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The Great Food Reset has begun We all lose from the global war on farmers

Is pig farming for the chop? (Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

Is pig farming for the chop? (Carsten Koall/Getty Images)


March 28, 2023   7 mins

France is in flames. Israel is erupting. America is facing a second January 6. In the Netherlands, however, the political establishment is reeling from an entirely different type of protest — one that, perhaps more than any other raging today, threatens to destabilise the global order. The victory of the Farmer-Citizen Movement (BBB) in the recent provincial elections represents an extraordinary result for an anti-establishment party that was formed just over three years ago. But then again, these are not ordinary times.

The BBB grew out of the mass demonstrations against the Dutch government’s proposal to cut nitrogen emissions by 50% in the country’s farming sector by 2030 — a target designed to comply with the European Union’s emission-reduction rules. While large farming companies have the means to meet these goals — by using less nitrogen fertiliser and reducing the number of their livestock — smaller, often family-owned farms would be forced to sell or shutter. Indeed, according to a heavily redacted European Commission document, this is precisely the strategy’s goal: “extensifying agriculture, notably through buying out or terminating farms, with the aim of reducing livestock”; this would “first be on a voluntary basis, but mandatory buyout is not excluded if necessary”.

It is no surprise, then, that the plans sparked massive protests by farmers, who see it as a direct attack on their livelihoods, or that the BBB’s slogan — “No Farms, No Food” — clearly resonated with voters. But aside from concerns about the impact of the measure on the country’s food security, and on a centuries-old rural way of life integral to Dutch national identity, the rationale behind this drastic measure is also questionable. Agriculture currently accounts for almost half of the country’s output of carbon dioxide, yet the Netherlands is responsible for less than 0.4% of the world’s emissions. No wonder many Dutch fail to see how such negligible returns justify the complete overhaul of the country’s farming sector, which is already considered one of the most sustainable in the world: over the past two decades, water dependence for key crops has been reduced by as much as 90%, and the use of chemical pesticides in greenhouses has been almost completely eliminated.

Farmers also point out that the consequences of the nitrogen cut would extend well beyond the Netherlands. The country, after all, is Europe’s largest exporter of meat and the second-largest agricultural exporter in the world, just behind the United States — in other words, the plan would cause food exports to collapse at a time when the world is already facing a food and resource shortage. We already know what this might look like. A similar ban on nitrogen fertiliser was conducted in Sri Lanka last year, with disastrous consequences: it caused an artificial food shortage that plunged nearly two million Sri Lankans into poverty, leading to an uprising that toppled the government.

Given the irrational nature of the policy, many protesting farmers believe it can’t simply be blamed on the urbanite “green elites” currently running the Dutch government. They suggest one of the underlying reasons for the move is to squeeze small farmers from the market, allowing them to be bought out by multinational agribusiness giants who recognise the immense value of the country’s land — not only is it highly fertile, but it is also strategically located with easy access to the north Atlantic coast (Rotterdam is the largest port in Europe). They also point out that prime minister Rutte is an Agenda Contributor of the World Economic Forum, which is well known for being corporate-driven, while his finance minister and Minister of Social Affairs and Employment are also tied to the body.

The struggle playing out in the Netherlands would seem to be part of a much bigger game that seeks to “reset” the international food system. Similar measures are currently being introduced or considered in several other European countries, including Belgium, Germany, Ireland and Britain (where the Government is encouraging traditional farmers to leave the industry to free up land for new “sustainable” farmers). As the second-largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, after the energy sector, agriculture has naturally ended up in the crosshairs of Net Zero advocates — that is, virtually all major international and global organisations. The solution, we are told, is “sustainable agriculture” — one of the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which form their “Agenda 2030”.

This issue has now been pushed to the top of the global agenda. Last November’s G20 meeting in Bali called for “an accelerated transformation towards sustainable and resilient agriculture and food systems and supply chains” to “ensure that food systems better contribute to adaptation and mitigation to climate change”. Just a few days later, in Egypt, the COP27 annual Green Agenda Climate Summit launched its initiative aimed at promoting “a shift towards sustainable, climate-resilient, healthy diets”. Within a year, its Food and Agriculture Organization aims to launch a “roadmap” for reducing greenhouse emissions in the agricultural sector.

The endgame is hinted at in several other UN documents: reducing nitrogen use and global livestock production, lowering meat consumption, and promoting more “sustainable” sources of protein, such as plant-based or lab-grown products, and even insects. The United Nations Environment Programme, for example, has stated that global meat and dairy consumption must be reduced by 50% by 2050. Other international and multilateral organisation have presented their own plans for transforming the global food system. The EU’s Farm to Fork strategy “aims to accelerate our transition to a sustainable food system”. Meanwhile, the World Bank, in its climate change action plan for 2021-2025, says that 35% of the bank’s total funding during this period will be devoted to transforming agriculture and other key systems to deal with climate change.

Alongside these intergovernmental and multilateral bodies, a vast network of “stakeholders” is now devoted to the “greening” of agriculture and food production — private foundations, public-private partnerships, NGOs and corporations. Reset the Table, a 2020 Rockefeller Foundation report, called for moving away from a “focus on maximising shareholder returns” to “a more equitable system focused on fair returns and benefits to all stakeholders”. This may sound like a good idea, until one considers that “stakeholder capitalism” is a concept heavily promoted by the World Economic Forum, which represents the interests of the largest and most powerful corporations on the planet.

The Rockefeller Foundation has very close ties to the WEF, which is itself encouraging farmers to embrace “climate-smart” methods in order to make the “transition to net-zero, nature-positive food systems by 2030”. The WEF is also a big believer in the need to drastically reduce cattle farming and meat consumption and switch to “alternative proteins”.

Arguably the most influential public-private organisation specifically “dedicated to transforming our global food system” is the EAT-Lancet Commission, which is largely modelled around the Davos “multistakeholderist” approach. This is based on the premise that global policymaking should be shaped by a wide range of unelected “stakeholders”, such as academic institutions and multinational corporations, working hand-in-glove with governments. This network, cofounded by the Wellcome Trust, consists of UN agencies, world-leading universities, and corporations such as Google and Nestlé. EAT’s founder and president, Gunhild Stordalen, a Norwegian philanthropist who is married to one of the country’s richest men, has described her intention to organise a “Davos for food”.

EAT’s work was initially supported by the World Health Organization, but in 2019 the WHO withdrew its endorsement after Gian Lorenzo Cornado, Italy’s ambassador and permanent representative to the UN in Geneva, questioned the scientific basis for the dietary regime being pushed by EAT — which is focused on promoting plant-based foods and excluding meat and other animal-based foods. Cornado argued that “a standard diet for the whole planet” that ignores age, sex, health and eating habits “has no scientific justification at all” and “would mean the destruction of millenary healthy traditional diets which are a full part of the cultural heritage and social harmony in many nations”.

Perhaps more important, said Cornado, is the fact that the dietary regime advised by the commission “is also nutritionally deficient and therefore dangerous to human health” and “would certainly lead to economic depression, especially in developing countries”. He also raised concerns that “the total or nearly total elimination of foods of animal origin” would destroy cattle farming and many other activities related to the production of meat and dairy products. Despite these concerns, raised by a leading member of the world’s top public health body and shared by a network representing 200 million small-scale farmers in 81 countries, EAT continues to play a central role in the global push for the radical transformation of food systems. At the 2021 United Nations Food Systems Summit, which originated from a partnership between the WEF and the UN Secretary-General, Stordalen was given a leading role.

This complete blurring of the boundaries between the public and the private-corporate spheres in the agricultural and food sectors is also happening in other areas — with Bill Gates standing somewhere in the middle. Alongside healthcare, agriculture is the main focus of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which finances several initiatives whose stated aim is to increase food security and promote sustainable farming, such as Gates Ag One, CGIAR and the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa. Civil society organisations, however, have accused the Foundation of using its influence to promote multinational corporate interests in the Global South and to push for ineffective (but very profitable) high-tech solutions which have largely failed to increase global food production. Nor are Gates’s “sustainable” agricultural activities limited to developing countries. As well as investing in plant-based protein companies, such as Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, Gates has been buying huge amounts of farmland in the US, to the point of becoming the biggest private owner of farmland in the country.

The problem with the globalist trend he embodies is obvious: ultimately, small and medium-scale farming is more sustainable than large-scale industrial farming, as it is typically associated with greater biodiversity and the protection of landscape features. Small farms also provide a whole range of other public goods: they help to maintain lively rural and remote areas, preserve regional identities, and offer employment in regions with fewer job opportunities. But most importantly, small farms feed the world. A 2017 study found that the “peasant food web” — the diverse network of small-scale producers disconnected from Big Agriculture — feeds more than half of the world’s population using only 25% of the world’s agricultural resources.

Traditional farming, though, is suffering an unprecedented attack. Small and medium-scale farmers are being subjected to social and economic conditions in which they simply cannot survive. Peasant farms are disappearing at an alarming rate across Europe and other regions, to the benefit of the world’s food oligarchs — and all this is being done in the name of sustainability. At a time when almost a billion people around the world are still affected by hunger, the lesson of the Dutch farmers could not be more urgent, or inspiring. For now, at least, there is still time to resist the Great Food Reset.


Thomas Fazi is an UnHerd columnist and translator. His latest book is The Covid Consensus, co-authored with Toby Green.

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Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

The arrogance, hubris and stupidity of these technocrats is so profound it’s almost comical – if it wasn’t so tragic. If you force the Dutch to cull their herd by say 1,000 animals, you aren’t doing anything to help the environment. Demand for these animals won’t magically disappear. The supply will simply be filled somewhere else.

And because the Dutch are maybe the most efficient and productive farmers in the world, production will almost certainly shift somewhere much less desirable, where the environmental footprint is significantly worse. So now we get some farmer in Brazil burning down 1,000 acres of rainforest so he can create the pasture to fill the market void left by the Dutch.

Meanwhile, in Holland you’ve made some farmers wealthier, but unproductive. They will likely invest their money in real estate or some other financial instrument that doesn’t produce tangible products or jobs.

I know I shouldn’t be shocked anymore, but the ignorance of these people never ceases to amaze me.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Agreed. Our government has started to talk about banning logs as fuel. Now, suddenly, on a path where I run I see more and more trees being cut down because they are ‘rotten’. All at the same time!
We are supposed to be aiming at net zero. Biomass is an approved fuel because rotten trees will give back their CO2 to the atmosphere. So the rotten ones are cut down and new are planted. Who will control this? The thought police obviously. People will be encouraged to report their not-so-green neighbours.
I guarantee that when the government starts to cut back on cows, every rabbit and pheasant will be shot. The stupidity is that everybody in power seems to believe that people will meekly walk to their own ruin.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

This rubbish is happening under a majority Tory party. It’s becoming a nightmare and producing anti human policies.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

This rubbish is happening under a majority Tory party. It’s becoming a nightmare and producing anti human policies.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Wait, Wait, Wait.
The claim that The Netherlands is the second largest exporter of agricultural products in the world, just behind the U.S., doesn’t add up. The Netherlands has a total landmass of only 16,160 square miles. France, for example has 248,600 square miles and the state of California alone has 423,967. How on earth can they possibly export almost as much as the U.S., even if they sold 100% of every cow, onion and tulip they grow on their postage stamp-sized country?
https://www.opportimes.com/the-worlds-largest-exporters-of-agricultural-products-in-2020/

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

I have no idea actually. It’s been repeated so often I assumed it was true. Not sure if it invalidates any arguments against the closures.

Tom Condray
Tom Condray
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Dutch agriculture includes high value added specialty products. Dutch exports are not massive amounts of grains, but rather such things as ornamental plants and flowers, beef, etc. All are high value in terms of volume and weight versus corn, for example.
In short, the Dutch use high tech to add high value to what they grow.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Condray
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Condray

They produce a massive amount of cheese from their dairy farming as well as beef. “We will soon put a stop to that” says their stupid government.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Condray

They produce a massive amount of cheese from their dairy farming as well as beef. “We will soon put a stop to that” says their stupid government.

Phil M
Phil M
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

As an Australian, I was surprised to learn my country isn’t in the top 10. But the Netherlands is #2
https://humboldt.global/top-agricultural-exporters/

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil M

You’ll soon be in the top 10 the way Netherlands are treating their farmers. There are not much better contributions than feeding your own country and exporting the excess to build up the economy.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil M

You’ll soon be in the top 10 the way Netherlands are treating their farmers. There are not much better contributions than feeding your own country and exporting the excess to build up the economy.

TaprootFarm
TaprootFarm
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

The exports include products made from ingredients that are grown elsewhere. For example, orange marmalade made in The Netherlands is considered one of their agricultural products although oranges do not grow there. Ornamental plants (tulips, for example) are also agricultural products.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  TaprootFarm

They use them to make good marmalade though. It might help them to do a Dutchxit and get away from the EU.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  TaprootFarm

They use them to make good marmalade though. It might help them to do a Dutchxit and get away from the EU.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

They are just very efficient and are the worlds 4th biggest producer of food. Why would their WEF government try to hinder them?

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

I have no idea actually. It’s been repeated so often I assumed it was true. Not sure if it invalidates any arguments against the closures.

Tom Condray
Tom Condray
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

Dutch agriculture includes high value added specialty products. Dutch exports are not massive amounts of grains, but rather such things as ornamental plants and flowers, beef, etc. All are high value in terms of volume and weight versus corn, for example.
In short, the Dutch use high tech to add high value to what they grow.

Last edited 1 year ago by Tom Condray
Phil M
Phil M
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

As an Australian, I was surprised to learn my country isn’t in the top 10. But the Netherlands is #2
https://humboldt.global/top-agricultural-exporters/

TaprootFarm
TaprootFarm
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

The exports include products made from ingredients that are grown elsewhere. For example, orange marmalade made in The Netherlands is considered one of their agricultural products although oranges do not grow there. Ornamental plants (tulips, for example) are also agricultural products.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

They are just very efficient and are the worlds 4th biggest producer of food. Why would their WEF government try to hinder them?

Mechan Barclay
Mechan Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Well Said!
We offer our humanity to the alter of efficiency in all its glory.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mechan Barclay

It is not even efficient though. Some of these young people are so deceived by it that they think they have only twelve years left before the world ends.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Mechan Barclay

It is not even efficient though. Some of these young people are so deceived by it that they think they have only twelve years left before the world ends.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

The Dutch government has made investing in real estate virtually impossible unless you are a huge mega-corporation. Exorbitant fines and byzantine tax and land lease rules are now in place to discourage property ownership.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

The rich will never have any problem buying land.

Chris J
Chris J
1 year ago

The rich will also have no problem in filling their plates with fiet mignon and other such foods while the rest of us will be expected to eat maggot pies.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris J

They won’t let you eat meat by the sound of it. I don’t know if maggots count.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris J

They won’t let you eat meat by the sound of it. I don’t know if maggots count.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago

Gates is buying up massive areas in the States. It’s not good.

Chris J
Chris J
1 year ago

The rich will also have no problem in filling their plates with fiet mignon and other such foods while the rest of us will be expected to eat maggot pies.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago

Gates is buying up massive areas in the States. It’s not good.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“You’ll own nothing and still be happy.” Klaus Scwab. We need to deal with these opressors.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

The rich will never have any problem buying land.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

“You’ll own nothing and still be happy.” Klaus Scwab. We need to deal with these opressors.

Ivan Hybs
Ivan Hybs
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

This is another example of (for the lack of words) socialist-techno-eco-oligo-klepto-fascism. It must stop or we are doomed.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Ivan Hybs

Marriage won’t be allowed. They want to own and influence the children themselves just like the communists did. Just look at what is happening in British schools.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Ivan Hybs

Marriage won’t be allowed. They want to own and influence the children themselves just like the communists did. Just look at what is happening in British schools.

Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

I agree, except they are not ignorant, they are greedy and evil. It’s all about The Grift—climate change and everything (like food production and distribution) being hung on it, COVID, Ukraine War, ESG, just about everything.

The government-corporate quasi-fascists profit from creating a problem, which may be real or may be manufactured, and then profit from imposing a solution that does not solve anything but sets up the need for another such solution when the problem persists.

If you doubt this, just look around you.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

It’s all to do with these crazy zero policies that have got out of hand. When I was growing up the so called experts were talking about the world freezing. This changed at some stage and now it’s global warming. It is affecting the young and some believe the world has only got twelve more years. Just poppycot and scaremongering. It’s a mad mad world.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Agreed. Our government has started to talk about banning logs as fuel. Now, suddenly, on a path where I run I see more and more trees being cut down because they are ‘rotten’. All at the same time!
We are supposed to be aiming at net zero. Biomass is an approved fuel because rotten trees will give back their CO2 to the atmosphere. So the rotten ones are cut down and new are planted. Who will control this? The thought police obviously. People will be encouraged to report their not-so-green neighbours.
I guarantee that when the government starts to cut back on cows, every rabbit and pheasant will be shot. The stupidity is that everybody in power seems to believe that people will meekly walk to their own ruin.

Last edited 1 year ago by Chris Wheatley
Warren Trees
Warren Trees
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Wait, Wait, Wait.
The claim that The Netherlands is the second largest exporter of agricultural products in the world, just behind the U.S., doesn’t add up. The Netherlands has a total landmass of only 16,160 square miles. France, for example has 248,600 square miles and the state of California alone has 423,967. How on earth can they possibly export almost as much as the U.S., even if they sold 100% of every cow, onion and tulip they grow on their postage stamp-sized country?
https://www.opportimes.com/the-worlds-largest-exporters-of-agricultural-products-in-2020/

Mechan Barclay
Mechan Barclay
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Well Said!
We offer our humanity to the alter of efficiency in all its glory.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

The Dutch government has made investing in real estate virtually impossible unless you are a huge mega-corporation. Exorbitant fines and byzantine tax and land lease rules are now in place to discourage property ownership.

Ivan Hybs
Ivan Hybs
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

This is another example of (for the lack of words) socialist-techno-eco-oligo-klepto-fascism. It must stop or we are doomed.

Martin Johnson
Martin Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

I agree, except they are not ignorant, they are greedy and evil. It’s all about The Grift—climate change and everything (like food production and distribution) being hung on it, COVID, Ukraine War, ESG, just about everything.

The government-corporate quasi-fascists profit from creating a problem, which may be real or may be manufactured, and then profit from imposing a solution that does not solve anything but sets up the need for another such solution when the problem persists.

If you doubt this, just look around you.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

It’s all to do with these crazy zero policies that have got out of hand. When I was growing up the so called experts were talking about the world freezing. This changed at some stage and now it’s global warming. It is affecting the young and some believe the world has only got twelve more years. Just poppycot and scaremongering. It’s a mad mad world.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
1 year ago

The arrogance, hubris and stupidity of these technocrats is so profound it’s almost comical – if it wasn’t so tragic. If you force the Dutch to cull their herd by say 1,000 animals, you aren’t doing anything to help the environment. Demand for these animals won’t magically disappear. The supply will simply be filled somewhere else.

And because the Dutch are maybe the most efficient and productive farmers in the world, production will almost certainly shift somewhere much less desirable, where the environmental footprint is significantly worse. So now we get some farmer in Brazil burning down 1,000 acres of rainforest so he can create the pasture to fill the market void left by the Dutch.

Meanwhile, in Holland you’ve made some farmers wealthier, but unproductive. They will likely invest their money in real estate or some other financial instrument that doesn’t produce tangible products or jobs.

I know I shouldn’t be shocked anymore, but the ignorance of these people never ceases to amaze me.

Peter Kwasi-Modo
Peter Kwasi-Modo
1 year ago

Great article! (Unherd, please note: more like this, please.)
I hope that these latter-day Marie-Antoinettes, saying “Qu’ils mangent des insectes”, meet a similar fate to the original.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Kwasi-Modo
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Well said indeed Notre Dame.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Well said indeed Notre Dame.

Peter Kwasi-Modo
Peter Kwasi-Modo
1 year ago

Great article! (Unherd, please note: more like this, please.)
I hope that these latter-day Marie-Antoinettes, saying “Qu’ils mangent des insectes”, meet a similar fate to the original.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Kwasi-Modo
RM Parker
RM Parker
1 year ago

Good God. The trajectory was clear enough in hindsight, but it’s only now, in the endgame, that the frog finally realises it’s being boiled. This won’t end well.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  RM Parker

Most people are not aware of it. I think you get a knowing crowd on here.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  RM Parker

Most people are not aware of it. I think you get a knowing crowd on here.

RM Parker
RM Parker
1 year ago

Good God. The trajectory was clear enough in hindsight, but it’s only now, in the endgame, that the frog finally realises it’s being boiled. This won’t end well.

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

People used to laugh when I argued that the whole point of the EU was to use bureaucracy and regulation to protect its big businesses against the competition from small business and other world markets.
They are not laughing now.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I wish ‘they’ would buy mine!

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

The opposite is true Frank. You need to read the right papers.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

I wish ‘they’ would buy mine!

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Frank McCusker

The opposite is true Frank. You need to read the right papers.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

The trouble with big business is that it is global and can get around the rules of nation states.

Frank McCusker
Frank McCusker
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  AC Harper

The trouble with big business is that it is global and can get around the rules of nation states.

AC Harper
AC Harper
1 year ago

People used to laugh when I argued that the whole point of the EU was to use bureaucracy and regulation to protect its big businesses against the competition from small business and other world markets.
They are not laughing now.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Please God, deliver us from bureaucrats and wealthy busybodies and their endless meddling in areas they don’t understand.

None of these policies are based on a holistic knowledge of the likely impact they will have. There will be endless unforeseen consequences. For instance, insects feed on animal dung. No animals, no dung, no insects, no wildflowers. They are recipes for the sterilisation of the earth.

Technocrats never seem to learn from their past mistakes. Their anthem is always ‘this time it will be different’.

It won’t.

John Holland
John Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Yes, some (not that many) insects feed in animal dung. However, the idea that the only animal dung on Earth can be from human livestock is pretty odd- until the latter part of the 20th century, most mammals on the planet were wild.

Chris J
Chris J
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

There are, supposedly , only 75.000,000 wild ruminantd on the planet against about 1 billion cattle. Might be a dung deficiency there, and who will be traipsing across the Serengeti to pick it up, I wonder.

Chris J
Chris J
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

There are, supposedly , only 75.000,000 wild ruminantd on the planet against about 1 billion cattle. Might be a dung deficiency there, and who will be traipsing across the Serengeti to pick it up, I wonder.

Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Indeed, we are living through the Western version of China’s Great Leap Forward. The latter led to all kinds of unforeseen consequences and mass starvation ensued with the loss of millions of lives.
I cannot believe that the prospective unforeseen consequences that lurk on the horizon obvious for most to see have been missed by our globalist overlords. They know where it is leading and they, enabled by legions of willing idiots, have spent the last decades ensuring a general population dumbed down and/or otherwise distracted enough not to ask any questions.

Last edited 1 year ago by Glyn R
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

Microsoft says gaming people are great and can develop their personalities through gaming. Yeah get them in to fantasy land to keep them quiet.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Glyn R

Microsoft says gaming people are great and can develop their personalities through gaming. Yeah get them in to fantasy land to keep them quiet.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Educated idiots if you ask me.

John Holland
John Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Yes, some (not that many) insects feed in animal dung. However, the idea that the only animal dung on Earth can be from human livestock is pretty odd- until the latter part of the 20th century, most mammals on the planet were wild.

Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Indeed, we are living through the Western version of China’s Great Leap Forward. The latter led to all kinds of unforeseen consequences and mass starvation ensued with the loss of millions of lives.
I cannot believe that the prospective unforeseen consequences that lurk on the horizon obvious for most to see have been missed by our globalist overlords. They know where it is leading and they, enabled by legions of willing idiots, have spent the last decades ensuring a general population dumbed down and/or otherwise distracted enough not to ask any questions.

Last edited 1 year ago by Glyn R
Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Educated idiots if you ask me.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago

Please God, deliver us from bureaucrats and wealthy busybodies and their endless meddling in areas they don’t understand.

None of these policies are based on a holistic knowledge of the likely impact they will have. There will be endless unforeseen consequences. For instance, insects feed on animal dung. No animals, no dung, no insects, no wildflowers. They are recipes for the sterilisation of the earth.

Technocrats never seem to learn from their past mistakes. Their anthem is always ‘this time it will be different’.

It won’t.

Andrew Buckley
Andrew Buckley
1 year ago

Follow the money!
A few people will get very rich from this nonsense and the rest of us will pay. The poorest will pay the most whether the lower income cohort in developed countries or the subsistence farmers and their ilk in the poorest countries.
This whole green movement has been captured by the wealth globalists with a few well intentioned patsies to do the shouting.
The wealthy will eat their Steak and the poor will be lucky to get enough of the genetically modified beans. Eating insects for many will be about scavenging (Mopani Worms in Africa for example) and not buying in lab grown protein.

John Holland
John Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Buckley

Why, when people utter the dread cliche ‘follow the money’, do they never actually follow it, but leap to their standard ideological bogeymen as if money only ever followed one simple channel?
Most of the rants here espouse a set of hopelessly conflicting conspiracies- that the decline of small farms is a plot by The Great Reset, that the Great Reset is a plot against the poor, that anyone suggesting a reduction in meat consumption is part of the Great Reset.
The reason why small, mixed farms have been disappearing since before WW2 is largely down to two factors; A. big agricultural corporations and chemical giants have the finance to buy up huge tracts of land to turn into industrial agriculture and make them reliant on their products, and B. the huge rise in meat consumption over this period, both in Europe and latterly across the globe, has made it impossible to meet this demand using small-scale traditional farms. The cheap meat that the Reset ranters see as the right of the poor is impossible without big-scale intensive specialist livestock farms. It’s no good whining about the loss of traditional farming whist simultaneously whining about bashing the poor and hating vegans and Greens for suggesting we eat less meat. It may be ideologically satisfying-conspiracies always are- but as a way of confronting the complexities of the world, it’s useless. That’s before we even start to talk about nitrate pollution, which both the author and his fans like to pretend doesn’t exist, as admitting the fact would be another ideological inconvenience.
God knows, no-one expects much joined-up thinking or fact-facing from the Unherd herd, but some effort might be a start,

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

Welcome back ‘Thorax’.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

And cheap food for the poor requires a lot of energy. Increase the cost/availability of energy and food becomes much more expensive/unavailable; the poorest have a much harder time eating.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

For decades after WW2 our British farmers were encouraged to emulate the American model of farming. Meanwhile the bolshy French who with the Germans created the EU made sure that the rules they wrote,seeing as they wrote the rules,protected their old style,in efficient,traditional,unprofitable family farms. They didn’t want their whole population to rush to the cities. They wanted to keep their native population on the land,in their traditional places and keep their way of life. Good for them. Due to this Brits in particular have sought to buy a place in France and live there for decades now because it’s like how sone of them remember it used to be here and the deep sense of peace in “la France profonde” is something to experience. I get why people want it. All beause the admirable Bolshy French told the Americans to go and do one. Now in USA the vaunted place of efficient,highly productive,science driven agriculture guaranteed to result in abundant cheap food for the masses,now food is scarce and expensive. I can buy 10 eggs for £3 which is more than if have paid but it’s still not equivalent to $12 or uowards in the USA. Looking at prices for “store cupboard” basics in the USA tells me that the FREE market is not in operation. The invisible hand is being well and truly guided by another invisible hand

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

If you want to dominate the world in your image you have to take care of the man in the street. Wake up and smell the coffee.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

Welcome back ‘Thorax’.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

And cheap food for the poor requires a lot of energy. Increase the cost/availability of energy and food becomes much more expensive/unavailable; the poorest have a much harder time eating.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

For decades after WW2 our British farmers were encouraged to emulate the American model of farming. Meanwhile the bolshy French who with the Germans created the EU made sure that the rules they wrote,seeing as they wrote the rules,protected their old style,in efficient,traditional,unprofitable family farms. They didn’t want their whole population to rush to the cities. They wanted to keep their native population on the land,in their traditional places and keep their way of life. Good for them. Due to this Brits in particular have sought to buy a place in France and live there for decades now because it’s like how sone of them remember it used to be here and the deep sense of peace in “la France profonde” is something to experience. I get why people want it. All beause the admirable Bolshy French told the Americans to go and do one. Now in USA the vaunted place of efficient,highly productive,science driven agriculture guaranteed to result in abundant cheap food for the masses,now food is scarce and expensive. I can buy 10 eggs for £3 which is more than if have paid but it’s still not equivalent to $12 or uowards in the USA. Looking at prices for “store cupboard” basics in the USA tells me that the FREE market is not in operation. The invisible hand is being well and truly guided by another invisible hand

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Holland

If you want to dominate the world in your image you have to take care of the man in the street. Wake up and smell the coffee.

Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Buckley

It is a return to serfdom. Pretty much there when you think of how we are taxed to the gills and now stand in danger of having our cars – that have granted such freedom and independence – from being confiscated.

John Holland
John Holland
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Buckley

Why, when people utter the dread cliche ‘follow the money’, do they never actually follow it, but leap to their standard ideological bogeymen as if money only ever followed one simple channel?
Most of the rants here espouse a set of hopelessly conflicting conspiracies- that the decline of small farms is a plot by The Great Reset, that the Great Reset is a plot against the poor, that anyone suggesting a reduction in meat consumption is part of the Great Reset.
The reason why small, mixed farms have been disappearing since before WW2 is largely down to two factors; A. big agricultural corporations and chemical giants have the finance to buy up huge tracts of land to turn into industrial agriculture and make them reliant on their products, and B. the huge rise in meat consumption over this period, both in Europe and latterly across the globe, has made it impossible to meet this demand using small-scale traditional farms. The cheap meat that the Reset ranters see as the right of the poor is impossible without big-scale intensive specialist livestock farms. It’s no good whining about the loss of traditional farming whist simultaneously whining about bashing the poor and hating vegans and Greens for suggesting we eat less meat. It may be ideologically satisfying-conspiracies always are- but as a way of confronting the complexities of the world, it’s useless. That’s before we even start to talk about nitrate pollution, which both the author and his fans like to pretend doesn’t exist, as admitting the fact would be another ideological inconvenience.
God knows, no-one expects much joined-up thinking or fact-facing from the Unherd herd, but some effort might be a start,

Glyn R
Glyn R
1 year ago
Reply to  Andrew Buckley

It is a return to serfdom. Pretty much there when you think of how we are taxed to the gills and now stand in danger of having our cars – that have granted such freedom and independence – from being confiscated.

Andrew Buckley
Andrew Buckley
1 year ago

Follow the money!
A few people will get very rich from this nonsense and the rest of us will pay. The poorest will pay the most whether the lower income cohort in developed countries or the subsistence farmers and their ilk in the poorest countries.
This whole green movement has been captured by the wealth globalists with a few well intentioned patsies to do the shouting.
The wealthy will eat their Steak and the poor will be lucky to get enough of the genetically modified beans. Eating insects for many will be about scavenging (Mopani Worms in Africa for example) and not buying in lab grown protein.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

We could first restrict the diet of all ‘Save The Planet’ badge wearers. When they have lived for 25 years without health problems, the rest of the world could, maybe, follow quietly.
Make the ‘Save the Planet’ mind-controllers into guinea pigs – let them not travel outside their own area, be denied a passport, wear a badge, make it illegal to serve them with meat, limit their energy supply to one half of the average, grow their own food, etc. They can spend a few years leading from the front.
More importantly, apply the same rules to all people in local government and national government who back these policies. Let us have a few MeatGate investigations to show that they are cheating and expose the frauds. Ban all government ministers from leaving the country – whatever the reason. Ban the visitors attending the coronation on May 6th.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

That doesn’t seem to align with the ‘polluters pay’ philosophy. It seems far more appropriate to look at society and find who have been the major consumers over the years, which sections of the population have benefitted the most from cheap energy, cheap food and cheap housing and perhaps look at them to make some sacrifices.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

You will find that rural communities are more ‘wasteful’ than urban communities. So, having done this work you will conclude that everyone should move and join you in the conurbations.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Robbie K

You will find that rural communities are more ‘wasteful’ than urban communities. So, having done this work you will conclude that everyone should move and join you in the conurbations.

Robbie K
Robbie K
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

That doesn’t seem to align with the ‘polluters pay’ philosophy. It seems far more appropriate to look at society and find who have been the major consumers over the years, which sections of the population have benefitted the most from cheap energy, cheap food and cheap housing and perhaps look at them to make some sacrifices.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

We could first restrict the diet of all ‘Save The Planet’ badge wearers. When they have lived for 25 years without health problems, the rest of the world could, maybe, follow quietly.
Make the ‘Save the Planet’ mind-controllers into guinea pigs – let them not travel outside their own area, be denied a passport, wear a badge, make it illegal to serve them with meat, limit their energy supply to one half of the average, grow their own food, etc. They can spend a few years leading from the front.
More importantly, apply the same rules to all people in local government and national government who back these policies. Let us have a few MeatGate investigations to show that they are cheating and expose the frauds. Ban all government ministers from leaving the country – whatever the reason. Ban the visitors attending the coronation on May 6th.

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago

Well I for one am looking forward to seeing how French farmers will react to this exciting new initiative!

Dominic S
Dominic S
1 year ago

I’m ordering in the popcorn…..

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic S

Hot dogs and sausage work will on bbq sticks too. Try to find a quiet corner of the mayhem though.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Dominic S

Hot dogs and sausage work will on bbq sticks too. Try to find a quiet corner of the mayhem though.

Dominic S
Dominic S
1 year ago

I’m ordering in the popcorn…..

Simon Blanchard
Simon Blanchard
1 year ago

Well I for one am looking forward to seeing how French farmers will react to this exciting new initiative!

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
1 year ago

One of the major problems with uniform, multinational food production is a lack of biodiversity. Local farmers used to actively cultivate varieties of crops conducive to their climate. Blue Mountain Corn is an example of this, tailored to the northern high-desert of America. California growers created lots of trees specific to the Sacramento Central Valley. The resulting genetic diversity provides resilience in the food system, something that’s useless until there’s a major crop disease outbreak. Minimal genetic variation risks a “banana pandemic” problem.
Genetic diversity is a pain in the rear to ADM and other large agricultural companies though. It’s cheaper to plant billions of the same hybridized seeds in all their fields.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
1 year ago

One of the major problems with uniform, multinational food production is a lack of biodiversity. Local farmers used to actively cultivate varieties of crops conducive to their climate. Blue Mountain Corn is an example of this, tailored to the northern high-desert of America. California growers created lots of trees specific to the Sacramento Central Valley. The resulting genetic diversity provides resilience in the food system, something that’s useless until there’s a major crop disease outbreak. Minimal genetic variation risks a “banana pandemic” problem.
Genetic diversity is a pain in the rear to ADM and other large agricultural companies though. It’s cheaper to plant billions of the same hybridized seeds in all their fields.

Matt Maas
Matt Maas
1 year ago

“You’ll eat bugs and you’ll like it, peasants!”

Matt Maas
Matt Maas
1 year ago

“You’ll eat bugs and you’ll like it, peasants!”

Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago

I think that there is a long way to go before people realise what is going on. Our mainstream media have prepared us well, and continue to do so. The vilification machine is still running in top gear. There is a lot of damage still to be done. Once this all comes out, and it will, the anger will be extremely dangerous and those pushing it probably won’t survive.
I was going to write something controversial here but thought better of it.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

You should say exactly what is on your mind.
Remember, it is a minority of FAR LEFT LUNATICS and AUTHORITARIANS who influence what happens in the WEST.
They do not have support in the majority of the population.
Climate Change, COVID, and the Ukraine
conflict are not reported authentically.
The establishment, which is EXTREMELY FAR LEFT lies constantly.
When the CRIMINAL BIDEN REGIME is deposed, things will get back to sanity.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

When the CRIMINAL BIDEN REGIME is deposed, things will get back to sanity

Optimistic.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

Yes, one has to be.
Biden and Clinton will end their days in jail.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Before the Nuremburg trials the Nazis did what they like. But the reckoning day usually comes in the end in a democracy.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Before the Nuremburg trials the Nazis did what they like. But the reckoning day usually comes in the end in a democracy.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

They need to deal with people like Gates and Soros as well though to try and stop their lies which they pay the mass media for.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

Yes, one has to be.
Biden and Clinton will end their days in jail.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  B Emery

They need to deal with people like Gates and Soros as well though to try and stop their lies which they pay the mass media for.

Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

My fear is that there will be a lot of people out for blood. Young vocal people like Greta will probably still be alive. Rightly or wrongly they will be targeted. Personally I am more a live and let live kinda guy. I can’t see her dying peacefully.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Is she really young. Sometimes she looks like a recycled 90 year old

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

They have houses in the local school. One of them is called Greta Thunberg. The children are being brought up on this stuff in the schools.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

They have houses in the local school. One of them is called Greta Thunberg. The children are being brought up on this stuff in the schools.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Well she is deceived but not wicked. Hopefully she will repent when she understands the damage she is doing.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Is she really young. Sometimes she looks like a recycled 90 year old

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Well she is deceived but not wicked. Hopefully she will repent when she understands the damage she is doing.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You are right about everything is lies, especially Ukraine,that’s 90% fake but sadly it’s beyond the point of no return. Someone or something worse is coming after old coffin dodger.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

I agree with you but I would say that the people in Ukraine need help. The ones I know in Britain are really nice people who are facing horrific situations because of Russia.

B Emery
B Emery
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

When the CRIMINAL BIDEN REGIME is deposed, things will get back to sanity

Optimistic.

Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

My fear is that there will be a lot of people out for blood. Young vocal people like Greta will probably still be alive. Rightly or wrongly they will be targeted. Personally I am more a live and let live kinda guy. I can’t see her dying peacefully.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You are right about everything is lies, especially Ukraine,that’s 90% fake but sadly it’s beyond the point of no return. Someone or something worse is coming after old coffin dodger.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

I agree with you but I would say that the people in Ukraine need help. The ones I know in Britain are really nice people who are facing horrific situations because of Russia.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Lots of people I know now see that I was right and they know at least fuzzily that bad things are being promoted as I do but they say “I just want to look after my family. Im not interested in big politics. We are just ordinary people. We are not the ones they’re after.” Maybe I’d be happier if I didn’t know as im impotent to do anything and like that poem says I’m not out there protesting yet I know that one day they’ll come for me……

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Nothing shocks me now. Did you know that Gates gives millions to the BBC and some other UK papers to influence people. Most people hope everything is still the same and cannot bear to dig beneath the surface and investigate. One can begin to recognise the Woke lot after a while. Think Independent and Guardian etc.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

You should say exactly what is on your mind.
Remember, it is a minority of FAR LEFT LUNATICS and AUTHORITARIANS who influence what happens in the WEST.
They do not have support in the majority of the population.
Climate Change, COVID, and the Ukraine
conflict are not reported authentically.
The establishment, which is EXTREMELY FAR LEFT lies constantly.
When the CRIMINAL BIDEN REGIME is deposed, things will get back to sanity.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Lots of people I know now see that I was right and they know at least fuzzily that bad things are being promoted as I do but they say “I just want to look after my family. Im not interested in big politics. We are just ordinary people. We are not the ones they’re after.” Maybe I’d be happier if I didn’t know as im impotent to do anything and like that poem says I’m not out there protesting yet I know that one day they’ll come for me……

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter D

Nothing shocks me now. Did you know that Gates gives millions to the BBC and some other UK papers to influence people. Most people hope everything is still the same and cannot bear to dig beneath the surface and investigate. One can begin to recognise the Woke lot after a while. Think Independent and Guardian etc.

Peter D
Peter D
1 year ago

I think that there is a long way to go before people realise what is going on. Our mainstream media have prepared us well, and continue to do so. The vilification machine is still running in top gear. There is a lot of damage still to be done. Once this all comes out, and it will, the anger will be extremely dangerous and those pushing it probably won’t survive.
I was going to write something controversial here but thought better of it.

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago

In short, it’s Mussolini’s definition of Fascism, adapted for the modern age. Corporatism, in other words.

It’s not hard to see an endgame in which most of us are effectively banned from a meat-based diet with no democratic power to challenge it. But then again that is the primary point of the existence of supranational NGOs: it’s a means of circumventing democracy and imposing democratically impossible measures on people against their will.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

The New Testament says that in the last days they will forbid marriage and forbid the eating of meat.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  John Riordan

The New Testament says that in the last days they will forbid marriage and forbid the eating of meat.

John Riordan
John Riordan
1 year ago

In short, it’s Mussolini’s definition of Fascism, adapted for the modern age. Corporatism, in other words.

It’s not hard to see an endgame in which most of us are effectively banned from a meat-based diet with no democratic power to challenge it. But then again that is the primary point of the existence of supranational NGOs: it’s a means of circumventing democracy and imposing democratically impossible measures on people against their will.

John Thorogood
John Thorogood
1 year ago

Excellent essay, Thomas. Very good job joining the dots. But you leave us hanging. So, what can we do? How?

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

Perhaps we should start by recognising that we do not live in democracies but are ruled by a global superclass of oligarchs who confuse the common good with their own self interest. The only way to fight back is to demand the democratisation of all our institutions.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

I don’t know. I fear that might be worse. They’ve dominated the education system so long that here in the U.S., at least, a pretty solid majority will likely vote the rope around their own necks.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

We are far more than them. They will do what they want without any resistance from the majority.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

I don’t know. I fear that might be worse. They’ve dominated the education system so long that here in the U.S., at least, a pretty solid majority will likely vote the rope around their own necks.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

We are far more than them. They will do what they want without any resistance from the majority.

Richard Maslen
Richard Maslen
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

We can press for sensible policies – revert to smaller farms, less hugely expensive machinery, more people, better crops and better environment as a result. Also preserve communities in rural areas and encourage better dietary health. Stop looking after big business just because it is big.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Maslen

That sounds exactly like French policy ever since they created the EU after WW2. They skewed the rules to keep their traditional ways of life and their old style unprofitable,inefficient family farms because they put their people first back then. Good for them. Macron is trying to convert their society to the (old) USA style that we adopted after WW2 notwithstanding the NHS. And the sensible French won’t have it.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Maslen

I find that even some of the big banks are going off and pushing policies that will be destructive to the ordinary man in the street.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Maslen

That sounds exactly like French policy ever since they created the EU after WW2. They skewed the rules to keep their traditional ways of life and their old style unprofitable,inefficient family farms because they put their people first back then. Good for them. Macron is trying to convert their society to the (old) USA style that we adopted after WW2 notwithstanding the NHS. And the sensible French won’t have it.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Richard Maslen

I find that even some of the big banks are going off and pushing policies that will be destructive to the ordinary man in the street.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

Stop voting and stop paying tax.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

That will do nothing. No influence on the government by not voting and sitting in prison because of not paying taxes.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

That will do nothing. No influence on the government by not voting and sitting in prison because of not paying taxes.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

Perhaps we should start by recognising that we do not live in democracies but are ruled by a global superclass of oligarchs who confuse the common good with their own self interest. The only way to fight back is to demand the democratisation of all our institutions.

Richard Maslen
Richard Maslen
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

We can press for sensible policies – revert to smaller farms, less hugely expensive machinery, more people, better crops and better environment as a result. Also preserve communities in rural areas and encourage better dietary health. Stop looking after big business just because it is big.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  John Thorogood

Stop voting and stop paying tax.

John Thorogood
John Thorogood
1 year ago

Excellent essay, Thomas. Very good job joining the dots. But you leave us hanging. So, what can we do? How?

Julian Pellatt
Julian Pellatt
1 year ago

A profoundly depressing article!
I am nauseated by the daily torrent of environmentalist propaganda that we are fed through the instruments of the BBC and other media. Much of this is mindless repetition which most people, even ‘intelligent’ individuals, absorb uncritically. As someone once observed (Stalin?), to paraphrase: “If you tell a big lie and repeat it often enough it becomes the received truth!” – especially if the state broadcaster is at the forefront of the brainwashing campaign.
In the UK government policy appears to be more concerned with the mad ‘Net Zero’ project than moving domestic agriculture towards food self-sufficiency for the nation. Better to have ‘wilded’ farms without cattle and reduce beef production for the benefit of wildlife! Let the people eat insects! Councils (bodies of accountable, elected representatives, fell urban trees (most probably because they are mature and have become dangerous in the public realm) and the Woking Class eco-warriors erupt to obtain court injunctions from unaccountable judges, no matter that the councils undertake to plant many new trees. Meanwhile the Doom Goblin is revered and showered with international awards.
Just travel the highways, by-ways and motorways of the UK to witness the huge accumulation of litter chucked out of moving vehicles by our environmentally aware citizens while the Woking Class ruling elite leave the rubbish piling up daily and never seek to arraign and convict these scumbags.
Madness!

Allie McBeth
Allie McBeth
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

The trees are felled usually because they are too costly for us council tax payers to keep trimming. I mean, there’s that big new town hall or other vanity project planned!

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Allie McBeth

There’s a disabled black LGBTQ community group to fund.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

They are mostly white actually.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

They are mostly white actually.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Allie McBeth

There’s a disabled black LGBTQ community group to fund.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

That’s why I no longer “consume” BBC content. Until about, actually until lockdown happened I believed 80% of the environmental stuff,but then I started to see it all from a different perspective. I hate beavers,scruffy ratty things. Ten years ago I would have bought the myth that they were being introduced to stop extreme flooding but now I see that it’s part of the strategy to reduce viable farmland area. In fact once you start this it gets a bit….well was Badger protection really introduced to protect the critters that were not in danger of dying out,or in order to attack farming as they do act as a reserve for TB just by virtue of natural biology. And it is bitterly funny how the whole British population loves badgers (we do) and is 100% behind the sabs going out in the woods at night doing their best to stop them getting culled if there is one on. Then a miracle,popular petrolhead Jeremy Clarkson turns up on tv and shows us his weeping neighbour and explains how her family is going broke due to her herd of cows being constantly reinfected by TB from the badgers in the woods next to her fields and what a miracle,suddenly I’m reading a myriad of posts saying “why are we allowing our countryside to be full of this diseased wildlife”. It took Jezza to convert “kindly Mr Badgers” to “diseased wildlife”. Brian May,you’re toast.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

If JC stopped being a caricature of himself, even more people would follow him. A very astute man.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

I never listen to the contaminated BBC news. I will watch sport or things like Gardiners World but I don’t touch their political stuff.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

If JC stopped being a caricature of himself, even more people would follow him. A very astute man.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

I never listen to the contaminated BBC news. I will watch sport or things like Gardiners World but I don’t touch their political stuff.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

I don’t read their twoddle anymore. They say one thing and do another.

Allie McBeth
Allie McBeth
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

The trees are felled usually because they are too costly for us council tax payers to keep trimming. I mean, there’s that big new town hall or other vanity project planned!

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

That’s why I no longer “consume” BBC content. Until about, actually until lockdown happened I believed 80% of the environmental stuff,but then I started to see it all from a different perspective. I hate beavers,scruffy ratty things. Ten years ago I would have bought the myth that they were being introduced to stop extreme flooding but now I see that it’s part of the strategy to reduce viable farmland area. In fact once you start this it gets a bit….well was Badger protection really introduced to protect the critters that were not in danger of dying out,or in order to attack farming as they do act as a reserve for TB just by virtue of natural biology. And it is bitterly funny how the whole British population loves badgers (we do) and is 100% behind the sabs going out in the woods at night doing their best to stop them getting culled if there is one on. Then a miracle,popular petrolhead Jeremy Clarkson turns up on tv and shows us his weeping neighbour and explains how her family is going broke due to her herd of cows being constantly reinfected by TB from the badgers in the woods next to her fields and what a miracle,suddenly I’m reading a myriad of posts saying “why are we allowing our countryside to be full of this diseased wildlife”. It took Jezza to convert “kindly Mr Badgers” to “diseased wildlife”. Brian May,you’re toast.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Pellatt

I don’t read their twoddle anymore. They say one thing and do another.

Julian Pellatt
Julian Pellatt
1 year ago

A profoundly depressing article!
I am nauseated by the daily torrent of environmentalist propaganda that we are fed through the instruments of the BBC and other media. Much of this is mindless repetition which most people, even ‘intelligent’ individuals, absorb uncritically. As someone once observed (Stalin?), to paraphrase: “If you tell a big lie and repeat it often enough it becomes the received truth!” – especially if the state broadcaster is at the forefront of the brainwashing campaign.
In the UK government policy appears to be more concerned with the mad ‘Net Zero’ project than moving domestic agriculture towards food self-sufficiency for the nation. Better to have ‘wilded’ farms without cattle and reduce beef production for the benefit of wildlife! Let the people eat insects! Councils (bodies of accountable, elected representatives, fell urban trees (most probably because they are mature and have become dangerous in the public realm) and the Woking Class eco-warriors erupt to obtain court injunctions from unaccountable judges, no matter that the councils undertake to plant many new trees. Meanwhile the Doom Goblin is revered and showered with international awards.
Just travel the highways, by-ways and motorways of the UK to witness the huge accumulation of litter chucked out of moving vehicles by our environmentally aware citizens while the Woking Class ruling elite leave the rubbish piling up daily and never seek to arraign and convict these scumbags.
Madness!

Sue Whorton
Sue Whorton
1 year ago

all of these ideas are different in principle to reality. If you only model outcomes and then don’t trial you do not become aware of complexities or false assumptions. The biggest losers are the most invisible. It is interesting how quickly Sri Lanka has disappeared from this debate. How do we reset the ability to interpret data, to evaluate evidence and question top down solutions that assume that in Social Policy, dosage isn’t important, that is a good thing in excess leads to worse results than doing nothing and allowing bottom up solutions to emerge.

Sue Whorton
Sue Whorton
1 year ago

all of these ideas are different in principle to reality. If you only model outcomes and then don’t trial you do not become aware of complexities or false assumptions. The biggest losers are the most invisible. It is interesting how quickly Sri Lanka has disappeared from this debate. How do we reset the ability to interpret data, to evaluate evidence and question top down solutions that assume that in Social Policy, dosage isn’t important, that is a good thing in excess leads to worse results than doing nothing and allowing bottom up solutions to emerge.

Paul Rodolf
Paul Rodolf
1 year ago

Whatever happened to the “Farm to Table” movement and the desire to consume locally produced food as being the most sustainable option?
I suppose there was little money to be made in that for large corporations.

Paul Rodolf
Paul Rodolf
1 year ago

Whatever happened to the “Farm to Table” movement and the desire to consume locally produced food as being the most sustainable option?
I suppose there was little money to be made in that for large corporations.

Susan Grabston
Susan Grabston
1 year ago

Became a hardcore UK prepper in 2018 when the writing was on the financial wall and Governments were displaying signs that they couldn’t be trusted at the lowest levels of Maslow’s hierarchy. It’s actually a great deal of fun and has revealed much about what makes for a good life.
Forced resilience is an emerging trend amongst my friendship group. People can see what’s happening and are taking steps.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan Grabston

Good for you.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan Grabston

Good for you.

Susan Grabston
Susan Grabston
1 year ago

Became a hardcore UK prepper in 2018 when the writing was on the financial wall and Governments were displaying signs that they couldn’t be trusted at the lowest levels of Maslow’s hierarchy. It’s actually a great deal of fun and has revealed much about what makes for a good life.
Forced resilience is an emerging trend amongst my friendship group. People can see what’s happening and are taking steps.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago

Remember that Nestle marketed powdered milk as an alternative to breast milk for babies despite the recognised risks for babies in developing countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1977_Nestl%C3%A9_boycott#:~:text=Advocacy%20groups%20and%20charities%20have,poor%20mothers%20in%20developing%20countries.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

What about that other great German invention THALIDOMIDE?
Certainly am improvement on Zyclon B, but really?

Mint Julip
Mint Julip
1 year ago

Nestle are also robbing communities of their water resources – in order to put it in plastic bottles and sell it to other people.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

What about that other great German invention THALIDOMIDE?
Certainly am improvement on Zyclon B, but really?

Mint Julip
Mint Julip
1 year ago

Nestle are also robbing communities of their water resources – in order to put it in plastic bottles and sell it to other people.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
1 year ago

Remember that Nestle marketed powdered milk as an alternative to breast milk for babies despite the recognised risks for babies in developing countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1977_Nestl%C3%A9_boycott#:~:text=Advocacy%20groups%20and%20charities%20have,poor%20mothers%20in%20developing%20countries.

Peter Donnelly
Peter Donnelly
1 year ago

The Dutch prime minister proudly carries his documents in a WEF bag to work every day. He also hosted the so-called Global Coordinating Secretariat and the European Food Innovation Hub at Wageningen Foodvalley in 2021. To quote for the WEF website, these Food Innovation Hubs are partnership platforms that connect across various ecosystem actors to foster partnerships and networks that unlocks investments, stimulates innovation and collectively works to de-bottleneck barriers. Hubs focus on primarily state national or regional level opportunities and are guided by the following principles:
Multistakeholder and inclusive, engaging governments, private sector, innovators, farmer organizations, civil society, international organizations and othersLocally driven and owned and aligned with national and regional goals, strategies and plans and in support of the Sustainable Development GoalsMarket-based, focusing on catalyzing and expanding sustainable and inclusive investments and market-based activitiesNeutral facilitator, playing the role of catalyst and honest brokerAlthough I can’t pretend I fully comprehend the management-speak, it does seem that there is little appetite for including small farmers. The Dutch population is having its own green revolution with the BBB leading the charge and I, for one, wish it a sweeping victory at the next general election in 2025 or, better still, well before that.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Donnelly

The dictators in the past were always violent and brutal types. We are not used to billionaires subtly dictating to us. We need to learn fast in order to combat these people. Gates for instance made billions from vaccines and it is now being proved to have caused a lot of damage.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Donnelly

The dictators in the past were always violent and brutal types. We are not used to billionaires subtly dictating to us. We need to learn fast in order to combat these people. Gates for instance made billions from vaccines and it is now being proved to have caused a lot of damage.

Peter Donnelly
Peter Donnelly
1 year ago

The Dutch prime minister proudly carries his documents in a WEF bag to work every day. He also hosted the so-called Global Coordinating Secretariat and the European Food Innovation Hub at Wageningen Foodvalley in 2021. To quote for the WEF website, these Food Innovation Hubs are partnership platforms that connect across various ecosystem actors to foster partnerships and networks that unlocks investments, stimulates innovation and collectively works to de-bottleneck barriers. Hubs focus on primarily state national or regional level opportunities and are guided by the following principles:
Multistakeholder and inclusive, engaging governments, private sector, innovators, farmer organizations, civil society, international organizations and othersLocally driven and owned and aligned with national and regional goals, strategies and plans and in support of the Sustainable Development GoalsMarket-based, focusing on catalyzing and expanding sustainable and inclusive investments and market-based activitiesNeutral facilitator, playing the role of catalyst and honest brokerAlthough I can’t pretend I fully comprehend the management-speak, it does seem that there is little appetite for including small farmers. The Dutch population is having its own green revolution with the BBB leading the charge and I, for one, wish it a sweeping victory at the next general election in 2025 or, better still, well before that.

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

As a Canadian I genuinely can’t understand how anyone tolerates being in the EU. Just one look at Ursula Von p***k or whatever the President’s name is – is enough to make you want to run for your life. She looks like a Disney villain. But seriously – at least we can vote that moron Trudeau out of office – you can’t get away from these people.

Rob N
Rob N
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Are you sure you can vote him out of office? Would not bet on it.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob N

He can fine your bank account if you try anything. Seriously though I trust there is enough democracy left to get rid of him and Biden as well.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob N

He can fine your bank account if you try anything. Seriously though I trust there is enough democracy left to get rid of him and Biden as well.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Doesn’t look to me like you can vote him out.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

I voted Brexit because I assumed we had a plan prepared,turns out I was wrong. But there are aspects of the EU that I think we’re lucky to be out of. For now. The idea is to get the whole world on board so maybe we are just postponing it a bit,whatever IT is,but I know it’s not good. BUT the French who co-created the EU put keeping their traditional style farming as a priority and I admire that. I always thought they got it right and now history is proving so.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

We haven’t fully had Brexit yet and are still tied in to a lot of agreements that the government don’t have the resolve to release us from. Think fisheries and illegal immigration plus NI still under the EU. There’s no resolve in the Tory party to deal with these things. Brexit will happen when enough vote for Brexit parties like Reform etc.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  jane baker

We haven’t fully had Brexit yet and are still tied in to a lot of agreements that the government don’t have the resolve to release us from. Think fisheries and illegal immigration plus NI still under the EU. There’s no resolve in the Tory party to deal with these things. Brexit will happen when enough vote for Brexit parties like Reform etc.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

You need to pray for us.

Rob N
Rob N
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Are you sure you can vote him out of office? Would not bet on it.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

Doesn’t look to me like you can vote him out.

jane baker
jane baker
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

I voted Brexit because I assumed we had a plan prepared,turns out I was wrong. But there are aspects of the EU that I think we’re lucky to be out of. For now. The idea is to get the whole world on board so maybe we are just postponing it a bit,whatever IT is,but I know it’s not good. BUT the French who co-created the EU put keeping their traditional style farming as a priority and I admire that. I always thought they got it right and now history is proving so.

Tony Conrad
Tony Conrad
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Johnson

You need to pray for us.

Peter Johnson
Peter Johnson
1 year ago

As a Canadian I genuinely can’t understand how anyone tolerates being in the EU. Just one look at Ursula Von p***k or whatever the President’s name is – is enough to make you want to run for your life. She looks like a Disney villain. But seriously – at least we can vote that moron Trudeau out of office – you can’t get away from these people.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

“America is facing another Jan. 6”? What? What is this guy talking about? Does he mean the feds are going to stage another for-the-cameras event? Why does he suppose they’ll do that again?
Look, Yuri Bezmenov explained it back in 1984. We are there now: pic.twitter.com/CGkZoplotB

Last edited 1 year ago by Allison Barrows
Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago

I couldn’t make any sense out of that either. I have no idea what he could possibly be referring to about us facing another Jan 6th.

Jeff Cunningham
Jeff Cunningham
1 year ago

I couldn’t make any sense out of that either. I have no idea what he could possibly be referring to about us facing another Jan 6th.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
1 year ago

“America is facing another Jan. 6”? What? What is this guy talking about? Does he mean the feds are going to stage another for-the-cameras event? Why does he suppose they’ll do that again?
Look, Yuri Bezmenov explained it back in 1984. We are there now: pic.twitter.com/CGkZoplotB

Last edited 1 year ago by Allison Barrows
T Bone
T Bone
1 year ago

The beauty of this Hermetic Stakeholder formula is that the people that create the shortages are able to reward themselves with more power to resolve them.

Its like a self-fulfilling prophecy with an attached bureacracy of positive reinforcement feedback loops.

T Bone
T Bone
1 year ago

The beauty of this Hermetic Stakeholder formula is that the people that create the shortages are able to reward themselves with more power to resolve them.

Its like a self-fulfilling prophecy with an attached bureacracy of positive reinforcement feedback loops.

Rob N
Rob N
1 year ago

So what do we do or who do we support/vote for to stop these @x><s from realising their destruction of our society, culture and nation/s?

Diane Merriam
Diane Merriam
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob N

Simple, really. Take power away from governments. Of course, it will never happen, but that’s the only thing that can change it.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Diane Merriam

As in Switzerland.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago
Reply to  Diane Merriam

As in Switzerland.

Diane Merriam
Diane Merriam
1 year ago
Reply to  Rob N

Simple, really. Take power away from governments. Of course, it will never happen, but that’s the only thing that can change it.

Rob N
Rob N
1 year ago

So what do we do or who do we support/vote for to stop these @x><s from realising their destruction of our society, culture and nation/s?

Michael Coleman
Michael Coleman
1 year ago

The cynic in me thinks this War on Farmers is just like the misguided War on Fossil Fuels. Leftist leaders are making it harder to obtain the FFs needed by the world economy to flourish with drilling, pipeline, refinery restrictions – achieving the green objective of lower CO2 by enforced scarcity. Forced scarcity of food is a logical, if cold-hearted, next step, as it wipes those pesky high CO2 emitting species members.

Michael Coleman
Michael Coleman
1 year ago

The cynic in me thinks this War on Farmers is just like the misguided War on Fossil Fuels. Leftist leaders are making it harder to obtain the FFs needed by the world economy to flourish with drilling, pipeline, refinery restrictions – achieving the green objective of lower CO2 by enforced scarcity. Forced scarcity of food is a logical, if cold-hearted, next step, as it wipes those pesky high CO2 emitting species members.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

The Great Reset is not about helping the people of the planet to access resources. It is quite the opposite: control of all resources in the hands of the few who will withhold money, food and energy from those who resist them.

Rupert Steel
Rupert Steel
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Perceptive. Medieval rulers understood that the means of production of food translated into political power. If you can starve the villeins at will, they will naturally tug their forelocks on demand. It’s slightly different today, but the principle is the same. With an overwhelmingly urban population, as to say, 80%, the majority of the UK becomes hostage to ‘food diplomacy’. Or coercion, to put it in more practical terms.

Rupert Steel
Rupert Steel
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Perceptive. Medieval rulers understood that the means of production of food translated into political power. If you can starve the villeins at will, they will naturally tug their forelocks on demand. It’s slightly different today, but the principle is the same. With an overwhelmingly urban population, as to say, 80%, the majority of the UK becomes hostage to ‘food diplomacy’. Or coercion, to put it in more practical terms.

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago

The Great Reset is not about helping the people of the planet to access resources. It is quite the opposite: control of all resources in the hands of the few who will withhold money, food and energy from those who resist them.

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago

Looks like we need a strongman or two to deal with these delinquent, corrupt dirtbags? Someone like Presidents Putin or Xi? er…. wait a minute. It would be the final irony if urban occidentals were eating sparrows and crickets whilst the Russians and Chinese had chicken and pork. I think that’s what Sun Tzu called “the long ambush” lol

mike otter
mike otter
1 year ago

Looks like we need a strongman or two to deal with these delinquent, corrupt dirtbags? Someone like Presidents Putin or Xi? er…. wait a minute. It would be the final irony if urban occidentals were eating sparrows and crickets whilst the Russians and Chinese had chicken and pork. I think that’s what Sun Tzu called “the long ambush” lol

Jeff Watkins
Jeff Watkins
1 year ago

Really good well researched article. More like this please.

Jeff Watkins
Jeff Watkins
1 year ago

Really good well researched article. More like this please.

Dominic English
Dominic English
1 year ago

If they stop growing food what do they expect us to eat? Oh hang on. Suddenly it all makes sense. We can all eat insects instead.