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The awkward truth about free speech Self-regarding academics defend it in bad faith

'Vogue's favourite philosopher', Amia Srinivasan

'Vogue's favourite philosopher', Amia Srinivasan


June 30, 2023   7 mins

Is it ever possible to take a neutral position on the importance of free speech? The task certainly seems quite difficult. As Vogue’s favourite philosopher, Amia Srinivasan, notes this month in the London Review of Books, many Right-wingers seem to assert the value of free speech, mainly or even only to make room for political views the Left would prefer smothered at birth. Occasionally, someone on the Right will complain about the suppression of a position or person they don’t agree with, but usually more to avoid complaints of inconsistency than anything else.

The Left, however, also has its blind spots — many of which are apparent in Srinivasan’s essay. Scathing about the new Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act’s attempt to create a culture which promotes academic freedom in UK universities, she barely acknowledges the problems diagnosed by its authors and defenders. Instead, as many a defensive-sounding progressive has implied before her, real cancellation almost never happens in academia — except, of course, where it happens to exactly those people who deserve it (cough).

Despite the occasional admission that campus life these days is becoming censorious and risk-averse, Srinivasan mostly presents the idea of cancel culture as confected by “Right-wing culture warriors”. (Even when you’ve previously written a book on contemporary sexual politics and are now writing about freedom of speech, becoming a culture warrior is still something that only happens to other people, apparently.)

Her framing is depressingly one-dimensional in other ways, too. Nasty Right-wing men twirl their moustaches and prosecute dastardly secret plans under cover of darkness. A bit like a window display in Ann Summers, dog whistles and fig leaves are everywhere you look. The Good Left bites its lip and stares nobly into the middle distance, trying to hold the line on causes such as anti-racism, trans rights and preventing climate change. Meanwhile, lecturers like me, who have experienced strong hostility within universities for expressing controversial academic views, have mistaken our hurt feelings over personal critique for a general social problem.

Indeed, academics like me are presented as somewhat confused about whether our speech has been suppressed at all — for some of us still write for newspapers and talk on television. As is often the case, the putative problem is treated as, at most, one of self-expression. Critics insist: didn’t you get your thoughts out into the world anyway? Well, then, what are you complaining about?

This assumption — that the plausibility of a given narrative about the suppression of an academic’s work is inversely proportional to the total number of her media appearances — ignores the obvious point that a set of ideas can be anathema in one venue and celebrated in another. For instance, as I’ve written before, though welcomed in some media outlets, gender-critical feminists seem to give Guardian and BBC editors a fit of the vapours.

And it’s strange that many progressives refuse to consider this general point. For one of their original critiques of free-speech defences made a somewhat similar observation, albeit about ethnic minorities rather than political ones. They held that such arguments don’t take account of how minorities can be systematically excluded from certain platforms and so don’t get a voice there.

Now, those who think of ideas as operating in a marketplace ruled by the laws of supply and demand might be happy with this. Maybe they think that — a bit like convincing an ice-cream parlour to stock your new brand — if you had really wanted to get your ideas into a particular forum, you should have made them more attractive in the first place. With ideas, though, perhaps unlike with ice cream, it’s not always wise to give the people exactly what they want.

In fact, self-expression or the lack of it is often not the main reason people are interested in academic freedom. The more pressing concern is whether conditions exist in universities that dissuade people from pursuing certain controversial topics out of fear alone. If so, and if those topics matter to society — which they often do, because public controversy is usually a sign of something mattering — then we all have a problem, and it’s one that goes well beyond hurt feelings.

In these cases, faulty beliefs are more likely to develop and spread, public frustration is more likely to proliferate, and policymakers will be more likely to act ineffectively and even harmfully as a result. There is no better example of this than the terrible state of the public conversations on women’s rights in relation to transactivism, and on the medical transition of minors — two conversations that are still very hard to have within UK universities without fear.

A separate pressing question about academic freedom, also nothing to do with self-expression, is whether the public is getting adequate access to a range of academic voices on controversial issues. This is not because academics need to be treated like rivalrous children, each getting the same number of pats on the head from Mummy and Daddy. It’s because if audiences are not exposed to a wide enough range of viewpoints about a given controversy, they will start to assume that the matter is settled. Worse, they might assume that everyone reasonable agrees the matter is settled, and so dismiss naysayers on the presumed authority of their favourite media sources. And their favourite media sources might be wrong.

Dropping Srinivasan’s emphasis on individual self-expression also has another benefit, in that it allows us to admit there might be circumstances where — perhaps with an initial air of paradox — certain kinds of speech should be regulated in order to avoid a chilling effect. On closer inspection, however, there is nothing paradoxical about suppressing some kinds of speech in order to facilitate others. Speech is one of the main tools used by humans to shut other humans up. There are clearly times when, given the further aim of a relatively open discursive environment, it is appropriate to disincentivise speech that does this.

For instance, unless the moral case is absolutely cut and dried in a way apparent to nearly everybody, I think we should dissuade people from implying, on behalf of supposedly politically neutral university organisations and institutions, that certain conclusions or discussions are ethically unacceptable. Whether it’s a manager writing a politicised tract against Brexit in an email to all staff, or a student tweeting out disgust for some invited speaker in the name of the society for whom he acts as president, the effect on dissenters within the same organisations is nearly always to make it harder for them to disagree with those in charge. (Exceptions might include associations whose explicit aims were to politically agitate in some direction — in which case, they should both make that prior agenda clear to joiners and not go off-piste).

So, unlike Observer columnist Kenan Malik commenting on a similar case a few weeks ago involving the Oxford University’s LGBTQ+ Society — an organisation that the uninitiated might assume was formed only to bring LGBTQ+ students together socially, regardless of political and philosophical commitments — I don’t think that regulating speech-that-chills-the-speech-of-others automatically counts as infringing individuals’ right to expression. The target, after all, is not the speech of individuals as such, but speech made by individuals on behalf of institutions. The individuals concerned are still free to express identical views in a personal capacity elsewhere. The familiar disclaimer “opinions expressed are my own and not that of my employer” is an easy one to adapt here.

Srinivasan, meanwhile, worries that the new Act threatens to undermine the basis of academic judgement itself — because, she says, much of what might look to some as speech suppression in academia is entirely legitimate. Academics, for instance, decide what can and cannot be said in seminars, journals and conferences on the basis of exercising specialist understanding about disciplinary standards and norms. The Act, she suggests, threatens to prevent academics from doing this.

But here she both overstates and understates the extent of academic competence. She overstates, because sometimes what passes for neutral academic judgement about the application of disciplinary standards is itself a way of suppressing politically unwanted conclusions, unconsciously or otherwise. This is particularly likely in high-stakes debates, where believers are convinced that there would be some terrible real-world consequences, were disbelievers to get the upper hand — climate change or vaccine discourse, for instance. Yet she also understates academic competence, by assuming there is no way of differentiating partisan cases from more neutral applications of disciplinary judgement. I’m sure academics could collectively develop an adequate methodology for this with a bit of thought. After all, they’re supposed to be good at this stuff.

Stepping back, it’s worth considering why discussions about free speech so often involve partisanship, or the projection of it onto others. To me, it seems partly due to two permanent features of human life, no matter what the historical situation.

The first of these is that truth matters to people — or more precisely, falsehood does. False beliefs cause actions to go wrong in various ways and can sometimes lead to disaster as reality suddenly hits you in the face.  So — except in the special case where you positively want to deceive someone for self-interested reasons — we have a general vested interest in stopping false ideas from spreading.

The second fact is that everyone thinks their own beliefs are true, and that negations of their own beliefs are false. You might be able to admit to yourself that, in principle, given human fallibility generally, some unspecified proportion of your beliefs is likely to be false — but admitting this about any one belief in particular would be a short route to ceasing to hold it as a belief altogether.

Taken together, these two features give rise to some of the issues we see across the political spectrum. First, they make it easy to get aerated when you think your own true beliefs are under threat, but hard to summon up enthusiasm for the protection of what you judge are the false beliefs of others. This is why free speech defences are so often self-interested.

Second, because it is hard to enthuse about protecting other people’s false beliefs, people tend to assume that if you are defending free speech about a particular set of beliefs, you probably also secretly hold those beliefs, too. This explains why guilt-by-association so frequently gets employed against defenders of free speech, as if they must be using it as cover for more heinous opinions.

In fact, although it’s hard, it is possible to believe that speech — including academic speech — should mostly be free, without having some controversial position secretly in mind when you do it. The academic freedom of others is not just the freedom to hold conclusions you and your friends like. And we mustn’t let either Right or Left forget this.


Kathleen Stock is an UnHerd columnist and a co-director of The Lesbian Project.
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Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

The UK has taken the correct action by legislating academic freedom and freedom of expression at universities. It is clear that universities are incapable of self regulation – – so they will have to be regulated. If they don’t like the legislation and think it goes ‘too far’ that is too bad – they brought this on themselves. They don’t deserve the stature they have in society or the public funding they receive. Hopefully even more forced reforms are coming soon.

FacRecte NilTime
FacRecte NilTime
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Yes to your first point, but not to your call for more regulation.

A short generation ago, freedom of expression and academic freedom were so taken for granted in the West that rehearsing the case for them seemed unnecessarily quaint and boring – an abstract topic for sixth form debates rather than for real world policy-making.

The recent legislation gives a statutory basis to freedoms that had previously been adequately respected due to shared cultural norms. While it’s a pity that this change became necessary, it’s good that the government has now acted.

The price of liberty is indeed eternal vigilance.

But I’m doubtful about the case for governments to regulate universities beyond the recent measures, unless perhaps to ensure that recruitment and promotion processes are not used to subvert these freedoms by the back door.

I have lived and worked in countries where universities are heavily regulated. They are not more free. And global rankings show that the quality of their research suffers.

Governments inevitably need to take a view on priorities for the allocation of taxpayers’ resources for research and skills training – although even here an arms length arrangement mediated by professionals with expertise is likely to be least bad.

The rest should surely be left to social and economic market forces to value institutions that cherish freedoms and thrive, and to relegate any that don’t to obscurity.

Over time, such forces may even restore a cultural mindset where banging on about such basic freedoms becomes boring once again.

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago

Amerika put the pen in front of the gun.
A Loud Voice scares more than a bullet.
My 1st amendment is more powerful than any 2nd.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

Yes, the writer misses the core issue: What is false is almost always more beautiful than what is true. The truth has one hand tied behind its back. Good writers know this. Some — Socrates is the best example — speak only and never write. The written word does not know who it’s speaking to.

Michael McElwee
Michael McElwee
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

Yes, the writer misses the core issue: What is false is almost always more beautiful than what is true. The truth has one hand tied behind its back. Good writers know this. Some — Socrates is the best example — speak only and never write. The written word does not know who it’s speaking to.

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago

Amerika put the pen in front of the gun.
A Loud Voice scares more than a bullet.
My 1st amendment is more powerful than any 2nd.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Shut them all down and start fresh.

FacRecte NilTime
FacRecte NilTime
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Yes to your first point, but not to your call for more regulation.

A short generation ago, freedom of expression and academic freedom were so taken for granted in the West that rehearsing the case for them seemed unnecessarily quaint and boring – an abstract topic for sixth form debates rather than for real world policy-making.

The recent legislation gives a statutory basis to freedoms that had previously been adequately respected due to shared cultural norms. While it’s a pity that this change became necessary, it’s good that the government has now acted.

The price of liberty is indeed eternal vigilance.

But I’m doubtful about the case for governments to regulate universities beyond the recent measures, unless perhaps to ensure that recruitment and promotion processes are not used to subvert these freedoms by the back door.

I have lived and worked in countries where universities are heavily regulated. They are not more free. And global rankings show that the quality of their research suffers.

Governments inevitably need to take a view on priorities for the allocation of taxpayers’ resources for research and skills training – although even here an arms length arrangement mediated by professionals with expertise is likely to be least bad.

The rest should surely be left to social and economic market forces to value institutions that cherish freedoms and thrive, and to relegate any that don’t to obscurity.

Over time, such forces may even restore a cultural mindset where banging on about such basic freedoms becomes boring once again.

Bret Larson
Bret Larson
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Shut them all down and start fresh.

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

The UK has taken the correct action by legislating academic freedom and freedom of expression at universities. It is clear that universities are incapable of self regulation – – so they will have to be regulated. If they don’t like the legislation and think it goes ‘too far’ that is too bad – they brought this on themselves. They don’t deserve the stature they have in society or the public funding they receive. Hopefully even more forced reforms are coming soon.

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 year ago

We need to articulate why free speech is a good idea, and not just regard that as a given, because for young people who have only ever been exposed to a “hate speech is harmful” narrative, it is not a given. Free speech allows for policies and proposals to be challenged, and ultimately for bad ideas to be rejected and good ideas to be adopted. In the absence of free speech, we used to burn heretics, sacrifice children to appease the gods, blame plagues on Jews poisoning the wells, treat illness as being an imbalance of the four humours, and believed the sun went round the earth. Which was all very stupid and wasteful, and led to needless poverty and suffering. A greater level of free speech enabled the western world to get rich while the rest of the world stayed poor. Suppression of free speech led to the Holocaust, the Soviet Famine of the 1930s, and the Great Leap Forward. We don’t need free speech for its own sake. We need it to avoid stupid and dangerous ideas gaining traction unchallenged.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephen Walsh
Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

‘We need to articulate why free speech is a good idea …’ Very true. For most people growing up in the shadow of WWII, it was accepted because we had seen or had parents that had seen the consequences of totalitarian fascism and socialism. Younger generations have not.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago

“Younger generations have not.” This is why history repeats itself over and over and over and over and over again. We never learn.

Bruce V
Bruce V
1 year ago

Yeonmi Park gives the most incredible and moving testament to this in an April speech. THIS is what young people should be exposed to at large left-wing universities: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XfACN_U-GE
To heck with that, THIS is what adults in the west should be exposed to as well.
Such a small frame, such a huge amount of bravery.

Last edited 1 year ago by Bruce V
Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago

“Younger generations have not.” This is why history repeats itself over and over and over and over and over again. We never learn.

Bruce V
Bruce V
1 year ago

Yeonmi Park gives the most incredible and moving testament to this in an April speech. THIS is what young people should be exposed to at large left-wing universities: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XfACN_U-GE
To heck with that, THIS is what adults in the west should be exposed to as well.
Such a small frame, such a huge amount of bravery.

Last edited 1 year ago by Bruce V
Steve White
Steve White
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

With the advent of the digital Euro (which is coming). Europeans will be exposed to having every transaction tracked. Freedom of any sort will not exist. You will not be free to hold or express the wrong position on anything. 

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

One might say a perfect case of “Turkeys voting for Christmas “. And serve ‘em right!

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

Indeed, there are whole flock of canaries in the coal mine keeling over to signal the noxious gas of a totalitarian regime being imposed. Nigel Ferage’s inability to obtain a bank account and the HoC Committee threatening dire consequences for those MPs who dare to traduce their decisions are but a couple. But who will save us from the indoctrinated pigs that believe that some pigs should be more equal than others? There seems to be no realistic party untainted by the ideology.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

What hyperbole! I truly regret, for example, that a former prime minister has been found out lying, lying and lying again. Should there be no sanctions at all to this? It is arguable.

But, the idea that any standards of whatever kind in a democratic society, even if inevitably having to be administered by fallible human beings, is a prelude to totalitarianism, is an absurd exaggeration.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

What hyperbole! I truly regret, for example, that a former prime minister has been found out lying, lying and lying again. Should there be no sanctions at all to this? It is arguable.

But, the idea that any standards of whatever kind in a democratic society, even if inevitably having to be administered by fallible human beings, is a prelude to totalitarianism, is an absurd exaggeration.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

The vast majority of people’s monetary transactions can be tracked already. This may well be concerning, but it is a huge overreach to claim that this means the end of any freedom of opinion.

George Venning
George Venning
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

True. But… what we see at the moment is two things happening together. 1. the convergence of a number of technologies which make make surveillance both more pervasive and more effective and 2. an increased willingness on the part of governments to use the tools already in their kit, to impose extra-judicial sanctions on dissent.
The archetypal example of 2 would be the Canadian Government’s decision to lock participants in the trucker protests out of aspects of the financial system. But George Monbiot had a piece in the Guardian yesterday about companies applying for injuctions on potential protestors and sending the legal bill for their fees to the indviduals injuncted…
Given that we’ve recently has anti-terror legislation re-purposed to check people were emptying their bins in the correct fashion, it’s not ridiculous to worry about the confluence of new technologies, a new political will to use it and the absence of any serious instituitional pushback.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

See my comment above

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I do not understand how you can ignore the gathering storm and dismiss the multiple examples of the erosion of our liberties and free speech over the past two decades. The villain – proudly – is the Progressive Leftist Identitarian New Order and its aggressive Equality ideology. Who do you think brought in Hate Speech? Who is demonising the author and the courageous JKR? The BBC, publishing and theatre have all totally caved in to the Diversity Industry and embrace this State ideology. Dissenters on covid lockdown, Islamism, the BLM, Net Zero fanaticism ..you name it…are by and large banished from the airwaves. See the Question Time audience frozen with fear and hands down on Rwanda?? You can taste the terror. China 68. We will probably be arrested and fined for criticizing the Privileged Privilege Gauliters of Parliament (arses). Free speech has been lost in this country because we first surrendered our common law, let in rogue human rights legislation and because the Progressive control of media and law has gone unchallenged by the hapless conservatives. It is not about politics. Even Kathleen must grasp this. It is a quasi religious culty phenomenon enforced and reinforced by SM groupthink. The Progressives see themselves as THE ELECT, higher chosen moral beings. And the Elect are given full licence to despise, punish traduce the non Elect – the nasty oiky whiteys who threatened their criminal property heist. The Elect do not believe in free speech; only their speech. Snd they hate dissent. They are very dangerous and very deranged and they now run this manor. Expect Unherd to be properly Unherd in future unless you wake up.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

“THE ELECT, higher chosen moral beings.” Sounds terrifyingly similar to 1939 in a country that, today, makes great gasoline powered automobiles. Verstehe?

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Ich verstehe!!! But I really do not think the idea of Politics – Right v Left – is in any way relevant here. I believe that dark religion – the religious ideological ferment & fanaticism of early Reformation – provides the very best guide to the New Elect worldview. They sit above politics, and way above the Unelect – the Damned (that is oiky non Remainiacs). They serve new Higher ‘moral’ purposes and new gods; commitment to say truth telling in journalism or integrity in law are secondary old values, jettisoned if they conflict with the New Way. These entitled detached progressives in our elite really do see themselves as a Higher Caste. They have escaped the sordid old identity of being English/British (shameful raycist imperialist slavers all!!!) and are reborn New Europeans, bound in a mission to shatter privilege and all forms of discrimination….(as they sit guzzling expensive wines in their untaxed £3m Islington townhouses with NHS rainbow & BLM.posters in the window bossing the gardener, the two cleaners and the pretty Czech nanny). Study the Calvinists! And remember that bad religious ideology is as supremacist & authoritarian as the political totalitarians of the last century. They are cold eyed fearful and hateful. Beware them.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

QUISLINGTON not Islington.*

(* First coined by Fraser Bailey Esq, a notable commentator on UnHerd back in the days of The Great Panic.)

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Guy Pigache
Guy Pigache
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

All the right words just not necessarily in the right order. (Thank you, Eric)

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

QUISLINGTON not Islington.*

(* First coined by Fraser Bailey Esq, a notable commentator on UnHerd back in the days of The Great Panic.)

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Guy Pigache
Guy Pigache
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

All the right words just not necessarily in the right order. (Thank you, Eric)

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Ich verstehe!!! But I really do not think the idea of Politics – Right v Left – is in any way relevant here. I believe that dark religion – the religious ideological ferment & fanaticism of early Reformation – provides the very best guide to the New Elect worldview. They sit above politics, and way above the Unelect – the Damned (that is oiky non Remainiacs). They serve new Higher ‘moral’ purposes and new gods; commitment to say truth telling in journalism or integrity in law are secondary old values, jettisoned if they conflict with the New Way. These entitled detached progressives in our elite really do see themselves as a Higher Caste. They have escaped the sordid old identity of being English/British (shameful raycist imperialist slavers all!!!) and are reborn New Europeans, bound in a mission to shatter privilege and all forms of discrimination….(as they sit guzzling expensive wines in their untaxed £3m Islington townhouses with NHS rainbow & BLM.posters in the window bossing the gardener, the two cleaners and the pretty Czech nanny). Study the Calvinists! And remember that bad religious ideology is as supremacist & authoritarian as the political totalitarians of the last century. They are cold eyed fearful and hateful. Beware them.

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

One needs 2 feet to walk straight a left & a right .
Your brain is also bicameral perhaps using both would help.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

Try addressing the argument you snide

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Mark M Breza

Try addressing the argument you snide

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

Colonel ‘bonking’ Bob Stewart DSO, MP, is currently being prosecuted Under Section 5 of the 1986 Public Order Act, for making an ‘alleged’ racist comment. The CPS have insisted this prosecution goes ahead in the ‘ public interest’.

That legislation was brought in under the late Lady Thatcher, so I suspect the ‘cancer’ within our so -called society is far, far, deeper than even you may think.

(* Perhaps the good old French are about to show us the way as they did in 1789?)

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago

Interesting. You are right of course. Thatcher impeded IRA access to airwave too. But the present Identitarian hysteria and cancel culture feels bigger, different and more scary. It is a mind virus and panic which since EQA 2010 has overwhelmed all the arms of the British State – law, media, education, civil service – yet also exists independently in woke groups and individuals, notably again in our governing elite the New Elect. It is being evangelized 24/7 by the BBC. Yet more evidence of this progressive impulse/reflex.. heavily mixed with crude authoritarianism and disdain for liberty – comes today from Ireland; an incredible Orwellian new law on free speech has been proposed.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago

Interesting. You are right of course. Thatcher impeded IRA access to airwave too. But the present Identitarian hysteria and cancel culture feels bigger, different and more scary. It is a mind virus and panic which since EQA 2010 has overwhelmed all the arms of the British State – law, media, education, civil service – yet also exists independently in woke groups and individuals, notably again in our governing elite the New Elect. It is being evangelized 24/7 by the BBC. Yet more evidence of this progressive impulse/reflex.. heavily mixed with crude authoritarianism and disdain for liberty – comes today from Ireland; an incredible Orwellian new law on free speech has been proposed.

Kevin Ludbrook
Kevin Ludbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

A general observation, not a criticism of your comment but I dislike that the term progressive is now synonymous with the left. Surely you should be progressive in your thinking with any political leaning? It defines the right as non-progressive and ‘conservative’ does the right no favours either.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Kevin Ludbrook

I agree. It is a shame that this word has been lost to the Left in common parlance. I do not think it is meant kindly. It is so hard to describe those on the Left. They are illberal and authoritarian; their net zero fanaticism is anti growth, totally unprogressive, as is their reverse race caste hatred for Brex non grad working classes. Woke is just too weak a word. If you peek into their ideological worldview, you find a scary quasi religious intolerant mania…hence why I think The Elect is best way to understand what has gripped our elite and the rabble outside. Meanwhile conservatism has vanished in practice from the political arena. Thats the New Order/Technocracy Rule State for you…

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Kevin Ludbrook

I agree. It is a shame that this word has been lost to the Left in common parlance. I do not think it is meant kindly. It is so hard to describe those on the Left. They are illberal and authoritarian; their net zero fanaticism is anti growth, totally unprogressive, as is their reverse race caste hatred for Brex non grad working classes. Woke is just too weak a word. If you peek into their ideological worldview, you find a scary quasi religious intolerant mania…hence why I think The Elect is best way to understand what has gripped our elite and the rabble outside. Meanwhile conservatism has vanished in practice from the political arena. Thats the New Order/Technocracy Rule State for you…

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

“THE ELECT, higher chosen moral beings.” Sounds terrifyingly similar to 1939 in a country that, today, makes great gasoline powered automobiles. Verstehe?

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

One needs 2 feet to walk straight a left & a right .
Your brain is also bicameral perhaps using both would help.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

Colonel ‘bonking’ Bob Stewart DSO, MP, is currently being prosecuted Under Section 5 of the 1986 Public Order Act, for making an ‘alleged’ racist comment. The CPS have insisted this prosecution goes ahead in the ‘ public interest’.

That legislation was brought in under the late Lady Thatcher, so I suspect the ‘cancer’ within our so -called society is far, far, deeper than even you may think.

(* Perhaps the good old French are about to show us the way as they did in 1789?)

Kevin Ludbrook
Kevin Ludbrook
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

A general observation, not a criticism of your comment but I dislike that the term progressive is now synonymous with the left. Surely you should be progressive in your thinking with any political leaning? It defines the right as non-progressive and ‘conservative’ does the right no favours either.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

You sound precisely like many of the well intentioned Jews in Germany during the late 1930’s, who never accepted that dangerous times were just ahead. Look what happened to them. A common explanation was, “we own businesses and homes, it can’t happen to us!” The same seeds have been sown today and we also have the maligned use of social media to fan the flames of hatred.

Last edited 1 year ago by Warren Trees
Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Yes they ignored the Progressive voices of the day.
Mr Tree you are paranoid of global warming correct ?

Mark M Breza
Mark M Breza
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Yes they ignored the Progressive voices of the day.
Mr Tree you are paranoid of global warming correct ?

Bruce V
Bruce V
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

It’s not the Tracking. The CBDC’s will give governments the Control of your bank accts. That’s whats new and terrifying.

Dominic S
Dominic S
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

And even if we use cash the proliferation of cctv (Chinese) means our transactions can, on the whole, still be tracked and checked.

George Venning
George Venning
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

True. But… what we see at the moment is two things happening together. 1. the convergence of a number of technologies which make make surveillance both more pervasive and more effective and 2. an increased willingness on the part of governments to use the tools already in their kit, to impose extra-judicial sanctions on dissent.
The archetypal example of 2 would be the Canadian Government’s decision to lock participants in the trucker protests out of aspects of the financial system. But George Monbiot had a piece in the Guardian yesterday about companies applying for injuctions on potential protestors and sending the legal bill for their fees to the indviduals injuncted…
Given that we’ve recently has anti-terror legislation re-purposed to check people were emptying their bins in the correct fashion, it’s not ridiculous to worry about the confluence of new technologies, a new political will to use it and the absence of any serious instituitional pushback.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

See my comment above

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I do not understand how you can ignore the gathering storm and dismiss the multiple examples of the erosion of our liberties and free speech over the past two decades. The villain – proudly – is the Progressive Leftist Identitarian New Order and its aggressive Equality ideology. Who do you think brought in Hate Speech? Who is demonising the author and the courageous JKR? The BBC, publishing and theatre have all totally caved in to the Diversity Industry and embrace this State ideology. Dissenters on covid lockdown, Islamism, the BLM, Net Zero fanaticism ..you name it…are by and large banished from the airwaves. See the Question Time audience frozen with fear and hands down on Rwanda?? You can taste the terror. China 68. We will probably be arrested and fined for criticizing the Privileged Privilege Gauliters of Parliament (arses). Free speech has been lost in this country because we first surrendered our common law, let in rogue human rights legislation and because the Progressive control of media and law has gone unchallenged by the hapless conservatives. It is not about politics. Even Kathleen must grasp this. It is a quasi religious culty phenomenon enforced and reinforced by SM groupthink. The Progressives see themselves as THE ELECT, higher chosen moral beings. And the Elect are given full licence to despise, punish traduce the non Elect – the nasty oiky whiteys who threatened their criminal property heist. The Elect do not believe in free speech; only their speech. Snd they hate dissent. They are very dangerous and very deranged and they now run this manor. Expect Unherd to be properly Unherd in future unless you wake up.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

You sound precisely like many of the well intentioned Jews in Germany during the late 1930’s, who never accepted that dangerous times were just ahead. Look what happened to them. A common explanation was, “we own businesses and homes, it can’t happen to us!” The same seeds have been sown today and we also have the maligned use of social media to fan the flames of hatred.

Last edited 1 year ago by Warren Trees
Bruce V
Bruce V
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

It’s not the Tracking. The CBDC’s will give governments the Control of your bank accts. That’s whats new and terrifying.

Dominic S
Dominic S
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

And even if we use cash the proliferation of cctv (Chinese) means our transactions can, on the whole, still be tracked and checked.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

If you doubt this is where we are heading, Nigel Farage’s bank of more than 40 years has recently closed his accounts without explanation and none of the other banks will allow him to open an account. You cannot exist in this day and age without a bank account. The people responsible should be dragged before the courts and held to account

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

I shake my head in disbelief to see so many smug idiots, mostly young people, paying at checkouts with their mobile phones. It only they knew where this will inevitably lead, which would be obvious if they could be bothered to give it a moment’s thought.
And in thirty years, carrying a switched on mobile at all times will probably be compulsory, so all one’s movements can be traced as well as all one’s financial transactions. (The ostensible justification will be so that everyone can promptly receive Government alerts, for safety’s sake or some similar bollox.)

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

One might say a perfect case of “Turkeys voting for Christmas “. And serve ‘em right!

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

Indeed, there are whole flock of canaries in the coal mine keeling over to signal the noxious gas of a totalitarian regime being imposed. Nigel Ferage’s inability to obtain a bank account and the HoC Committee threatening dire consequences for those MPs who dare to traduce their decisions are but a couple. But who will save us from the indoctrinated pigs that believe that some pigs should be more equal than others? There seems to be no realistic party untainted by the ideology.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

The vast majority of people’s monetary transactions can be tracked already. This may well be concerning, but it is a huge overreach to claim that this means the end of any freedom of opinion.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

If you doubt this is where we are heading, Nigel Farage’s bank of more than 40 years has recently closed his accounts without explanation and none of the other banks will allow him to open an account. You cannot exist in this day and age without a bank account. The people responsible should be dragged before the courts and held to account

John Ramsden
John Ramsden
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve White

I shake my head in disbelief to see so many smug idiots, mostly young people, paying at checkouts with their mobile phones. It only they knew where this will inevitably lead, which would be obvious if they could be bothered to give it a moment’s thought.
And in thirty years, carrying a switched on mobile at all times will probably be compulsory, so all one’s movements can be traced as well as all one’s financial transactions. (The ostensible justification will be so that everyone can promptly receive Government alerts, for safety’s sake or some similar bollox.)

Eamonn Toland
Eamonn Toland
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

I agree with your general point, but the presence of free speech can also spread toxic and hateful ideas. Witch-hunting in Europe was suppressed for nearly a thousand years, until the invention of the printing press allowed Malleus Maleficarum, or The Hammer of the Witches, to become a best-seller in the Renaiisance (second only to the Bible for 150 years) during a period of volatile climate change. In the 21st century the persecution of the Rohingya in Burma was facilitated by social media. We need not only to articulate why free speech is a good idea, but also why people need to think for themselves rather than accepting conventional wisdom.

Adam Huntley
Adam Huntley
1 year ago
Reply to  Eamonn Toland

Very useful reminder. Much as I support free speech, it is easy to take an unrealistically rosy view of it.

Hector Mildew
Hector Mildew
1 year ago
Reply to  Eamonn Toland

In the 21st century the persecution of the Rohingya in Burma was facilitated by social media
An interesting example. Would you like to explain what the persecution of Christians in Africa, Central Asia, Pakistan, China and many other places is “facilitated” by? You don’t need social media when you have religious fanaticism.

Adam Huntley
Adam Huntley
1 year ago
Reply to  Eamonn Toland

Very useful reminder. Much as I support free speech, it is easy to take an unrealistically rosy view of it.

Hector Mildew
Hector Mildew
1 year ago
Reply to  Eamonn Toland

In the 21st century the persecution of the Rohingya in Burma was facilitated by social media
An interesting example. Would you like to explain what the persecution of Christians in Africa, Central Asia, Pakistan, China and many other places is “facilitated” by? You don’t need social media when you have religious fanaticism.

Marissa M
Marissa M
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Excellently put.
Rather than ban or legislate freedom of speech at universities, perhaps one of the first mandatory classes taken by students should be: The Responsibility of Free Speech and its History. The course should focus on the danger of suppression of freedom of speech but also the heavy duty that accompanies it and the destruction of individuals and their lives because of “woke” rhetoric and accusations.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Well said, but how absolutely extraordinary that you of all people should object to the fact that some people describe ‘Bloody Sunday’ as ‘Good Sunday’?

Illogical is it not?

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 year ago

I don’t want to ban it; I just don’t think they should do it.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Without wishing to sound impertinent, but were your around at the time may I ask?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Without wishing to sound impertinent, but were your around at the time may I ask?

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 year ago

I don’t want to ban it; I just don’t think they should do it.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

‘We need to articulate why free speech is a good idea …’ Very true. For most people growing up in the shadow of WWII, it was accepted because we had seen or had parents that had seen the consequences of totalitarian fascism and socialism. Younger generations have not.

Steve White
Steve White
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

With the advent of the digital Euro (which is coming). Europeans will be exposed to having every transaction tracked. Freedom of any sort will not exist. You will not be free to hold or express the wrong position on anything. 

Eamonn Toland
Eamonn Toland
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

I agree with your general point, but the presence of free speech can also spread toxic and hateful ideas. Witch-hunting in Europe was suppressed for nearly a thousand years, until the invention of the printing press allowed Malleus Maleficarum, or The Hammer of the Witches, to become a best-seller in the Renaiisance (second only to the Bible for 150 years) during a period of volatile climate change. In the 21st century the persecution of the Rohingya in Burma was facilitated by social media. We need not only to articulate why free speech is a good idea, but also why people need to think for themselves rather than accepting conventional wisdom.

Marissa M
Marissa M
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Excellently put.
Rather than ban or legislate freedom of speech at universities, perhaps one of the first mandatory classes taken by students should be: The Responsibility of Free Speech and its History. The course should focus on the danger of suppression of freedom of speech but also the heavy duty that accompanies it and the destruction of individuals and their lives because of “woke” rhetoric and accusations.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Stephen Walsh

Well said, but how absolutely extraordinary that you of all people should object to the fact that some people describe ‘Bloody Sunday’ as ‘Good Sunday’?

Illogical is it not?

Stephen Walsh
Stephen Walsh
1 year ago

We need to articulate why free speech is a good idea, and not just regard that as a given, because for young people who have only ever been exposed to a “hate speech is harmful” narrative, it is not a given. Free speech allows for policies and proposals to be challenged, and ultimately for bad ideas to be rejected and good ideas to be adopted. In the absence of free speech, we used to burn heretics, sacrifice children to appease the gods, blame plagues on Jews poisoning the wells, treat illness as being an imbalance of the four humours, and believed the sun went round the earth. Which was all very stupid and wasteful, and led to needless poverty and suffering. A greater level of free speech enabled the western world to get rich while the rest of the world stayed poor. Suppression of free speech led to the Holocaust, the Soviet Famine of the 1930s, and the Great Leap Forward. We don’t need free speech for its own sake. We need it to avoid stupid and dangerous ideas gaining traction unchallenged.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stephen Walsh
Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago

University humanities departments depend on government spending. They will ally with those who support that spending and try to silence those who question that spending.
The trans lobby are opposed to science, empiricism and logic. They are fighting for a return to the pre-scientific age: censorship, dictatorship and the ultimate cancellation which is murder. That is why we must stand with Kathleen Stock.

Andrew H
Andrew H
1 year ago

Some might and will argue that you’re overstating the threat from the trans lobby by referencing murder. But in light of the widespread “Kill terfs” slogan on the placards and t-shirts of militant trans rights activists at rallies and demonstrations and the huge number of death (and rape) threats they send to women online, you’re absolutely right to make this point.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew H

I agree: “Kill terfs” couldn’t be clearer as an incitement to violence, and the police should immediately be arresting anyone bearing such slogans. And this should equally be applied were anyone shouting or bearing a placard reading “kill trans people”.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

It is not nearly as bad an act of incitement as silently praying in the street.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago

Good point! If in doubt, always pick a soft target.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago

Good point! If in doubt, always pick a soft target.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

The motivation of the police is very dubious : they clearly are unlikely to arrest anyone shouting ‘kill terfs’, because they did nothing about people bearing placards saying “Behead those who insult isl*m”. And they should have reacted in the strongest possible way.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

It is not nearly as bad an act of incitement as silently praying in the street.

John Solomon
John Solomon
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

The motivation of the police is very dubious : they clearly are unlikely to arrest anyone shouting ‘kill terfs’, because they did nothing about people bearing placards saying “Behead those who insult isl*m”. And they should have reacted in the strongest possible way.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew H

I agree: “Kill terfs” couldn’t be clearer as an incitement to violence, and the police should immediately be arresting anyone bearing such slogans. And this should equally be applied were anyone shouting or bearing a placard reading “kill trans people”.

Andrew H
Andrew H
1 year ago

Some might and will argue that you’re overstating the threat from the trans lobby by referencing murder. But in light of the widespread “Kill terfs” slogan on the placards and t-shirts of militant trans rights activists at rallies and demonstrations and the huge number of death (and rape) threats they send to women online, you’re absolutely right to make this point.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago

University humanities departments depend on government spending. They will ally with those who support that spending and try to silence those who question that spending.
The trans lobby are opposed to science, empiricism and logic. They are fighting for a return to the pre-scientific age: censorship, dictatorship and the ultimate cancellation which is murder. That is why we must stand with Kathleen Stock.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Nobody ever seems to want to ask the underlying question: why do we need all these universities and academics anyway? There are far too many of them, they cost far too much and most of their output is only capable of holding down non-jobs in the public sector.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Please address your complaint to Sir Anthony Blair, who created this mess in the first place.

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Tony Blair’s masterstroke… get young people off the unemployment register and get them to pay for it with their own money.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

And thus encourage them “to rise above their station” (as we used to say) and then endure a lifetime of bitter disappointment.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago

Not necessarily. I had the misfortune to have to visit Worcester hospital this week. Wondering who could be responsible for the shambles I looked up the chairman and chief executive whose academic credentials were not worth the paper they were written on from the university of who gives a t*ss.
Interestingly the chairman, a former member of the communist party, was in charge of the West Midlands Health Authority at the time of the events that led to the Mid Staffs scandal (up to 1,200 patients may have died as a result of maltreatment and neglect) , and was pressured to resign from his position with NHS England as a result. He also had an issue with apparently claiming £6,000 in one year for first class travel which is odd (but not) for a former communist.
So you see a poor academic record and and a career untainted by success is the ticket to a wonderful career in our NHS

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago

He had ‘form’, he was a Communist, and once a Communist, always a Communist.

The bacillus of Communism STILL pollutes our national life and every level and is FAR more dangerous than a ridiculous little event such as COVID.

From before 1939 we have been totally feeble about is, and should for example have executed all of our Atom Spies and other MI6 traitors without exception.

What did we do instead? Execute an Irish-American nutter, who was not even a British citizen for making somewhat tasteless remarks on the Wireless! Bravo Britain!

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago

He had ‘form’, he was a Communist, and once a Communist, always a Communist.

The bacillus of Communism STILL pollutes our national life and every level and is FAR more dangerous than a ridiculous little event such as COVID.

From before 1939 we have been totally feeble about is, and should for example have executed all of our Atom Spies and other MI6 traitors without exception.

What did we do instead? Execute an Irish-American nutter, who was not even a British citizen for making somewhat tasteless remarks on the Wireless! Bravo Britain!

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago

Not necessarily. I had the misfortune to have to visit Worcester hospital this week. Wondering who could be responsible for the shambles I looked up the chairman and chief executive whose academic credentials were not worth the paper they were written on from the university of who gives a t*ss.
Interestingly the chairman, a former member of the communist party, was in charge of the West Midlands Health Authority at the time of the events that led to the Mid Staffs scandal (up to 1,200 patients may have died as a result of maltreatment and neglect) , and was pressured to resign from his position with NHS England as a result. He also had an issue with apparently claiming £6,000 in one year for first class travel which is odd (but not) for a former communist.
So you see a poor academic record and and a career untainted by success is the ticket to a wonderful career in our NHS

Alan Bright
Alan Bright
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

But many will never pay off their loans, so our children’s children pay for it.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

And thus encourage them “to rise above their station” (as we used to say) and then endure a lifetime of bitter disappointment.

Alan Bright
Alan Bright
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

But many will never pay off their loans, so our children’s children pay for it.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Sir John Major was the main culprit!

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Tony Blair’s masterstroke… get young people off the unemployment register and get them to pay for it with their own money.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Ben Jones

Sir John Major was the main culprit!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

The English medieval Church once held similar sway, that is until the splendid Master Thomas Cromwell ‘savaged’ it almost beyond recognition.

Would Sir Anthony Blair be prepared to follow the path of say the Abbots of Glastonbury, Reading and Colchester? Or even Latimer, Cranmer, or Ridley for that matter?

ps. Wasn’t Sir John Major equally culpable?

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Norman Powers
Norman Powers
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

I want to ask that question! The article is predicated on the assumption that academia must be filled with people debating trans stuff all day to begin with. Why? Nobody outside the academy is reading these papers and probably even nobody inside it.
How about, anyone who publishes anything on race, gender or trans related topics just immediately has to repay all grant money received from the government, and can never receive any ever again? That wouldn’t solve free speech in academia but would at least be a good start. As Stock demonstrates, there are apparently plenty of people willing to pay academics to write about such things all day anyway so it’s not like universities must do so.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Another piece of the puzzle regarding excessive Uni intake – those with lower academic/intellectual confidence are much more likely to cave in to peer pressure; so it is not surprising that we are seeing an uptick in herding behaviours, as campus numbers swell.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

To brainwash the youth and get them heavily into debt at the same time. What a wizard wheeze…

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Smith

The brainwashing occurs at school

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago

Sadly now even at ETON,

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago

Sadly now even at ETON,

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Martin Smith

The brainwashing occurs at school

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Please address your complaint to Sir Anthony Blair, who created this mess in the first place.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

The English medieval Church once held similar sway, that is until the splendid Master Thomas Cromwell ‘savaged’ it almost beyond recognition.

Would Sir Anthony Blair be prepared to follow the path of say the Abbots of Glastonbury, Reading and Colchester? Or even Latimer, Cranmer, or Ridley for that matter?

ps. Wasn’t Sir John Major equally culpable?

Last edited 1 year ago by Charles Stanhope
Norman Powers
Norman Powers
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

I want to ask that question! The article is predicated on the assumption that academia must be filled with people debating trans stuff all day to begin with. Why? Nobody outside the academy is reading these papers and probably even nobody inside it.
How about, anyone who publishes anything on race, gender or trans related topics just immediately has to repay all grant money received from the government, and can never receive any ever again? That wouldn’t solve free speech in academia but would at least be a good start. As Stock demonstrates, there are apparently plenty of people willing to pay academics to write about such things all day anyway so it’s not like universities must do so.

Dominic A
Dominic A
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Another piece of the puzzle regarding excessive Uni intake – those with lower academic/intellectual confidence are much more likely to cave in to peer pressure; so it is not surprising that we are seeing an uptick in herding behaviours, as campus numbers swell.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

To brainwash the youth and get them heavily into debt at the same time. What a wizard wheeze…

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Nobody ever seems to want to ask the underlying question: why do we need all these universities and academics anyway? There are far too many of them, they cost far too much and most of their output is only capable of holding down non-jobs in the public sector.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

“First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Socialist.

“Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

“Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Jew.

“Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Martin Niemöller

ben arnulfssen
ben arnulfssen
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

That’s all very well.. but WOULD those people have spoken for you? The evidence suggests they would not, and their arrest made no difference to your position.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

For the sake of balance it could just as well have been:-

“First they came for the Fascists and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Fascist.
“Then they came for the Priests , and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Priest.
“Then they came for the Irish and I did not speak out,
Because I was not Irish .
“Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

This is true. They choose their first victims carefully – someone no one really wants to defend. So the first person banned from YouTube was Alex Jones – obnoxious conspiracy theorist. They ended with President of the United States. The Canadian media regulator CRTC banned RT News from cable service and the internet last year – dirty Russians! But now they are proposing Fox News – allegedly for transphobia. I have no doubt cancelling publications like this one and Quillette is their ultimate goal.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Excellent point.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Excellent point.

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

This is true. They choose their first victims carefully – someone no one really wants to defend. So the first person banned from YouTube was Alex Jones – obnoxious conspiracy theorist. They ended with President of the United States. The Canadian media regulator CRTC banned RT News from cable service and the internet last year – dirty Russians! But now they are proposing Fox News – allegedly for transphobia. I have no doubt cancelling publications like this one and Quillette is their ultimate goal.

ben arnulfssen
ben arnulfssen
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

That’s all very well.. but WOULD those people have spoken for you? The evidence suggests they would not, and their arrest made no difference to your position.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

For the sake of balance it could just as well have been:-

“First they came for the Fascists and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Fascist.
“Then they came for the Priests , and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Priest.
“Then they came for the Irish and I did not speak out,
Because I was not Irish .
“Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

“First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Socialist.

“Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

“Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out,
Because I was not a Jew.

“Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Martin Niemöller

Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
1 year ago

My own opinion is enough for me. And I claim the right to defend it against any consensus, any majority anywhere, any place, any time. And anyone who disagrees with this can pick a number, get in line and kiss my ass.
Christopher Hitchens
What the political left, even in democratic countries, share is the notion that knowledgeable and virtuous people like themselves have both a right and a duty to use the power of government to impose their superior knowledge and virtue on others.
Thomas Sowell
Many months ago the wonderful David Starkey posted a video wherein he explained, as only he could, the dangers past and present, of the Tyranny of the Know Betters. The irony is of course that these people are actually No Betters, their superior ideology is strictly a product of their own Disney World of delusion.
This cabal of “justice”, so firmly entrenched in progressive politics along with their media toadies shouldn’t have a care in the world about unfiltered criticism. why give a second thought to what some troll says when one is engaged in such good works? What threat could social media sniping possibly pose to a movement so firmly set on course to rebuild a just and equitable world?
Perhaps the problem is that the progressives haven’t actually been right about anything they’ve bleated about for the last decade or three. The impending Climate Armageddon has proven to be almost entirely nonsense at great economic cost.
The progressives were wrong about Trump, claiming he could never get elected and if he did he would bankrupt America and cause WW3.
They got Brexit wrong. (damn proles)
The Covid pandemic was a universally mismanaged fiasco, causing social, medical and economic damage it will take years to fully appreciate.
A dirty teacup in a gypsy caravan would have been just as reliable as anything the Know Betters have been telling us about the Russia Ukraine debacle.
And don’t forget the Gender Wars and the march of the Alphabet people. A motley collection of the perpetually confused, latent exhibitionists and sideshow hucksters have convinced legions of the gullible that their subjective re-inventions of the English language are actually legitimate. Never before has so much been demanded from so many by so few.
No wonder there’s a war on free speech. The progressive house of cards can’t stand even the slightest breath of criticism.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Sadly even the “wonderful” Dr David Starkey cravenly capitulated eventually.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Did he? He apologised as I recall about the “so many damn blacks” remark – and although apologies are never accepted by the progressive Left, I do think nonetheless he made a stupid comment originally and was justified honourable in doing so.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I’m sorry but your last sentence doesn’t make sense.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Fisher

I’m sorry but your last sentence doesn’t make sense.

Andrew Fisher
Andrew Fisher
1 year ago

Did he? He apologised as I recall about the “so many damn blacks” remark – and although apologies are never accepted by the progressive Left, I do think nonetheless he made a stupid comment originally and was justified honourable in doing so.

Last edited 1 year ago by Andrew Fisher
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Eloquently put

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Sadly even the “wonderful” Dr David Starkey cravenly capitulated eventually.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Eloquently put

Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
1 year ago

My own opinion is enough for me. And I claim the right to defend it against any consensus, any majority anywhere, any place, any time. And anyone who disagrees with this can pick a number, get in line and kiss my ass.
Christopher Hitchens
What the political left, even in democratic countries, share is the notion that knowledgeable and virtuous people like themselves have both a right and a duty to use the power of government to impose their superior knowledge and virtue on others.
Thomas Sowell
Many months ago the wonderful David Starkey posted a video wherein he explained, as only he could, the dangers past and present, of the Tyranny of the Know Betters. The irony is of course that these people are actually No Betters, their superior ideology is strictly a product of their own Disney World of delusion.
This cabal of “justice”, so firmly entrenched in progressive politics along with their media toadies shouldn’t have a care in the world about unfiltered criticism. why give a second thought to what some troll says when one is engaged in such good works? What threat could social media sniping possibly pose to a movement so firmly set on course to rebuild a just and equitable world?
Perhaps the problem is that the progressives haven’t actually been right about anything they’ve bleated about for the last decade or three. The impending Climate Armageddon has proven to be almost entirely nonsense at great economic cost.
The progressives were wrong about Trump, claiming he could never get elected and if he did he would bankrupt America and cause WW3.
They got Brexit wrong. (damn proles)
The Covid pandemic was a universally mismanaged fiasco, causing social, medical and economic damage it will take years to fully appreciate.
A dirty teacup in a gypsy caravan would have been just as reliable as anything the Know Betters have been telling us about the Russia Ukraine debacle.
And don’t forget the Gender Wars and the march of the Alphabet people. A motley collection of the perpetually confused, latent exhibitionists and sideshow hucksters have convinced legions of the gullible that their subjective re-inventions of the English language are actually legitimate. Never before has so much been demanded from so many by so few.
No wonder there’s a war on free speech. The progressive house of cards can’t stand even the slightest breath of criticism.

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago

Very nice and useful distinction – between freedom of speech for individuals, and limits on what you can say on behalf of the institutions you are part of. Could one also make a distinction between individual (re)actions and organised harassment campaigns, demonstrations etc.?

As a slightly off example: The UK national footbal (socccer) team. No one could object if Gareth Southgate or Marcus Rashford want to support Black LIves Matter. They can kneel to BLM all they want – on their own time. But by setting up their kneeling ritual at the start of the national world cup games, they are speaking on behalf of the nation, its footballers, and its entire population. And they do not have the freedom to promote their own personal policies on other people’s behalf.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

There will be some players in that team who do not agree but who are forced to go along with the ritual which is even worse

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
1 year ago
Reply to  Rasmus Fogh

There will be some players in that team who do not agree but who are forced to go along with the ritual which is even worse

Rasmus Fogh
Rasmus Fogh
1 year ago

Very nice and useful distinction – between freedom of speech for individuals, and limits on what you can say on behalf of the institutions you are part of. Could one also make a distinction between individual (re)actions and organised harassment campaigns, demonstrations etc.?

As a slightly off example: The UK national footbal (socccer) team. No one could object if Gareth Southgate or Marcus Rashford want to support Black LIves Matter. They can kneel to BLM all they want – on their own time. But by setting up their kneeling ritual at the start of the national world cup games, they are speaking on behalf of the nation, its footballers, and its entire population. And they do not have the freedom to promote their own personal policies on other people’s behalf.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

This may be inappropriate, but I suggest people read a recent essay by Andrew Sullivan entitled “Gay Rights And The Limits Of Liberalism.”

I apologize to both the author and Unherd about referencing a similar article. I found it particularly insightful.

“Homosexual citizens absolutely deserved equal rights, but the question of homosexuality itself would — and should — always be open to dispute and debate. Since a liberal society contains both fundamentalist preachers as well as lesbian atheists, it cannot resolve the core question. So it shouldn’t try. And it should celebrate, not bemoan, this ideological diversity.”

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Thanks for the suggestion. I like that he rejects both warring extremes, as they are advanced by groups he calls “theocons” and “transqueers”. Many of the most prominent champions of ideological or viewpoint diversity seem, like Sullivan, to have sought refuge at Substack.

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

It is reasonable to expect tolerance from others. It is not reasonable to expect acceptance from others.
If a man wants to wear a dress and live as though he were a woman, he is entitled to expect from me a tolerance as it is unlikely to have much impact on me. He has no right to expect me to believe that he is a woman.

JOHN KANEFSKY
JOHN KANEFSKY
1 year ago

Yes. Ditto “respect” and “courtesy”.

I always try to be courteous to others, unless they are discourteous to me.

But my respect has to be earned, not assumed or demanded.

So I too understand that some people are “trans”, and should be given the same right to live the life they want as everyone else. But not privileged over others.

And the screeching trans lobby will never get me to deny the science that you cannot change sex, only the outward appearances that we assign to male or female.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

100% correct. Unless someone advocates direct violence against others, democracy requires us to tolerate opposing viewpoints. It doesn’t mean we have to agree.

JOHN KANEFSKY
JOHN KANEFSKY
1 year ago

Yes. Ditto “respect” and “courtesy”.

I always try to be courteous to others, unless they are discourteous to me.

But my respect has to be earned, not assumed or demanded.

So I too understand that some people are “trans”, and should be given the same right to live the life they want as everyone else. But not privileged over others.

And the screeching trans lobby will never get me to deny the science that you cannot change sex, only the outward appearances that we assign to male or female.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

100% correct. Unless someone advocates direct violence against others, democracy requires us to tolerate opposing viewpoints. It doesn’t mean we have to agree.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Thanks for the suggestion. I like that he rejects both warring extremes, as they are advanced by groups he calls “theocons” and “transqueers”. Many of the most prominent champions of ideological or viewpoint diversity seem, like Sullivan, to have sought refuge at Substack.

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

It is reasonable to expect tolerance from others. It is not reasonable to expect acceptance from others.
If a man wants to wear a dress and live as though he were a woman, he is entitled to expect from me a tolerance as it is unlikely to have much impact on me. He has no right to expect me to believe that he is a woman.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

This may be inappropriate, but I suggest people read a recent essay by Andrew Sullivan entitled “Gay Rights And The Limits Of Liberalism.”

I apologize to both the author and Unherd about referencing a similar article. I found it particularly insightful.

“Homosexual citizens absolutely deserved equal rights, but the question of homosexuality itself would — and should — always be open to dispute and debate. Since a liberal society contains both fundamentalist preachers as well as lesbian atheists, it cannot resolve the core question. So it shouldn’t try. And it should celebrate, not bemoan, this ideological diversity.”

Fafa Fafa
Fafa Fafa
1 year ago

In the US there is (or certainly: was) a motto: “I completely disagree with what you say but I defend to the bitter end your right to say it.” Or something like that. It is clear, simple and principled, and does not require a philosopher to understand it and to make it understood. (Meanwhile, with great appreciation for KS’s impeccable logic, as always)

In the 1990 some KKK folks in Georgia, or some other state like that, got it in their heads that it would be a good idea to march down 125th Street in Manhattan, which is in Harlem, and at that time was the center of black culture and life in NYC. They applied for a permit and Giuliani, who was the mayor then, rejected it, saying something like “racists are not welcome”. It was the Amsterdam News, the city’s prime black newspaper, that intervened and convinced Giuliani to issue the permit.

A smallish contingent of KKK came, they marched down the avenue quietly and uneventfully, and went home. I lived n NYC then and was very impressed – this is America!

No more!

Last edited 1 year ago by Fafa Fafa
AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Fafa Fafa

“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it”
That quote is often mistakenly attributed to Voltaire (1694-1778), but was actually penned by Evelyn Beatrice Hall, (pen name S.G. Tallentyre) in 1906, purporting to capture Voltaire’s mindset, and confusingly placed within quotation marks in her book “The Friends of Voltaire”.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Fafa Fafa

Yes, indeed, that was the old conservative’s mindset in response to the liberal’s ramblings. Today’s liberal mindset is to firmly place a foot on the throat of a conservative to shut them up.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

That is not liberal at all, but a modish form of extreme Progressivism or well-heeled neo-Marxism.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

That is not liberal at all, but a modish form of extreme Progressivism or well-heeled neo-Marxism.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Fafa Fafa

“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it”
That quote is often mistakenly attributed to Voltaire (1694-1778), but was actually penned by Evelyn Beatrice Hall, (pen name S.G. Tallentyre) in 1906, purporting to capture Voltaire’s mindset, and confusingly placed within quotation marks in her book “The Friends of Voltaire”.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Fafa Fafa

Yes, indeed, that was the old conservative’s mindset in response to the liberal’s ramblings. Today’s liberal mindset is to firmly place a foot on the throat of a conservative to shut them up.

Fafa Fafa
Fafa Fafa
1 year ago

In the US there is (or certainly: was) a motto: “I completely disagree with what you say but I defend to the bitter end your right to say it.” Or something like that. It is clear, simple and principled, and does not require a philosopher to understand it and to make it understood. (Meanwhile, with great appreciation for KS’s impeccable logic, as always)

In the 1990 some KKK folks in Georgia, or some other state like that, got it in their heads that it would be a good idea to march down 125th Street in Manhattan, which is in Harlem, and at that time was the center of black culture and life in NYC. They applied for a permit and Giuliani, who was the mayor then, rejected it, saying something like “racists are not welcome”. It was the Amsterdam News, the city’s prime black newspaper, that intervened and convinced Giuliani to issue the permit.

A smallish contingent of KKK came, they marched down the avenue quietly and uneventfully, and went home. I lived n NYC then and was very impressed – this is America!

No more!

Last edited 1 year ago by Fafa Fafa
Steve White
Steve White
1 year ago

In the end no one wants to have their bank accounts abruptly closed like Brexiter Nigel Farage. Political persecution is everyone’s future who holds to and speaks an unapproved position. The more convincing you are, the more of a threat you are.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve White
Steve White
Steve White
1 year ago

In the end no one wants to have their bank accounts abruptly closed like Brexiter Nigel Farage. Political persecution is everyone’s future who holds to and speaks an unapproved position. The more convincing you are, the more of a threat you are.

Last edited 1 year ago by Steve White
Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago

We’ve been here before, when a great part of a university’s output was religious in nature. Dissent, from Galileo to Darwin, was career-threatening. But in terms of academic development, dissent is absolutely essential to challenge the divine right of kings. An inquisition-controlled academy that is only allowed to wrestle over verses in a divine book will discover nothing, compared to the free-for-all rough-and-tumble of enlightenment-based university that fosters dissent and debate.

Saul D
Saul D
1 year ago

We’ve been here before, when a great part of a university’s output was religious in nature. Dissent, from Galileo to Darwin, was career-threatening. But in terms of academic development, dissent is absolutely essential to challenge the divine right of kings. An inquisition-controlled academy that is only allowed to wrestle over verses in a divine book will discover nothing, compared to the free-for-all rough-and-tumble of enlightenment-based university that fosters dissent and debate.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Isn’t the idea that people aren’t really cancelled, something I hear from leftists all the time, also what they same people tend to call ‘Gaslighting?’ An evil man twirling his moustache is confused and would like to know.

Ben Jones
Ben Jones
1 year ago

Isn’t the idea that people aren’t really cancelled, something I hear from leftists all the time, also what they same people tend to call ‘Gaslighting?’ An evil man twirling his moustache is confused and would like to know.

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago

I teach an introductory course in statistics at a London university and introduce the concept of mutually exclusive events. I was reading over my notes recently and noticed that I stated that male and female were mutually exclusive categories. I mentioned it last year but I think I got away with it. However, I must confess that I am concerned about making this statement again this coming Autumn.
How stupid is that?

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
1 year ago

As far as I know nobody has yet claimed to be both male and female, but only neither. So ‘mutually exclusive’ is probably safe (for now). ‘Mutually exclusive and exhaustive’, on the other hand….

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

Actually about 1 in 200 people have intersex characteristics, and a much smaller subset are quite evenly split. Still, no documented person has ever, for example, been able both to impregnate someone and give birth. In separate hypothetical instances of course, or else it would be weird. 😉

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
laura jamieson
laura jamieson
1 year ago
Reply to  AJ Mac

Unless you identify as a snail

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  laura jamieson

True. I thought the discussion was still (barely) confined to the human realm.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  laura jamieson

True. I thought the discussion was still (barely) confined to the human realm.

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  AJ Mac

Doesn’t it come down to a true binary; small or large gametes?

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

I think I get the wink or nudge.
(If so: Though I wouldn’t call them mutually exclusive, I’d say brains and nuts are often in binary conflict)
I see I mistook your meaning after all. I’ll concede: According to your precise definition, male and female are mutually exclusive binaries. However, in a few cases this is not phenotypically apparent, even without makeup or combat boots, length of hair, etc. to skew the look one way or the other.

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

I think I get the wink or nudge.
(If so: Though I wouldn’t call them mutually exclusive, I’d say brains and nuts are often in binary conflict)
I see I mistook your meaning after all. I’ll concede: According to your precise definition, male and female are mutually exclusive binaries. However, in a few cases this is not phenotypically apparent, even without makeup or combat boots, length of hair, etc. to skew the look one way or the other.

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
laura jamieson
laura jamieson
1 year ago
Reply to  AJ Mac

Unless you identify as a snail

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  AJ Mac

Doesn’t it come down to a true binary; small or large gametes?

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

I give percentages…

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

Actually about 1 in 200 people have intersex characteristics, and a much smaller subset are quite evenly split. Still, no documented person has ever, for example, been able both to impregnate someone and give birth. In separate hypothetical instances of course, or else it would be weird. 😉

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago
Reply to  Russell Sharpe

I give percentages…

Russell Sharpe
Russell Sharpe
1 year ago

As far as I know nobody has yet claimed to be both male and female, but only neither. So ‘mutually exclusive’ is probably safe (for now). ‘Mutually exclusive and exhaustive’, on the other hand….

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
1 year ago

I teach an introductory course in statistics at a London university and introduce the concept of mutually exclusive events. I was reading over my notes recently and noticed that I stated that male and female were mutually exclusive categories. I mentioned it last year but I think I got away with it. However, I must confess that I am concerned about making this statement again this coming Autumn.
How stupid is that?

William Simonds
William Simonds
1 year ago

This is a good treatise on free speech in academia, but it seems to me it misses a salient point: academics (i.e. professors and lecturers) do not regulate speech on campuses. Administrators do. And the motive in most cases of suppression by administrations is not ideological, but rather an innate desire administrators of anything almost universally have: to manage things to the least possible level of turmoil. Ideas matter less than organizational peace and quiet. After all, why should I support free speech if it makes my job as an administrator more difficult? I’m not paid to enhance free speech. I’m paid to run an organization as efficiently as possible. And if that means quieting (aka cancelling) this voice or that, then so be it.
And the apparent fact is that the majority left leaning academics are more vocal than the majority of right leaning academics. So which voice is easier to quell? Rule 1 in administration of anything: when forced to choose between opposing views, always choose to side with the most vocal voices because to side with the less vocal is organization suicide for an administrator. Make decisions that ruffle the least feathers.

Last edited 1 year ago by William Simonds
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

Good point, and this is why the “long march through the institutions” appears to be successful. Only now are we starting to see something of a backlash.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

What you say might well be true of most administrators, William, even implicitly (or explicitly) part of their job descriptions. But what you say is very cynical, too, and very discouraging. I’m not convinced–not yet–that no one becomes an academic administrator without some sense of a higher calling than maintaining order at the cost of intellectual and moral integrity. In fact, I can think of at least one piece of evidence (from Wikipedia) to the contrary: the “Chicago Statement.”
“Following a series of incidents in 2014 where students at various schools sought to prevent controversial commencement speakers, the Committee on Freedom of Expression at the University of Chicago was formed and charged by the President Robert J. Zimmer and Provost Eric D. Isaacs in July 2014, to draft a statement that would articulate the University of Chicago’s “overarching commitment to free, robust, and uninhibited debate and deliberation among all members of the University’s community.”

William Simonds
William Simonds
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Nathanson

Paul, your point is well taken. However, the Chicago Statement is, I fear, the exception rather than the rule. And it gets a Wikipedia article for that very fact. It is cited because rises above the tide of cancellations that subsume free speech in favor of discouraging dissent.
And in the reality of day to day university administration, this tide of cancellation has its roots in middle and lower level administration, not the executive level. There is an old saying in business: “those who have the least amount of authority tend to use it the most.” Cancellations begin because of this lower level organizational unwillingness to commit to ideology over efficiency at the lower levels. They simply can’t be bothered. There are too many papers that need pushing.
And that is the true irony of this piece. The clothes this cancellation wave wears is ideological purity (suppress ideological dissent). But underneath, if you pull back the kimono, what you see is an administration that has no real ideological commitment. They are all too willing to go along with that suppression as an acceptable price to pay to make peace with the most vocal of their organization.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

Okay, William, I can’t argue with you (or John) about the prevalence of corruption. I’d like to do that, but I can’t. My own personal experience as an academic–I could regale you with many stories about being betrayed by colleagues (not only by bureaucrats)–has taught me that the university, like just about every other institution in our time, is both morally and intellectually bankrupt. I’d rather remain naïve than acknowledge the terminal illness of society, but old age pushes me relentlessly toward cynicism. And yet I’m still unwilling to give up on human nature itself. As individuals and even as communities, we do have at least some choices to make.
Only a few days ago, I got into a (futile) argument of this kind with a friend, a much younger man. He’s a teacher, although he has a passionate interest in the politics of Quebec separatism. Unable to convert me on rational grounds, he now argues (irony notwithstanding) that reason is nothing more than a thin veneer that people manipulate in order to legitimate the emotional longings that are inherent in romanticism and nationalism. And for him, now, “that’s okay.” My friend is actually a kind and generous person, one who still supports the rational enterprise of democracy, not a postmodernist theorist or a woke ideologue. And he is certainly not yet a budding demagogue who would intentionally inspire frenzied mobs. But even he now understands his own nationalism as a secular religion of the fundamentalist kind–that is, beyond debate. So I came away from that argument more hopeless than ever.
It’s true that emotion evolved earlier than reason and is more deeply rooted in human nature. But the relative fragility of reason doesn’t make it less important (or even less natural) than emotion as an innate feature of the human condition. On the contrary, it makes the daunting task of cultivating reason–not manipulating it, and therefore distorting it, to support personal or collective self-interest–more important than ever.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

Here’s more evidence to support your point of view, William. God, this is depressing. What follows is an excerpt from Jamie Sarkonak, Academic Freedom Trampled to Prevent ‘Harm’ to Trans Students,” National Post, 29 June 2023; https://nationalpost.com/opinion/jamie-sarkonak-gender-critical-professors-demotion-is-an-attack-on-academic-freedom?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NP%20Platformed%20newsletter%202023-06-29&utm_term=NP_Comments
Labour arbitrator agrees Kathleen Lowrey did nothing deserving of punishment, but backed her poor treatment anyway
The labour arbitrator in May decided that Lowrey’s dismissal was not an act of discipline and did not violate her academic freedom because, in his view, it was simply a matter of making the department run smoothly. To his credit, he ruled that union protection should apply to professors carrying out administrative roles like that of associate chair (arbitrators of the past haven’t been so generous, so the decision on this front was a win for labour). Lowrey’s expression of gender critical views wasn’t worthy of punishment, he wrote, but it did render her “unable to carry out the job in a way that served … the department’s needs.”
“The associate chair’s role requires a person who can act and be seen to act as a supportive student advisor, a committee chair able to move the business of the faculty forward and so on,” explained the arbitrator in his decision.
“The disputes over the treatment of transgender students within the university were live and controversial. It would be difficult for anyone to act as a chair or assistant chair that, of necessity, had to deal with such issues, not just as they arise, but in this case once they had clearly arisen.”
In other words, the arbitrator said that because Lowrey would potentially encounter transgender students in the course of her duties, and because she proclaimed to not believe in gender ideology, her removal was acceptable. He tried to say that she was being demoted for the effects of the expression of her views, not disciplined for her views. He went as far as declaring that “the case is not in any way a ruling on the strongly held views of the protagonists in the debate over transgender rights and accommodation, or over gender critical views.”
But calling the sky red when it’s blue doesn’t make it red. In reality, the arbitrator drew a distinction without a difference. Lowery was demoted for her views, because her views — her belief in biological sex and disbelief in gender ideology — were deemed incompatible with the extra administrative duties that she took on.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

Okay, William, I can’t argue with you (or John) about the prevalence of corruption. I’d like to do that, but I can’t. My own personal experience as an academic–I could regale you with many stories about being betrayed by colleagues (not only by bureaucrats)–has taught me that the university, like just about every other institution in our time, is both morally and intellectually bankrupt. I’d rather remain naïve than acknowledge the terminal illness of society, but old age pushes me relentlessly toward cynicism. And yet I’m still unwilling to give up on human nature itself. As individuals and even as communities, we do have at least some choices to make.
Only a few days ago, I got into a (futile) argument of this kind with a friend, a much younger man. He’s a teacher, although he has a passionate interest in the politics of Quebec separatism. Unable to convert me on rational grounds, he now argues (irony notwithstanding) that reason is nothing more than a thin veneer that people manipulate in order to legitimate the emotional longings that are inherent in romanticism and nationalism. And for him, now, “that’s okay.” My friend is actually a kind and generous person, one who still supports the rational enterprise of democracy, not a postmodernist theorist or a woke ideologue. And he is certainly not yet a budding demagogue who would intentionally inspire frenzied mobs. But even he now understands his own nationalism as a secular religion of the fundamentalist kind–that is, beyond debate. So I came away from that argument more hopeless than ever.
It’s true that emotion evolved earlier than reason and is more deeply rooted in human nature. But the relative fragility of reason doesn’t make it less important (or even less natural) than emotion as an innate feature of the human condition. On the contrary, it makes the daunting task of cultivating reason–not manipulating it, and therefore distorting it, to support personal or collective self-interest–more important than ever.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

Here’s more evidence to support your point of view, William. God, this is depressing. What follows is an excerpt from Jamie Sarkonak, Academic Freedom Trampled to Prevent ‘Harm’ to Trans Students,” National Post, 29 June 2023; https://nationalpost.com/opinion/jamie-sarkonak-gender-critical-professors-demotion-is-an-attack-on-academic-freedom?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=NP%20Platformed%20newsletter%202023-06-29&utm_term=NP_Comments
Labour arbitrator agrees Kathleen Lowrey did nothing deserving of punishment, but backed her poor treatment anyway
The labour arbitrator in May decided that Lowrey’s dismissal was not an act of discipline and did not violate her academic freedom because, in his view, it was simply a matter of making the department run smoothly. To his credit, he ruled that union protection should apply to professors carrying out administrative roles like that of associate chair (arbitrators of the past haven’t been so generous, so the decision on this front was a win for labour). Lowrey’s expression of gender critical views wasn’t worthy of punishment, he wrote, but it did render her “unable to carry out the job in a way that served … the department’s needs.”
“The associate chair’s role requires a person who can act and be seen to act as a supportive student advisor, a committee chair able to move the business of the faculty forward and so on,” explained the arbitrator in his decision.
“The disputes over the treatment of transgender students within the university were live and controversial. It would be difficult for anyone to act as a chair or assistant chair that, of necessity, had to deal with such issues, not just as they arise, but in this case once they had clearly arisen.”
In other words, the arbitrator said that because Lowrey would potentially encounter transgender students in the course of her duties, and because she proclaimed to not believe in gender ideology, her removal was acceptable. He tried to say that she was being demoted for the effects of the expression of her views, not disciplined for her views. He went as far as declaring that “the case is not in any way a ruling on the strongly held views of the protagonists in the debate over transgender rights and accommodation, or over gender critical views.”
But calling the sky red when it’s blue doesn’t make it red. In reality, the arbitrator drew a distinction without a difference. Lowery was demoted for her views, because her views — her belief in biological sex and disbelief in gender ideology — were deemed incompatible with the extra administrative duties that she took on.

JOHN KANEFSKY
JOHN KANEFSKY
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Nathanson

“what you say is cynical”.

But true.

Reminds me of my father’s saying that a realist is a cynic who knows what’s happening.

William Simonds
William Simonds
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Nathanson

Paul, your point is well taken. However, the Chicago Statement is, I fear, the exception rather than the rule. And it gets a Wikipedia article for that very fact. It is cited because rises above the tide of cancellations that subsume free speech in favor of discouraging dissent.
And in the reality of day to day university administration, this tide of cancellation has its roots in middle and lower level administration, not the executive level. There is an old saying in business: “those who have the least amount of authority tend to use it the most.” Cancellations begin because of this lower level organizational unwillingness to commit to ideology over efficiency at the lower levels. They simply can’t be bothered. There are too many papers that need pushing.
And that is the true irony of this piece. The clothes this cancellation wave wears is ideological purity (suppress ideological dissent). But underneath, if you pull back the kimono, what you see is an administration that has no real ideological commitment. They are all too willing to go along with that suppression as an acceptable price to pay to make peace with the most vocal of their organization.

JOHN KANEFSKY
JOHN KANEFSKY
1 year ago
Reply to  Paul Nathanson

“what you say is cynical”.

But true.

Reminds me of my father’s saying that a realist is a cynic who knows what’s happening.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

Academics cannot institute a binding regulation, but they might stifle or demonize divergent views. I think John Stuart Mill and his Libertarian offspring get this one right: Your personal liberties cannot be allowed to crush the same personal liberties for another legally competent adult citizen. It’s correct for a professor to have a measure of authority and influence, but not to silence or pre-emptively squash disagreement.

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

Good point, and this is why the “long march through the institutions” appears to be successful. Only now are we starting to see something of a backlash.

Paul Nathanson
Paul Nathanson
1 year ago

What you say might well be true of most administrators, William, even implicitly (or explicitly) part of their job descriptions. But what you say is very cynical, too, and very discouraging. I’m not convinced–not yet–that no one becomes an academic administrator without some sense of a higher calling than maintaining order at the cost of intellectual and moral integrity. In fact, I can think of at least one piece of evidence (from Wikipedia) to the contrary: the “Chicago Statement.”
“Following a series of incidents in 2014 where students at various schools sought to prevent controversial commencement speakers, the Committee on Freedom of Expression at the University of Chicago was formed and charged by the President Robert J. Zimmer and Provost Eric D. Isaacs in July 2014, to draft a statement that would articulate the University of Chicago’s “overarching commitment to free, robust, and uninhibited debate and deliberation among all members of the University’s community.”

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

Academics cannot institute a binding regulation, but they might stifle or demonize divergent views. I think John Stuart Mill and his Libertarian offspring get this one right: Your personal liberties cannot be allowed to crush the same personal liberties for another legally competent adult citizen. It’s correct for a professor to have a measure of authority and influence, but not to silence or pre-emptively squash disagreement.

Last edited 1 year ago by AJ Mac
William Simonds
William Simonds
1 year ago

This is a good treatise on free speech in academia, but it seems to me it misses a salient point: academics (i.e. professors and lecturers) do not regulate speech on campuses. Administrators do. And the motive in most cases of suppression by administrations is not ideological, but rather an innate desire administrators of anything almost universally have: to manage things to the least possible level of turmoil. Ideas matter less than organizational peace and quiet. After all, why should I support free speech if it makes my job as an administrator more difficult? I’m not paid to enhance free speech. I’m paid to run an organization as efficiently as possible. And if that means quieting (aka cancelling) this voice or that, then so be it.
And the apparent fact is that the majority left leaning academics are more vocal than the majority of right leaning academics. So which voice is easier to quell? Rule 1 in administration of anything: when forced to choose between opposing views, always choose to side with the most vocal voices because to side with the less vocal is organization suicide for an administrator. Make decisions that ruffle the least feathers.

Last edited 1 year ago by William Simonds
C Troedodo
C Troedodo
1 year ago

No specific mention of it here, but I did read Srinivasan’s piece in LRB and was struck that in the last few paragraphs she brought up the ‘tolerance’ of the Left. She specifically mentioned an individual who demonstrated her tolerance in the 1980’s and 1990’s….. which made me wonder whether that was the last time someone from the Left was tolerant. Perhaps the Left’s tolerance died with Isaiah Berlin in 1997?

C Troedodo
C Troedodo
1 year ago

No specific mention of it here, but I did read Srinivasan’s piece in LRB and was struck that in the last few paragraphs she brought up the ‘tolerance’ of the Left. She specifically mentioned an individual who demonstrated her tolerance in the 1980’s and 1990’s….. which made me wonder whether that was the last time someone from the Left was tolerant. Perhaps the Left’s tolerance died with Isaiah Berlin in 1997?

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

In my youth I used to read Science Fiction stories where our Hero’s fleet of good ships met in space battle with the Totalitarian fleet of bad ships. The bad ships each had a Political Commissar on board to ensure compliance with the Party Line. The Political Commissars could even overrule the Captain.
You could argue that our Fleet of Universities forging ahead into the glorious future has accumulated Political Commissars who interfere with the smooth running of each ship. They should be scraped off, like barnacles.

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

In my youth I used to read Science Fiction stories where our Hero’s fleet of good ships met in space battle with the Totalitarian fleet of bad ships. The bad ships each had a Political Commissar on board to ensure compliance with the Party Line. The Political Commissars could even overrule the Captain.
You could argue that our Fleet of Universities forging ahead into the glorious future has accumulated Political Commissars who interfere with the smooth running of each ship. They should be scraped off, like barnacles.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

It’s deeply depressing that we’re discussing the value free speech in the 21st Century after having gone through the 20th. My late in-laws, who were children during WWII (father-in-law was enslaved by the Nazis when he was 15, and later by the Communists until he was rescued), warned his son and me back in the 80s that our freedoms were very tenuous and, if we didn’t fight to protect them, the horrors of Soviet suppression, oppression, silencing, and punishment would be our fate, too. I scoffed: “ Nonsense! This is America! Freedom of speech is the very first and most important right protected by our founding document!”. And yet, here we are, being spied on by a completely incompetent but punitive government and “cancelled” by those perfectly willing to curry the favor of the goons and weirdos that somehow hold positions of authority. My own daughter, who really should know better, argued with her father and I about the perceived “excesses” of free speech. That’s how deeply disturbing this has become. It used to be self-evident that suppression of information and shutting down opinion was clearly a totalitarian impulse. And now, in Western democracies, we’re made to defend it? Speak the h*ll up about everything, I say, and defend to the death that quintessential human right.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

So a 14-year-old can be forced to study hardcore Critical Race Theory, without any balancing view, or be told to leave the AP English class? That’s based, of course, on a recent real-world example. I’m in primary agreement with you, but my own brand of digital outspokenness seems to compel me to find exceptions to almost any absolute claim.
Good post, thanks.

AJ Mac
AJ Mac
1 year ago

So a 14-year-old can be forced to study hardcore Critical Race Theory, without any balancing view, or be told to leave the AP English class? That’s based, of course, on a recent real-world example. I’m in primary agreement with you, but my own brand of digital outspokenness seems to compel me to find exceptions to almost any absolute claim.
Good post, thanks.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

It’s deeply depressing that we’re discussing the value free speech in the 21st Century after having gone through the 20th. My late in-laws, who were children during WWII (father-in-law was enslaved by the Nazis when he was 15, and later by the Communists until he was rescued), warned his son and me back in the 80s that our freedoms were very tenuous and, if we didn’t fight to protect them, the horrors of Soviet suppression, oppression, silencing, and punishment would be our fate, too. I scoffed: “ Nonsense! This is America! Freedom of speech is the very first and most important right protected by our founding document!”. And yet, here we are, being spied on by a completely incompetent but punitive government and “cancelled” by those perfectly willing to curry the favor of the goons and weirdos that somehow hold positions of authority. My own daughter, who really should know better, argued with her father and I about the perceived “excesses” of free speech. That’s how deeply disturbing this has become. It used to be self-evident that suppression of information and shutting down opinion was clearly a totalitarian impulse. And now, in Western democracies, we’re made to defend it? Speak the h*ll up about everything, I say, and defend to the death that quintessential human right.

Adrian Smith
Adrian Smith
1 year ago

When free speech dies shortly after out of favour people start dying. Everyone needs the right to say what they believe and feel no matter how many people agree or disagree with them. People don’t have to listen. Indeed the answers to a lot of the issues that have generated a lot of heat but very little light in recent years are growing a thicker skin and selected deafness. All the “hate speech” laws should be repealed. Yes they were probably well intentioned but are living proof that the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Adrian Smith
Adrian Smith
1 year ago

When free speech dies shortly after out of favour people start dying. Everyone needs the right to say what they believe and feel no matter how many people agree or disagree with them. People don’t have to listen. Indeed the answers to a lot of the issues that have generated a lot of heat but very little light in recent years are growing a thicker skin and selected deafness. All the “hate speech” laws should be repealed. Yes they were probably well intentioned but are living proof that the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
1 year ago

FFS. Stock says sex is immutable, that ‘trans-women’ are not women and never will be. That is not controversial in anything but a populist sense, it is basic fact. What is controversial is the idea that men can be women. That is nonsense on stilts and can only be made ‘true’ by bullying, censorship and in Ms Stock’s case and others, persecution; short of the Gulag so far but hey let’s be progressive about it…

Martin Smith
Martin Smith
1 year ago

FFS. Stock says sex is immutable, that ‘trans-women’ are not women and never will be. That is not controversial in anything but a populist sense, it is basic fact. What is controversial is the idea that men can be women. That is nonsense on stilts and can only be made ‘true’ by bullying, censorship and in Ms Stock’s case and others, persecution; short of the Gulag so far but hey let’s be progressive about it…

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

Do i detect the opening salvoes of a battle between philosophical rivals being launched here?

If so, let battle commence! The prospect is delicious, and it matters.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago

Do i detect the opening salvoes of a battle between philosophical rivals being launched here?

If so, let battle commence! The prospect is delicious, and it matters.

Penny Adrian
Penny Adrian
1 year ago

“False beliefs cause actions to go wrong in various ways and can sometimes lead to disaster as reality suddenly hits you in the face.”
Spot on!
This is exactly what has happened everywhere that the “trans women are women/sex work is work” falsehood has been imposed on the public.
Incarcerated women have been raped due to the first and sex trafficking has increased due to the second (see: London School of Economics study, which demonstrates what common sense should tell us, which is when you destigmatize sex buying, you increase demand, and since there is never enough willing “supply” to meet demand, traffickers are incentivized to traffick).
But women like Amia Srinivasan don’t know any incarcerated women or trafficking survivors. She, like others of her kind, are like toddlers with guns. These sheltered little girls have far more power than they can handle and do far more harm than they are aware of.
Thank You for another great article!
If you’re ever in Llano Texas, check out Cooper’s Pit Bar B Q and Fuel Coffee House – those places are the best!

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
1 year ago
Reply to  Penny Adrian

Indeed. It appears that Amia’s views are derived from surfing…