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Starmer’s ruthless attack on the Left Labour's selection process verges on corruption

Blue steel. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Blue steel. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)


December 2, 2022   6 mins

For Lauren Townsend, becoming an MP was an obvious choice. Born in Milton Keynes to a working-class family, she has lived in the city all her life, working in a variety of jobs, including as a waitress for TGI Friday where she led a campaign for fair tips for restaurant staff. In 2019, Townsend was elected as a local councillor, and later became a council cabinet member. In October, she applied to be Labour candidate in the seat of Milton Keynes North — and that’s when her party career came to an abrupt end.

The opinion polls suggest Keir Starmer is heading for a majority at the next election, with a Labour victory in Milton Keynes North. Given the party only has 202 seats, securing a majority will require the biggest influx of new Labour MPs since 1945 — roughly 140 new MPs to get up to the 340 mark, which would entail a majority of about 30. Add to this the usual “retirements” — perhaps 40-50 existing MPs — and the current selection processes taking part across the country will determine not just the texture of Starmer’s forces in the Commons, but also the pool of MPs from whom his ministers would be appointed.

Starmer’s team knows this, and is quietly managing the process in minute detail. This battle is being overseen by Labour’s election campaign director Morgan McSweeney, who worked on Starmer’s leadership campaign and was briefly his chief-of-staff. McSweeney “doesn’t have room for compromise with the hard Left”, says his friend Nick Forbes, a former leader of Newcastle City Council. “He thinks they need to be eradicated from the party because they are so dangerous.” This ruthlessness now underscores every Labour selection process, as Lauren Townsend discovered last month.

Townsend was backed by six major trades unions, which would normally have guaranteed her a place on the long-list. But Labour’s National Executive Committee panel blocked her. Among the reasons given was that Townsend had “liked” a tweet by Nicola Sturgeon in 2021 in which the Scottish First Minister announced a Covid test she had taken was negative. Her offence, it seems, was “supporting other parties”. Townsend was also accused of being involved with the Green New Deal campaign, whose policies go further than Labour’s official Green New Deal. “I feel gutted,” Townsend said after she was blocked, “not just for me but for what this says to the wider membership of our party and especially to other young women and/or mothers who desperately want to get more involved in politics, but find it an impossible and somewhat intimidating prospect”.

Bigger names than Townsend have been purged too. Lisa Forbes, who was MP for Peterborough until she was unseated in 2019, was kept off the long-list this time round. Emma Dent-Coad, another prominent Left-winger who was MP for Kensington from 2017 to 2019, was also kept off the long-list for her old seat, despite building a formidable reputation for her response to the Grenfell fire tragedy in her constituency just after she was elected.

Meanwhile, Labour’s Candidates Team is busy working in the background, deciding seat-by-seat who they do want. They have to operate surreptitiously, as local parties guard their independence and do not like to be pushed around. Nor does it do a candidate any good to be known as the choice of the Leader of the Opposition’s Office — the LOTO contender. But in most selections, it doesn’t take much to work out who LOTO is backing.

There are, for instance, striking similarities about the preferred contenders’ campaign videos and websites, where they advised what to say and, more importantly, what not to say. Don’t mention that you went to Oxford or Cambridge — that looks elitist. If you are a London councillor, just say you’re a councillor, and people may think it’s for the seat you’re going for. Be very careful saying what job you do. Community activists, overseas development, charities, mental health — indeed, anything to do with the NHS — all are occupations to shout about. If you’re in banking, financial services, management consultancy, it’s best to keep schtum.

LOTO contenders will be advised about how to make the most of any local roots, and they’ll be introduced to key local Labour figures. The chosen ones may even be consulted by national Labour fixers on when the selection should ideally take place. Nor do Labour officials appear to care if a favoured candidate breaks the party’s tight spending rules for candidate campaigns. It’s amazing how much some candidates manage to do with their limited budgets.

But the most contentious issue is the highly prized list in each constituency of each party member and their contact details. Having spoken to a number of those involved in the selection process, anointed or LOTO contenders appear to have a remarkable ability to obtain membership lists before their ordinary rivals. They may have been leaked by local party officials, or by local councillors, or from someone on high in regional or national HQ — and any such lack almost certainly breaks data protection law. Contenders who stick to the rules are only sent local members’ details once the shortlist has been drawn up. This gives them about a fortnight to contact every voter, which is almost impossible to do individually given some parties have 2,000 members.

Then, when it comes to the selection meeting itself, there have been numerous complaints about supporters of unfavoured candidates being excluded unfairly. It’s also suspected that LOTO contenders sometimes get advance notice of the common questions which every contender is asked at the final selection meeting where the vote is taken. And full-time regional Labour officials sometimes make no secret of where their loyalties lie.

Perhaps the most egregious example is Pearleen Sangha, acting director of the London Labour party, who previously worked for Labour to Win, an umbrella group for organisations on the Labour Right. Half an hour before the selection in Camberwell and Peckham last month, Sangha publicly tweeted that the favourite, Miatta Fahnbulleh, was “a class act”. A few weeks earlier, when the shortlist was announced for Thurrock, just outside of London, Sangha publicly wished the favoured contender Jen Craft “good luck” on Twitter. Both Fahnbulleh and Craft went on to win.

More recently, a group of activists in Bolsover — Dennis Skinner’s old seat — wrote to the chair of the Labour NEC calling for an investigation into “corruption” and irregularities in the East Midlands regional office. These complaints concerned the exclusion of strong local applicants from the long list to favour another contender, and the alleged leaking of the membership list to the supposedly favoured contender. The anonymous complainants asked for the selection in Bolsover to be frozen pending such an investigation.

Perhaps it’s unsurprising that, so far, the Labour Left has been trounced in this round of selections. Of almost 60 selections, only one has produced a candidate who is firmly on the Left — Faiza Shaheen, who was picked for Iain Duncan Smith’s seat, Chingford and Woodford Green, the constituency she contested in 2019. At the same time, there are only a handful of candidates who have any experience of working in manual or low-paid jobs. Around two thirds of Labour candidates for winnable seats so far are, or have been, councillors, with roughly a quarter serving as council leaders or deputy leaders.

There’s nothing wrong with councillors in parliament, but the parliamentary Labour Party is in danger of being over-run with them, at a time when it urgently needs experts on the economy, foreign policy and defence. Of course, the extremely tight manipulation of the candidate selection system may help prevent mishaps during the election campaign, and avoid having more dud MPs such as Jared O’Mara, accused of sexual misconduct and fraud, and Fiona Onasanya, who went to jail for perverting the course of justice. Luke Akehurst, a Labour First stalwart who sits on the Labour National Executive and chairs many of the NEC panels, says: “This is not about factional advantage or stitch-ups, it is about getting ready for power and being the professional organisation we should be.”

But while organising the selection process may help avoid internal rows within a Starmer government, it could still weaken the party and any government in the long run. The shared fate of the Johnson and Truss regimes show the perils of confining your ministerial team to a narrow range of loyalists. By contrast, the successful Labour administrations of Attlee, Wilson and even Blair all had significant representation from the Left — Nye Bevan, Dick Crossman, Barbara Castle, Michael Foot, Tony Benn, Claire Short and John Prescott, to name a few.

There’s a more worrying issue too. What does this tell us about how a Starmer government will handle its critics? Labour’s selection processes appear to be deeply unjust, open to abuse, and verge on the corrupt. Left-wingers, passionate trades unionists, troublemakers and mavericks need not apply. The plan seems to be to wipe out the Left completely, to find the flimsiest excuse to block anyone who doesn’t toe the party line. It is not inconceivable that if Angela Rayner, John Prescott, Margaret Beckett, or Neil Kinnock now applied to be a candidate, they would be blocked at the first hurdle by an NEC panel.

Of course, bigwigs in all parties have long tried to fix certain parliamentary selections, and the Labour high command has probably interfered more than most. The Corbynites were ruthless in purging their opponents, often on seemingly trumped-up charges, but their efforts were never on this scale. The Starmer team looks fixated on achieving total control, intent on stamping out anything that might embarrass the party. Their tactics go way beyond the dark arts of Peter Mandelson, Alastair Campbell and New Labour, though it’s not clear how much Starmer knows about how the selection system is being rigged, and whether he — a former human rights lawyer — turns a blind eye to the abuses.

Yet regardless of how involved he is, it seems likely the key players in fixing these 200 selections will be rewarded with substantial jobs in Downing Street. One has to wonder whether, amid the pressures of office, a Starmer premiership would have much respect for dissent. For pluralism is the key to democratic politics — without it lies the road to incompetent government.


Michael Crick is a broadcaster and writer whose most recent book is One Party After Another: The Disruptive Life of Nigel Farage (Simon & Schuster). His Selections Twitter feed is @Tomorrow’sMPs

MichaelLCrick

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Zak Orn
Zak Orn
1 year ago

Good. It’s one thing when they’re just the opposition but with a near 100% chance that Labour will win the next election now is not the time to be pandering to the fanatics. Labour already have a bunch of utter clowns as MPs, they don’t need any more of them. 
It’s baffling how you can acknowledge the need for “experts on the economy, foreign policy and defence” and then think the solution to that would be more left MPs, rather than less. You only have to listen to any of the existing left Labour MPs to realise they’re dangerously detached from reality on all three of those issues.

Dylan Regan
Dylan Regan
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

It’s not just that Labour MPs should be centrist and left wing, it’s that they shouldn’t all be former councillors who went to Oxbridge who have never actually worked a proper job all their life

MJ Reid
MJ Reid
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

They need people who will get elected… I left the Labour Party when Tony Blair and his cronies took power and drove the centrist agenda rather than the socialist agenda that grass roots members supported. Nothing much has changed. I won’t vote Labour outside Scotland because of the politics of the leader which is more right wing than some Tories. If you only put forward middle class university educated people, they won’t get votes from the people they profess to care about and we will have another Tory government at the next election.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  MJ Reid

There hasn’t been a Tory government since
Mrs Thatcher.

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Bizarre. 8 people have linked this comment. Do you deny Churchill was a Tory too? After all he was pro Europe?

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Everyone is Pro Europe.
The EU is not Europe, just as the
Democratic National Committee
is not America.
You are getting confused.
Churchill never proposed that Britain should join a shady outfit like the EU.
Don’t try and rewrite history.
I can easily drag up Churchill’s quotations
regarding Europe and the open sea.
Most people would understand what I am referring to.

j watson
j watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Dear oh dear, you know the Right’s in trouble when they start pinning for dear old Winnie. Of course forgetting he only became PM in May 40 because of the Labour party, and as soon as VE over public dumped him spectacularly. They knew something many forgotten.
May 40 he deserves eternal respect but the hagiography about the rest is missplaced.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

..but a few might realise you’re being very selective and a tad distorted in your views!

j watson
j watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Dear oh dear, you know the Right’s in trouble when they start pinning for dear old Winnie. Of course forgetting he only became PM in May 40 because of the Labour party, and as soon as VE over public dumped him spectacularly. They knew something many forgotten.
May 40 he deserves eternal respect but the hagiography about the rest is missplaced.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

..but a few might realise you’re being very selective and a tad distorted in your views!

Rob Mcneill-wilson
Rob Mcneill-wilson
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Churchill was ‘pro-Europe’ for nations on the Continent not GB, as I am sure you are aware.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

No, but he was, by his OWN admission virtually educationally sub-normal.

Harrow Entrance Exam: Zero.

No possibility of Oxbridge, like his father, even with the possibility of colossal nepotism from the Marlborough gang.

Three attempts to get into the Army, then only at the bottom of the list, and thus the ‘people’s cavalry’.

However he did have other talents, but a Tory? Who knows he was a Liberal when it suited him, let us NOT forget.

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago

Churchill was merely a late developer. If you think he was a dullard, I suggest you read some of his prodigious output of history, journalism, biography and memoir. I doubt even Thatcher had a greater intellect than WSC. With the possible exception of DLG, I doubt any Prime Minister of the past 120 years has had as fine and powerful a mind as Churchill.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

What that charlatan DLG? You must joking Mr Joy!
Give me WEG any day.

As for WSC, a fine journalist I’ll grant you but otherwise ‘intellectually challenged’ as his CIGS Alan Brooke made quite clear.

However fiscally hopeless, his private life being continually on the cusp of bankruptcy, and thus he bankrupted the rest of us!
And for what?

Or did they not teach you that at Pirbright/Mons/ Sandhurst? Or wherever?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

At least DLG s family are nice unlike WSC!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Yes indeed.

BTW did you ever come across a Mr Joy during your time in the Household Division?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

I had the privilege of seeing Joy Division live, at a Rock Against Racism gig in the Rainbow in Finsbury Park a few weeks before Ian Curtis’s tragic demise.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago

I had the privilege of seeing Joy Division live, at a Rock Against Racism gig in the Rainbow in Finsbury Park a few weeks before Ian Curtis’s tragic demise.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

Yes indeed.

BTW did you ever come across a Mr Joy during your time in the Household Division?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

At least DLG s family are nice unlike WSC!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

What that charlatan DLG? You must joking Mr Joy!
Give me WEG any day.

As for WSC, a fine journalist I’ll grant you but otherwise ‘intellectually challenged’ as his CIGS Alan Brooke made quite clear.

However fiscally hopeless, his private life being continually on the cusp of bankruptcy, and thus he bankrupted the rest of us!
And for what?

Or did they not teach you that at Pirbright/Mons/ Sandhurst? Or wherever?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago

Churchill was merely a late developer. If you think he was a dullard, I suggest you read some of his prodigious output of history, journalism, biography and memoir. I doubt even Thatcher had a greater intellect than WSC. With the possible exception of DLG, I doubt any Prime Minister of the past 120 years has had as fine and powerful a mind as Churchill.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

I think Churchill may have been a Liberal for most of his career.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Everyone is Pro Europe.
The EU is not Europe, just as the
Democratic National Committee
is not America.
You are getting confused.
Churchill never proposed that Britain should join a shady outfit like the EU.
Don’t try and rewrite history.
I can easily drag up Churchill’s quotations
regarding Europe and the open sea.
Most people would understand what I am referring to.

Rob Mcneill-wilson
Rob Mcneill-wilson
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Churchill was ‘pro-Europe’ for nations on the Continent not GB, as I am sure you are aware.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

No, but he was, by his OWN admission virtually educationally sub-normal.

Harrow Entrance Exam: Zero.

No possibility of Oxbridge, like his father, even with the possibility of colossal nepotism from the Marlborough gang.

Three attempts to get into the Army, then only at the bottom of the list, and thus the ‘people’s cavalry’.

However he did have other talents, but a Tory? Who knows he was a Liberal when it suited him, let us NOT forget.

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

I think Churchill may have been a Liberal for most of his career.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Surely the term ‘authoritarian’ is a more accurate term for a Thatcherite govt.? After all, the word ‘conservative’ means conserving current policies/systems/laws etc.? Surely Maghie did the exact opposite, ripping up all such things rarher than conserving them? Or is the worderely a fig leaf for brutal class war?

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Bizarre. 8 people have linked this comment. Do you deny Churchill was a Tory too? After all he was pro Europe?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Surely the term ‘authoritarian’ is a more accurate term for a Thatcherite govt.? After all, the word ‘conservative’ means conserving current policies/systems/laws etc.? Surely Maghie did the exact opposite, ripping up all such things rarher than conserving them? Or is the worderely a fig leaf for brutal class war?

Michael Askew
Michael Askew
1 year ago
Reply to  MJ Reid

The modern Labour Party is largely indifferent to the concerns of the working class. It has abandoned its roots in favour of the priorities of the metropolitan elite.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  MJ Reid

There hasn’t been a Tory government since
Mrs Thatcher.

Michael Askew
Michael Askew
1 year ago
Reply to  MJ Reid

The modern Labour Party is largely indifferent to the concerns of the working class. It has abandoned its roots in favour of the priorities of the metropolitan elite.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

He has a point though. Labour was supposed to represent the lower classes. The metropolitan luvvies should go elsewhere.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Since when have Labour represented the lower classes ?
People like Starmer only encounter such people on window cleaning day.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

I vaguely remember, back in the mist of time, when it had some real people in its ranks.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

It did and and may have one or two even now.
Kate Honey was one and Graham Stringer is still hanging in there.
Stringer is the only Labour MP with a STEM degree as far as I know.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

It did and and may have one or two even now.
Kate Honey was one and Graham Stringer is still hanging in there.
Stringer is the only Labour MP with a STEM degree as far as I know.

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You seem not aware that Starmer comes from an ordinary working class background himself. he may not be now of course. And Labour always represented ordinary people, if not well at times. Most of the legislation to the benefit of the ‘lower classes’ of the last 100 years has been from Labour.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

I don’t care about Starmer’s class,
race or background.
This intersectionality B/S pushed by the Left
is what is so destructive.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

But the problem is, it’s not just ‘the Left’ that is pushing it: it’s the whole State-Establishment Blob, from Chief Constables right through to the Archbishop of Canterbury numerous ‘Conservative’ MPs and even senior military staff and the Permanent Secretary at the MoD. This is no longer just the province of smelly, donkey-jacketed Trots and weirdo academics. It has become the new puritan religion of the whole Anglosphere establishment.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

But the problem is, it’s not just ‘the Left’ that is pushing it: it’s the whole State-Establishment Blob, from Chief Constables right through to the Archbishop of Canterbury numerous ‘Conservative’ MPs and even senior military staff and the Permanent Secretary at the MoD. This is no longer just the province of smelly, donkey-jacketed Trots and weirdo academics. It has become the new puritan religion of the whole Anglosphere establishment.

Michael Marron
Michael Marron
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Starmers background is as working class as Edsel Ford.
His father may have started as a toolmaker, but he wound up a Director and large shareholder of the company.
How else would he have afforded the fees for Starmers education? (Reigate grammar was only state funded for the first year of Starmers attendance. Current fees are nearly eight grand a term)
Starmers father was also a well known local patron of the arts.
Starmers father was clearly an admirable man. It was Starmers denial of his fathers success that led to their falling out for years -not exactly the close family Starmer likes to pretend.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

He doesn’t actually. His father was a managering director. Starmer misrepresented him as a “worker”, rather than someone who exploited workers.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

I don’t care about Starmer’s class,
race or background.
This intersectionality B/S pushed by the Left
is what is so destructive.

Michael Marron
Michael Marron
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Starmers background is as working class as Edsel Ford.
His father may have started as a toolmaker, but he wound up a Director and large shareholder of the company.
How else would he have afforded the fees for Starmers education? (Reigate grammar was only state funded for the first year of Starmers attendance. Current fees are nearly eight grand a term)
Starmers father was also a well known local patron of the arts.
Starmers father was clearly an admirable man. It was Starmers denial of his fathers success that led to their falling out for years -not exactly the close family Starmer likes to pretend.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

He doesn’t actually. His father was a managering director. Starmer misrepresented him as a “worker”, rather than someone who exploited workers.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

About 1926. when Ramsay Macdonald sold them out, or so some would say. More reasonably perhaps, the transformation took place during 1963-83, as Britain’s unionised heavy industries collapsed and the huge expansion of the Polys and Universities took place, resulting in the horny- handed, practical sons of toil being displaced in local Labour parties by the soft-handed, abstract-minded activist bourgeois twutocrats who have run them since.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

I vaguely remember, back in the mist of time, when it had some real people in its ranks.

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

You seem not aware that Starmer comes from an ordinary working class background himself. he may not be now of course. And Labour always represented ordinary people, if not well at times. Most of the legislation to the benefit of the ‘lower classes’ of the last 100 years has been from Labour.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

About 1926. when Ramsay Macdonald sold them out, or so some would say. More reasonably perhaps, the transformation took place during 1963-83, as Britain’s unionised heavy industries collapsed and the huge expansion of the Polys and Universities took place, resulting in the horny- handed, practical sons of toil being displaced in local Labour parties by the soft-handed, abstract-minded activist bourgeois twutocrats who have run them since.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago
Reply to  polidori redux

Since when have Labour represented the lower classes ?
People like Starmer only encounter such people on window cleaning day.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

Meeaiooww!!

MJ Reid
MJ Reid
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

They need people who will get elected… I left the Labour Party when Tony Blair and his cronies took power and drove the centrist agenda rather than the socialist agenda that grass roots members supported. Nothing much has changed. I won’t vote Labour outside Scotland because of the politics of the leader which is more right wing than some Tories. If you only put forward middle class university educated people, they won’t get votes from the people they profess to care about and we will have another Tory government at the next election.

polidori redux
polidori redux
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

He has a point though. Labour was supposed to represent the lower classes. The metropolitan luvvies should go elsewhere.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Dylan Regan

Meeaiooww!!

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

The only real difference between Starmer and the hard left is that the tankies aren’t lying.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Can you elaborate?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

Can you elaborate?

Graeme Kemp
Graeme Kemp
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

I’ve a lot of sympathy with what you are saying.

Phil Rees
Phil Rees
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

Any selection system that ensures the likes of Dent Coad are never selected must be a good thing. I’d like to see an old style Labour Party given a chance but that requires a massive improvement in their MPs.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil Rees

Yes, but the trouble with that is that – while it’s exactly what you’d expect for Labour and the SNP – it is shady, corrupt, fraudulent and makes a mockery of local democracy and the very notion of the political party in this, a party-based Parliamentary system. It’s not even half a step from that to claiming that, say, ‘any system that ensures the likes of Brexiteers aren’t elected is a good thing’.
No. I won’t have that. If the new, Davos-backed Labour leadership gang of Starmer – which ‘won’ election, btw, fraudulently on the basis of a leftist manifesto it now says it has no intention of carrying out (and never did) – can’t provide candidates who can win selection honestly, then it has no business being in post. And as the article states, this sort of shameless, sheity corruption so as to achieve their ends bodes ill, very ill, for the sort of 15- or 20-year junta they are likely to be.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

SHEITY? Or do you mean:-

SHEISTY :A modern adjectival outgrowth the noun “shyster.” The original term refers to someone who behaves in a disreputable or unethical fashion. Thus a “sheisty” …

Or perhaps something rather ruder?
Did you learn that at Pirbright? Or with the Pioneer Corps?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

SHEITY? Or do you mean:-

SHEISTY :A modern adjectival outgrowth the noun “shyster.” The original term refers to someone who behaves in a disreputable or unethical fashion. Thus a “sheisty” …

Or perhaps something rather ruder?
Did you learn that at Pirbright? Or with the Pioneer Corps?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Phil Rees

Yes, but the trouble with that is that – while it’s exactly what you’d expect for Labour and the SNP – it is shady, corrupt, fraudulent and makes a mockery of local democracy and the very notion of the political party in this, a party-based Parliamentary system. It’s not even half a step from that to claiming that, say, ‘any system that ensures the likes of Brexiteers aren’t elected is a good thing’.
No. I won’t have that. If the new, Davos-backed Labour leadership gang of Starmer – which ‘won’ election, btw, fraudulently on the basis of a leftist manifesto it now says it has no intention of carrying out (and never did) – can’t provide candidates who can win selection honestly, then it has no business being in post. And as the article states, this sort of shameless, sheity corruption so as to achieve their ends bodes ill, very ill, for the sort of 15- or 20-year junta they are likely to be.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

There is a distinction between ‘pandering to the fanatics’ – classic straw-manning there – and brazenly corrupt election-rigging, in open defiance of the Party’s own rules and pretensions to party democracy and probity. And with an absolute confidence of impunity in so doing. But considering Arise Sir Keir Starmer’s conduct at the CPS and the manner in which he and his gang took control of the party in the first place, it’s hardly surprising.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
j watson
j watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

A bit of ruthlessness to purge Corbynista’s – people are going to like and welcome that. Not allowing himself to be dragged at same time into a Blairite position. Avoiding gifting the Tories some obvious pot-shots. Track record as a Prosecutor. And increasingly showing he may not be blessed with buckets of charisma but he’s his own man. Like it.
And it’s borne out from the less favourable comments here – they are really struggling to land punches so default to nonsense about his background. So boring. And furthermore however they play it he compares well to a much richer man who’s family avoided tax.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  j watson

..interesting take on matters.
Of course all political parties interfere with local selections.. to suggest it’s solely a Labour thing is misleading.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  j watson

..interesting take on matters.
Of course all political parties interfere with local selections.. to suggest it’s solely a Labour thing is misleading.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

The effect is usually softened using 3 balancing inputs:
1. Buy in experts as consultants / advisors.
2. Collective responsibility of the Cabinet.
3. The Civil Service experts who are generally conservative (small c)…
So I wouldn’t panic. Once they don’t have a big red button on the desk (Truss style) you’ll be OK.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Your 3 is comedy gold. Civil servants are all woke lefty turds nowadays.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Your 3 is comedy gold. Civil servants are all woke lefty turds nowadays.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

Exactly! We have zero idea about what this new cohort actually believe in!!! Keir cannot mask his beliefs so well. Are we to assume they are all Middle class friendly Neo Tonys? Proto Liz Truss types who look on in absolute horror at the deranged identity politics of the current Lab MPs?? We have no idea!!! LThe fact that declaring yourself anything but a nurse or social worker with zero connection to the world of — God I feel sick even writing the word ‘business’ – is a taboo tells us a lot. A new army of scrubbed up studenty social justice Corbyny Wokester warriors – all still Tory Scum Hating & Confused about Gender – are poised to fill the chambers of Westminster while the Union arm creates mayhem outside. How could it come to this…

Dylan Regan
Dylan Regan
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

It’s not just that Labour MPs should be centrist and left wing, it’s that they shouldn’t all be former councillors who went to Oxbridge who have never actually worked a proper job all their life

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

The only real difference between Starmer and the hard left is that the tankies aren’t lying.

Graeme Kemp
Graeme Kemp
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

I’ve a lot of sympathy with what you are saying.

Phil Rees
Phil Rees
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

Any selection system that ensures the likes of Dent Coad are never selected must be a good thing. I’d like to see an old style Labour Party given a chance but that requires a massive improvement in their MPs.

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

There is a distinction between ‘pandering to the fanatics’ – classic straw-manning there – and brazenly corrupt election-rigging, in open defiance of the Party’s own rules and pretensions to party democracy and probity. And with an absolute confidence of impunity in so doing. But considering Arise Sir Keir Starmer’s conduct at the CPS and the manner in which he and his gang took control of the party in the first place, it’s hardly surprising.

Last edited 1 year ago by Peter Joy
j watson
j watson
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

A bit of ruthlessness to purge Corbynista’s – people are going to like and welcome that. Not allowing himself to be dragged at same time into a Blairite position. Avoiding gifting the Tories some obvious pot-shots. Track record as a Prosecutor. And increasingly showing he may not be blessed with buckets of charisma but he’s his own man. Like it.
And it’s borne out from the less favourable comments here – they are really struggling to land punches so default to nonsense about his background. So boring. And furthermore however they play it he compares well to a much richer man who’s family avoided tax.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

The effect is usually softened using 3 balancing inputs:
1. Buy in experts as consultants / advisors.
2. Collective responsibility of the Cabinet.
3. The Civil Service experts who are generally conservative (small c)…
So I wouldn’t panic. Once they don’t have a big red button on the desk (Truss style) you’ll be OK.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
1 year ago
Reply to  Zak Orn

Exactly! We have zero idea about what this new cohort actually believe in!!! Keir cannot mask his beliefs so well. Are we to assume they are all Middle class friendly Neo Tonys? Proto Liz Truss types who look on in absolute horror at the deranged identity politics of the current Lab MPs?? We have no idea!!! LThe fact that declaring yourself anything but a nurse or social worker with zero connection to the world of — God I feel sick even writing the word ‘business’ – is a taboo tells us a lot. A new army of scrubbed up studenty social justice Corbyny Wokester warriors – all still Tory Scum Hating & Confused about Gender – are poised to fill the chambers of Westminster while the Union arm creates mayhem outside. How could it come to this…

Zak Orn
Zak Orn
1 year ago

Good. It’s one thing when they’re just the opposition but with a near 100% chance that Labour will win the next election now is not the time to be pandering to the fanatics. Labour already have a bunch of utter clowns as MPs, they don’t need any more of them. 
It’s baffling how you can acknowledge the need for “experts on the economy, foreign policy and defence” and then think the solution to that would be more left MPs, rather than less. You only have to listen to any of the existing left Labour MPs to realise they’re dangerously detached from reality on all three of those issues.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago

Maybe Starmer has an overriding desire to return Labour to the party whose main objective is to support the working class. He won’t achieve that by importing “culture war grifters”

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
Graeme Kemp
Graeme Kemp
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Quite.

neville austin
neville austin
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Not the first idea what your code is meant to mean.

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Did you read the article? The people who have been ruled out are not ‘culture war grifters’, something that is really a Right Wing phenomenon, but local community activists. They would absolutely get elected.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

What nonsense!
Where were you educated Ms Harries?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
A Willis
A Willis
1 year ago

State educated! Heaven forfend!
The country is in the state it is in today thanks to the constant cadres of expensively educated rissoles displaying precisely such bigoted arrogance.
I usually agree with everything you write, but, oh my! Honi soit qui mal y pense (and I suppose that’ll have to apply equally to my state-educated self, too).
.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  A Willis

Guilty as charged !
I thought it fun to ‘ wind up’ our Welsh Wizard’, Ms Harries.
My sincere apologies if it inadvertently offended you.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  A Willis

You need to wash your mouth out (or your keying finger/s) if you ‘generally agree with everything’ Charlie S says! He’s a bit.. how shall I put it? …not very fair minded is as bland as I can make it!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  A Willis

Guilty as charged !
I thought it fun to ‘ wind up’ our Welsh Wizard’, Ms Harries.
My sincere apologies if it inadvertently offended you.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  A Willis

You need to wash your mouth out (or your keying finger/s) if you ‘generally agree with everything’ Charlie S says! He’s a bit.. how shall I put it? …not very fair minded is as bland as I can make it!

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago

Indeed. Another “convenient” avoidance of reality from the woke. When their culture war attacks get rebuffed, they just blab” well you started it ….”

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
A Willis
A Willis
1 year ago

State educated! Heaven forfend!
The country is in the state it is in today thanks to the constant cadres of expensively educated rissoles displaying precisely such bigoted arrogance.
I usually agree with everything you write, but, oh my! Honi soit qui mal y pense (and I suppose that’ll have to apply equally to my state-educated self, too).
.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago

Indeed. Another “convenient” avoidance of reality from the woke. When their culture war attacks get rebuffed, they just blab” well you started it ….”

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

‘Community activists’, or yet another bunch of low-calibre, white collar Blairite chancers on the make. Each set are complete strangers to any experience of physical labour and from a now floating voter’s point of view, I don’t which I find more repugnant.
Is there now a single former manual worker to be found anywhere in the Parliamentary Labour Party or candidates’ list?

ben arnulfssen
ben arnulfssen
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

Lisa Forbes, briefly MP for Peterborough following the dismissal of Fiona Onosaya for good and sufficient cause was a typical example – a Blairite activist employed by the NHS in a union official capacity.

ben arnulfssen
ben arnulfssen
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

Lisa Forbes, briefly MP for Peterborough following the dismissal of Fiona Onosaya for good and sufficient cause was a typical example – a Blairite activist employed by the NHS in a union official capacity.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Yes I did. The author seems to have conveniently avoided mentioning the large number of more Trotskyite or ultra woke) candidates that Labour has/must keep out in order to be elected.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

It’s curious is it not that ultra right-wing, Davos-driven, worker-hating, bankophiles never seem to be despised on the other side irrespective of THEIR (proven) ability to wreck the economy? Somehow they destroy in a ‘good way’ it seems.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

It’s curious is it not that ultra right-wing, Davos-driven, worker-hating, bankophiles never seem to be despised on the other side irrespective of THEIR (proven) ability to wreck the economy? Somehow they destroy in a ‘good way’ it seems.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

..elected yes. But form part of a cohesive, effective govt.? Maybe not.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

What nonsense!
Where were you educated Ms Harries?

Last edited 1 year ago by CHARLES STANHOPE
Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

‘Community activists’, or yet another bunch of low-calibre, white collar Blairite chancers on the make. Each set are complete strangers to any experience of physical labour and from a now floating voter’s point of view, I don’t which I find more repugnant.
Is there now a single former manual worker to be found anywhere in the Parliamentary Labour Party or candidates’ list?

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

Yes I did. The author seems to have conveniently avoided mentioning the large number of more Trotskyite or ultra woke) candidates that Labour has/must keep out in order to be elected.

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  glyn harries

..elected yes. But form part of a cohesive, effective govt.? Maybe not.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

No point in being a ‘clean’ opposition. Gotta git in there and get down and dirty!

Graeme Kemp
Graeme Kemp
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Quite.

neville austin
neville austin
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Not the first idea what your code is meant to mean.

glyn harries
glyn harries
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Did you read the article? The people who have been ruled out are not ‘culture war grifters’, something that is really a Right Wing phenomenon, but local community activists. They would absolutely get elected.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

No point in being a ‘clean’ opposition. Gotta git in there and get down and dirty!

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago

Maybe Starmer has an overriding desire to return Labour to the party whose main objective is to support the working class. He won’t achieve that by importing “culture war grifters”

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton
Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

Unfortunately, Labour has to be elected. It serves as a natural correction to force the ‘normal’ types of MPs to think more.
The whole party system is shocking. There is no democracy. The people who get elected are idiots and they are given air-time to spread their idiocy. I suspect that well over half of the electorate doesn’t listen to anything relating to politics. I know several people who always vote Labour “because of Margaret Thatcher” and several who always vote Tory for the same reason. I think it would help if contributors to UnHerd stopped falling back on the words ‘left’, ‘leftie’, ‘left-leaning’, which are totally meaningless, and instead we had some kind of wokicity scale from 1 to 10 where extreme wokedness scores a 10.
The main thing really is trying to decide who will win Strictly.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

Bravo, well said!

neville austin
neville austin
1 year ago

????

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  neville austin

“The people who get elected are idiots and they are given air-time to spread their idiocy.”

Do you disagree with that sentiment?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  neville austin

“The people who get elected are idiots and they are given air-time to spread their idiocy.”

Do you disagree with that sentiment?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

No difference between LavaTories and Labour.. both ” reound veowel seound” terylene clad, woke lower line manager over promoted lower middle class, self promoting Pooteresque, otherwise unemployable detritus.

Jonathan Nash
Jonathan Nash
1 year ago

Stop beating about the bush and tell us what you really think please

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

How many have served in the Household Division I wonder?

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago

I doubt you did.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

Did you?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Gdsmn Joy 33 Welsh Guards?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Test him out with a tin of kiwi, blow torch, bees wax and a yellow duster!

Adrian Maxwell
Adrian Maxwell
1 year ago

Holts Damp Start was far easier.

Adrian Maxwell
Adrian Maxwell
1 year ago

Holts Damp Start was far easier.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

I served in the Boy Scouts: does that count?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Not quite!
How about the IRA?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

Grandfather yes*, me no. Father as a medic during the Emergency (you call it WW2). As a pacifist I regard killing to sort out rich and powerful people’s disagreements as the ultimate in stupidity.
As Napoleon said: “I have discovered something amazing: men will die for ribbons!”.
What grovelling idiots they are to do so!
* For you a terrorist for me a freedom fighter – he worked in intelligence in Michael Collins’ resistence movement against our foreign rulers at the time (to visualize, imagine Nazi Germany had invaded GB: you might perhaps do the same: if you had the courage: I doubt it: you’re more the armchair warrior).
BTW he refused to carry a gun lest he use it. Willing to die but not to kill. I guess he too was a pacifist, like his son and grandson after him. So, now you know Charlie!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Did ‘we’ execute your grandfather I wonder?
It might explain why you are so irredeemably’chippy’.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Did ‘we’ execute your grandfather I wonder?
It might explain why you are so irredeemably’chippy’.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

Grandfather yes*, me no. Father as a medic during the Emergency (you call it WW2). As a pacifist I regard killing to sort out rich and powerful people’s disagreements as the ultimate in stupidity.
As Napoleon said: “I have discovered something amazing: men will die for ribbons!”.
What grovelling idiots they are to do so!
* For you a terrorist for me a freedom fighter – he worked in intelligence in Michael Collins’ resistence movement against our foreign rulers at the time (to visualize, imagine Nazi Germany had invaded GB: you might perhaps do the same: if you had the courage: I doubt it: you’re more the armchair warrior).
BTW he refused to carry a gun lest he use it. Willing to die but not to kill. I guess he too was a pacifist, like his son and grandson after him. So, now you know Charlie!

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Not quite!
How about the IRA?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Gdsmn Joy 33 Welsh Guards?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Test him out with a tin of kiwi, blow torch, bees wax and a yellow duster!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

I served in the Boy Scouts: does that count?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Peter Joy

Did you?

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Still a good few Tories, but I suspect no l***a… There was that nice MP who was a Scots Grey?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

‘Tam’Dalyell?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

‘Tam’Dalyell?

Peter Joy
Peter Joy
1 year ago

I doubt you did.

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

Still a good few Tories, but I suspect no l***a… There was that nice MP who was a Scots Grey?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

What you’re really saying is you too think any of them are wonderful?

Jonathan Nash
Jonathan Nash
1 year ago

Stop beating about the bush and tell us what you really think please

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago

How many have served in the Household Division I wonder?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago

What you’re really saying is you too think any of them are wonderful?

neville austin
neville austin
1 year ago

????

Nicky Samengo-Turner
Nicky Samengo-Turner
1 year ago

No difference between LavaTories and Labour.. both ” reound veowel seound” terylene clad, woke lower line manager over promoted lower middle class, self promoting Pooteresque, otherwise unemployable detritus.

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

May I repeat my friend’s proposal that UK citizens be allowed to vote in either political elections or reality television shows in any given year, but not both?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

I take it you paint all parties with the same brush?

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

Bravo, well said!

Alphonse Pfarti
Alphonse Pfarti
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

May I repeat my friend’s proposal that UK citizens be allowed to vote in either political elections or reality television shows in any given year, but not both?

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

I take it you paint all parties with the same brush?

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
1 year ago

Unfortunately, Labour has to be elected. It serves as a natural correction to force the ‘normal’ types of MPs to think more.
The whole party system is shocking. There is no democracy. The people who get elected are idiots and they are given air-time to spread their idiocy. I suspect that well over half of the electorate doesn’t listen to anything relating to politics. I know several people who always vote Labour “because of Margaret Thatcher” and several who always vote Tory for the same reason. I think it would help if contributors to UnHerd stopped falling back on the words ‘left’, ‘leftie’, ‘left-leaning’, which are totally meaningless, and instead we had some kind of wokicity scale from 1 to 10 where extreme wokedness scores a 10.
The main thing really is trying to decide who will win Strictly.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Max Headroom has nothing to say and will not address the problems that the UK and the rest of the West faces.
He cannot even say what a women is, as if the question was complicated. He is dangerous because because to
low information voters,
he looks ” reasonable ” compared to the out and out Marxist, Corbyn.
Then there is the front bench, Abbott, Rayner, Nandy, et al. Everyone of them ridiculously and hideously incompetent.
I despair of the Tories but a Labour government will make the Tories look like geniuses.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

My sentiments exactly. If you lack the courage or the intelligence to state what a woman is, then you have no business being in politics or, indeed, law.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Especially while taking the knee …

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

The official term for one who indulges in such self-abasement is GROVELLER.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Abasement, so appropriate.

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Abasement, so appropriate.

CHARLES STANHOPE
CHARLES STANHOPE
1 year ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

The official term for one who indulges in such self-abasement is GROVELLER.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Can you explain the political importance of avoiding an idiotic question please? Only a woke idiot would (a) pose the question and (b) answer it.
Anyone with an ounce of commonsense would ignore the question. It’s akin to ssking: “Is it true you’ve stopped beating your wife”!

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Especially while taking the knee …

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Julian Farrows

Can you explain the political importance of avoiding an idiotic question please? Only a woke idiot would (a) pose the question and (b) answer it.
Anyone with an ounce of commonsense would ignore the question. It’s akin to ssking: “Is it true you’ve stopped beating your wife”!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Anyone who “makes the Tories look like geniuses” deserves some kind of recognition surely. To achieve that would be to achieve the utterly impossible!
It beggars belief that a significant proportion of British voters think the Tory party are anything otjer than stupid, greedy, self-opinonated, entitled degenerates. Apart from what Tory party members are like: what in God’s name are those who elect them like? I refer to the average British bloke (not the chinless, Etonian, well healed, self-satisfied, greedy, smug cretin)..

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

My sentiments exactly. If you lack the courage or the intelligence to state what a woman is, then you have no business being in politics or, indeed, law.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
1 year ago
Reply to  Stoater D

Anyone who “makes the Tories look like geniuses” deserves some kind of recognition surely. To achieve that would be to achieve the utterly impossible!
It beggars belief that a significant proportion of British voters think the Tory party are anything otjer than stupid, greedy, self-opinonated, entitled degenerates. Apart from what Tory party members are like: what in God’s name are those who elect them like? I refer to the average British bloke (not the chinless, Etonian, well healed, self-satisfied, greedy, smug cretin)..

Stoater D
Stoater D
1 year ago

Max Headroom has nothing to say and will not address the problems that the UK and the rest of the West faces.
He cannot even say what a women is, as if the question was complicated. He is dangerous because because to
low information voters,
he looks ” reasonable ” compared to the out and out Marxist, Corbyn.
Then there is the front bench, Abbott, Rayner, Nandy, et al. Everyone of them ridiculously and hideously incompetent.
I despair of the Tories but a Labour government will make the Tories look like geniuses.

Last edited 1 year ago by Stoater D
Ian Barton
Ian Barton
1 year ago

It’s very hard to imagine how the inclusion of some of the more fanatical candidates into an incoming Labour cabinet would lead to increased government competence.
Just look at some of the existing shadow cabinet ….

Last edited 1 year ago by Ian Barton