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King Charles should not meet Ngozi Fulani

Can he weather this political storm? Credit: Getty

December 5, 2022 - 9:47am

On the scaffold at the Banqueting House on 30th January 1649, Charles I is said to have expressed deep remorse for having signed the death warrant of his close ally Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford. He had done so eight years earlier, under great pressure from his enemies in Parliament, in the faint hope that it might mollify them and stabilise the deteriorating political situation. It did not work.

Now, nearly 374 years later, another King Charles has felt compelled to cut loose a courtier in the hope of blunting the assaults of his critics.

The comparison with Strafford is absurd, of course. And yet I wonder whether there might be a germ of a lesson there for our new King. It was reported on Sunday that he and Queen Camilla have invited Ngozi Fulani for “talks”. If true, this seems to reflect a certain pusillanimity on their part, a willingness to cede a good deal of moral and political ground that does not need to be ceded.

For the Fulani-Hussey kerfuffle is an entirely synthetic “scandal”, initiated and sustained by an individual with a clear ideological agenda. A brief apology for Lady Hussey’s lack of tact would have been more than sufficient. That the Palace does not seem to understand this does not bode well for their ability to weather more serious storms.

More serious storms are certainly coming. Two notable trends point to this. First, the demographic transformation. Britain will become a majority-minority country, with white Britons forming less than 50% of the population, early in William’s reign — and perhaps even in Charles’, given current levels of immigration. Second, the broad and deep cultural radicalism of the rising generations, as well as their vast ignorance of Christianity and our national history. Taken together, these will be used as a battering ram against the sustainability of a Christian hereditary monarchy, buttressed by tradition and pageantry, rooted in the Bad Old Days of whiteness and Empire.

It may be these storms are inevitably terminal, and that 1300 years of Christian monarchy are drawing to a close regardless. But not necessarily. It is not foreordained that my twilight years will be spent watching Mr George Windsor retire to private life while Buckingham Palace becomes a Museum of Colonial Infamy. The royals must find the vigour, the self-confidence and the courage to stand up for the country and its history against those who would tear down the whole edifice in the service of their sterile and resentful ideologies.

There is no certainty of salvation this way, but there is certainty of ignoble defeat if they embrace the alternative — grievance summits and apology tours, political faddism and gradual erosion of state ceremonial; death by a thousand cuts, making endless concessions in the vain hope of appeasing powerful foes. If the monarchy patently does not believe in itself or in the nation, no-one else will. Better to die standing than live on your knees.


Niall Gooch is a public sector worker and occasional writer who lives in Kent.

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Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago

Everybody needs to calm down.
Lady Hussey was rude and overbearing (touching a stranger at a social event is just not acceptable) and that needs an apology – so Charles is right to offer this. But on the other hand, Fulani was so clearly on a mission that evening. Out for whatever nugget of controversy she could get which could then be bigged up and smeared all over the brainless media to further the narrative of the racist royal family. If you go to an event looking like you covered yourself in glue before running through Oxfam, people are going to ask questions!
Fulani hasn’t done herself any favours with this. Her charity is going to have scrutinising eyes all over it like a rash. And, at the end of the day, she’s caused the humiliation an elderly lady who was hard of hearing and who messed up a smalltalk situation (haven’t we all had/got that one elderly relative who comes out with something off-colour every now and again?). That’s something which you sort out QUIETLY and on the sidelines, not by running to the media, saying (as a domesic violence activist, for Pete’s sake!!!) that you have been violated.
Can we please remember that Olena Zelenska was present at that event – whose people are dealing with real violation: rape, bombing, torture. To have this Fulani woman emoting all over the BBC about a slightly offensive encounter at a social event is proof of just how ridiculous and politically charged British media has become.
This wasn’t racism. I live abroad with a surname that no native can pronounce or place and it means that people are just interested and ask questions. Most of the time it’s pleasant and I’m glad to talk about it, but there are weird ones: one person I spoke to was absolutely ADAMANT that because my name is Eyre, which is one letter away from “Eire”, then I – or at least my ancestors – must be from Ireland. I’m not and they weren’t. But you just move on, you don’t have a nervous breakdown and cry on TV!
Another classic own goal by the #bekind mob, attempting to further their crusade for more kindness and compassion in the world by behaving like berserkers.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Hear, hear!

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

Its “here here” actually

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

It actually isn’t. Rasmus was correct.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

You’re wrong ! He was just trying to draw attention to himself 😉

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Ooooooohh !!! I can do emoji’s, what fun.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Ooooooohh !!! I can do emoji’s, what fun.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

You’re wrong ! He was just trying to draw attention to himself 😉

Graham Strugnell
Graham Strugnell
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

If you’re rude enough to ignore the argument and show your ignorance in an intended correction please keep quiet. Hear hear is correct.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

It actually isn’t. Rasmus was correct.

Graham Strugnell
Graham Strugnell
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

If you’re rude enough to ignore the argument and show your ignorance in an intended correction please keep quiet. Hear hear is correct.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

Its “here here” actually

Angelique Todesco
Angelique Todesco
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I thoroughly agree with your comment aside from the first line. Was Lady Hussey rude and overbearing though? Everyone who knows her says she is anything but, she was however being deliberately obfuscated by Fulani whilst trying to get information from her, which is her job. This would understandably have been confusing to an 83 year old who was quite obviously just trying to work out the origin of the African dress Fulani was proudly wearing (even though she is not in fact African).
The touching thing, do you never touch someone lightly on the arm when talking, I do. All she did was move her hair away from the name card so she could address her properly and politely. This is hardly unacceptable, by calling it this, we are digging ourselves a very deep hole in terms of human relations and kindness.
A photo a bit later shows Fulani with her arms around two other women, so she obviously does not have touching issues herself.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago

I don’t like being touched by people I don’t know and so I refrain from doing so in social situations like business networking mixers as there are probably a lot of people out there like me. If you know it’s controversial, stay on the safe side and don’t do it is my approach.
On the other hand, I have a very dear friend who is about 80 years old. Every now and again during conversation, he’ll pat my leg or put his hand on it. With a man any younger, or who I didn’t know – that hand would be swatted away pretty quickly and I would think the act highly inappropriate. With him, I know it’s not meant in a creepy way, so I let it go. But the point is, I know him well enough to make that judgment. At a social mixer, you don’t have that info and shouldn’t assume that “people will understand I don’t mean it that way”.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You usually write a lot of sense on this site.

Generally, your main post (beginning ‘Everybody needs to calm down’) makes many very good and important points.

But I do agree that Angelique Todescu is right to ask whether there is evidence that Lady Susan Hussey was ‘rude and overbearing’.

And I also agree that it is doubtful that that complainant really minded about ‘being touched’ (as I understand it, having her hair moved a little to read her name badge) if she had her arms around other people, as AT states.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

There can be no “evidence” about being rude. You might read the dialogue and find nothing impolite about it; I read it and think Lady Hussey’s questioning comes off as rude. Offence is a very much a subjective thing so all questions of “evidence” are irrelevant. One person’s “interested, granular questioning” is another person’s “please stop badgering me”.

Penny Adrian
Penny Adrian
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I don’t think Ngozi deserves to be seen as acting in good faith. She, like so many activists, is a narcissist who made “16 days against gender violence” all about herself. No one should be enabling this, because it encourages other narcissists to act out in destructive ways.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Penny Adrian

No I don’t think she was either and believe me – she will get her comeuppance. Isn’t being criticised all over the Unherd and other comments sections enough to make you wish you’d keep your trap shut? But nevertheless, Hussey’s conduct could be seen as rude – even by someone with no ulterior motive. Plenty of other people have remarked upon it as tactless, rude or overbearing so it is clearly a divisive issue and an apology is the best way to smooth the waters. Imagine the palace refusing an apology! God, you’d never hear the end of it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
Russell Hamilton
Russell Hamilton
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Lady Hussey was probably discombobulated by responses that were so out of the ordinary – she was being played with by someone who already thought the royals were racist. Her very long record in public life does not show any racist behaviour.

The response by the royals was terrible – they know that SH is not a racist, yet there was no loyalty to a loyal servant. They acted far too quickly. Their statement that racism was unacceptable and the person involved had stepped aside implied SH was a racist. Which implies that the Queen had been a racist – after all, SH had been the Queen’s friend and colleague for 60 years. If the Queen hadn’t been a racist she would’t have cultivated the relationship. Bad and stupid behaviour from the Palace.

Russell Hamilton
Russell Hamilton
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Lady Hussey was probably discombobulated by responses that were so out of the ordinary – she was being played with by someone who already thought the royals were racist. Her very long record in public life does not show any racist behaviour.

The response by the royals was terrible – they know that SH is not a racist, yet there was no loyalty to a loyal servant. They acted far too quickly. Their statement that racism was unacceptable and the person involved had stepped aside implied SH was a racist. Which implies that the Queen had been a racist – after all, SH had been the Queen’s friend and colleague for 60 years. If the Queen hadn’t been a racist she would’t have cultivated the relationship. Bad and stupid behaviour from the Palace.

rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Penny Adrian

Also: I cant help noticing last week her “Sistah” website specifically referred to Black Caribbean and African Ladies – but this week those words have been removed/amended.

This Charity has not – however – managed to get The Charity Commission to amend its listing nor change the published accounts that both still refer to Black Caribbean and African women. Presumably the question this charity asks potential clients is “where are you from?”

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

“Sistah Space advocate for African heritage women and girls of African and Caribbean heritage affected by abuse.”

That from the Charity Commission’s website entry for Sistah Space.

Helping people who have been affected by abuse (here I understand to mean domestic violence and the like, though the wording is extremely vague) – understandable.

But limiting the help exclusively to African and Caribbean heritage – why?

As Rob Drummond has pointed out, Sistah Space asks the girls and women ‘where are you from?’

And Sistah Space turns away women and girls in need, just because they don’t meet the ‘heritage’ (i.e. race) requirement.

In other words, it practises racial discrimination.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

No, they don’t ask. Why would they? If they’re black, the applicant’s Afro-Caribbean heritage is written all over their face, rendering further enquiry redundant.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

“Sistah Space advocate for African heritage women and girls of African and Caribbean heritage affected by abuse.”

That from the Charity Commission’s website entry for Sistah Space.

Helping people who have been affected by abuse (here I understand to mean domestic violence and the like, though the wording is extremely vague) – understandable.

But limiting the help exclusively to African and Caribbean heritage – why?

As Rob Drummond has pointed out, Sistah Space asks the girls and women ‘where are you from?’

And Sistah Space turns away women and girls in need, just because they don’t meet the ‘heritage’ (i.e. race) requirement.

In other words, it practises racial discrimination.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  rob drummond

No, they don’t ask. Why would they? If they’re black, the applicant’s Afro-Caribbean heritage is written all over their face, rendering further enquiry redundant.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Penny Adrian

No I don’t think she was either and believe me – she will get her comeuppance. Isn’t being criticised all over the Unherd and other comments sections enough to make you wish you’d keep your trap shut? But nevertheless, Hussey’s conduct could be seen as rude – even by someone with no ulterior motive. Plenty of other people have remarked upon it as tactless, rude or overbearing so it is clearly a divisive issue and an apology is the best way to smooth the waters. Imagine the palace refusing an apology! God, you’d never hear the end of it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
rob drummond
rob drummond
1 year ago
Reply to  Penny Adrian

Also: I cant help noticing last week her “Sistah” website specifically referred to Black Caribbean and African Ladies – but this week those words have been removed/amended.

This Charity has not – however – managed to get The Charity Commission to amend its listing nor change the published accounts that both still refer to Black Caribbean and African women. Presumably the question this charity asks potential clients is “where are you from?”

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I’m not sure. As someone with a British accent living in the US I am often asked where I am from. Not once have I ever taken offence. I too have an Irish surname, one which is often mispronounced by Americans. It just doesn’t bother me in the slightest.
For someone who heads a charity, her actions come across as rather uncharitable.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Do you think this is NORMAL?
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Do you think this is NORMAL?
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
Penny Adrian
Penny Adrian
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I don’t think Ngozi deserves to be seen as acting in good faith. She, like so many activists, is a narcissist who made “16 days against gender violence” all about herself. No one should be enabling this, because it encourages other narcissists to act out in destructive ways.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I’m not sure. As someone with a British accent living in the US I am often asked where I am from. Not once have I ever taken offence. I too have an Irish surname, one which is often mispronounced by Americans. It just doesn’t bother me in the slightest.
For someone who heads a charity, her actions come across as rather uncharitable.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

There can be no “evidence” about being rude. You might read the dialogue and find nothing impolite about it; I read it and think Lady Hussey’s questioning comes off as rude. Offence is a very much a subjective thing so all questions of “evidence” are irrelevant. One person’s “interested, granular questioning” is another person’s “please stop badgering me”.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

what inane and asinine rubbish

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You usually write a lot of sense on this site.

Generally, your main post (beginning ‘Everybody needs to calm down’) makes many very good and important points.

But I do agree that Angelique Todescu is right to ask whether there is evidence that Lady Susan Hussey was ‘rude and overbearing’.

And I also agree that it is doubtful that that complainant really minded about ‘being touched’ (as I understand it, having her hair moved a little to read her name badge) if she had her arms around other people, as AT states.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

what inane and asinine rubbish

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago

No, if I don’t know you, it is not acceptable to move my hair, or coat, or anything else obscuring my name badge. It is over familiar. Ask me my name.
Once a rapport has been established (usually well after names have been established) perhaps then.

Mike Cook
Mike Cook
1 year ago

Did she “move her hair away”? What proof is there of this? In view of what we have discovered about the “charity” that Marlene Headley runs (on her own it would appear) and that she has paid herself ÂŁ65k with ÂŁ150k of expenses undetailed in the accounts which have not been filed for 3 years. I think we should have some proof before amplifying this “fact”.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago

I don’t like being touched by people I don’t know and so I refrain from doing so in social situations like business networking mixers as there are probably a lot of people out there like me. If you know it’s controversial, stay on the safe side and don’t do it is my approach.
On the other hand, I have a very dear friend who is about 80 years old. Every now and again during conversation, he’ll pat my leg or put his hand on it. With a man any younger, or who I didn’t know – that hand would be swatted away pretty quickly and I would think the act highly inappropriate. With him, I know it’s not meant in a creepy way, so I let it go. But the point is, I know him well enough to make that judgment. At a social mixer, you don’t have that info and shouldn’t assume that “people will understand I don’t mean it that way”.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago

No, if I don’t know you, it is not acceptable to move my hair, or coat, or anything else obscuring my name badge. It is over familiar. Ask me my name.
Once a rapport has been established (usually well after names have been established) perhaps then.

Mike Cook
Mike Cook
1 year ago

Did she “move her hair away”? What proof is there of this? In view of what we have discovered about the “charity” that Marlene Headley runs (on her own it would appear) and that she has paid herself ÂŁ65k with ÂŁ150k of expenses undetailed in the accounts which have not been filed for 3 years. I think we should have some proof before amplifying this “fact”.

Toby B
Toby B
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

The fact that you can say “Charles is right to offer an apology” shows exactly how bonkers this has all become. Why should he apologise? As you say yourself, Fulani was on a calculated mission. She went looking for offence and, lo and behold, she found it. And you think Charles should apologise for that, whilst Lady Hussey – a dedicated and loyal servant of the Crown – is cast aside in the process? Are the consequences to Lady Hussey irrelevant to you?

Whenever someone apologises in a contrived scandal like this, the grievance-mongers demonstrate their power, achieve the humiliation they desire and are incentivised to do it all over again. They are vicious parasites masquerading as victims, ruining good people’s lives in the process. No-one should be apologising to them. They don’t deserve it. At the very least they should be ignored. And wherever possible they should be condemned and ridiculed. Otherwise this is never going to end.

Last edited 1 year ago by Toby B
Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

If you had read my comment properly, then you would have noticed that I did mention the unnecessary humiliation of Lady Hussey.
And to be honest, I thought that Lady Hussey’s behaviour seemed rude. If I give an answer to a certain question then – unless I’m in a police cell or at a witness stand in a court or something – then I expect that answer to be accepted and not be badgered.
If I’d have been the addressee of those questions, I would have felt a bit put out and think that Hussey was a bit too much like Mary Poppins for her own good but just let it go. But there again, I’m not out to cause a scandal.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

It is important to remember that the incident including Lady Hussey’s questions, verbatim, has been reported to us by Ngozi Fulani and two of her friends, so we cannot be certain that it is accurate. After 60 years service to our Queen with all her experience of social occasions, with no other evidence, anecdotal or otherwise of a lack of tact, I think I prefer to give Lady Hussey the benefit of the doubt.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Toby B
Toby B
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I did read all of your comment. It still doesn’t make sense.

Someone who has merely been the recipient of rudeness (if that’s what it was, which is debatable) doesn’t (a) decide to record the conversation in advance, (b) broadcast their experience on social media and then (c) clearly relish the ensuing days of media interviews.

Fulani set out to be as destructive as possible from the outset. A person like that does not deserve an apology. They deserve ignoring, or a rebuttal. And even if Fulani did deserve an apology, it shouldn’t come from Charles. He’s got nothing to do with it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Toby B
Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Lady Hussey apologised and resigned, which was an honourable response, that seems more than enough to me.

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Since when has it been a crime to be ‘rude’ to a race-baiting grifter?
Lady Hussey should be feted and applauded for her ‘rudeness’.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

I can assure you, that rudeness would not be tolerated for long in my house. Nor your applause.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

In that case, can I be rude to you?

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

I can assure you, that rudeness would not be tolerated for long in my house. Nor your applause.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

In that case, can I be rude to you?

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Lady Hussey apologised and resigned, which was an honourable response, that seems more than enough to me.

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Since when has it been a crime to be ‘rude’ to a race-baiting grifter?
Lady Hussey should be feted and applauded for her ‘rudeness’.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You think that is rude? Grow up…

Claire D
Claire D
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

It is important to remember that the incident including Lady Hussey’s questions, verbatim, has been reported to us by Ngozi Fulani and two of her friends, so we cannot be certain that it is accurate. After 60 years service to our Queen with all her experience of social occasions, with no other evidence, anecdotal or otherwise of a lack of tact, I think I prefer to give Lady Hussey the benefit of the doubt.

Last edited 1 year ago by Claire D
Toby B
Toby B
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I did read all of your comment. It still doesn’t make sense.

Someone who has merely been the recipient of rudeness (if that’s what it was, which is debatable) doesn’t (a) decide to record the conversation in advance, (b) broadcast their experience on social media and then (c) clearly relish the ensuing days of media interviews.

Fulani set out to be as destructive as possible from the outset. A person like that does not deserve an apology. They deserve ignoring, or a rebuttal. And even if Fulani did deserve an apology, it shouldn’t come from Charles. He’s got nothing to do with it.

Last edited 1 year ago by Toby B
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You think that is rude? Grow up…

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

“At the very least they should be ignored.”
They should never be ignored. They should be told loudly and repeatedly to stick their woke narcissism up their our souls.

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Excellent comment. Instead of receiving apologies, the race-baiting grifter should receive universal condemnation.
‘Grown up, both sides’ fence sitters on here do nothing but reveal their arrogance, complacency, and entirely misplaced sense of superiority.
“If you had read my comment properly”
The absolute lack of self-awareness of these clueless fools.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

You really like that term ‘race-baiting grifter’, don’t you? Triggered much?

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  John Sullivan

You really like that term ‘race-baiting grifter’, don’t you? Triggered much?

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

If you had read my comment properly, then you would have noticed that I did mention the unnecessary humiliation of Lady Hussey.
And to be honest, I thought that Lady Hussey’s behaviour seemed rude. If I give an answer to a certain question then – unless I’m in a police cell or at a witness stand in a court or something – then I expect that answer to be accepted and not be badgered.
If I’d have been the addressee of those questions, I would have felt a bit put out and think that Hussey was a bit too much like Mary Poppins for her own good but just let it go. But there again, I’m not out to cause a scandal.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

“At the very least they should be ignored.”
They should never be ignored. They should be told loudly and repeatedly to stick their woke narcissism up their our souls.

John Sullivan
John Sullivan
1 year ago
Reply to  Toby B

Excellent comment. Instead of receiving apologies, the race-baiting grifter should receive universal condemnation.
‘Grown up, both sides’ fence sitters on here do nothing but reveal their arrogance, complacency, and entirely misplaced sense of superiority.
“If you had read my comment properly”
The absolute lack of self-awareness of these clueless fools.

Iris C
Iris C
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Was she rude? I don’t think so! Elderly hearing in a noisy room is the only reasonable explanation for pursuing the subject…
However by involving the media with phrases like “it went on for five minutes” and “I felt violated and diminished” – both ridiculous assertions – she has, in fact, verbally abused Lady Hussey..
.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Iris C

Have you ever been out with a man, maybe at a party, and another man was slyly flirting with you? But the man you were out with had NO idea the other man was subtly flirting with you right u set his nose! Then later, when you told him “That man was being a bit flirty with me”, he said “You’re mad! I was with you the whole time! Nothing happened!” But you know it DID happen, and you know there are some things women pick up on that men are blind to. Call it women’s intuition.

Well, in this next bit, you’re the clueless man. And the black lady at Buckingham Palace is the woman. And she’s got BLACK intuition. Which YOU don’t have any of. And just because YOU didn’t pick up on what was racist about what happened doesn’t mean it wasn’t racist. Black people pick up on subtle racism a lot better than YOU do. You should TRUST us on that. What Lady Hussey said was coded in a way that completely escapes you. Decoded, it meant “To me you’re a foreigner. I don’t accept your claim to be British.”
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Iris C

Have you ever been out with a man, maybe at a party, and another man was slyly flirting with you? But the man you were out with had NO idea the other man was subtly flirting with you right u set his nose! Then later, when you told him “That man was being a bit flirty with me”, he said “You’re mad! I was with you the whole time! Nothing happened!” But you know it DID happen, and you know there are some things women pick up on that men are blind to. Call it women’s intuition.

Well, in this next bit, you’re the clueless man. And the black lady at Buckingham Palace is the woman. And she’s got BLACK intuition. Which YOU don’t have any of. And just because YOU didn’t pick up on what was racist about what happened doesn’t mean it wasn’t racist. Black people pick up on subtle racism a lot better than YOU do. You should TRUST us on that. What Lady Hussey said was coded in a way that completely escapes you. Decoded, it meant “To me you’re a foreigner. I don’t accept your claim to be British.”
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

The ghastly women should have been on her knees in gratitude even to be in the presence of Lady Hussey, let alone have Lady Hussey waste her time attempting to be friendly: I have enjoyed people asking me where I an from all my life as I have a part Italian surname, and with Irish Italian parentage, and despite being born here, am no more English than this seditious, nasty politically motivated trouble making non-entity.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Lady Hussey was rude and overbearing (touching a stranger at a social event is just not acceptable) and that needs an apology”
That certainly ‘might’ be one explanation, although one often ‘makes’ allowance for differences in etiquette ( the mortal fear, of all good Englishmen, of being grasped, by a foreign chap (read ‘French’, obviously) and being kissed on both cheeks. We might well be embarrassed, even mortified, by such displays of ‘closeness’, but we’re British, dammit (stiff upper lip and all that), especially for ‘older’ people, who might, for any number of, non obvious reasons, think and behave differently. We hardly call in the Navy to bombard Calais, do we ? We simply put it down to ‘funny ‘ foreigners, and with a faintly embarrassed smile get on with life.
Another explanation, as suggested by me elsewhere, is that Lady Hussey was doing her job, approaching individuals who might have an interesting story, and are ‘safe’, finding out their thing and then guiding Camila in their direction. Lady Hussey could hardly have gone “This is

errrrrr
.. thingy-ma-jig, I didn’t catch her name properly, from hooja-ma-flip, possibly Peckham, evidently, “I know, I know”, she’s got an African sounding name and dresses in some, vaguely random African style of dress, but it seems she’s never been near the place, claims no association whatsoever ” now could she ? Given the possible ‘hubbub’, and that Hussey is in her eighty’s, and maybe not the best of hearing, possibly with a punctiliousness and brusqueness, demanded by the time imperative and occasion, is it not unreasonable to, with a sympathetic reading of events, think that she was confirming with her eyes what she maybe thought she was hearing, and rather than shout over the din , considered the best, quickest and simplest solution was to look at the woman’s name badge, which, on this occasion, was part covered by her hair ?

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Lewis
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

If Lady Hussey was anything other than selfless, she would not lower herself into the company of such pond life and detritus of zero consequence in the first place…

Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Well said some common sense and understanding

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

If Lady Hussey was anything other than selfless, she would not lower herself into the company of such pond life and detritus of zero consequence in the first place…

Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Well said some common sense and understanding

Jonas Moze
Jonas Moze
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Fulani is the ugly side of immigration.

But although I am a Monarchist and loved the Queen – and I like Charles – I watched him all my life on TV, he has something really bothersome, he is high placed WEF. Watch again: Prince Charles speaks at World Economic Forum in Davos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jaTt7sfI1k
I guess I have heard a lot of David Icke, and his theory the global elite are 4th dimensional lizards has an element of truth, if only in analogy (but I would not be surprised if also in reality)

Andrew Wise
Andrew Wise
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

If you go to an event looking like you covered yourself in glue before running through Oxfam, people are going to ask questions!

lol – poking the hornet’s nest 🙂 you will have the professionally offended class up in arms. 🙂 🙂

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

“haven’t we all had/got that one elderly relative who comes out with something off-colour every now and again?”
Apparently my grandparents in South Africa had a dog called Nword.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

That was quite informative.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Thanks for sharing your AMUSING anecdote. And how white of you not to find that offensive in the least ‍♂

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

That was quite informative.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Thanks for sharing your AMUSING anecdote. And how white of you not to find that offensive in the least ‍♂

David C
David C
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Fabulously witty. applause.Oxfam -loved this.

Oggie Weldon
Oggie Weldon
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

What more can I add, not much, except I agree with every thing except touching the hair, it was just to be able to read her name badge.
Reading that the Fulani woman has changed her name from Mary or Marlene to an African sounding name, wearing bright colours with African ste hairstyles, why wouldn’t you ask her roots.
I noticed the day after, during interviews on TV and radio, she became more vehement in her way of telling her story adding more and more about the ‘incident’ each time.
If anything,shecshould apologise to Lady Hussey, afterall, her own charity states African and Caribbean – that in its is racist.

Julie Ellis
Julie Ellis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

So true the world has gone mad

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Julie Ellis

GONE mad??

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Julie Ellis

GONE mad??

Vuyelwa Carlin
Vuyelwa Carlin
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I agree. What infuriating absurdity. No doubt others also heard the QT panel last Thursday falling over themselves (with the partial exception of Olivia Utley) to condemn a rather tactless old lady who is behind the woke times. The most ridiculous thing is that 99% of people will agree – out loud or not – that it is a storm in a teacup. And if Fulani really thought she had been insulted, would it not have been the right thing to complain direct to the Palace, rather to take to Twitter – which she knew would cause a furore and the probably instant cancellation of Lady Hussey?Self-centred, mean-minded virtue signalling; all too common in our feverishly offence-loving times.

Dustin Needle
Dustin Needle
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

“Her charity is going to have scrutinising eyes all over it like a rash.”
Now closed due to “safety reasons”. So not for a while…

Kat L
Kat L
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Did she actually touch the lady or was it hearsay? It looked a lot like a deliberate setup from here.

ash williams
ash williams
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

It’s crazy the lengths you all go to to explain away blatant racism. What Lady Hussey did was RACIST. You defending what she did is RACIST. This entire article is nasty and RACIST. Right is right and wrong is wrong. You all simply love being ignorant and love being racist. It’s sad, but totally expected of you all.

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Hear, hear!

Angelique Todesco
Angelique Todesco
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I thoroughly agree with your comment aside from the first line. Was Lady Hussey rude and overbearing though? Everyone who knows her says she is anything but, she was however being deliberately obfuscated by Fulani whilst trying to get information from her, which is her job. This would understandably have been confusing to an 83 year old who was quite obviously just trying to work out the origin of the African dress Fulani was proudly wearing (even though she is not in fact African).
The touching thing, do you never touch someone lightly on the arm when talking, I do. All she did was move her hair away from the name card so she could address her properly and politely. This is hardly unacceptable, by calling it this, we are digging ourselves a very deep hole in terms of human relations and kindness.
A photo a bit later shows Fulani with her arms around two other women, so she obviously does not have touching issues herself.

Toby B
Toby B
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

The fact that you can say “Charles is right to offer an apology” shows exactly how bonkers this has all become. Why should he apologise? As you say yourself, Fulani was on a calculated mission. She went looking for offence and, lo and behold, she found it. And you think Charles should apologise for that, whilst Lady Hussey – a dedicated and loyal servant of the Crown – is cast aside in the process? Are the consequences to Lady Hussey irrelevant to you?

Whenever someone apologises in a contrived scandal like this, the grievance-mongers demonstrate their power, achieve the humiliation they desire and are incentivised to do it all over again. They are vicious parasites masquerading as victims, ruining good people’s lives in the process. No-one should be apologising to them. They don’t deserve it. At the very least they should be ignored. And wherever possible they should be condemned and ridiculed. Otherwise this is never going to end.

Last edited 1 year ago by Toby B
Iris C
Iris C
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Was she rude? I don’t think so! Elderly hearing in a noisy room is the only reasonable explanation for pursuing the subject…
However by involving the media with phrases like “it went on for five minutes” and “I felt violated and diminished” – both ridiculous assertions – she has, in fact, verbally abused Lady Hussey..
.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

The ghastly women should have been on her knees in gratitude even to be in the presence of Lady Hussey, let alone have Lady Hussey waste her time attempting to be friendly: I have enjoyed people asking me where I an from all my life as I have a part Italian surname, and with Irish Italian parentage, and despite being born here, am no more English than this seditious, nasty politically motivated trouble making non-entity.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Lady Hussey was rude and overbearing (touching a stranger at a social event is just not acceptable) and that needs an apology”
That certainly ‘might’ be one explanation, although one often ‘makes’ allowance for differences in etiquette ( the mortal fear, of all good Englishmen, of being grasped, by a foreign chap (read ‘French’, obviously) and being kissed on both cheeks. We might well be embarrassed, even mortified, by such displays of ‘closeness’, but we’re British, dammit (stiff upper lip and all that), especially for ‘older’ people, who might, for any number of, non obvious reasons, think and behave differently. We hardly call in the Navy to bombard Calais, do we ? We simply put it down to ‘funny ‘ foreigners, and with a faintly embarrassed smile get on with life.
Another explanation, as suggested by me elsewhere, is that Lady Hussey was doing her job, approaching individuals who might have an interesting story, and are ‘safe’, finding out their thing and then guiding Camila in their direction. Lady Hussey could hardly have gone “This is

errrrrr
.. thingy-ma-jig, I didn’t catch her name properly, from hooja-ma-flip, possibly Peckham, evidently, “I know, I know”, she’s got an African sounding name and dresses in some, vaguely random African style of dress, but it seems she’s never been near the place, claims no association whatsoever ” now could she ? Given the possible ‘hubbub’, and that Hussey is in her eighty’s, and maybe not the best of hearing, possibly with a punctiliousness and brusqueness, demanded by the time imperative and occasion, is it not unreasonable to, with a sympathetic reading of events, think that she was confirming with her eyes what she maybe thought she was hearing, and rather than shout over the din , considered the best, quickest and simplest solution was to look at the woman’s name badge, which, on this occasion, was part covered by her hair ?

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Lewis
Jonas Moze
Jonas Moze
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Fulani is the ugly side of immigration.

But although I am a Monarchist and loved the Queen – and I like Charles – I watched him all my life on TV, he has something really bothersome, he is high placed WEF. Watch again: Prince Charles speaks at World Economic Forum in Davos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jaTt7sfI1k
I guess I have heard a lot of David Icke, and his theory the global elite are 4th dimensional lizards has an element of truth, if only in analogy (but I would not be surprised if also in reality)

Andrew Wise
Andrew Wise
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

If you go to an event looking like you covered yourself in glue before running through Oxfam, people are going to ask questions!

lol – poking the hornet’s nest 🙂 you will have the professionally offended class up in arms. 🙂 🙂

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

“haven’t we all had/got that one elderly relative who comes out with something off-colour every now and again?”
Apparently my grandparents in South Africa had a dog called Nword.

David C
David C
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Fabulously witty. applause.Oxfam -loved this.

Oggie Weldon
Oggie Weldon
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

What more can I add, not much, except I agree with every thing except touching the hair, it was just to be able to read her name badge.
Reading that the Fulani woman has changed her name from Mary or Marlene to an African sounding name, wearing bright colours with African ste hairstyles, why wouldn’t you ask her roots.
I noticed the day after, during interviews on TV and radio, she became more vehement in her way of telling her story adding more and more about the ‘incident’ each time.
If anything,shecshould apologise to Lady Hussey, afterall, her own charity states African and Caribbean – that in its is racist.

Julie Ellis
Julie Ellis
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

So true the world has gone mad

Vuyelwa Carlin
Vuyelwa Carlin
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I agree. What infuriating absurdity. No doubt others also heard the QT panel last Thursday falling over themselves (with the partial exception of Olivia Utley) to condemn a rather tactless old lady who is behind the woke times. The most ridiculous thing is that 99% of people will agree – out loud or not – that it is a storm in a teacup. And if Fulani really thought she had been insulted, would it not have been the right thing to complain direct to the Palace, rather to take to Twitter – which she knew would cause a furore and the probably instant cancellation of Lady Hussey?Self-centred, mean-minded virtue signalling; all too common in our feverishly offence-loving times.

Dustin Needle
Dustin Needle
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

“Her charity is going to have scrutinising eyes all over it like a rash.”
Now closed due to “safety reasons”. So not for a while…

Kat L
Kat L
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Did she actually touch the lady or was it hearsay? It looked a lot like a deliberate setup from here.

ash williams
ash williams
1 year ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

It’s crazy the lengths you all go to to explain away blatant racism. What Lady Hussey did was RACIST. You defending what she did is RACIST. This entire article is nasty and RACIST. Right is right and wrong is wrong. You all simply love being ignorant and love being racist. It’s sad, but totally expected of you all.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
1 year ago

Everybody needs to calm down.
Lady Hussey was rude and overbearing (touching a stranger at a social event is just not acceptable) and that needs an apology – so Charles is right to offer this. But on the other hand, Fulani was so clearly on a mission that evening. Out for whatever nugget of controversy she could get which could then be bigged up and smeared all over the brainless media to further the narrative of the racist royal family. If you go to an event looking like you covered yourself in glue before running through Oxfam, people are going to ask questions!
Fulani hasn’t done herself any favours with this. Her charity is going to have scrutinising eyes all over it like a rash. And, at the end of the day, she’s caused the humiliation an elderly lady who was hard of hearing and who messed up a smalltalk situation (haven’t we all had/got that one elderly relative who comes out with something off-colour every now and again?). That’s something which you sort out QUIETLY and on the sidelines, not by running to the media, saying (as a domesic violence activist, for Pete’s sake!!!) that you have been violated.
Can we please remember that Olena Zelenska was present at that event – whose people are dealing with real violation: rape, bombing, torture. To have this Fulani woman emoting all over the BBC about a slightly offensive encounter at a social event is proof of just how ridiculous and politically charged British media has become.
This wasn’t racism. I live abroad with a surname that no native can pronounce or place and it means that people are just interested and ask questions. Most of the time it’s pleasant and I’m glad to talk about it, but there are weird ones: one person I spoke to was absolutely ADAMANT that because my name is Eyre, which is one letter away from “Eire”, then I – or at least my ancestors – must be from Ireland. I’m not and they weren’t. But you just move on, you don’t have a nervous breakdown and cry on TV!
Another classic own goal by the #bekind mob, attempting to further their crusade for more kindness and compassion in the world by behaving like berserkers.

Last edited 1 year ago by Katharine Eyre
Rick Sareen
Rick Sareen
1 year ago

Ngozi Fulani was born Marlene Headley to parents Meredith and Gladstone. Her sister is called Sharon.
She was brought up in Kilburn not Hackney.
She runs a one person charity and paid herself ÂŁ65k with ÂŁ150k of expenses undetailed in the accounts which have not been filed for 3 years.
She is “from” Barbados but dresses in full African clothing with an adopted Nigerian name.
You can see why she doesn’t want to answer the question where she is from because to do so would expose her hypocrisy and cultural appropriation.

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

That could explain quite a lot. Makes one agree ever more with the headline.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

So she is basically a fraud. The King should certainly be advised to keep away from her and it sounds as if the Charity Commission should investigate her “Charity” that seems additionally to be race discriminatory. Of course they probably won’t for fear of the cry of racism.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Charles will feel quite at home with charitable frauds – perhaps she should bring a paper bag of cash with her when she meets him………..

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Charles will feel quite at home with charitable frauds – perhaps she should bring a paper bag of cash with her when she meets him………..

Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

At last! The perfect concluding evidence! Well understood, well researched and well said.
Bravo, Rick! Excellent.

Stu W
Stu W
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

Intriguing…

Last edited 1 year ago by Stu W
Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

I do hope King Charles’s advisor’s take all this into consideration before he gives an apology which is totally unnecessary

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

But she IS British, right? So when she says she is, no further questioning is required. RIGHT? BUT

SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

That could explain quite a lot. Makes one agree ever more with the headline.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

So she is basically a fraud. The King should certainly be advised to keep away from her and it sounds as if the Charity Commission should investigate her “Charity” that seems additionally to be race discriminatory. Of course they probably won’t for fear of the cry of racism.

Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

At last! The perfect concluding evidence! Well understood, well researched and well said.
Bravo, Rick! Excellent.

Stu W
Stu W
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

Intriguing…

Last edited 1 year ago by Stu W
Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

I do hope King Charles’s advisor’s take all this into consideration before he gives an apology which is totally unnecessary

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

But she IS British, right? So when she says she is, no further questioning is required. RIGHT? BUT

SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Last edited 1 year ago by ron c
Rick Sareen
Rick Sareen
1 year ago

Ngozi Fulani was born Marlene Headley to parents Meredith and Gladstone. Her sister is called Sharon.
She was brought up in Kilburn not Hackney.
She runs a one person charity and paid herself ÂŁ65k with ÂŁ150k of expenses undetailed in the accounts which have not been filed for 3 years.
She is “from” Barbados but dresses in full African clothing with an adopted Nigerian name.
You can see why she doesn’t want to answer the question where she is from because to do so would expose her hypocrisy and cultural appropriation.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago

The whole affair is a striking, and prescient, example of who now holds power in modern day Britain. Even the King bows down in supplication, and grovels, at the feet of the new rulers.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Lewis
Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Indeed but it should not be so. It is striking that those of mixed race tend to identify as black. The King should certainly not meet with this ultra race conscious individual. It is nothing to do with him if a courtier shows an interest in the background of a woman who was clearly keen to emphasise her African roots by her appearance. Her only fault was not to have backed off when it became clear the woman was likely to make an issue of her curiosity. She was perhaps used to some deference from those less close to the Crown than she was and had failed to register the potential minefield she was venturing into. For that reason it was perhaps time for her to retire. We don’t know if that was the conclusion she reached herself or whether she was encouraged to reach that conclusion.

Morgan Watkins
Morgan Watkins
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

There is an excruciatingly complex power grab happening
 our ancestors would be horrified. We should stop playing by their rules.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Morgan Watkins

Do explain. What rules?

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Morgan Watkins

Goodness me, Morgan. You win the ‘Drama Queen of the Day’ award!

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Morgan Watkins

Do explain. What rules?

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Morgan Watkins

Goodness me, Morgan. You win the ‘Drama Queen of the Day’ award!

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Do you actually believe that nonsense? Don’t be silly.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Indeed but it should not be so. It is striking that those of mixed race tend to identify as black. The King should certainly not meet with this ultra race conscious individual. It is nothing to do with him if a courtier shows an interest in the background of a woman who was clearly keen to emphasise her African roots by her appearance. Her only fault was not to have backed off when it became clear the woman was likely to make an issue of her curiosity. She was perhaps used to some deference from those less close to the Crown than she was and had failed to register the potential minefield she was venturing into. For that reason it was perhaps time for her to retire. We don’t know if that was the conclusion she reached herself or whether she was encouraged to reach that conclusion.

Morgan Watkins
Morgan Watkins
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

There is an excruciatingly complex power grab happening
 our ancestors would be horrified. We should stop playing by their rules.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Lewis

Do you actually believe that nonsense? Don’t be silly.

Tom Lewis
Tom Lewis
1 year ago

The whole affair is a striking, and prescient, example of who now holds power in modern day Britain. Even the King bows down in supplication, and grovels, at the feet of the new rulers.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Lewis
Mike F
Mike F
1 year ago

As Charles Moore put it in the Telegraph, if I turned up in a kilt with a name-tag saying “Hamish McTavish”, I shouldn’t be surprised (or feel “violated”) if someone asked me what part of Scotland I was from, or to which Clan I belonged.
Nobody should be apologising to this woman.

Mike F
Mike F
1 year ago

As Charles Moore put it in the Telegraph, if I turned up in a kilt with a name-tag saying “Hamish McTavish”, I shouldn’t be surprised (or feel “violated”) if someone asked me what part of Scotland I was from, or to which Clan I belonged.
Nobody should be apologising to this woman.

Tony Sandy
Tony Sandy
1 year ago

Identify as British? That is a laugh, then why change your name to Ngozi Fulani from Marlene Headley and dressing in African clothes, plus wearing dreadlocks (pretentious). My brother was christened Terence Brian but was known by his nickname of Jim and later in life changed his first name to Smiley (he’s now back to being called Terry). A friend changed her surname from White to Gentle because of numerology, thinking it would change her fortunes (it didn’t). I have been known by my birth name all my life and it has left me unharmed as far as I can tell.
If someone asked me where I come from I’d say Norfolk and name my town. Did Lady Hussey ask other people there, where they came from, no matter what their colour? There was nothing in Lady Hussey’s questioning that was overtly racist. Also why didn’t she just answer and say her parents were from the Caribbean straight away?
Her reactions sounded defensive as though she had an inferiority complex about her origins. At least that is what I thought first of all. Her putting the exchange on Twitter seemed more like seeking kudos or a cuckoo in the nest trying to kick out rivals for attention (apparently she is a pal of Meghan Markle and is obviously seeking to impress her or why publicise the encounter?).
Never complain, never explain is obviously not her motto. Real prejudice is the killing of black youths by black youths as in a news item a few years ago, where a senior detective pointed out that knife fatalities in London the previous year was one white person and twenty eight coloured men, in gang warfare by black on black youths mostly. My wife was asked, when she went to school in Inverness, whether she used knives and forks where she came from? This was the Western Isles and she was white.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Sandy
Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Glad you mentioned an inferiority complex, add paranoia and an over emotional reaction to a perfectly innocent conversation and the truth is out. Fulani is a drama queen, she could be green with yellow spots and come from a remote constellation in the galaxy, she is still emotionally unbalanced.
Load of fuss over nothing.

Tony Sandy
Tony Sandy
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

As for those trying to make out that not being able to pronounce someone’s name means you are racist as a female Nigerian poet claimed on BBC Two in a program on poetry recitation recently, that too is nonsense. Thandie Newton wants people to remember her Zulu name for instance. Fine is it is written down but if you don’t know the rhythm of the language, pronouncing it is problematic. Even though Thandie is not based on English, it follows the spelling rules of English which makes it easy to say it. Her Zulu name is a sentence just as American Indian’s names are. Perhaps she should use the English version of her name’s meaning or just change her name to ‘comfort’ as I shorten my name from Anthony to Tony.
Cholmondeley for instance threw me for years because it is Norman French, not Anglo-Saxon and it took me years to connect the pronunciation of the name with Chumleigh its equivalent. I find Gaelic names or French spelling equally perplexing for the same reason but have no problem with Chinese or Indian unless they are written in Hindi, Urdu or Chinese characters. Spell names how you like but remember every language has its own pronunciation and spelling rules (this is linguistics in other words, not race), which throw every foreign speaker who is not aware of these rules. Monty Python had a sketch called ‘It’s The Arts,’ which lambasted all this ego stuff years ago, taking the mickey out of German etc. long-winded names and in this case ‘Johann Gambolputty etc. etc etc.’
Coloured people do well as athletes nowadays, making up about three quarters of their number in America. Sports people used to be white but does that mean to balance things out, someone like me should be included even though I can’t run, just because I am white? Positive discrimination can lead to the danger of resentment from the imbalance and a backlash because of it. Tokenism doesn’t really work because of this psychological factor. What we need are people who can do the job, not be picked for appearance but ability. For instance I would rather have Michelle Obama as president, not Donald Trump because I would want someone sensible with their finger on the destruct button. Again would you want a surgeon operating on you whose colour you approved of as opposed to someone who knew what they were doing despite their race?

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

You lost me at “coloured people”. I knew what was coming after that


Kat L
Kat L
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Michelle Obama sensible?? She’s been a grievance broker from the get go; and still complaining in Martha’s Vineyard


ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

You lost me at “coloured people”. I knew what was coming after that


Kat L
Kat L
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Michelle Obama sensible?? She’s been a grievance broker from the get go; and still complaining in Martha’s Vineyard


Rick Sareen
Rick Sareen
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

She couldn’t say she was from the Caribbean because she was presenting as an African and she would have outed her own cultural appropriation/hypocrisy.
As to the touching hair bit, Lady H was moving her hair to see her name badge.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

It wasn’t even her own hair. It was a bleedin’ syrup!

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

She can’t say she is from where your ancestors worked the hell out her peoples.she don’t want to be identified as a former slave from a slave colony.did that make any sense to you?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

So the narcissistic racist moron changes her name to that of a tribe of slave traders. You wokies really do take the biscuit.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

So the narcissistic racist moron changes her name to that of a tribe of slave traders. You wokies really do take the biscuit.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

You have 600 years worth of global history to bone up on. That’s quite an ambitious study programme, but then – you have left it rather late in the day….

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  blacklimelight

The whitesplaining going on here is hilarious! Think they’ve got it sussed, but they’re completely clueless.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  blacklimelight

The whitesplaining going on here is hilarious! Think they’ve got it sussed, but they’re completely clueless.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

You think it’s ‘hypocrisy’ for a descendant of Africa to wear African clothing? Tell you what, no matter what I change my name to, or what I’m wearing, if I answer I’m British, accept it and move on. Any questions?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

It wasn’t even her own hair. It was a bleedin’ syrup!

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

She can’t say she is from where your ancestors worked the hell out her peoples.she don’t want to be identified as a former slave from a slave colony.did that make any sense to you?

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

You have 600 years worth of global history to bone up on. That’s quite an ambitious study programme, but then – you have left it rather late in the day….

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Rick Sareen

You think it’s ‘hypocrisy’ for a descendant of Africa to wear African clothing? Tell you what, no matter what I change my name to, or what I’m wearing, if I answer I’m British, accept it and move on. Any questions?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

For several years I had a lodger from Estonia with whom I enjoyed a ribald relationship based on mutual urine extraction, which sometimes involved questioning her about her tail.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Sounds more like a Rigby/Rising Damp power dynamic actually.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Sounds more like a Rigby/Rising Damp power dynamic actually.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Dreadlocks would indeed be deemed ‘pretentious’,were you or I to sport them. There seems to be some confusion over their cultural and/or religious significance, but fear not – I can recommend a reading and listening list which may clarify things for you….

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Haven’t you heard? We are not coloured. It’s the 21st Century. Only ignorant people still use that terminology.

Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Glad you mentioned an inferiority complex, add paranoia and an over emotional reaction to a perfectly innocent conversation and the truth is out. Fulani is a drama queen, she could be green with yellow spots and come from a remote constellation in the galaxy, she is still emotionally unbalanced.
Load of fuss over nothing.

Tony Sandy
Tony Sandy
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

As for those trying to make out that not being able to pronounce someone’s name means you are racist as a female Nigerian poet claimed on BBC Two in a program on poetry recitation recently, that too is nonsense. Thandie Newton wants people to remember her Zulu name for instance. Fine is it is written down but if you don’t know the rhythm of the language, pronouncing it is problematic. Even though Thandie is not based on English, it follows the spelling rules of English which makes it easy to say it. Her Zulu name is a sentence just as American Indian’s names are. Perhaps she should use the English version of her name’s meaning or just change her name to ‘comfort’ as I shorten my name from Anthony to Tony.
Cholmondeley for instance threw me for years because it is Norman French, not Anglo-Saxon and it took me years to connect the pronunciation of the name with Chumleigh its equivalent. I find Gaelic names or French spelling equally perplexing for the same reason but have no problem with Chinese or Indian unless they are written in Hindi, Urdu or Chinese characters. Spell names how you like but remember every language has its own pronunciation and spelling rules (this is linguistics in other words, not race), which throw every foreign speaker who is not aware of these rules. Monty Python had a sketch called ‘It’s The Arts,’ which lambasted all this ego stuff years ago, taking the mickey out of German etc. long-winded names and in this case ‘Johann Gambolputty etc. etc etc.’
Coloured people do well as athletes nowadays, making up about three quarters of their number in America. Sports people used to be white but does that mean to balance things out, someone like me should be included even though I can’t run, just because I am white? Positive discrimination can lead to the danger of resentment from the imbalance and a backlash because of it. Tokenism doesn’t really work because of this psychological factor. What we need are people who can do the job, not be picked for appearance but ability. For instance I would rather have Michelle Obama as president, not Donald Trump because I would want someone sensible with their finger on the destruct button. Again would you want a surgeon operating on you whose colour you approved of as opposed to someone who knew what they were doing despite their race?

Rick Sareen
Rick Sareen
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

She couldn’t say she was from the Caribbean because she was presenting as an African and she would have outed her own cultural appropriation/hypocrisy.
As to the touching hair bit, Lady H was moving her hair to see her name badge.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

For several years I had a lodger from Estonia with whom I enjoyed a ribald relationship based on mutual urine extraction, which sometimes involved questioning her about her tail.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Dreadlocks would indeed be deemed ‘pretentious’,were you or I to sport them. There seems to be some confusion over their cultural and/or religious significance, but fear not – I can recommend a reading and listening list which may clarify things for you….

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Tony Sandy

Haven’t you heard? We are not coloured. It’s the 21st Century. Only ignorant people still use that terminology.

Tony Sandy
Tony Sandy
1 year ago

Identify as British? That is a laugh, then why change your name to Ngozi Fulani from Marlene Headley and dressing in African clothes, plus wearing dreadlocks (pretentious). My brother was christened Terence Brian but was known by his nickname of Jim and later in life changed his first name to Smiley (he’s now back to being called Terry). A friend changed her surname from White to Gentle because of numerology, thinking it would change her fortunes (it didn’t). I have been known by my birth name all my life and it has left me unharmed as far as I can tell.
If someone asked me where I come from I’d say Norfolk and name my town. Did Lady Hussey ask other people there, where they came from, no matter what their colour? There was nothing in Lady Hussey’s questioning that was overtly racist. Also why didn’t she just answer and say her parents were from the Caribbean straight away?
Her reactions sounded defensive as though she had an inferiority complex about her origins. At least that is what I thought first of all. Her putting the exchange on Twitter seemed more like seeking kudos or a cuckoo in the nest trying to kick out rivals for attention (apparently she is a pal of Meghan Markle and is obviously seeking to impress her or why publicise the encounter?).
Never complain, never explain is obviously not her motto. Real prejudice is the killing of black youths by black youths as in a news item a few years ago, where a senior detective pointed out that knife fatalities in London the previous year was one white person and twenty eight coloured men, in gang warfare by black on black youths mostly. My wife was asked, when she went to school in Inverness, whether she used knives and forks where she came from? This was the Western Isles and she was white.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tony Sandy
Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Never complain, never explain and never ever apologise.

Murray Morison
Murray Morison
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Now, who was it said that first?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Always complain, never explain, and never ever apologise to the woke scum.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Oh dear. Perhaps you’ve confused yourself with that popular rallying cry from your boisterous youth – ‘No Surrender To The IRA (Scum)’?

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Oh dear. Perhaps you’ve confused yourself with that popular rallying cry from your boisterous youth – ‘No Surrender To The IRA (Scum)’?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Always complain, never explain, and never ever apologise to the woke.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

But you’re on here explaining
 duh.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

But you’re on here explaining
 duh.

Murray Morison
Murray Morison
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Now, who was it said that first?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Always complain, never explain, and never ever apologise to the woke scum.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Always complain, never explain, and never ever apologise to the woke.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Never complain, never explain and never ever apologise.

William Cameron
William Cameron
1 year ago

The New Puritans – Clinging to their Critical Race Theory cannot be accommodated. There are no terms they they will ever accept.
They require the whole country to give them all the money and total power over us all. Nothing less would satisfy them.
So there are two choices- agree and give in – or tell them to get stuffed. I recommend the latter they are bullying hollow people.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

Absolutely right.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Absolutely laughable. Discarded broom sweepings from the Paranoid Ward.

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Absolutely laughable. Discarded broom sweepings from the Paranoid Ward.

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago

Tell the prime minister that mate.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

What point are you trying to make now, you woke moron?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

What point are you trying to make now, you woke moron?

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago

Here we go again. Explain your statement with actual references to Critical Race Theory.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago

You know he can’t!

ron c
ron c
1 year ago

You know he can’t!

ron c
ron c
1 year ago

You’re SUCH a Drama Queen


Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

Absolutely right.

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago

Tell the prime minister that mate.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago

Here we go again. Explain your statement with actual references to Critical Race Theory.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago

You’re SUCH a Drama Queen


William Cameron
William Cameron
1 year ago

The New Puritans – Clinging to their Critical Race Theory cannot be accommodated. There are no terms they they will ever accept.
They require the whole country to give them all the money and total power over us all. Nothing less would satisfy them.
So there are two choices- agree and give in – or tell them to get stuffed. I recommend the latter they are bullying hollow people.

Veronica Lowe
Veronica Lowe
1 year ago

Fulani lied immediately she said she did not know where she ‘came from’. Part of Lady Susan’s lifetime job has been to know details of people invitied to meet royals to ease conversation. She should not be required to step down.

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago
Reply to  Veronica Lowe

Well she is gone gone gone

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Veronica Lowe

I suspect that Ngozi can trace her heritage back rather further than a single generation. The question is infinitely nuanced, and the potential answermultiple choice, to anyone from the Black diaspora. Does this really need explaining, in 2022?

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago
Reply to  Veronica Lowe

Well she is gone gone gone

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago
Reply to  Veronica Lowe

I suspect that Ngozi can trace her heritage back rather further than a single generation. The question is infinitely nuanced, and the potential answermultiple choice, to anyone from the Black diaspora. Does this really need explaining, in 2022?

Veronica Lowe
Veronica Lowe
1 year ago

Fulani lied immediately she said she did not know where she ‘came from’. Part of Lady Susan’s lifetime job has been to know details of people invitied to meet royals to ease conversation. She should not be required to step down.

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
1 year ago

Apparently, Fulani’s charity has been fined by the Charity Commission for failing to submit its accounts on time and is now under investigation for unexplained expenses. I think Ms Fulani nee Headley is going to regret kicking this hornets nest.
Of course Charles and/or Camilla shouldn’t meet this ghastly woman.

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago

Always under investigation to tarnish images of good humans.wheres your charity?

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago

Would you direct the same simpering disdain at, say Michelle Mone? If not, why not?

muhammed manneh
muhammed manneh
1 year ago

Always under investigation to tarnish images of good humans.wheres your charity?

blacklimelight
blacklimelight
1 year ago

Would you direct the same simpering disdain at, say Michelle Mone? If not, why not?

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
1 year ago

Apparently, Fulani’s charity has been fined by the Charity Commission for failing to submit its accounts on time and is now under investigation for unexplained expenses. I think Ms Fulani nee Headley is going to regret kicking this hornets nest.
Of course Charles and/or Camilla shouldn’t meet this ghastly woman.

Jonathan Nash
Jonathan Nash
1 year ago

What revolts me is that when these race grifters appear on TV making these obviously absurd, exaggerated, bad faith claims, the interviewer never challenges them. Apart from anything else it would make excellent TV to watch the explosion which would follow a simple: “That’s utter nonsense, isn’t it?”.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonathan Nash

Love when white men think they’re experts on racism and its impact. You still haven’t clocked the Black and White Minstrel Show was racist, and it’s been 40 years


ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Jonathan Nash

Love when white men think they’re experts on racism and its impact. You still haven’t clocked the Black and White Minstrel Show was racist, and it’s been 40 years


Jonathan Nash
Jonathan Nash
1 year ago

What revolts me is that when these race grifters appear on TV making these obviously absurd, exaggerated, bad faith claims, the interviewer never challenges them. Apart from anything else it would make excellent TV to watch the explosion which would follow a simple: “That’s utter nonsense, isn’t it?”.

Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago

This diva drama has turned into a complete farce. Basic common sense is all that’s required to understand that Lady Hussey was not being rude or racist. To have ones hair gently moved slightly to read a name tag is not an invasion of privacy, deliberate racial malice or intimidating in any way. Fulani clearly over reacted. I would label her description of ‘trauma’ as paranoia. For goodness sake, Lady Hussey is not a racist.
Why give a second thought to an emotionally unbalanced, paranoid reaction to a series of innocent questions that are standard small talk? It’s absurd. No apology or explanation necessary. There are far more serious issues to be concerned about.
The Queen once remarked that Charles is useless. Her words, not mine.

Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Mary Thomas

I’ll ask a simple question. Would you walk up to someone you don’t know at a conference and move their hair/coat/whatever to look at their name badge?
No? Fancy that. If you would, you clearly don’t go to conferences or have any sense of social graces.
And that was the first move.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Mary Thomas

Your clueless. It’s coded. You don’t know the code. Let me help you. It means “To me you’re a foreigner, I don’t accept that you’re British.
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Nicholas E. Gilkes
Nicholas E. Gilkes
1 year ago
Reply to  Mary Thomas

I’ll ask a simple question. Would you walk up to someone you don’t know at a conference and move their hair/coat/whatever to look at their name badge?
No? Fancy that. If you would, you clearly don’t go to conferences or have any sense of social graces.
And that was the first move.

ron c
ron c
1 year ago
Reply to  Mary Thomas

Your clueless. It’s coded. You don’t know the code. Let me help you. It means “To me you’re a foreigner, I don’t accept that you’re British.
SH: Where are you from?
Me: Here, the UK.
SH: No, but what nationality are you?
Me: I am born here and am British.
SH: No, but where do you really come from


Mary Thomas
Mary Thomas
1 year ago

This diva drama has turned into a complete farce. Basic common sense is all that’s required to understand that Lady Hussey was not being rude or racist. To have ones hair gently moved slightly to read a name tag is not an invasion of privacy, deliberate racial malice or intimidating in any way. Fulani clearly over reacted. I would label her description of ‘trauma’ as paranoia. For goodness sake, Lady Hussey is not a racist.
Why give a second thought to an emotionally unbalanced, paranoid reaction to a series of innocent questions that are standard small talk? It’s absurd. No apology or explanation necessary. There are far more serious issues to be concerned about.
The Queen once remarked that Charles is useless. Her words, not mine.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

He should meet her, and give her a bloody good talking to about things like basic manners, not being racist against white people, and not bullying old ladies.
But he won’t.

Murray Morison
Murray Morison
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Kind of you to share, Richard
“English poets borrowed the sonnet form from the Italian poet Francesco Petrarch. Traditionally, it has fourteen lines of iambic pentameter linked by an intricate rhyme scheme. Iambic pentameter refers to its rhythm; basically, each line of the poem has ten syllables, and every other syllable is stressed.”
If you look at little more carefully – you will see that this poem exactly fits the description. It is 14 lines, with a title (At A Party, at a palace). The rhyme scheme for the 3 sets of 4 lines is intricate (ie different for each quatrain) and ends just as it should with a simple rhyming couplet. I split the lines (this is allowed) but the way UnHerd reformats loses that subtlety. Each line has 10 syllables. It ends with my name (fair enough?) (This allows the poem to make sense.) And the detail about my father and his (and his) is true. All born in India. Go figure!

Last edited 1 year ago by Murray Morison
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

just get her to do the washing up…

Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I totally agree it’s about time that someone did .

Murray Morison
Murray Morison
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

Kind of you to share, Richard
“English poets borrowed the sonnet form from the Italian poet Francesco Petrarch. Traditionally, it has fourteen lines of iambic pentameter linked by an intricate rhyme scheme. Iambic pentameter refers to its rhythm; basically, each line of the poem has ten syllables, and every other syllable is stressed.”
If you look at little more carefully – you will see that this poem exactly fits the description. It is 14 lines, with a title (At A Party, at a palace). The rhyme scheme for the 3 sets of 4 lines is intricate (ie different for each quatrain) and ends just as it should with a simple rhyming couplet. I split the lines (this is allowed) but the way UnHerd reformats loses that subtlety. Each line has 10 syllables. It ends with my name (fair enough?) (This allows the poem to make sense.) And the detail about my father and his (and his) is true. All born in India. Go figure!

Last edited 1 year ago by Murray Morison
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

just get her to do the washing up…

Isabella Steedman
Isabella Steedman
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Craven

I totally agree it’s about time that someone did .

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

He should meet her, and give her a bloody good talking to about things like basic manners, not being racist against white people, and not bullying old ladies.
But he won’t.