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Albert Speer’s egomania Who cares that Nazis can be charming?

Albert Speer on his way to Hollywood (IMDB)


December 6, 2021   5 mins

There’s obviously something a little suspect about being interested in Nazis. I was one of those kids who went through a Nazi phase, though I guess I also went through a North Korea phase. There’s something cool about the esoterica of Nazi obsession, like you’re learning something scary and subterranean and thrilling about human existence; it’s as if, beyond the low-octane, meaningless insults of consumer society, there’s some surreal tipoff into limitless violence.

They might be wearing Hugo Boss and driving Volkswagens, but Nazis don’t really seem to live on the same planet as us; and that’s why, maybe, Nazi content is sort of like True Crime or UFO stories. And, of course, there’s the taboo part of it: most of the Holocaust freaks I’ve known are either Jewish or anti-Semitic, all of them fascinated by this primal bloodlust that it’s more polite to ignore.

But where does Albert Speer fit into this narrative? Hitler’s Minister of Armaments and lead architect, known for his grandiose designs for the “Thousand Year Reich”, was one of the lucky Nazis. He was sent to prison for 20 years, but afterwards he was able to profit from his actions: in 1970, the man who had commanded an estimated 12 million slave labourers, about 2.5 million of whom died, wrote a best-selling memoir, Inside the Third Reich. He was later approached by Kubrick-protĂ©gĂ© Andrew Birkin about a film adaptation, and, in conversations that Birkin recorded as they workshopped their screenplay in 1972, downplayed his relationship with Hitler and his knowledge of wartime atrocities. Fortunately, Paramount Pictures did not pick up the script, and it was not produced.

I couldn’t help asking myself, while watching Vanessa Lapa’s Speer Goes to Hollywood, composed of dramatisations of those Birkin recordings and footage from the Nuremberg trials: what is the point of Nazi documentaries, and why am I watching one? I suppose the straightforward answer is Holocaust Remembrance, as with Yom HaShoah and public memorials and the Holocaust Studies lessons that are mandatory in sixteen US states.

But if Holocaust remembrance is really the point of Holocaust documentaries, I’m not sure these films are up to the task. The most Holocaust-conscious people I know have tended to be, let’s say, “Holocaust-critical independent researchers”, like the shaved-head kid with an Iron Cross ring that sat in the front of my college Holocaust Studies class and “asked a lot of questions”. I think he may have thought it was a workshop.

I’ve never met someone who doesn’t know the phrase “six million”, but I’ve known a number that would say “six million sounds like a lot”, and I’m not sure Speer Goes to Hollywood is going to make much of a difference for them. If these films are simply preaching to the choir, that’s fine; but does that mean Nazi films are just True Crime for boys?

That said, I suppose Nazi documentaries may still serve some salutary function in American society. In an era of increasing groupthink and hyperpoliticisation, we might consider that Nazi eugenicists were, actually, “following the science”, with the eager collaboration of leading American scientists funded by the Rockefellers. And with today’s poorly educated often decried as “Nazis”, we might do well to reflect that the German profession that voted for the Nazi party in the highest numbers was physicians. Speer might fit in there: reminding us that Nazis can be charming, well-spoken, and professional.

Perhaps there’s some value in Hannah Arendt’s idea of “the banality of evil”: that evildoers aren’t scary, “perverted and sadistic” monsters, but instead thoughtless, “terrifyingly normal” joiners. Arendt’s thesis has since been criticised as more research shows that Adolf Eichmann did, actually, have some real ideological investment in the extermination of the Jews. However, as a general rule, there’s some truth there: people tend to think they’re doing the right thing, or at least not committing a crime against humanity — and they tend to do the easiest thing under the circumstances.

But how do you show banality in film, a medium designed to hypnotise the masses with spectacle and splendour? The most obvious answer can be found in Claude Lanzmann’s nine-hour-long Shoah (1985); a 355-minute torrent of interviews about the most revolting atrocities, described through minute, twist-of-the-knife probing, but with almost nothing to see. There aren’t photographs; there aren’t newsreels; there aren’t, God forbid, animations. There’s mostly absence: the empty field of stones and grass where there was Treblinka, the grey pond, wide and boring, where thousands of Jews’ ashes were dumped. And, sometimes, that absence extends to the interviews, showing how the Final Solution was executed by commonplace acts and with, even, commonplace feeling: in one chilling interview, a few residents of the village of Auschwitz calmly, undramatically, say they’re happy the Jews are gone.

Speer Goes to Hollywood doesn’t have the visual subtlety of Shoah; it’s more or less what you’d expect, built on familiar black-and-white archival images of rallies, camps and propaganda. But I suppose it, actually, implicitly denies the banality of an evil thesis. Speer mythologised himself in two ways: first, that he was a great architect, and second, that he wasn’t interested in genocide, just in making some really impressive buildings. As he says, “I was just 29 and I would have sold my soul to Mephisto”.

Yet his explanations, an exercise in cognitive dissonance, are sometimes inadvertently absurd in their coldness: for example, when talking about the Jews in Weimar Berlin, he says: “I can’t really say [I had] an anti-Semitic feeling. It was a feeling of disgust when I saw it.” He later claims that though he knew Hitler was planning to annihilate the Jews, he had “no direct knowledge” of the camps since a friend had told him never to go to Auschwitz because “terrible things [were] happening there”.

But however hard he was trying to whitewash himself, he still comes across as narcissistic and deluded. When he emerges from prison, he cheerily says to excited journalists: “You see that after 20 years I’m still relatively good looking”. And when Birkin tells him that “Paramount and the Jewish Brigade associated with them” (wow!) have rejected the script, since only two out of its one-hundred-ten pages address the extermination of the Jews (wow!), Speer states, “That is their problem” (wow!).

Paramount didn’t produce the film, but ‘the Speer myth’ — this poor handsome man; he had no idea what they were doing at those funny places out East — did make him millions in book royalties. Still, I’m not sure how many Holocaust-heads today truly believe that he didn’t know about the camps, given that correspondence released in 2007 made it clear he was lying.

And yet he still commands a unique fascination. Perhaps Speer seemed less obscene; perhaps, 15 years after the end of the war, his “poor-me” memoirs made mankind seem kinder. I don’t know. Speer was a weird figure. And he was neither a politician nor a military man; he was an architect and urbanist, a fairly influential pioneer of sustainable building and planning. He was also a moving writer, who wrote of Hitler’s unhappiness and Eva Braun’s loneliness in ways that are genuinely absorbing. He was almost respectable.

Here’s the thing, though: he was still an official in the Nazi Party, who, as his own book makes clear, was intimate with Hitler, Goebbels, and the whole gang. It’s clear why Speer lied, and not all that surprising how he lied: the real question, which this latest film and countless before fail to ask, is why anyone believed him.


Ann Manov is a writer living in New York. Visit her website here.

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Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago

As a civil engineer I have sometimes wondered about the construction of the extermination infrastructure.

There must have been meetings with the chemical engineers to establish the optimum dimensions of the chambers. Logistics experts would be involved in designing the transport systems. Somewhere there must be plans showing the reinforced steel design, signed, dated and version controlled by a draughtsman. There must be specifications, contracts, materials lists, and so and so on ad nauseam (in the most literal sense).

The banality of evil is ordinary people doing ordinary things in the pursuit of something monstrous.

There are industries today with some very dubious outputs. Where does this line of thinking leave a mid level marketing exec in the opioids division of a pharmaceutical company?

Francis MacGabhann
Francis MacGabhann
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Or an Australian police officer rounding up the unvaxxed?

James Joyce
James Joyce
2 years ago

Touche! The thoughts of the author and some commentators are dealt with in a much better, even profound way, in the first 50 pages or so of THE KINDLY ONES. This discussion shows how many people who saw themselves as far removed from the machine of death were actually essential cogs in this machine.
The opening in this fictional work is so much more powerful because it is told by someone who was directly involved in the killing–though he didn’t want to be, it was his fate–as pushback against those who thought they had less or no responsibility due to proximity.

Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago

When reading this I found myself reflecting on the disconnect between the moralising about what dead Nazis did wrong and the blindness we are showing to the tyranny being imposed on us in our own time.
Whether Speer was a good baddy or a really bad baddy is of some slight academic interest. A better question is what we are going to do about Peter Daszak and Anthony Fauci, who conspired to cover up their part in creating a virus that has killed millions.
Or what we might do about those who are complicit in the ongoing vaccine mandates – utterly useless in stopping COVID from spreading, and which are tearing our civilisation apart.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

How do we know that what we have been about the Nazis is actually true or at least not greatly exaggerated.
Given the way western governments seem to lie with impunity what makes us think they were telling the truth back in the 1940s and 50s.
How can sensibly believe that we are now told now is confection of half-truths, misinformation and out right lies and yet accept the given history of WW2 as essentially.
My road to Damascus moment came with the invasion of Iraq. I reassured myself that no British Prime Minister would lie about something so serious. It sounds naĂŻve now but the realisation that we had to lied to for what can only have been base and inconsequential motive was a shock.
I have since looked to other materials concerning matters about which I had always assumed that version of events that I had corresponded more or less to the truth. Amongst other things the subject matter was the origins, conduct and aftermath of WW2 and at best the official version of events is selective, self serving and disingenuous.
One of the most disturbing aspects was the genocide perpetrated on the Germen people following the end of the war. I am no apologist for the Germans. I cannot see anything anything to apologise for about the with the bombing of Dresden. However, there can be no excuse for the genocidal ethnic cleansing and revenge killings that took place after Germany surrendered and which the allies both participated in and turned a blind eye to. What was done bears compassion to the very atrocities of which the Germans were accused but it was of course air-brushed from history. There are 2 good books on the subject, Savage Continent and Hellstorm.
So the question is how much is our understanding of our recent history a fabrication and was WW2 really about what we were brought up to believe it was about.

Graham Stull
Graham Stull
2 years ago

I agree with your quest for nuance and desire to question received wisdom.
I do think, though, that the Nazis represented a low-point for Western Civilization. Any ethno-state, which eradicates individual rights and imposes state control, is far from the ideals of the Enlightenment. And the Third Reich epitomises all of these vices.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
2 years ago
Reply to  Graham Stull

So we are told

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

They reaped what they sowed, and voted for in very large numbers.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
2 years ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

I agree when the war was on, but afterwards?

Andrew Holmes
Andrew Holmes
2 years ago

As an individual seeking data, you may be interested in “Bloodlands” by T Snyder. It offers an account from original documents, a bibliography (largely inaccessible to me because of languages), and statistics that may quiet your doubts about six millions.

As for Dresden, Goebbels famously exaggerated the death toll for political purposes. I would find your concern more convincing if you cited area bombing of population centers as immoral. Dresden is simply an incident in a broader policy.

And lastly, I understand that there were widespread abuses in the French zone of occupation which the US and Britain did not address. However, the depravity of murder, rape, and ethnic cleansing was Stalin’s policy displacing populations with disregard for their survival. Would you hold that the moral course was to declare war on the USSR, or to fecklessly flap our allied jaws saying, naughty, naughty.

Martin Bollis
Martin Bollis
2 years ago

Indeed. Or a teacher of critical race theory, who almost certainly thinks she is on the side of the angels

Judy Englander
Judy Englander
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

Coincidentally, I’m currently watching the 80s series ‘War and Remembrance’ based on Hermann Wouk’s book. It’s magnificent, dramatising the Holocaust through fictional characters spliced with real footage. As it’s a very long series we get to know the characters enough before they’re absorbed into the maw of the Shoah to care deeply about their fate. And Wouk (or the producers) appear to have taken great care about accuracy. One segment shows the building of the fake showers (gas chambers) and the super-powerful ovens to dispose of bodies. A whole range of professionals were involved, from architects to engineers from a major company (was it IG Farben? – I don’t remember) who struggled to design ovens where the extreme heat didn’t result in an explosion. Such an interesting challenge for them!
I know it’s on an infinitely lower level, but I’m always reminded of this banality of evil when I see modern companies spouting the wokist zeitgeist. I firmly believe their opportunism would turn on a dime from the political left to the far right if they considered it to be in their interest.

Last edited 2 years ago by Judy Englander
David Morley
David Morley
2 years ago
Reply to  Martin Bollis

The banality of evil is ordinary people doing ordinary things in the pursuit of something monstrous.

And doing it for the most ordinary motives imaginable. Advancing your career, impressing friends, attracting women who are more interested in money than morals. And we all collude, by tacitly agreeing not to look below the surface when we meet up for the weekend.
Somehow, cartoon monsters who set out to be evil, are so much more comforting. Because they just don’t look like us.

Dustshoe Richinrut
Dustshoe Richinrut
2 years ago

There seems to be some confusion here over the term “banality”.
Is “do(img) the easiest thing under the circumstances” really one aspect of banality? This is surely not what Hannah Arendt meant by her term of “the banality of evil”.
Eichmann may not have been at the coal-face, as it were; instead, he was at the mine’s offices. Even so, without him, the machinery of annihilation would not have been usefully cranked into gear. The stroke of the pen in his hand was in essence the banality of evil. Like what Saddam Hussein once said about the law being whatever he wrote on a scrap of paper.
The banality is in the mere obeying of orders. Or in the marks made by pen. It’s nothing to do with the fact that an ordinary (cowed) man may have been caught out by “circumstances” or under pressure to obey orders. You might call that cowardice or complicity.
The banality of evil is still the brutality of evil. The electrifying news story, however, may be dependent on the more obvious brutality aspect only.

Spectacle and splendour on film (as in the Nuremberg Nazi rallies of the Thirties) are also aspects of the banality of evil. As much as the stroke of a pen. It’s about how evil is accommodated into the workings and habits of society. And how evil hides in plain sight.

I think showing the “absence”, or rather the desolation, in Lanzmann’s Shoah film spoke very effectively of past evil doings. It helped at the time (1985) viewers in the West to see the remaining evidence of what was left behind at a time when the Cold War, I imagine, restricted the historian’s movements behind the Iron Curtain.
Those telling scenes must have provided context for those interviews in which the Final Solution was shown to be carried out by commonplace acts – where banality and brutality merged.

An interesting piece, the piece. Thanks.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
2 years ago

I think that Arendt went slightly further in the concept of banality. In her works she showed how anti-semitism grew very, very gradually over hundreds of years, starting in France and radiating outwards over Europe, until it became the norm. So, in normal life people cursed the Jews when anything went wrong and it was a normal, automatic thing to do, a reflex reaction for everybody.
Then the key figures came along to steer the masses just a little further, and a little more, and a little more, until they were caught up in the evil of the 30s and 40s. The works tended to show that these anti-semitic views were so ‘normal’ that they were banal. The results in the camps were more banalities as people stayed on automatic.
Japan was perhaps a little different in that there was no in-bred anti-anything, just a training for the soldiers in cruelty, an idea of doing a service for the Emperor and Japan. After the war, the German people realised what had happened and apologised but the Japanese didn’t.

David Morley
David Morley
2 years ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

And of course there was that standard piece of antisemitic (psycho)logic.
I hate the Jews: therefore the Jews must be evil.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago

War is what made mankind, all our systems came from the needs of defense, offense, and the political and technological advances needed to counter the opposing sides advancements in Social structure, technology, industry, science, skills, politics, agriculture…. Then a huge factor indeed was the wealth needed keep armies meant surplus of civil production always was vital to afford the means of a civilization’s survival. War required prosperity, and advancement, those who did not manage disappeared. Of all which has made us humans, war has been the greatest driver. – Fantastically cruel though it is; its History is us.

As the driver of Social, Technical, Philosophical, creative, communal, Political advancements it’s end result has been the Charity, Arts, Community, education, Philosophy – all the Liberal benefits were achieved by the trials of war forcing us to keep advancing in all areas of greater society.

I suppose much like nature – that fantastically cruel system of the creatures having many more offspring than the environment can support, and thus most doomed to a miserable early death of disease, predator, want, and harm…. – yet it produces all which is around us, and us.

But anyway – the War Trials. Long ago it was tacitly decided by man that just a token of the enemy was to be punished after defeat. Take Nuremberg and the Japanese WWII War Crime Trials, just the merest token amounts of people were tried and convicted. The ones on the ground who did the vast majority of evil were let go, just some very few made the scapegoats and hanged, or imprisoned. And there really is no other real way I would guess, to handle it. The Japanese were as bad as the Germans in that war. In retaliation to the Chinese helping ‘Doolitle Raid’ air crews escape; the Japanese executed 250,000 Chinese civilians – just as one example. A very few of the Japanese were hanged and imprisoned afterwards, like the Germans.

It is hard to think of specific parts of what happens in War and see what it all means afterwards. Sort of ‘What are you going to do’? Military history and military ethics have long been a great interest of mine, and I still cannot figure out what to think when I read articles concerning specifics like this. Except – that I find the modern peoples understanding of history is appallingly lacking, so they have so little to take this sort of story into context with.

I recommend this series, ‘WWII in Colour’, (only I cannot watch it again as the insane Youtube requires you to sign in to prove your age – and I have will not have an account with them…) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tvc8mP5LkKU&list=PLZxIFAN12m6wmm5K8fPkApSB1F90885hS&index=4 The excellent ‘World At War’ Documentary Series (1970, Thames TV, I think) has been taken off youtube – but if you can find it it is very good – and Speer was consulted in its making.

This one for the Pacific War – I find them fascinating – but tend to skip over the Russian Campaign and things too grim even for me…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJLE2pnN9WY&list=PL86G_7SF_iwqiPnw7Mq5y6rhVmlooylVL

That is about 30 hours of real documentaries – get rid of the Horrible streaming Cr* p and learn something. This guy is fantastic for Navy, a true historian, Drachinifel, just search youtube for his 100 videos –

History and Life is not what most of you think it is – So much good stuff on youtube I never fail to find something worth watching.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I do hope some of you sheep with no idea of history do watch the series I linked – start with the Pacific one. The thing you come to see is how people are sucked up into this.

Like our Firebombing of Tokyo – 100,000+ died in the firestorm – to put in context the Nuclear bombs killed 80,000. The other thing is the Nuks saved Millions of lives. Millions. Japan had a weeks left of food, at near starvation rates. Their entire shipping had been destroyed much earlier so no imported foods or materials, they were starving. Without the Nukes it is estimated a million of civilian would have died in very short order of starvation alone, and continued as they fought on the Japanese soil as all the remaining food was set to keep the troops going – Millions and Millions would have died in the land war. 250,000 civilians died in the Okinawan invasion just prior – and that is nothing to what Japan invasion would have taken….

Watch how all sides, every thing, all are sucked up in it, war is not really bad guys against good guys – it is that a lot, but not all as once loosened it is like a pandemic, a hurricane, and …

And that is the thing, alluded in posts above, ‘Total War’ – but the words not understood as so few actually bother to understand war, even though it made the modern world, and us and all history.

Total War is where there is no ‘Civilian’ as the citizens make the arms, uniforms, fuel, uniforms – transport, mine, manufacture, grow food – so all, soldiers and civilian are ‘Combatants’ The citizens make the gun and ammo – the solider aims and fires it – the differences are vague and unclear = Total War. Firebombing Tokyo, Coventry, Dresden, and a very many other huge places….

In my opinion Speer’s greatest harm was keeping the Germans fighting way past the time they needed to surrender. This made the deaths so pointless, the destruction much worse, and caused misery beyond reckoning – Speer was one of the ones fueling this insanity of refusing to stop the fight, both politically and by producing armaments in mass till the very end.

Watch the F***ing videos – you sheep need to get some more understanding of what it is we are – 30 hours and you will know a lot more than you do – another 300 more and you will have the bare minimum of understanding what is humanities greatest driver, and greatest Historical driver.

Matt B
Matt B
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Why all the unnecessary language to make your point – to strangers?.

Last edited 2 years ago by Matt B
Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I would recommend taking a look at Time Ghost History’s productions. Between Two Wars was probably the best historical production I have watched. They started out with their Youtube channel The Great War which covered the entire First World War week by week. They have another channel now simply called World War Two where they are doing the same thing with the Second World War. By the way, WWII in Colour was a great program. I have never seen World at War.
Side note am I the only one who gets annoyed at the pointless spelling difference in America and the U.K. over the missing “u” in words like color/colour armor/armour?
https://www.youtube.com/c/TimeGhost/channels

Last edited 2 years ago by Matt Hindman
Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago
Reply to  Matt Hindman

thanks for the link, I tried the week by week and it wore me down by so much stuff and little connected story –

but I cannot spell -, so it does not matter to me – when I do spell check half the page lights up

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

The Between Two Wars series is a must. My personal suggestion for long things like the week by week is listen to it while doing something else. Otherwise you might go crazy. Think of it as listening to several long audiobooks. They also have shorter programming on individual subject matter. The Great War is currently doing a month by month program about the world right after the first world war and it is excellent work.

Last edited 2 years ago by Matt Hindman
Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
2 years ago

It is the worship pf power by the inadequate. Both Communism and Nazism attracts people who lack charismos. Charismos was given to humans by gods for a divine purpose. Provided humans used charismos for the purpose intended by the gods, avoided hubris they did not suffer nemesis.
If one looks at many of those involved in combat in WW2 , especially volunteers where authority was given to them at early ages age, perhaps only 18 years of of age, their photographs show charismos; they have an aura of light about them. Examples . are Hallows GC, Szabo, Khan GC, GC, Wake GM, Yeo- Thomas GC, Lawrence DSO, Leigh Fermour DSO, F Spencer Chapman DSO. Khan GC was betrayed to the Gestapo by a Frenchman jealous of her beauty. Those who survived were vaccinated against a lust for power by their authority they carried at a young age. The youngest Wing Commander in the RAF was 21 years, the fighter pilot Finucane and there were plenty of people who were majors by the age of 23 years. They were happy to relinquish the power of life and death after the war was won.
Lawrence was an example of charismos for it was because of this attribute the toughest Beduin in Arabia followed him across deserts and into combat. In fact his body guard refused to wear white out of respect for him and they comprised 75 of the of the some of most murderous Beduin in Arabia.
Any dictatorship and increasingly the State offers earthly power, in the form of salary and status to the inequate. as Wilde said ” I can resist anything apart from temptation ” also “The only people who think about money more than the rich are the poor “. It is the inequate, poor in charismos who hunger for status and to a lesser extent salary; they will do anything obtain it. The modern day celebrity culture is an example of those lack charismos who lust to possess it.
Those who were the tortureres and executioners and death guards in the Nazi and Communists systems were never front line combat units but rear echelon types. Yeo-Thomas GC said the only kindness shown by a German guard while he was being torturred in Paris was by one who had WW1 combat medals.
As increasingly God is ignored, inequate people, desperate for charismsos use the State to obtain status and salary, so they may become gods and be worshipped. We may not be worshipping golden idols but we are worshipping Politicians and State Employees with gold plated pensions.

chris sullivan
chris sullivan
2 years ago
Reply to  Charles Hedges

perhaps then the ‘banality of most humans’ vs evil per se. It is ridiculous to blame some disembodied concept as a cause of evil being done WHEN IT IS ACTUAL HUMANS THAT perform it. What conceptual rubbish we create to avoid the grim reality that humans are a very primitive and almost totally selfish creature………

Charles Hedges
Charles Hedges
2 years ago
Reply to  chris sullivan

Bronwoski in Ascent of Man p374 standing in a puddle at Auschwitz picking up a handfull of ash ” It was done by arrogance. It was done by dogma. It was done by ignorance. When people believe they have absolute knowledge, with no test in reality, this is how they behave. This is what men do when they aspire to the knowledge of gods.. In the end the words were said by Oliver Cromwell ” I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken”.
The arrogance of power and knowledge is power.Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
To believe one is possessed of Divine Knowledge, that as a consequence one can replace God is the absolute corruption and leads to mass murder be it in the name of communism, nazism or any other ism.
The banality of evil is the question how mundane and ordinary people such as Hitler, Himmler, Geobbels and Goering came to control the most educated race in the World.

Geoffrey Simon Hicking
Geoffrey Simon Hicking
2 years ago

But how do you show banality in film, a medium designed to hypnotise the masses with spectacle and splendour?

Come and See.

David Morley
David Morley
2 years ago

The nazi big brother house?

Last edited 2 years ago by David Morley
Richard Stanier
Richard Stanier
2 years ago

A truly awesome film, but it shows sadism, not banality.

Madeleine Jones
Madeleine Jones
2 years ago

Amazing article!
I guess I’m err… stuck in an eternal “Nazi phase”? For like, the last thirteen years I’ve been obsessed with Nazis / Neo-Nazis. I’ll read every book, watch every movie, talk, get into arguments about their motives. I look over on Neo-Nazi movements or sort-of Nazi stuff like the Alt-Right with utter fascination. Just the other day, I read about Hitler Esotercisim and Mysticism and it was incredible. 50% of my jokes around family members are Nazi-related. Some are mortifed, others join in, lol. Also interested in Nazism & Romanticism / Wagner, Nazism and fashion (Hugo Boss? Chanel? Those uniforms are sexy)
I don’t deny the Holocaust, nor do I see myself as a Nazi. I’ve always felt some guilt over this. It’s weird, I know. But I keep my interest to myself and those around me. Because I’m well-versed in Nazi history / culture, maybe I can put my knowledge to good use and write a book that hopefully makes a meaningful contribution to historical research.

Last edited 2 years ago by Madeleine Jones
David Morley
David Morley
2 years ago

I’ve seen this with adolescent boys, and some adolescent men, but never with women before. Is this some sort of fetish?
Btw – have you watched “kiss of the spider woman”

Last edited 2 years ago by David Morley
Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago

“I look over on Neo-Na*i movements or sort-of Na*i stuff like the Alt-Right”

Alt Right is not neo-Na*i by any means! Na*i Fas *ism was the joining of Government and Corporate. It is shortened: ‘National Socialism’ and Much more akin to Communism, except wealth was loved openly, rather than hidden in the latter. Maybe more like Modern China’s Communism – and we make ourselves weak for them with our Neo-Marxism, so they ultimately can consume us…

But I think you need to get some help with that Na*i love/fetish. It is deeply disturbing, and a very unhealthy place to let yourself be in. I would say you need to talk with some professional and get counseling and try to see what is going on…

Last edited 2 years ago by Galeti Tavas
Madeleine Jones
Madeleine Jones
2 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Thanks for your comment – I’ll keep it in mind 🙂

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

If it fascinates you then that’s fine. Better than being one of the sheep that a commenter here has such contempt for!

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

There’s nothing wrong with being fascinated by a period in which humankind went to extremes. I regularly engage in debate with a friend whose middle class German relatives benefitted during the nazi regime without supporting it, as he is so perplexed that they were so conformist and didn’t resist it.
You live in a time when such scrutiny and review of the records and direct experiences is feasible, unlike other periods in the past when humankind went to extremes.

JR Stoker
JR Stoker
2 years ago

“Following the science”. Quite so.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago
Reply to  JR Stoker

The Covid ‘plandemic’ response is Nothing to do with Health. These lockdowns have NOTHING to do with health – neither do vaxing the children.

Bret Weinstein, who has been on here 3 times – does a series on youtube (where they have to be Very Careful to not be banned – they have been demonetized and warned) – and it is fascinating to watch his evolution from an academic uber Liberal to now where he finally sees everything is false with covid, and thus his whole cosmology is very much in doubt…

This, his latest. is VITAL to watch – unless you have fallowed him you will miss much of the code youtubers have to use as Social Media is a Fas* ist Agenda Police and Propaganda tool.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnClIOoYCFg

This is from PhD’s of evolutionary biology, Liberal/Lefty Academic – so know a lot about virus evolution, and see the things are not about viruses and variants and health … and see the responce is completely for some hidden reason – to make the people give up their rights and freedoms, and destroy society and the economy.

But watch them – it is fun, easy watching, and unless you do you will continue being a sheep.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
2 years ago

Going back to the interwar period – Wiemar Germany, the creativity was almost unparalleled in history. The arts, literature, music, philosophy, science… But so much was dark – almost all of it. The Na*i are gone, but that huge horror, as evil, from that time and place remains and grows like a cancer in all the West.

Post Modernism and Neo-Marxism. The ‘Frankfurt School’.

It is why the Western nations are out to self genocide, driven apart, hedonist and stupidly greedy, Immoral, unethical, and so destroying the economies and nations and people. This sick and pernicious philosophy of hate and self loathing (exemplified by Woke) is going to cause more destruction and suffering then Fas *ism did – as that was based in the physical war – this is the philosophical war of degeneracy and evil, and it has totally taken root, and will win unless the decent people manage to resist. Now is when the good must fight more than ever before.

Gerard McGlynn
Gerard McGlynn
2 years ago

I thought Gitta Sereny had put to rest for all time Speer’s supposed innocence ! Did she not prove that he did not leave the Wansee Conference ” early ” ?
That he suggested that he did not know of the slave labourers dying is preposterous.

Giles Chance
Giles Chance
2 years ago
Reply to  Gerard McGlynn

I’m sure he did, but don’t forget that most of the European ruling class (including the Brits) supported Hitler and his anti-Semitic ideas.

Giles Chance
Giles Chance
2 years ago
Reply to  Gerard McGlynn

I’m sure he did, but don’t forget that most of the European ruling class (including the Brits) supported Hitler and his anti-Semitic ideas.

Gerard McGlynn
Gerard McGlynn
2 years ago

I thought Gitta Sereny had put to rest for all time Speer’s supposed innocence ! Did she not prove that he did not leave the Wansee Conference ” early ” ?
That he suggested that he did not know of the slave labourers dying is preposterous.

Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

On the symbolism of absence
.I once visited a holocaust museum in a wee town in Belgium which covered the Jews that were deported from that town. There was a video showing in the basement in which a Jewish man talked next to the railway track going into the death camp, and said how he drew comfort from seeing the rails because it brought him closer to his dead relative, as she would have been transported along that same railway track. It was such a desperate effort to find solace that it made me cry, and then we emerged from the basement into bright sunshine, which made it even harder.

Last edited 2 years ago by Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago

On the symbolism of absence
.I once visited a holocaust museum in a wee town in Belgium which covered the Jews that were deported from that town. There was a video showing in the basement in which a Jewish man talked next to the railway track going into the death camp, and said how he drew comfort from seeing the rails because it brought him closer to his dead relative, as she would have been transported along that same railway track. It was such a desperate effort to find solace that it made me cry, and then we emerged from the basement into bright sunshine, which made it even harder.

Last edited 2 years ago by Ian Stewart
John P
John P
2 years ago

I liked this! Incidentally, I have Speer’s Spandau Secret Diaries on shelf next to me right now.

John P
John P
2 years ago

I liked this! Incidentally, I have Speer’s Spandau Secret Diaries on shelf next to me right now.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
2 years ago

“Perhaps there’s some value in Hannah Arendt’s idea of “the banality of evil”: that evildoers aren’t scary, “perverted and sadistic” monsters, but instead thoughtless, “terrifyingly normal” joiners.”
Thus woke admin & corporate HR.

LCarey Rowland
LCarey Rowland
2 years ago

He was a nazi beast just like all the rest of them. He his in the shadows after the Holocaust; he hid for long enough to be overlooked in the shadows if history.
History is full of slippery Speer serpents, who slide through the undergrowth while the rest of us have our sights set on higher events.
Even now, there are Speers hiding in the shadows of whatever dark circumstances conceal the next massive attempt to conquer the institutions of human decency.
But don’t let them make their move! Never again!
No more Holocausts, no more beerhall puschs, no more lynchings, no more cross-burnings, no menorah-meltings, no more Jan6 kristallbustings.
No more Speers slithering through the grass, no more camouflaged respectables sliding through the Web of confounded 21st-century civilization.
Never again!

LCarey Rowland
LCarey Rowland
2 years ago

He was a nazi beast just like all the rest of them. He his in the shadows after the Holocaust; he hid for long enough to be overlooked in the shadows if history.
History is full of slippery Speer serpents, who slide through the undergrowth while the rest of us have our sights set on higher events.
Even now, there are Speers hiding in the shadows of whatever dark circumstances conceal the next massive attempt to conquer the institutions of human decency.
But don’t let them make their move! Never again!
No more Holocausts, no more beerhall puschs, no more lynchings, no more cross-burnings, no menorah-meltings, no more Jan6 kristallbustings.
No more Speers slithering through the grass, no more camouflaged respectables sliding through the Web of confounded 21st-century civilization.
Never again!

Giles Chance
Giles Chance
2 years ago

Why are we still obsessed with these murders, that happened more than 70 years ago ? What about, say, Rwanda ? Or the thirty, forty or fifty million people in China who were killed by Mao’s Great Leap Forward ? Oh, of course, I realised. It’s because the 6 million were Jews !! That’s why, every day, we’re reminded of the 6 million. Let’s move on, people. Time to forget, and, if possible forgive. (OK guys, I know you’re not going to forgive, but others might).

Last edited 2 years ago by Giles Chance
Ian Stewart
Ian Stewart
2 years ago
Reply to  Giles Chance

I think it’s because the slaughter was organised with industrial efficiency. But you’re right to point out that other mass slaughters just don’t get the scrutiny and memorialising they deserve.
And I think the Germans have been forgiven too – they just need to forgive themselves and move on.

Giles Chance
Giles Chance
2 years ago
Reply to  Ian Stewart

They have been forgiven by me, but not by the Jewish people.