people are democrats. This is a very rational comment section.

Paul Deignan
Paul Deignan
3 months ago

Yes, there is some truth in both perspectives. The point being made is that most all people do not agree with the fact of what the Dem party espouses in action. You can see this in the polls that do not shade the truth of the issues.

But your point has some truth as well. The reason for the vote being split is that people, especially the Dems, are not purely voting by issue and certainly not by a cold analysis of the facts. Rather, many vote by tribal affiliations that run to deeper, less rational aspects of the voter-party relationship. You can see this as well in the difference in the nature in party messaging to their respective bases.

Simply put, Dems Feel and Republicans Think. This also is a proven psychometric fact. When you understand this, you will understand the political dynamic.

Wally Palo
Wally Palo
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul Deignan

I think, also, that a quickly growing share of Democrat ballots originate from non-voting citizens whose information is used by nefarious Democrat organizations to print and stuff fake ballots using these non-voting citizens’ names & addresses.

Chris Shannon
Chris Shannon
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul Deignan

I came to recognize a few years back that what the Democrat Party really is is a ‘patchwork quilt of disaffected weirdoes.’ A confederation of increasingly narrowly-defined grudge groups, who collectively have little in common beyond their irrational hatred of the USA in particular, and free market Capitalism, personal freedom/individual liberty and the Constitution.
The only unifying thread that binds this bizarre group of crazies is this narrow spectrum of opinion. Other than that they hate one another!

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago

It’s rapidly changing. The Biden administration has disappointed a lot of Democrats. Many Americans blame him for high inflation and high petroleum prices. He is now rapidly expanding the IRS, which has also be known to be political about who it audits.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“He is now rapidly expanding the IRS” He is returning it to the size it was under Ronald Reagan. Inflation is controlled by the FED which is run by Trump appointees. It was Trump that spent his entire 4 years in office trying to browbeat the FED into printing more money. Biden has never done that.

Last edited 3 months ago by lbrown
Warren Trees
Warren Trees
3 months ago

That is absolutely correct, which makes about half in favor of the republicans. Half of American voted for Trump, but the democrat leaders forget this inconvenient fact and alienate half the population in order to “bring us all together”.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Trump has never come remotely close to getting 50% of the vote. And especially in the 2016 election, the majority of his voters were holding their noses when they voted for him.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

If 47% of the popular vote is not remotely close to 50%, then you are absolutely correct!

Chris Shannon
Chris Shannon
3 months ago

Removing the fraudulent votes shows far fewer (partly joking). Actually, ‘Democrat’ includes a broad spectrum of ideological range. The truly insane and inflUential radial left are actually likely less than 10% The challenge is to present Republican candidates that can get enough die-hard Democrats, who vote D regardless, to vote for the other party, or a 3rd party. Once we break the back of the radical lunatics who currently hold sway over their party we can truly begin the process of restoring sanity.

Betsy Arehart
Betsy Arehart
3 months ago
Reply to  Chris Shannon

The Woke Democrats are the Chihuahua wagging the Newfoundland dog.

Southern Yankee
Southern Yankee
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Todays Democrat party has far more in common with Lee Harvey Oswald than with JFK.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago

Lee Harvey Oswald, where are you when your country needs you?

Johnathan Galt
Johnathan Galt
3 months ago

Better think that through – if Lee succeeded today, what would be the consequence????

Charles Simpson
Charles Simpson
3 months ago

We can’t even count on the modern woke Marine Corps to supply another sharpshooter to carry out a mi ssion ala Oswald.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago

Oh, I wouldn’t write off the USMC quite as readily as that.

Johnathan Galt
Johnathan Galt
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

It’s simpler than that. They are the party of bullies, abusers, and totalitarianism. They are a danger to themselves and others, and belong in padded rooms.

harold whitney
harold whitney
3 months ago
Reply to  Johnathan Galt

Remove them, to safe places, one at a time, they are not numerous…they are only loud and present AS numerous.

Geoff Williams
Geoff Williams
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“Donald Trump will be gone, but your dishonor will remain.”

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

While agreeing with your sentiments, your phrase: “majority of Americans” seems inaccurate.

suzann fulbright
suzann fulbright
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

SU contraire. Reagan sold authoritarian fascism to the American public decades ago under the guise of “supply-sided economics.” Under the exercise of his policies, we’ve deregulated and detaxed with some phone promise of “job creation” which never materialized. The GOP is becoming more authoritarian fascist by the minute, now with the abortion Gestapo abusing power over women through the blasphemous confounding of Church and State with an eye, not to saving babies with Hitler’s anti-abortion policies – and there is no coincidence that Germany overturned the last vestiges of Nazi abortion policy on the same day the American Christofascists overturned RvW! GOP can couch their authoritarian fascism under pretty euphemisms like “family” and “freedom” … freedom to oppress and ram their heretical Christofascist Cult in the name of religion down the throat of an unwilling democratic Republic. Under the GOP USA is headed for a full on Nazi fascist trainwreck. Question is when will it become to late to escape the Nazis. For everyone knows the reason communists, gays, Jews, the disabled were trapped inside Nazi Germany is that every Nazi needs a scapegoat. Freedom will live outside of What was once America!

James Stangl
James Stangl
3 months ago

You really need to get back on your medication.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“The Democrats have become utterly loathsome to the majority of Americans.” Then why do they always get the majority of the vote?

Charles Simpson
Charles Simpson
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

They cheat and rig every so called election to their corrupt ideas of what America should be:a communist, globalist, and un-Patriotic nation. They need to be outed and eliminated, just like you, Ivan.

Last edited 3 months ago by Charles Simpson
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago

I wouldn’t call her ‘Ivan’. Like the foul Cheney herself, the stinking Dems and the Stonewall rainbow gang are at the very forefront of Russophobic hate and of aggressive NATO expansionism.
Here in Blighty, it is noticeable that the houses flying Stonewall-Ukraine glass (including seemingly every C of E vicarage) are the very same ones that flew ‘We Love our NHS Heroes’ flags in 2020-21 and EU ring of stars flags in 2016-19, signifying their deluded sense of moral superiority and support for the State regime. In short, the smug, stuck-up, deracinated, low-wage product of elite overproduction, the prole- and nation-hating, useful idiot rank-and-file of the liberal Extreme Centre.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

Well, they seem to have got the majority of the ‘ballot papers’ last time round.
But that’s not quite the same thing, is it?

Chris Shannon
Chris Shannon
3 months ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Wow. Exactly. The Democrats and assorted Swamp Zombies of the Deep State are the existential threat to our Constitutional republic. If anyone doubted that our own government is the biggest threat we face as a nation, the excuses for not believing have been stripped away.

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
3 months ago

I don’t know why “free markets” need to be dragged into it. Its not as if the Democrats and their Corporate allies are champions of free markets. They use regulation to stifle competition, create BS jobs for their constituency, and control the general public.

Philip Tisdall
Philip Tisdall
3 months ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

I took it to mean one-sided trade with a dishonest China, hence the quotes.

Mike Sevilla
Mike Sevilla
3 months ago

The democratic nationalist party and their lap dogs of the gestapo fbi…
Are running under the guise of the republican party…
She’s as vile as those old hags on the View..
Watch the first thing she does.. is to be a part of cnn democratic mouth piece..
She’s a traitor to all the people of conservative values . Not just her home state…
Good riddance

John Smith
John Smith
3 months ago

Thank you! I have been saying this for years now. The old Republican guard is dead on a national scale… the Democrats now “pine” for these “respectable republicans” that they used to demonize mercilessly specifically because they know that will always beat them. I read an article the other day where some leftist columnist was asking: What happened to republicans like Bob Dole? Simple answer: They lost… badly. What is the point of having people your enemies deem “respectable” if they only treat you that way when you are no threat to them?

Trump is FAR from perfect, or even ideal… but what he has done has put FIGHT back into the republican party, instead of these “statesmen” who simply show up and get blasted by the left wing media who insult, criticize, and condescend to all republicans… and then these statesmen slink off to their millions of dollars and their lives that are unaffected by whatever policies the current establishment enacts.

Trump actually fights back on behalf of the right… and he doesn’t even have to, since he could have also simply enjoyed his millions and the social independence it afforded him… That has made him popular in a way that none of the old guard can come close to.

Noel Chiappa
Noel Chiappa
3 months ago
Reply to  John Smith

Absolutely on target. if one hangs out on conservative sites like RedState, a lot of people there understand that Trump has significant personality issues (e.g. like many politicians, he has an out-of-control ego big enough to sink the Titanic), but i) his policy positions were almost always very sound (if many of his personnel decisions weren’t – e.g. Wray), and ii) he doesn’t curl up in a ball when Democrats accuse him of being ‘mean-spirited’ or ‘racist’ – and those outweigh the personality issues.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago
Reply to  John Smith

“the Democrats now “pine” for these “respectable republicans” that they used to demonize mercilessly specifically because they know that will always beat them.” GWBush actually won two elections and is the only republican in the last 33 years to get more votes than the democrat.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe he lost the popular vote to Gore in 1999. And either way, he – or more accurately, the downright evil Duck Cheney – was a President of near-catastrophic awfulness.

michael harris
michael harris
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

If it quacks like a duck and waddles like a duck…it must be Duck (Iraq) Cheney. Peter, he was never in title president. Demotically he was known as ‘Vice’.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  michael harris

Yup, I’m well aware he was formally only the VP. But on everything that counted, Cheney always seemed to be the man in charge, ruling the roost, the loathsome guiding spirit of the 2000-08 Presidency, issuing the dumb, lightweight Bush his orders. Bush – to borrow a phrase from either Hunter Thompson or Christopher Hitchens – was nothing but a ‘dry-drunk glove-puppet’.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

I looked it up. Bush IInd did indeed get an official 537,179 votes fewer than Boston Brahmin and future green subsidy-billionnaire Al Gore: 0.51%.

michael harris
michael harris
3 months ago
Reply to  Brown Lyn

George W won his first by the thinnest of chads in Florida (Plus the best lawyers, James Baker leading). He won his second while the ‘War on Terror’ was still seen as honourable and winnable. Besides, he had very dull opponents both times.

Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
Mr Sketerzen Bhoto
3 months ago

The neoconservatives have largely jumped ship to the Democrats anyway.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago

Because the Democrats are the neocons now…

Russell Hamilton
Russell Hamilton
3 months ago

A pleasure to read.

Philip Tisdall
Philip Tisdall
3 months ago

As a main stream Republican, this is pitch perfect.

Frank Roberts
Frank Roberts
3 months ago

“…Trump’s threat to established power is less ideological than proprietary…”
That is Spot On.

Seasick sailor
Seasick sailor
3 months ago

Well and entertainingly written.

Tyler Keller
Tyler Keller
3 months ago

Asia for the Asians, Africa for the Africans, but White countries for EVERYBODY? That’s Genocide! Anti-racist is just a code word for anti-White.

Leftyseaturtle
Leftyseaturtle
3 months ago

Democrats are all in on convincing white suburban females to abandon Trump but in the process they are losing minorities in droves, especially Latinos who migrated from countries where the authoritarian left criminalized opposition and are turned off to Democrats. Liz Cheney is the embodiment of this new phenomenon. It didn’t end well for her yesterday, and November will be a comeuppance for all Democrats and their Republican turncoats in general. Trump with his unwavering and ever-expanding base will assure that result.

Mark Kennedy
Mark Kennedy
3 months ago

One small triumph for justice. Thank you, voters.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark Kennedy

It’s be a triumph for justice when she, her vile father, Pelosi and a host of Democrats besides are being held in orange PJs in Gitmo, awaiting tortu-…. er, I mean ‘enhanced interrogation’ as enemy combatants. Cheney himself approved this, after all.

Peter Scott
Peter Scott
3 months ago

Yes. As Mark Steyn pointed out six years ago, it is easier for the base (the people who vote Republican) to get a new elite than for the elite (of the old, long useless Republican Party) to acquire a new base.

Charles Simpson
Charles Simpson
3 months ago

These quickly becoming nobodies (Neo-Cons) are proving to be modern day Judas’. It makes my blood boil to realize how much I have been lied to and fooled by these backstabbing RINOs, It is getting harder and harder to stay cheerful and have a positive outlook for our country because of these Deep State traitors.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago

I look forward to their appointment to enhanced interrogation at Gitmo; fair trial at a military tribunal; and appointment with the Federal hair clippers and Old Sparky at Fort Leavenworth later in this decade.

Mark Kennedy
Mark Kennedy
3 months ago

“…outside the province of certain op-ed writers whose primary audience is each other…”

You’d think by now that the situation would be clear to everyone… and it is, except–perversely–to the strange minority that has custody of institutional media printing presses (*sigh*). So much for the power of the press! Op-ed geese abused it to such an extent that their supposed golden eggs were finally recognized as counterfeits.

Mark Kennedy
Mark Kennedy
3 months ago

Liz Cheney’s Non-Concession Speech:
https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2022/08/16/liz-cheney-concession-speech-00052319
Dear Liz.
Stop pretending it’s solely Trump who displeases you. Really, it’s every “deplorable” he represents–they’re the ones you’d deny any input into public policy formation, if you could. You’d gleefully shut them up online, too.
Please re-think your hypocritical disregard of the voters’ verdict and go away. Their repudiation of you is much less ambiguous than their supposed repudiation of Trump (why are you so strangely eager to champion the sanctity of the latter, but not the former? Never mind… I think I know, and anyway it’s already clear enough to the voters).

Dirk Lay
Dirk Lay
3 months ago

Julian is correct …. if the Soviet Union had won the Cold war and taken control of the United States …. they would have implemented many of the policies that the Democrat Bolsheviks have inflicted on us.

Last edited 3 months ago by Dirk Lay
Bob Smalser
Bob Smalser
3 months ago

Grifters gotta grift. There was a validity to Neocons during the Cold War and when we were dependent on Gulf Oil. That’s no longer the case, and these people are in bed with our next opponent, still nurturing their rice bowls.

M. M.
M. M.
3 months ago

Seth Barron wrote, “[Neoconservatives] can still make noise and wave their tattered battle flags, even threatening to mount rear-guard challenges at national conventions.”

Neoconservatism has 3 components: open borders, free trade, and military intervention.

Conservative populism has 3 components: closed borders, free trade with only other Western countries, and avoidance of military intervention.

Neoconservatism hurts ordinary Americans of European or Asian ancestry. Free trade robs them of jobs with adequate pay and working conditions. Military intervention wasted the sacrifice of their sons and grandsons in Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.

Open borders robs these Americans of the Western environment in which they spent their childhoods.

By 2040, the United States will cease being a Western nation, due to open borders. By 2040, most Americans will reject Western culture, and Hispanic culture will dominate. In California, most residents already reject Western culture, and Hispanic culture dominates.

Although neoconservatism has receded, it permanently damaged the United States. By 2040, it will cease being a Western nation.

Both the European Union and Great Britain must respond by distancing themselves from the United States. The Europeans should treat the United States in the same manner that the British treats Argentina after the Falklands War.

Get more info about this issue.

Last edited 3 months ago by Matthew M.
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  M. M.

While I agree with much of what you write, the whole of Europe – bar the MSM-demonised free states of Hungary and Poland – are at about the same place on the same track as California.

Betsy Arehart
Betsy Arehart
3 months ago
Reply to  M. M.

Is not Hispanic (Spain) a part of western culture?

J Bryant
J Bryant
3 months ago

I’d like to agree with the author but I’m not sure. Liz Cheney has just announced she’s founding a new organization to oppose Trump and what, in her view, he stands for. This might be seen as the futile last stand of the old Republican neoliberal order, as the author suggests.
But increasingly I see the establishment, both Republican and Democrat, coalescing to resist Trump and the populist movement. When it comes to Trump, there really is little to distinguish between the attitudes of the old guard Republicans and the Democrats.
Perhaps a new Republicanism has formed, dedicated to “no new wars, law and order, an end to Wokeness in public schools, and sensible pro-family policies,” as the author suggests. I’m sure many middle-of-the-road voters would agree with those policies. But the Republican party is in disarray and the message of the new Republicanism is being lost in all the noise. Surely that’s exactly the goal of the Democrats and Republicans like Cheney: distract the voters in the run up to the midterms and, ultimately, the 2024 election. I already see the msm trying to build up Biden’s achievements while relentlessly denigrating Trump.
The midterms once seemed a guaranteed victory for the Republicans. Now I’m not so sure.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  J Bryant

‘Build up Biden’s achievements…’
They’ll have a job there. Most voters – unlike the tosspots who produce the MSM – live in the real America and the real world. To the extent that that incontinent, geriatric child-molester has any ‘achievements’, they are catastrophically negative and working people can see that for themselves.

Capitalist Roader
Capitalist Roader
3 months ago

Please clap.
Sincerely,
Jeb Bush

Henry Gowin
Henry Gowin
3 months ago

Love this!

George Pellett
George Pellett
3 months ago

Loved this article, well done Seth Barron!

Marcus Tiro
Marcus Tiro
3 months ago

Excellent analysis. But “perfidy”?

Johnathan Galt
Johnathan Galt
3 months ago
Reply to  Marcus Tiro

lol – an “underserved word…”

Joe Hampton
Joe Hampton
3 months ago
Reply to  Marcus Tiro

Please use words that most Dems understand. Typical Lib hubris!

harold whitney
harold whitney
3 months ago

But WHO in the World advised her to throw away her political future to affiliate with the Devil ? Surely her father a wise, and an experienced old pol wouldn’t so advise her. Who could have seen the eventual destruction of Liz Cheney, yet still successfully guided “the third most powerful in Leadership” (after only three years on the job) to throw away her future ? Who would have advised such a move on her part ?
I am truly flummoxed by her decision to self destroy ! Who advised her to take such an absurd position on the field of play ?
I WANT A NAME !!

Last edited 3 months ago by harold whitney
Mark Kennedy
Mark Kennedy
3 months ago
Reply to  harold whitney

Even if somebody gave you one, the decision-making responsibility is hers alone.

Fanny Blancmange
Fanny Blancmange
3 months ago

This article and some of the comments are as disturbing as the bearded face-painted Jamiroquai’s terrifyingly ill-mannered acquiescence to the patriotic incitements of the heroic agents-provocateurs working to defend the deep state on 6th January last year.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
3 months ago

What?

Tony Conte
Tony Conte
3 months ago

Liz Cheney should not have joined the Democrats’ January 6th Committee to wage war on Trump, but I applaud her courage for standing up to Trump delusions. Trump’s egomania driven quest for revenge is dividing the Republican Party and jeopardizing our chance to stop the progressives from destroying this country.

Last edited 3 months ago by Tony Conte
Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
3 months ago

Cue comments from Trump bampots…..

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

If that’s all you’ve got to contribute, ya wee naff, you might as well not bother.

Brown Lyn
Brown Lyn
3 months ago

“utter and total defeat of the Bush-Cheney-Romney era of the Republican Party” If this were true both of Trump’s endorsees wouldn’t have been shown the curb in both the alaska senate and house race.

Andrew McKinney
Andrew McKinney
3 months ago

First, let’s stipulate that President Biden is in at least early dementia and that his scripted and limited appearances are choreographed by Twitter-infused Woke cultists.
In that vein, let’s recognize that the Woke/Anti-Racist/CRT/Intersectionality/Gender Fluidity programs all trace their inception to the Frankfurt School’s (Herbert Marcuse) explication of Critical Theory, a Marxist Hegelian fusion that, in some form or fashion, is distinguished by its adherents from straight-up Leninism/Maoism etc.
Finally, let’s recognize that the foregoing has a solid foothold in academia and corporate media and is gaining significant ground in publicly traded entities leveraged by a Foucauldian commitment to the ruthless extermination and suppression of dissent.
All of which, if it were to come to full fruition, would be the end of Modern Western Liberal Democracy and the advent of a new totalitarian regime.
Opposing this onslaught is Donald Trump and his adherents. What could possibly go wrong? Trump raises 250 million to contest stolen elections. The courthouses remain open and yet, not a single credible case of election perfidy has been brought with this huge war chest.
Despite this, the price of admission to the House of Trump is public affirmation that the election was stolen. Like BLM’s founding myth “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”, admission to the House of Trump is based on adopting a lie–a huge lie, a lie the Joseph Goebbels himself would struggle to sell.
And, to make things worse, anyone who refuses to take the Trump Sacrament of a The Stolen Election is a turncoat, a traitor, a RINO, a whatever.
Roughly 12% of registered Democrats sign on to Progressivism. About half of Republicans buy into the Glorious Cause/Stolen Election. Half of Republicans represents about 12% of the country.
The public square belongs to the moral and intellectual cretins on the extreme. As Trump himself would say: Sad.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
3 months ago

“the Democrats’ narrative regarding Trump’s alleged attempt to ignore the election results”
Well, he attempted to do so in over 50 court cases, and lost every time. Are you saying that the orange-faced draft-dodging Putinista’s lackies didn’t in fact mount various farcical court cases in relation to uncorroborated allegations of voting irregularities?
And here’s the Eastman memo, in which Trump’s supporters set out a 6-point plan to reverse the election result:
VP Pence, presiding over the joint session (or Senate Pro Tempore Grassley, if Pence recuses himself), begins to open and count the ballots, starting with Alabama (without conceding that the procedure, specified by the Electoral Count Act, of going through the States alphabetically is required).When he gets to Arizona, he announces that he has multiple slates of electors, and so is going to defer decision on that until finishing the other States. This would be the first break with the procedure set out in the Act.At the end, he announces that because of the ongoing disputes in the 7 States, there are no electors that can be deemed validly appointed in those States. That means the total number of “electors appointed” – the language of the 12th Amendment – is 454. This reading of the 12th Amendment has also been advanced by Harvard Law Professor Laurence Tribe. A “majority of the electors appointed” would therefore be 228. There are at this point 232 votes for Trump, 222 votes for Biden. Pence then gavels President Trump as re-elected.Howls, of course, from the Democrats, who now claim, contrary to Tribe’s prior position, that 270 is required. So Pence says, fine. Pursuant to the 12th Amendment, no candidate has achieved the necessary majority. That sends the matter to the House, where “the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote . . .” Republicans currently control 26 of the state delegations, the bare majority needed to win that vote. President Trump is re-elected there as well.One last piece. Assuming the Electoral Count Act process is followed and, upon getting the objections to the Arizona slates, the two houses break into their separate chambers, we should not allow the Electoral Count Act constraint on debate to control. That would mean that a prior legislature was determining the rules of the present one – a constitutional no-no (as Tribe has forcefully argued). So someone – Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, etc. – should demand normal rules (which includes the filibuster). That creates a stalemate that would give the state legislatures more time to weigh in to formally support the alternate slate of electors, if they had not already done so.The main thing here is that Pence should do this without asking for permission – either from a vote of the joint session or from the Court. Let the other side challenge his actions in court, where Tribe (who in 2001 conceded the President of the Senate might be in charge of counting the votes) and others who would press a lawsuit would have their past position – that these are non-justiciable political questions – thrown back at them, to get the lawsuit dismissed. The fact is that the Constitution assigns this power to the Vice President as the ultimate arbiter. We should take all of our actions with that in mind.
Full text of that memo here: https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/21066248-eastman-memo

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

The fact of the matter is that Trump wasn’t the tyrannical dictator the Democrats and their news arms made him out to be.

In combating imaginary f*scist foes, Democrats have looked too deep into the Nietszchean abyss and have become that which they claim to hate.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

Hate has no home here.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
3 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

They go away if you don’t feed them.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
3 months ago

I wish they could be made to disappear if negative below some threshold I set.

J Andrey
J Andrey
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

par·a·graph: noun, a distinct section of a piece of writing, usually dealing with a single theme and indicated by a new line, indentation, or numbering.

high steppa high steppa
high steppa high steppa
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

My! Such insults. Both impressive and repulsive. But you missed the opportunity to slip in the old chestnut “Basket of Deplorables.” You lose a point for that.