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The tyranny of diversity training America is exporting its Calvinistic tendencies to British workplaces

There's no avoiding race politics. Credit: Pat Scaasi/MI News/NurPhoto/ Getty

There's no avoiding race politics. Credit: Pat Scaasi/MI News/NurPhoto/ Getty


March 26, 2021   7 mins

Half a millennium ago a social revolution caused a culture war setting two world views at each other’s throats. The Reformation unleashed by Lutherans was then followed, a generation later, by a more radical, second burst of Protestantism led by the French theologian Jean Calvin.

Calvinism was an energetic and revolutionary creed which found its epicentre in Geneva. Here, as elsewhere, Calvinists showed themselves devoted to education, enthusiastic charity givers and generous to refugees.

They also proved to be violently intolerant, with Jean Calvin’s Geneva imposing extreme punishments for perceived sinners, including the death penalty for pregnancy out of wedlock. They also had a tendency to smash up statues and burn down abbeys, or anything else that was associated with the old religion. Perhaps most puzzling of all to religious conservatives, Calvinists saw the world being divided between the damned and the saved — and the doubt this caused in believers often led to extreme psychological stress, to the point of breakdown.

It wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea, and so just over 400 years ago, a group of English men and women with Calvinistic leanings, feeling that their homeland wasn’t Godly enough, set sail to start a new country. This they did, pretty successfully, and today the new religion spreading from America displays that country’s strong Calvinist roots, and with the zealot’s indifference to local customs.

Today the faith is spread not by preachers, or even teachers, but through the institutions that wield the most power in the 21st century; corporations, and their Human Resources departments. For the practitioners of what is generally known as “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion” are teaching nothing less than a modern form of political Calvinism, one that paints a pessimistic picture of humanity destined to be damned. And their strength is growing.

Our economy may be in deep trouble following the pandemic, but one area which is already enjoying a roaring 20s is the diversity industry, which has significantly increased its presence in many companies since the protests that followed the death of George Floyd. All around, in hushed tones, people in a variety of careers, from academia to medicine to finance, grumble about the increasing encroachments on their workplace by newly empowered D.E.I teams. And the grumbling is always private; no one wants to go on record.

For some it’s a mere time-wasting exercise, with occasional Zoom conferences adding to the day’s workload. For others it goes much further, with HR-led diversity teams now even deciding who can be hired for what role. But almost everywhere there has been a significant ramping-up since last June.

The usual pattern is that a well-meaning manager, bombarded with images of BLM and racial justice from every corner of social media, will suggest that the organisation needs to alleviate concern about racism. The company or department, aware that racism is seen as the number one social evil and that anti-racist courses might also act as insurance against any discrimination lawsuit, will hire a professional anti-racist activist from outside.

It is rarely initiated by human resources, but HR embrace it because it gives them a role as priests of the new faith. There is also a whole outside industry that benefits too.

A middle manager at a medical professional body told me how, following the summer protests in the US, “it was [considered] a matter of urgency that we ran a series of mandatory diversity and inclusion training sessions for our staff”. There hadn’t been any problem at the company, which was pretty diverse and had good morale.

The sessions were run by professional diversity consultants, and were “quite different from previous E&D training I had attended at past jobs. Whilst those ones tended to focus more on how to avoid breaking the law, these sessions felt a lot more like an induction into their ideology.” They said that equality meant “treating people differently and acknowledging their race” and afterwards participants were told to research “ally behaviour” and “to educate ourselves about the British Empire”.

As with many of these courses, some very questionable claims were made: “We were told that high levels of diversity were in all cases a great thing and can only lead to good outcomes,” when numerous studies point to the opposite. They were told the gender pay gap was in large part caused by people using the word “girl” instead of “woman”, a claim that fails to take into account the overwhelming influence of child-rearing on the gender pay gap.

There was a talk about unconscious bias testing, even though it’s been shown to be largely bogus, and as with so many of these sessions, almost all the examples and talking points came from the US, “and there didn’t seem to be any kind of recognition from the trainers that these are two very different countries with very different histories”.

Many diversity and equality sessions instruct employees to read Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility, a runaway bestseller that has become the Little Red Book of the diversity industry. White Fragility is mainly tasked with teaching white liberals that the polite ways they talk about race to avoid offence are actually proof of their deep-seated sin. Whites, says DiAngelo, are able to “infuse their racial prejudice into the laws, policies, practices, and norms of society in a way that people of color do not”, and being unconscious of this racism is merely proof of how insidious it is.

In this world, greater white average wealth in any area is a priori evidence of this racism, even though over a dozen or so ethnic minority groups in the United States are wealthier than the white average. This central inequality, according to the book, “represents power and control by a racial group that is in the position to disseminate and protect its own self-image, worldview, and interests across the entire society”.

It is an incredibly bleak worldview, and as Matt Talibi said, “sees the human being as locked into one of three categories: members of oppressed groups, allies, and white oppressors”.

And this is what is being taught at workplaces across Britain, a new American religion proclaiming that, whatever we do, we are damned. It goes largely unopposed partly because the British are so unused to politics intruding in these areas of life, but also because workers are scared for their jobs; the rise of woke capital has given large corporations more power over their precarious employees.

One of the things I find so alien about the new religion is the absence of humour. So much of what is called identity politics is funny in its absurdity, because fanatics are intrinsically ridiculous — but only when they can’t get at you. But most people feel that they can, they can get them sacked or publicly humiliated, and so all the humour is told in DM groups or Slack channels. True believers certainly can’t laugh at themselves, and are determined to take the public realm’s sacred space for themselves.

There is also the difference between the totalitarian mind and the liberal mind; for the former, everything is about politics. What you do in your spare time has political implications, and so no area of life is free of political discussion. The traditional English cultural taboo about not discussing religion or politics in the pub reflected a deep-seated aversion to fanaticism; the idea that workplaces might be settings for political instruction would once have struck people here as positively demented.

A friend who works for a Russell Group university in the north of England described how, since June last year, there have been “constant invitations to regular Race Equality sessions and Diversity and Inclusion sessions”. Even in department-level meetings on completely unrelated topics there are now talks “educating us about the slave trade” with videos and slides. She describes these as “just complete non-sequiturs since the majority of the meeting is about new research grants, new students in the department, recruitment for next year”. It’s not that it’s a great intrusion, it’s just that it’s…. weird.

They are also made to undergo unconscious bias training before being allowed on interview panels for new staff and students, and are told things which are either questionable or outright false. At one of the meetings a diversity and inclusion officer told faculty that “if you only have one woman on your job shortlist there’s statistically no likelihood you’ll recruit her”, and this went unchallenged, even though this is not only untrue, it’s obviously untrue. Strangest of all, they were also told to “start every lecture with a picture of a black scientist and say that they have a voice and that it’s being heard”. She finds it embarrassingly patronising.

Universities are particularly vulnerable to this sort of activism, because by nature they are political. Many privately despair, including academics who aren’t especially right-wing; whatever your politics, conformism can become intolerable in a workplace. Talking about politics all the time is tedious. And activists can be disagreeable people.

Another academic, working at a politics department, recalled that things ramped up after the death of George Floyd when a committee was set up to look at diversity and decolonisation. It ended with activists from outside the department hiring students to “review” their reading list and blaming the inclusion of John Locke and David Hume for the BAME attainment gap. The conclusion was the demand that they separate “colonial and non-colonial” political history courses, which meant in effect separate courses for white and non-white political philosophers.

The strangest thing about all this expanded HR is that there is almost no evidence that diversity officers improve outcomes for underrepresented minorities. Indeed there is even evidence of the “pharisee effect”, that people made to recite a platitude about diversity and gender equality were less likely to hire a black or female candidate; it just made them feel like they’ve done their bit, a criticism that has been made against upper-class activism since Tom Wolfe’s day.

None of this stops it expanding. Even the royal family are on board, or as it was reported last week, “Queen to appoint diversity tsar”, one of those headlines that would truly baffle someone waking from a long coma. This will not improve the life of a single BAME person except for the actual tsar, or tsarina, who gets the job; everyone knows it, it’s just the royal family conforming to the state religion, just as their ancestor George I did.

The companies hiring diversity consultants probably aren’t improving people’s lives, and they aren’t encouraging tolerance, let alone “diversity”; quite the opposite. They’re doing what people in positions of power have done since the first states were formed, ensuring that their gods and saints are the ones being revered by the subjects they rule. As for the individuals who do not believe in the new faith, they do what people in totalitarian societies have always done – they keep quiet and retreat to an inner world where the intolerance and conformity of the powers-that-be cannot reach them.


Ed West’s book Tory Boy is published by Constable

edwest

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George Bruce
George Bruce
3 years ago

I read White Fragility by Robin Di Angelo just to try and know what these people are saying.
If someone asked me what kind of book it was, I would not say it was a sociology book commenting on the lives of black people or a psychological work talking about the way white people think. There is also no element of humility acknowledging that what she is writing is theory or opinion.
It`s much closer to a religious work with rules for living – say the Koran – or perhaps a political work like Mein Kampf.

Vikram Sharma
Vikram Sharma
3 years ago
Reply to  George Bruce

Every assertion in that book is non-falsifiable. So nothing in it meets the criterion of truth.

Last edited 3 years ago by Vikram Sharma
A Spetzari
A Spetzari
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

Yes it’s the classic postmodern mind trick of removing any concept of there being truths – so therefore opening the door to not saying anything wrong.
Although I never understood how more people don’t see the self-defeating futility of that viewpoint. Or how in within that framework you could legitimately advocate horrific causes.

Nigel Blumenthal
Nigel Blumenthal
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

Ah, but it doesn’t have to. Surely you know that “Truth” is simply a white male invention designed to hold down the rest of the population.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

I think you must mean ‘meaningfulness’ rather than ‘truth’.

Vikram Sharma
Vikram Sharma
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

I mean the truth. In the Popperian sense. Empirical truth which can be proven or disproven

George Glashan
George Glashan
3 years ago
Reply to  George Bruce

Coming soon the new book from Robin Di Angelo “ My Struggle (with Whiteness)

Last edited 3 years ago by George Glashan
Linda Brown
Linda Brown
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

🙂
Her new book, out in 2021 is called: “Nice Racism: How Progressive White People Perpetuate Racial Harm”. I wonder if it is an autobiography.

Last edited 3 years ago by Linda Brown
Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

Haha! It may amuse you to hear that I was banned from Waterstones several months ago for repeatedly reshelving ‘Why I’m no longer talking to crackers about race’ next to Mein Kampf.

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

I hope you gave them the name you used above!

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

She is absolved because she belongs to the cast of the progressive-sinless-elite. The new apostles of the Religion of the Pure.

Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
3 years ago
Reply to  George Bruce

I have not read the book but plenty of critiques appear to verify your impression.
I assume then that this hot-selling manifesto would be ripe for a copy-and-paste treatment and by simply replacing one word or phrase could be made to suit any particular grievance bee that occupied one’s bonnet.
Christian Fragility. Jewish Fragility. Islamic Fragility. Celebrity Fragility. Corporate Executive Fragility. Star Baker Fragility.
An entire “For Dummies” series for the oppressed and envious.

Marian Baldwin
Marian Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Look in the Grievance Study (or Hoax) done by James Lindsay, Helen Pluckrose, and Peter Boghassian. They were submitting papers to various gender/feminist journals with outrageous articles, including one that was a chapter from Mein Kampf, but written in feminist lingo. It was accepted!!!!

James Rowlands
James Rowlands
3 years ago

It is getting stupid. A friend of mine basically spends his day negotiating contracts. He says he now goes to meetings and of there is a black guy in the other team he wonders if they are the “token black” and therefore maybe not up to job and a potential area of weakness.
He says he makes a point of probing and if he is correct he suggests that they join a critical subcommittee.
In essence he is saying that the effect of all this is to increasingly make people assume that all blacks been appointed for their colour and therefore have to prove their ability, more often, before being accepted.

Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson
3 years ago
Reply to  James Rowlands

I have to admit the E&D people have got us all very much on edge. I have a very good black friend who finds the whole issue as crazy as I do. To treat him in a special way (his words here) is to treat everyone else in a worse way therefore promoting racism. Why can’t we all look beyond the colour of people’s skin or their sexuality FGS? The person who gets the job should be the person who’ll make the best job of it not someone not qualified enough just because they’re not white/straight/cis male etc’. The vast army of highly paid E&D teams have a lot to answer for.

jill dowling
jill dowling
3 years ago

Similar crap was been spouted in the late ’90’s for promoting women. It made me feel that I was part of a “quota” rather than someone who had achieved through her own hard work. Soul destroying.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

I have a very good black friend who finds the whole issue as crazy as I do.

I suspect this is not uncommon. Black people are understandably against genuine prejudice and disadvantage.
But it’s the crazy white people who are the problem.

Natalija Svobodné
Natalija Svobodné
3 years ago
Reply to  James Rowlands

Works the same with women too, or in-fact any other group, gay or minority. At least before PC, everyone knew everyone was there that could pull their own weight.

David Stanley
David Stanley
3 years ago

Great article, perfectly summing up the problems with the modern world.
Everyone I’ve ever met who has been committed to this ideology has been a complete pain in the backside. All they do is start arguments and fall out with people. The irony is that they generally do this to people who are pretty much on their side in the first place. This pushes people further away into the welcoming arms of people like Trump, Farage, etc. Given the choice of being screamed at by some blue haired maniac or have a civilised chat with a fellow gammon I know what I’d rather do.
The lack of humor in these people is also very noticeable. They seem to be completely miserable all of the time. I worked with a young woman like this who was very concerned about all the modern issues (BLM, climate change, gender, etc.). She rarely smiled or laughed about anything and was one of the most depressing people to be around. She just sucked the life out of any room she entered.
I’m thankful that I work for a small company run by a very reasonable Anglo-Indian who seems completely oblivious to all this nonsense. We have no HR department, no way of monitoring people’s protected characteristics and I can hire and fire who I want. Sometimes my team has a lot of minorities, sometimes it doesn’t, it just depends on who the best candidate is. What a novel idea!

Last edited 3 years ago by David Stanley
Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  David Stanley

The lack of humor in these people is also very noticeable.

It may not exactly be a high-brow observation, but there is a scene in an episode of Family Guy (‘ …which some viewers may find offensive’) which sums it up. In the high school canteen, a defence of an insensitive tweet – ‘It was only a joke’ – provokes the solemn responses: ‘There’s no such thing as jokes anymore’ and ‘Yeah, we live in a post-joke world.’

The upshot is a mass brawl in which nearly all the students kill each other. Is this the way we are heading?

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

Sir Roger Scruton wrote an article about the importance of forgiveness and irony.
Forgiveness and Irony: What makes the West strong | City Journal (city-journal.org)

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  David Stanley

It’s said that when a person loses one sense their other senses increase. For example when someone loses their sense of humour, their sense of self importance massively increases.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  David Stanley

“Moderation in all things “
as ‘you know who said’.

Mads Naeraa-Spiers
Mads Naeraa-Spiers
3 years ago
Reply to  David Stanley

“Annoy a liberal – work hard, be happy”

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago

Very good…….all grown ups should aspire to this!

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  David Stanley

Brilliant…….clearly a company of grown ups. There is severe immaturity today, no one takes responsibility, most young people’s aspirations seem to be about becoming a celebrity and if things get tough, like who will pay my mobile phone bill, well we can all look out!

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

It isn’t actually America exporting it, it’s blue America (and elites associated with it) exporting it. You can actually avoid much of this nonsense in the US by living outside the places badly infected with wokeism. The vast majority of the country is perfectly normal, we do have some totally dysfunctional spots but they do not represent the country, or even most of it. You can identify non dysfunctional areas of the US by looking at gun laws coupled with gun violence statistics. In dysfunctional spots, laws are stringent and gun violence is also very high. These tend also to be areas with lots of virtue signaling/diversity training programs coupled with very little diversity itself.

Last edited 3 years ago by Annette Kralendijk
Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
3 years ago

The Second Amendment is the most important tool USA has to remain free, without it we are sunk. It always reminds the people we are the ultimate sovereign of ourselves, we do have control over own safety, we have not surrendered our personal defense, thus freedom, to the State Authorities. I believe in law abiding households, Black, White, Hispanic, should all responsibly own a firearm if they wish, and the people I know in my town, Black And White, all own a fire arm, and that is better for everyone, like Switzerland. Where I live it is just normal, my guess is well over half of all houses have a firearm, and we are roughly equal numbers by race, and I would guess fire arm ownership is equal. We also all get along in my town because we all feel it is our community.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

The Second Amendment is the most important tool USA has to remain free, without it we are sunk.
which is why the left constantly seeks to chip away at gun rights.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I totally agree Sanford. Where I live there are lots of people with legal guns and almost no gun violence. Criminals can never be sure that their victims are not armed and they therefore stay in places where they know the law abiding types are not armed. Like Chicago. It must be fabulous to be sure that you can knock over any store or any individual and be almost positive that your victim won’t be armed. Not where I live.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
3 years ago

Perception creates reality though. Mass movements are historically very ineffective. Revolutions (from France to Russia to Myanmar) are led by upper-middle-class university students. In short: elites are what matter because elites control the institutions the masses depend on.

Our elites have been converted to a new religion: woke-ism. That means it will be forced down the masses throats within a generation.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

I’m going to disagree, perception is not reality. Reality is reality. Elites do have control over much of life in the US which is why when someone comes along threatening it, like Trump, people lose it. You are certainly right about that. I don’t think this will spread much beyond blue states, it just doesn’t sell in red states. Academia has a long history of various polluting theories, this too shall pass.
But it’s important that people sending kids to college help them understand the indoctrination. I had to do this with my own. A fraternity at one of the colleges one of my daughters attended had a cowboys and Indians party with associated inappropriate dress. It was similar to toga parties my generation had in college, lord I am dating myself. Anyway, the fraternity was disciplined and all the parents got apologetic letters from the dean. Over a party. With people dressed as cowboys and Indians. It was ludicrous. My daughter understood that. I guess I owe an apology to Romans for the toga party.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago

Annette I would like to think you are right, however I am in the UK and I have never seen such a change in society and in double quick time. Unfortunately, much happens while people are thinking about it!

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Jayne Lago

There must be places in the UK that are not infected with these dysfunctions though. Is it truly everywhere? I recognize that the US is very much defined by different states and it’s fairly easy to live in a state that is much less dysfunctional. It’s just that the dysfunctional states get the lions share of the attention while life goes on undisturbed in much of the country.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago

Let’s think positive and hope the grown ups rebel!

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago

How very reassuring, thank you.

Chris Wheatley
Chris Wheatley
3 years ago

Surely, the point is that not everyone can or will be able to live outside the trouble spots. These spots will be cancerous and will take over every neighbourhood.
In America and in the UK in the past, the people who were able to move went ahead and moved – to avoid the guns and drugs and, more recently, to miss being infected by wokeism. The rest were stuck and had to obey the rules of the moment.
Personally, I think that wokeism is a fad of youth – a dangerous fad but a fad. When everybody has the BLM t-shirt, there will be another fad – perhaps even anti-wokeism.
Reactions to wokeism vary. Young people tend to think it is very important. Middle-aged people go along with it to show that they’re still young and gravity hasn’t started to play tricks yet, older working people go along with it for a quiet life. Older, non-working people are almost unaffected and just carry on as normal.
The thinkers of the world, the ones who feel they should warn everybody else, are adamant that wokeism is bad. Why is it bad if it can’t tell you what to think? Why is it bad if presidents fill their staff with black people?
In fact, wokeism is bad because it is trying to shut down the world as we, the old thinkers, know it. Unfortunately, in the UK but not in America, the damage has already been done by the environmentalists who are trying to stop all things which involve moving from A to B, all forms of useful heating for houses, all industry, all enjoyment except looking at computer screens. The effects of wokeism will be trivial compared to the effects produced by the environmentalists.

Last edited 3 years ago by Chris Wheatley
Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

I think the people who don’t want to live with this can and will move. Don’t forget that there are people quite happy in blue states with rioting and looting. And people are moving in droves in the US away from blue states.
I agree it’s a young thing, it’s for people with little real world experience. And people who can live on their parents money. The older people who enjoy this sort of thing are usually dead ender types with little in their lives in the first place.

Marian Baldwin
Marian Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

Wokeism is bad because it wants you to fall into only one of two categorie–narrow binary thinking. (Racist or anti-racist, with the latter carrying certain rules of behavior). You are to be a mind reader so if someone is “offended” by your “micro-aggression”, it is your fault no matter if there was no intent to offend, placing no demands for the offended to question their own perhaps misperceptions to your words or actions. Wokeism lives in its own generalizations, and wants to keep it that way as it keeps well-intentioned people confused. Who can argue with the ideas when nothing is clearly defined? Quite simply, Wokeism is about power. Not truth. Not common human values. Just plain old political tribal power.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  Chris Wheatley

‘Older non working people are almost unaffected and just carry on as normal’

I can tell you us older retired people are furious! Just because we no longer work doesn’t mean our brains are depleted in some way……I may not be as quick as I was at twenty but my passion for my country, heritage and culture is as important to me now as ever. I know many older people are appalled at the lack of action on this serious change in direction, which I believe we will all pay for in years to come. Look at many countries around the world and see what happens when the governments are caught napping.

Last Jacobin
Last Jacobin
3 years ago

So dysfunction leads to gun violence and stringent gun laws? That I can follow.
Or is it the stringent gun laws leading to dysfunction and gun violence?
Or is it the gun violence leading to dysfunction and stringent gun laws?
What do you mean by there being very little diversity in the areas with the most dysfunction, stringent gun laws, gun violence and diversity training? Do you have a place in mind?

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Last Jacobin

No, gun violence which is prevalent in places with stringent gun laws, leads to dysfunction. All the law abiding people are wide open to becoming victims as they can’t defend themselves. It makes cities unlivable. As does acceptance of homeless tent cities and graffiti and garbage everywhere all over the streets. As does poor public schools and a preponderance of single parent homes. These all lead to dysfunctional cities. Diversity training doesn’t make cities live able. It’s pure theatre with gunshots as the background noise.
Highly dysfunctional cities have very little diversity, they are all run by democrats.

Last edited 3 years ago by Annette Kralendijk
Last Jacobin
Last Jacobin
3 years ago

Thanks for clarifying.

angelosnyktos
angelosnyktos
3 years ago

You make it sound as if living in a city like Chicago means constantly being exposed to criminals, rioting and looting. I have lived in Chicago for 25 years. I’m German, grew up in Bremen, then lived in Paris for 6 years and moved to Chicago when I met my husband. I wholeheartedly prefer Chicago to Paris and Germany. My husband and I have always lived in the north of Chicago – North Side, then North Shore suburbs and have never experienced a shooting, rioting, mugging or burglary, not even a car break-in. Whereas I did experience muggings and a burglary and witnessed a shooting when I lived in Paris. So, to me Chicago has always been super safe. This is a vast city and to get from my neighborhood to a bad neighborhood I’d have to drive 90 minutes. I have no inclination to do so (and neither do the criminals, they know they’d be spotted and reported right away). Chicago is also one of the cleanest cities in the world, all my friends and family who have visited me from Europe over the years have marveled at the cleanliness and beauty of Chicago’s northside neighborhoods and the gorgeous Lakefront.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  angelosnyktos

Yes, you live in the nicer part of Chicago. Every city has nicer parts. Even SF has parts that aren’t covered in homeless people. But the stats don’t lie. Gun violence is rampant in Chicago. Over this past weekend, 30 people were shot in Chicago, 3 died. This isn’t normal and it doesn’t happen everywhere in the US. In 2020 more than 700 people died in gun violence in Chicago. Looters have torn through the lovely Magnificent Mile. Lori Lightfoot does not have control of the city.
btw, I loved my time in Bremen, I was working with MBB on an airbus program.

Ceelly Hay
Ceelly Hay
3 years ago

I have been told that America is immune to its own ideas.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Ceelly Hay

Hmmm, not sure what you mean by that. Surely poor leadership infects many places within the US. It’s hard to characterize the whole country as one thing or another. But yes, there are many places in the US where you can live a very normal life, unaffected by crime and gun violence and rioting and looting, and bad schools and garbage piled everywhere. I’ve lived in places in the US that had those things and in places that didn’t. I can tell you that life is much much nicer when you do not have to put up with those things.

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago

I am glad to hear but do not underestimate the woke mob! Russia was destroyed by a group of Bolsheviks who knew where to hit and how to dismantle the whole society. And Russia is a huge country, nevertheless, Bolsheviks played their cards very well.
Carlo Cipolla (The 5 Basic Laws of Human Stupidity), also warned us to never underestimate the number of stupid people in a society and the damage they can do. When stupidity is blended with evil, the mix is lethal!

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago

White Privilege: often an accusation made by those who benefited the most from it against those who benefited the least.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

Yes, The most sickening thing about all this is that it is largely pushed by very rich and privileged white people who have no intention of giving up either their riches or their privileges.

George Glashan
George Glashan
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

thats the whole point of woke-ism, its like that hat from Harry Potter, its sorts people in to their “correct” place, the sons and daughters of the Good people, (who just happen to be the most wealthy) get in to the correct house. And the others get kept out and branded so that the Good know to avoid them, lest their Goodness be tarnished.

Simon Baggley
Simon Baggley
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

Cue Sainsburys – huge disparity between those at top of company and bottom in relation to earnings – cutting staff and installing auto checkouts to please shareholders – but hey we’ve installed safe spaces for our black staff so all is well.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago

It’s getting worse, The Oregon Department of Education has brought into the absolutely idiotic: Math(s) is racist. Black kids apparently can’t be expected to do white man’s maths. Of course (ironically) stats show a very wide distribution of maths success within ethnicity and gender, and in the US & UK plenty of immigrants groups including Africans easily outperform whites. It’s spectacularly anti-black racism, yet these people think they’re the good guys non-binaries anti-racists.

There is of course similar stuff out there around gender, Dawkins wrote a good piece in the Spectator about it a few months ago. In simple terms some of these people are pushing the idea that logic & reason are tools of white male supremacy, even that working hard and dedication are ‘white’ traits, thus these traits are bad. To use reason or logic to question them is to wrong too. It’s hard to know where to start with it all, historical & emprical evidence shows that they’re wrong, ironically they’re trying to associate what most people (like employers) believe are good traits with white men, perhaps it’s a cunning plan – after all the post-modernist founders were white men.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Depressing, worrying, but nothing new, I’m afraid.

I have just been looking again at a book first published as long ago as 1981 (Women’s Reality by Anne Wilson Shaef), which explains everything you could ever want to know about the White Male System.

Just for example: ‘The White Male System believes in the reality of numbers. It has to in order to support its own mythology. If numbers are not real … they cannot be used to measure, predict and control.’

See, numbers, science, logic, the rational, and all that … nothing more than a cunning trick pulled by the White Male System to keep women and non-white people under control.

So now you know.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

I know, after all our modern numbers were invented by Europeans – which is why they’re name ‘European Numerals’ , and I believe it was an Englishman who invented the concept of Zero – or perhaps not.
Base 10 and other ideas were created in Egypt, when the total canon of North European intellectual thought was ironically about zero. Obvious Indian, China and other areas had massive input too.
In England we didn’t start using these numbers properly until nearly 1600. Now it turns out we’ve ruined it for everyone.

Raoul De Cambrai
Raoul De Cambrai
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Very interesting. I didn’t know they were called European numerals. In my schoolbooks, including dictionaries, (try OUP for a start) they were always called Arabic numerals, in contrast to Roman numerals. Still, we live and learn.
As for an Englishman inventing the concept of zero (Jingoism lives OK!), you might like to look at a very brief account in Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/history-of-zero/
Oh dear, them pesky furriners. Still, maybe it’s nicer to live in a rosy glow thinking we invented everything.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago

I’m not sure how to put this without causing embarrassment, but Luke was making a joke. And a good one, I thought.

Although I do of course appreciate that we now live in a post-joke world.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

I’m afraid you missed the sarcasm.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago

It’s hardly even sarcasm! I literally put – ‘or perhaps not’ It’s well known that they’re called Arab Numerals, but probably Indian.

I mean the rest of my post disparages the idea of (northern) European superiority, acknowledging that African Egypt was using base 10 when ‘we’ could barely count to it.

Kathy Prendergast
Kathy Prendergast
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Having invented particular numerals does not make a culture “superior”. Western European societies presumably adopted the use of Arabic numerals over time because they were more practical and simpler than Roman ones. Still, the Roman ones worked fine for many centuries. Different indigenous European peoples all had their own numerical systems and ways of counting, which worked fine for them long before the universal adoption of Roman and then Arabic numerals.
Not sure where you get the idea that Europeans were barely able to count several thousand years ago. All human beings of normal intelligence are able to count, an ability that generally emerges in children at around age three or four, and independently develop their own methods of doing so. Complex systems of accounting and record-keeping emerged in different places throughout history as conditions for survival necessitated them. The Egyptians, inhabiting what was mostly a desert wasteland, depended entirely for their survival on their brief growing season made possible by the flooding of the Nile river. The Europeans inhabited a very different environment.
Or are you just trying to imply that northern Africans and Arabs were more intelligent than Europeans?

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago

Of course not! to nearly all of that. You did drop off the northern bit from Europeans. For a lot of history the Med was a centre of civilization, Britain was a a foggy island far to the north.

Nice and informative reply though. Culture is so important. And yes Roman Numerals made do, but base 10 rules.

Ok I might have been exaggerating when I said that northern Europeans could barely count to 10 2000+ years ago. But I struggle to think of Northern Europe being particularly important to the world intellectually until the last 500 years.

And no I don’t think anyone is cleverer than anyone else, the fact that centres of intellectual achievement have moved about geographically is a sign to me that’s it’s culture not genes.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

I think Egyptians invented” Zero” to enable their calculations? But to born an englishman,is Win Raffle of life?..

Allons Enfants
Allons Enfants
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

Just for example: ‘The White Male System believes in the reality of numbers. It has to in order to support its own mythology. If numbers are not real … they cannot be used to measure, predict and control.’

Haha! I’m a woman, and yes i always had a grudge against the decimal numerical system, finding it inept, insufficient and sloppy: it cannot even put an exacting numerical value (a ‘name’) to abstract constants, so they get called by Greek letters instead.
Not exactly the same grudge though that this Anne Wilson Shaef person has against rationality, mind you. Much au contraire.

Dorothy Slater
Dorothy Slater
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Ah yes, life in Oregon. Churches have now removed their BLM signs in favor of Stand with Our Asian friends. I was raised a Missouri Synod Lutheran. There could not have been a more ultra conservative theological and cultural religious body in Christendom. As an adult, I looked for and joined PROGRESSIVE churches that supported gay marriage, ordination of women, etc.
Now that for the most part, Protestant churches even ordain gay women, something more is needed to justify our existence. We came up with the idea of becoming very active SJW. We march in every parade and protest which keep us all very busy since there are many of both in Portland Our social justice committees are almost as ubiquitous as after church cookie committees. It is literally dangerous to ask for Bible study, or discussion groups around Karin Armstrong’s many book etc.
II am on the lookout for a Missouri Synod Lutheran Church but doubt that I will find one in Portland.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Dorothy Slater

Despite going to nominally CoE schools with prayer in assembly I’ve never been a real Christian myself. In much of the UK the church is literally the biggest, tallest and most beautiful building in the village, and 700-800 years old . You only actually go there for Christians, weddings and funerals. The joke with Covid was that they’ve been social distancing for decades.

It’s difficult to gauge how much churches should adapt and how much they should stick to orthodox views. It does make a joke of the ‘word of God’ if that word is immutable and yet keeps changing. I mean I’ve got nothing against homosexuality, but was the church prior to recent times (2000?) wrong? Or is it only wrong by today’s standards?

If you want to be depressed the modern UK churches are also full of brain dear wokies, with diversity targets and vicars making extremist racist statements, but ones which align with currently fashionable views.

Marian Baldwin
Marian Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  Dorothy Slater

An extended family member (also named Dorothy) is a Missouri Synod member of the Living Savior Church in Tualatin, south of Tigard. With a new Minister a few years back, the Church has really built up in size. Hope this is what you are looking for!

Gerald gwarcuri
Gerald gwarcuri
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Ah, math. Certainly not a discipline we should foist upon “people of color”. This idiocy is nothing if not “the soft bigotry of low expectations”. And, it was disproved categorically in the 1980s, in the tough inner-city high schools of East Los Angeles. If you really want to see this lie exposed, read the true life story of one courageous teacher, Jaime Escalante. Or watch the award-winning movie made about him in 1988: “Stand and Deliver”. It’s awe-inspiring, and proves beyond doubt that what kids need in order to succeed is not coddling, not being told over and over again that they are oppressed, but they need people who really love them, and prove it by holding them to higher standards.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

Ironically Democrats from California,flee to Oregon or Republican states and still vote for this ”Mind Control”

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Robin Lambert

I’ve heard this, whats happened to California is deeply worrying. One of the richest places on earth being destroyed.

Matthew Powell
Matthew Powell
3 years ago

Wokeism is essentially a bastardised version of the worst aspects Christianity but i believe it’s best understood as a tool the reactionary middle classes are using, trying to hold on to their diminishing wealth and power.

Post credit crunch, the swollen middle classes, which had sustained a neo-liberal hegemony at the ballot box collapsed. With the rise of popularism amongst the now less affluent lower middle and working classes, the only way to break up this electoral threat has been for the middle class to turn to a race baiting divide and rule strategy.

Immigrant communities in the west are promised preferential treatment in return for votes with similarly deprived communities denied help on the grounds of their existing “privilege”. This however is a fragile and often unsuccessful coalition, with many of the communities actually holding heavily socially conservative views, associating more with their class than their race or disliking the patronising behaviour of their saviours.

More than anything it’s success is down to the pernicious and badly written equality and race relations laws which have not protected but elevated certain groups above others in the eyes of the law and the lack strong legal protections for employees against their employers.

These laws are what give relatively small number of true believers the ability to spread their intolerant faith because they have the power to hire and fire and even in extreme cases have their enemies imprisoned with spurious allegations.

Until this is addressed, there is no way of stopping the institutions falling one by one to this new faith.

Last edited 3 years ago by Matthew Powell
Cho Jinn
Cho Jinn
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

There is little support for the movement – I think it is more of a subculture, really – in Amercia’s middle class. It is a spectre of virulent social media, academics, only certain member of the underclass, and corporate and political interests looking to exploit the foregoing at cost to everyone. However, it is all certainly dogmatic, and like most dogma it is just dressed-up excuses to exert control over others.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Cho Jinn

I agree. I see no evidence that wokeism is a middle class phenomenon, in fact, it seems very non middle class.

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago

As far as I can tell a lot of it is being pushed by well-heeled suburban moms. Check out what’s happening in Loudon County, VA. School boards doxxing parents who speak out against Critical Race Theory being taught at their elementary schools.

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
3 years ago

Wokeism is totally Trotsky Entryism in its methods, goals, and how it works. The Trots all used this system to destroy, it is remarkably effective. Look up ‘Millitant Tendencies, which now is ‘Momentum’ to see how amazingly effective Entryism is at the few controlling the many.

Simon Baggley
Simon Baggley
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Didn’t win Labour a General Election though did it – so not that successful

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Simon Baggley

ALl political Parties bow down to greenism,Climateism,Wokeism only SDP,reform &Independents in Political Arena rebel ahast at orwellian SARS2 Europe ,US,Australasia,China future!

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago

In Uk it appears to be Climate Activists,Brainwashed Teenage Schoolchildren main Political parties,(Lib-Lab-Cons-Greens-Snp) mainstream media,BBC,ITV,ch4, Sky News… Later this Year A New News Channel GB news Starts, it will Present Non opinionated news,” Just the Facts mam,just the facts”

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

“Wokeism is essentially a bastardised version of the worst aspects Christianity”

It actually holds no similarity to Christianity in any of its philosophies and beliefs – but as the writer used the analogy, just as a force which can drive on a militant Faith more like Jonestown than Rome. That it is entirely faith based, and thus a religion – but definitely not Christian. Christianity is always ‘God serves those who serve themselves’, and is actually exceedingly intellectual – all science as we know it came from the scientific Priests, all the Universities, the Scientific method its self, 10,000 monks hand copied the classic books in the Monasteries for centuries to educate the Barbarians and create the Reformation ultimately, 100 of the world’s most recognized Philosophers were Christians, Clergy and Lay.

No, these guys are Frankfurt School 11 Points foot soldiers, totally designed to destroy the West. Big name intellectuals created the ‘School’, google if you do not know it as it is the force in the world today, WIKI has a long, and biased, article on it, or just use my link to jump right to the 11 points.. The Frankfurt School began with Marxist intellectuals in Weimar Republic, that time/place which keeps giving, also Ant fa as well, and Hi *le r. https://celticsavageyoutube.blogspot.com/2017/09/the-11-point-plan-of-frankfurt-school.html

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

You have grossly exaggerated the role of Christianity.

As far a Philosophy goes the renowned British philosopher A.N Whitehead once commented on Plato’s thought: “The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.”

In fact, as you well know, Islamic scholars made a far better job of preserving the glories of Classical Civilisation than Christianity.

In reality the monasteries were little more than a gigantic ‘typing pool’, slavishly copying out ancients texts of which they had little or no understanding.

Michael Whittock
Michael Whittock
3 years ago

I think some of your assertions are wrong. Christians as well as Muslims were involved in translating and preserving classical texts. The Byzantine Empire based in Constantinople had an excellent educational system based on the classics. In Palestininian monasteries men like St. John of Damascus were in volved in preserving the classics. The monastery of Mar Saba, near Jerusalem had one of the most extensive libraries of the period.
The transmission of classical texts to the West is a long and complicated one. But the philosopher Boethius (477-524) stands out as a translator of Plato and Aristotle Into Latin. So even in what we very mistakenly call the dark ages the classics were influencing western culture. We shouldn’t forget the Carolingian Renaissance of the 8th. Century and the work of Alcuin of York who brought some of its fruit to Britain enabling Alfred the Great to have access to Boethius and others.
I think medieval monasteries were a little more than “gigantic typing pools”. Thank God there were hundreds of monks who spent their lives copying texts from which later generations benefitted. Thank Him also that they were places of prayer, learning and social care and produced such great minds as Anselm, Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago

I beg to differ, but unfortunately UnHerd is no longer a forum for such a discussion.
Under the ‘new’ system it is sadly very much a case of “fire & forget”.

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago

This is a forum, but that doesn’t mean we have to agree with false ideas!
I read Dario Fernando Moreira’s book, “The Myth of Andalusian Paradise”, which sustains the findings of Sylvain Guggenheim who was ostracized because he dared to claim, based on facts, that not the Islamic “scholars”, helped the West to reconnect to Greek philosophy, but Greek monks escaped from the Byzantine Empire following the Ottoman conquest.
We have to rediscover our past, and avoid the false ideas promoted by the anti-Christian “intelligentsia.”
For some reason, many academics, possibly bribed, paint a rosy picture of the Islamic occupation and besmear, belittle, deride our past. Not sure what is their game? They hate their own roots, foolishly thinking that in an Islamic theocracy their life would be as prosperous and free as in the West. Honestly, I think such people need to be diagnosed.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Chris Sirb

I think you mean certified rather than diagnosed for your final word?

However both Christianity and Islam are the very antithesis of Classical Philosophy and Civilisation.
The most unfortunate triumph of blind, unthinking Faith, over Logic and Reason.

Fortunately the emergence of Protestantism in the 16th century was an essential step in the direction of Atheism and Agnosticism, which has proved so beneficial for the modern world.

Incidentally there never was a Byzantine Empire. It is a construct of a 16th century German scholar. The population of Constantinople called themselves Romanoi, as did their enemies, even on the last day, Tuesday 29th May, 1453.

Last edited 3 years ago by Charles Stanhope
Last Jacobin
Last Jacobin
3 years ago

Blimey, not a popular view! I up voted you.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Last Jacobin

Thanks!
The truth never is!

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago

Truth? Based on what data do you make your claim?

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago

I’m not sure you are correct, but I upvoted you anyway. Personally, I believe downvotes should be reserved for unnecessarily rude or insulting comments, not for those I disagree with.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

Thank you. It is a fairly complex problem that dates back at least as far as Edward Gibbon.
The main problem, as always is that ‘History is written by the Victors’.

Your upvote coupled with Mark Bridgeford’s give a total of 15 downvotes. Not bad, but I was expecting more!

Andrew D
Andrew D
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

Upvote for that!

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

No! A thumb down is for false info.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago

See You in Batley,Yorkshire Soon?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Robin Lambert

Yes, I hope so, what a name Batley, worth fighting for!

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
3 years ago

You should read Tom HOlland’s Dominion for an interesting view of the role of Christianity by an atheist.

J StJohn
J StJohn
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Googled it. The phrase originated in ancient Greece as “the Gods help those who help themselves” and may originally have been proverbial. It is illustrated by two of Aesop’s Fables and a similar sentiment is found in ancient Greek drama

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  J StJohn

As usual, the fountain of all wisdom.

David Brown
David Brown
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

As the article makes clear, it has far more in common with Calvinism than any other branch of Christianity. Non-Calvinist Christians accept salvation through faith and repentance, but to the Woke there is no salvation. You can have devoted your entire adult life to fighting against racism, but it they can find one thing that someone say you said when you were much younger, even if there is more than one interpretation that could be applied to it, and regardless of whether you admit to having said it, you will be expected to issue a firstly grovelling apology, and secondly your resignation from whatever posts you hold.
It’s reminiscent of the Stalinist show trials of the 1930s. First the confession, then the bullet in the back of the head.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

The idea that it’s cynically pushed by the wealthy is unproven. Yes the wealthy and powerful have a huge amount to gain from pushing a ideology that focuses attention away from their own corrupt existence and real privileges – and makes the bottom 99% fight each other. And yes it also allows them to falsely share and dilute the the ‘blame’ amongst the majorty.

But apart from keeping hold of their privilege, power, wealth and absolving themselves of personal responsibility, what’s in it for rich people?

Last edited 3 years ago by LUKE LOZE
mlaplant001
mlaplant001
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

What’s in it for the rich people? They get to keep their riches and power over the rest of us.

Robin Williamson
Robin Williamson
3 years ago
Reply to  mlaplant001

Sarcasm not your strong point?

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  mlaplant001

Gates,Soros,Bezos etc.., EU,WHO,UN ,CCP ALL push it they are wealthy?…

Michael Whittock
Michael Whittock
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

“Wokeism is essentially a bastardised version of the worst aspects of Christianity…” Please explain. By the way I tried to register a downtick on this comment but 3 upticks came up. What a joke this system is.

Giulia Khawaja
Giulia Khawaja
3 years ago

Yes. Click several times to no avail. Occasionally the figure increases by two or more and a red banner appears saying you have already voted. It’s rubbish.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  Giulia Khawaja

Michael and Julia, I reported this a few weeks ago when the ‘new look’ came in. It was explained to me by the technical support people that a given person’s tick can bring up dormant ticks from previous voters. And the count seems to work on a net vote basis, so presumably a given person’s uptick could bring in a single prior dormant downtick, netting to zero. Hope that helps.

David Owsley
David Owsley
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

correct and it has been like that for years on many forums.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
3 years ago
Reply to  David Owsley

Apparently a software release is imminent to start correcting the recent dreadful removal of functionality.

Michael Whittock
Michael Whittock
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

Thanks A Bloke. It would be good if Unherd would be more communicative about these intricacies.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Giulia Khawaja

To use the vernacular, it is cr*p.

Frank Freeman
Frank Freeman
3 years ago

The “guilt” trip.

Frank Freeman
Frank Freeman
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

It is mainly a power trip for bullies, but it also is a religion, with many similarities to Christianity, such as the “guilt trip”. But an important difference is that most Christians understand that they are practicing a religion, which means that there is damage limitation. Unfortunately, many “woke” people do not know they are practicing a religion, they genuinely believe that their way is the true shining path. They also think they are clever, which makes them stupid.

Simon Baggley
Simon Baggley
3 years ago
Reply to  Frank Freeman

Unlike Wokeism – there is an element of forgiveness in Christianity

Michael Whittock
Michael Whittock
3 years ago
Reply to  Simon Baggley

Amen and that is a huge difference.

steve eaton
steve eaton
3 years ago
Reply to  Frank Freeman

So, I take it that you assume that people who are practicing a religion don’t really believe that they are following a true shining path, or in other words are not true believers in it? I find your post odd and unsettling in a few different ways.

Last edited 3 years ago by steve eaton
Last Jacobin
Last Jacobin
3 years ago
Reply to  Matthew Powell

I think people really need to explain what they mean by middle classes, lower middle classes and working classes – it seems to mean different things to different people in different countries.
Increasingly people’s class is being defined by commentators based on their political views or worse, race. A trade union activist nurse becomes middle class woke and a small business owner in construction becomes white working class.
Immigrant communities in the west are promised preferential treatment in return for votes with similarly deprived communities denied help on the grounds of their existing “privilege”. 
Can you point to a concrete example of this as deliberate policy in the UK?

Monty Marsh
Monty Marsh
3 years ago
Reply to  Last Jacobin

There clearly is, and has been, a tacit understanding that police forces in the more working class areas of England will treat Pakistani rape gangs with cultural sensitivity, so long as they only rape chavvy little white girls. Been going on for years, victims in the thousands now.

Last Jacobin
Last Jacobin
3 years ago
Reply to  Monty Marsh

Do you have a source for that?

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 years ago

“The race industry” – that concept is just 50 kinds of wrong. And yet you write it and I know exactly what you mean – it must therefore exist.

Vikram Sharma
Vikram Sharma
3 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Now you’ve got me thinking about a bestselling erotica about a mixed-race liaison in an HR department D&I team called 50 Shades of Wrong.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

Pass the brain bleach. HR and erotica shouldn’t go together in the same sentence. EVER.

Last edited 3 years ago by Katharine Eyre
Nigel Blumenthal
Nigel Blumenthal
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

Not enough diversity in that title. Should be “Fifty shades of Wong”. Or maybe even “Fifty shades of White”.

Gerald gwarcuri
Gerald gwarcuri
3 years ago

As in “two wongs don’t make a wite?”

Marian Baldwin
Marian Baldwin
3 years ago

Woody Allen’s “What’s Up Tiger Lily”? though I spell it “two Wongs don’t make a right”. I thought the film was very funny, but it’s Allen’s least favorite.

Ian Barton
Ian Barton
3 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I’d recommend a degree course in “Grievance Studies”.
Yours for just £60k and guaranteed to lead to a job at an MSM outlet.

Marian Baldwin
Marian Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  Ian Barton

Only if taught by James Lindsay or Helen Pluckrose–who are never invited to appear on MSM, such as MSNBC or CNN..

Simon Diggins
Simon Diggins
3 years ago

Thank you. We are a long way from Elizabeth 1’s determination, after nearly 50 years of religious strife in England and Europe that, “I will not make windows into men’s souls.”

To be sure, there was a minimal level of conformity required, essentially linked to state continuity and power; I hope that we will eventually move to such a place but we have a long way to go and there is no guarantee that we will have a similar outcome.

In the meantime, as you rightly point-out, those who are genuinely most disadvantaged are not benefitting at all: their disadvantage being turned by one élite group into a lever to force out another; again, the 16th century Wars of Religion are a grim warning.

Last edited 3 years ago by Simon Diggins
George Glashan
George Glashan
3 years ago

Vikram, before too long you too will be White, as will an other AME’s that are successful. ( god i hate that BAME acronym). Its no accident that the B is first, the whole racist progressive clericy needs to keep B’s at the bottom, as the old saying goes “give a man a fish and he eats today, teach a man to fish and he eats for life”, the progressives have been giving fish to B’s for years, they want B’s dependant on the fishgivers, they need a voting base and underclass to sustain and justify their position above the underclass. Unfortunately for the clericy every other racial , AME, group that succeeds is a direct refutation of their creed and position afforded to them because of it.

Vikram Sharma
Vikram Sharma
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

George
I was called an Uncle Tom in a high profile meeting with senior people attending. No one even flinched. I now write under a pseudonym. I am the wrong kind of minority; I don’t know my place as a perpetual victim who should gratefully accept crumbs of comfort and dollops of pity from the Gaurdianistas.
The worst kind of racists are the antiracists. They only see race and victimhood, never the individual. Despicable lot yet so smugly sanctimonious

David Brown
David Brown
3 years ago
Reply to  Vikram Sharma

I believe that in the US there is a school of thought that “Asians” (by which they usually mean East Asians rather than South Asians, when for us in the UK it’s the other way about) are, to all intents and purposes, white, because the average US-Asian educational attainment and income both outstrip that of the average American white, and therefore the Asians are clearly not “People of Colo[u]r”, but instead enjoy white privilege as much as any WASP.
Wait until they spot that the same applies to immigrant Ghanaian-Americans and, to a lesser degree, Nigerian-Americans. They’ll be “white” next.
You really couldn’t make it up.
Oh, and I am deeply sorry that you were subjected to a racial slur by someone who undoubtedly considers him or herself an “anti-racist”.

Giles Chance
Giles Chance
3 years ago

The article’s link between this new blanket, over-the-top intolerance and America is correct. I know because I am an adjunct professor at a leading American business school. What can be done ? Only, become like one of those people mentioned in the final paragraph: shrink into our foxholes, go on thinking our own thoughts and just hope it’s all going to blow over. I thank God that I am retired, don’t have to apply for a job, or state how diverse I am, or do diversity training.

hugh bennett
hugh bennett
3 years ago
Reply to  Giles Chance

Yes i agree Giles… thank god i am retired. I almost navigated a whole career in the NHS avoiding D & E training and the other crap industrialised training trends that preceded it. But I decided to retire early as the net closed around we, I thought to myself that one day my Celtic temperament would flare and I would end up telling these zealots to “—- —“. So rather than risk losing my pension I cowardly took early retirement…. By the way if you want to know what discrimination is like try being Welsh, English speaking welsh, short, 64yrs of age, balding and middle class – haha.
I will leave it to readers to guess what colour my skin is?

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  hugh bennett

I was supposed to complete a diversity course when contracting to government agency in the past, along with a health and safety course. They were both utterly bizarre, apparenly ‘matches can cause fires’ and ‘people with missing limbs have a noticable physical disability’. Also you should consider hiring a disable person not a) because they might be great for the job and it would be idiotic and bigoted to not consider them, but b) to increase diversity.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

‘Disabled Fire Officers’? Anyone; or Lift Marshals in charge of Evacuation…

David Brown
David Brown
3 years ago
Reply to  hugh bennett

“English speaking Welsh…”
Ah, yes, Welsh enough to cop the banter from us Saeson, but not “Welsh enough” for the more extreme of your own countrymen.

Kathy Prendergast
Kathy Prendergast
3 years ago
Reply to  Giles Chance

DEI (I almost misspelt the acronym there as DIE; Freudian slip?) training sounds like a form of mental torture, or cultish brainwashing at the very least. I strongly suspect that its main purpose, like that of all Marxist propaganda, is to confuse, terrorize and humiliate, not to make a workplace a better or safer place for anyone.

Last edited 3 years ago by Kathy Prendergast
LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Giles Chance

I live i hope that what I still think of as true Liberalism is the obvious truth and destination . I suppose its my version of the Whiggish/Marxist/Progressive view of history.

The scary alternative is the worsening identity group politics were seeing now, at best we end up with crap society.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

The US is almost 60 years removed from having “colored only” anything, yet a group of loud (and ignorant) people insists that we are living a dystopian nightmare. I started grade school at the dawn of integration long ago, and the idea of some 20- or 30-something lecturing me on how to get on with other races is beyond offensive. Being of Greek heritage, I have been mistaken for numerous groups, and I’ve been some nice names along the way.
Regardless, this isn’t training in the traditional sense of the word. It’s browbeating, it’s shaming, it’s a means of accomplishing the exact opposite of its stated intention. A family member teaches English to Chinese children. Those kids are learning gerunds and past participles; our kids are learning to hate themselves and each other. Which group sounds better off?

Jez O'Meara
Jez O'Meara
3 years ago

I’ve been a member of the Armed Forces for about 23 years, recently in the last few years we started receiving mandatory Diversity Training. It essentially consists of gangs of “right on” people telling us to agree with and understand the things that we cant possibly understand let alone agree with.

This years session was interesting when we received no less than the August presence of the Co Chair of the Army BAME network. Capt Stephen Henry MBE. I thought this might be interesting. His highlight of the “workshop” was detailing his “lived experience” and the incident that happened to him last year. He had built this up as quite the surprise throughout, eventually after all the usual lectures and diatribes and even telling us to “dig deeper” by reading DiAngelo book on white privilege, the moment came where he would tell us last years lived experience. This turned out to be an incident on the afternoon train from London to Peterborough where he was sat down with a spare seat beside him, he motioned to a fellow standing passenger to sit down and seemingly this passenger didnt. At that point with no verbal communication whatsoever he assumed straight away that this was racially motivated and became quite engourged about the apparent snub.
Later we got the chance to eventually speak and I commented to him that “if that example of your lived experience in modern day Britain is all you can find, then we have come very far indeed in the UK”. He suggests I was ignorant to his feelings, to which I suggested that perhaps owing to the “non verbal” manner of the exchange a misinterpretation may have occurred between the two of them. Again he insisted that he had not misinterpreted this apparent racism on his courtesy. I suggested that perhaps he was “searching for insult” in the exchange and asked him if he could remember any instances of courtesy paid to him recently by white people…perhaps holding a door or be allowed to pull out in the car etc. He replied that of course he could, I suggest that the problems he tries to find are hardly endemic and systematic as he lectured us on earlier. He was utterly unable to agree with me and saw racism everywhere.
The mistake I made was then suggesting that he had done quite well for himself in the “diversity business” what with being commissioned from the NCO ranks and gaining an MBE for his work with BAME. Capt Henry then denounced everything I’d said based on this last comment, and moved away from our by now uncomfortable discussion to his closing comments. He said he felt so up lifted by this group and that we had all achieved a great amount of progress with the days session, aside from some “closed minded opinions”.
After the session I was treated to a friendly interrogation by one of the unit Majors who had heard concerns from my group that I wasn’t comfortable with the session. I repeated chapter and verse what had happened and you could literally see the common sense falling across her face as I explained how ridiculous all of this felt, she left me with the words “you have given me a lot to think about”.

I bet I have. It was the same feeling I got when I read Douglas Murrays books for the first time.

Sorry for the long post, but that it is my recent lived experience of this diversity training.

Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin
3 years ago
Reply to  Jez O'Meara

Thank you for sharing, its a real cancer and is eating common sense for breakfast.

Jez O'Meara
Jez O'Meara
3 years ago
Reply to  Richard Turpin

My pleasure, it is utterly cancerous. The discussion with Capt Henry MBE was fruitless as he is completely lost, rewarded and invested in the “progress” industry. But I think I got through to at least one person, that being the Major at the end.

I just wish more could be done to fight this at a systemic level. All it achieves to my mind as a member of the armed forces, is provide an excuse for people to escape failure, punishment or a good days work in general.

So many of my colleagues have fallen foul of the complaints from juniors in the name of perceived racism, and WORSE, none upheld yet the record of the complaint is not removed, or any sanction on the complainer some of which are serial in nature.

D Ward
D Ward
3 years ago
Reply to  Jez O'Meara

“We are here to check your thinking”

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Jez O'Meara

Problems Could Arise in London Mayoral elections…Khan Gets in although 1) London assembly is an EU regional talking shop ,Uk has left EU 2) the Amount of opposing candidates 1 lib-dim 1 labour ! green 1 Tory & 10 Other candidates will atomise opposition votes

Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
3 years ago
Reply to  Jez O'Meara

Thanks, this was very interesting first hand experience.

Jez O'Meara
Jez O'Meara
3 years ago

Thanks for this Margaret. The saddest part I felt during the exchanges above was how the attitudes of the other members of the group i was part of changed towards me. They slowly distanced themselves physically and intellectually as if I carried a live hand grenade! The signaling of their virtue extending to create this distance. I dont blame them I suppose, they have long careers ahead of them and perhaps felt threatened.

I wish some instrument of common sense would sweep all of this away before something worse comes along and blasts it away along with everything we cherish in western society.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  Jez O'Meara

Thank you for your very enlightening post. The circumstances you state are seen in different ways, every day in the uk now…….I am amazed how many intelligent people/ business world/academics are falling for this manipulation.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago

The problem isn’t that they’re already inside, it’s that they came from inside. This is being forced on the plebs by the rulers.

J Bryant
J Bryant
3 years ago

As an American, I can only offer my sympathy that the infection of diversity training is penetrating UK companies and institutions. It’s certainly a favorite form of virtue signaling in US corporations.
This article describes the phenomenon of diversity training. In the current issue of Unherd, Sarah Ditum explains why the left (sorry, Left) celebrate violence. It’s all good, solid journalism, but it stops short of providing any advice about how to counter these trends.
By now, we all understand the ideology and tactics of wokedom. But what do we do about it? Unherd recently had a series describing times, like the covid pandemic, when normal life was brutally interrupted and what came after. It was historically very interesting, at least to me, but what none of the authors even attempted was to use these historical precedents as a guide for responding to the challenges modern society faces post-covid, especially the rise of woke politics, except to say we must all adapt to change.
Which authors are currently writing not just about the phenomenon of woke politics, but how we can actively counter it (that’s not a rhetorical question; I’d appreciate recommendations)?

Last edited 3 years ago by J Bryant
Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

It can be countered. It just needs one person to speak up when they come across a blatant example of it. In my experience, the ‘woke’ are bullies and like most bullies they are abject cowards when confronted by someone with stronger convictions than themselves.

Mark Preston
Mark Preston
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

It can be countered. It just needs one person to speak up when they come across a blatant example of it” – if you work for a big company do this and you’ve lost your job.

David Morrey
David Morrey
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Preston

Yes. Would love to comment on this thread. But genuinely afraid about what may happen if I do. I am basically going to have to keep my thoughts to myself until I am at the point in my career when I no longer have to worry about what it might cost me. To echo what was said by J Bryant, I would love for some advice on what to do about it, because like most people I am essentially powerless to avoid the most damaging of consequences should I disagree with the corporate gospel.

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morrey

I think that Helen Pluckrose has a hotline for those who want to talk about Diversity training. She said that many, many people called in. We need to start to fight back, document abuses, and compare it to what was happening in the Soviet Union and Maoist China during the “struggle sessions.”
Fight for your rights, muster courage, It is a must!

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Preston

That’s why it’s important to have a plan B.

Ellie Gladiataurus
Ellie Gladiataurus
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

One person speaking up can have their live threatened, and their livelihood taken away. This cannot be countered by a few people, acting on their own volition.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago

This is true..but our politicians should be actively dealing with this and they aren’t and frankly, at least here in the Uk, irrespective of your politics, not one of them has the backbone to do it.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

Only by Retired People like myself.Luckily I dont have to Work fulltime,Only bonus of being Single..However i work for My pet Cats ,hopefully they’ll never be chairman meows!

Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
3 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Do not go out without your red MAGA hat. I was supposed to be back in London last April, now a year later I still can not come because of the insane British lockdowns, and with my non-vax policy may never be able to return to my old home again. Otherwise look for me, face completely covered in long white hair, half bald yet lots of more white hair, six and a half foot tall,, like some mad scientist/end of earth Loon, at speakers corner in my MAGA hat – ranting at the people about how they are all worthless maggots. “There’ll Be No Butter In Hell!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5evsxRdkJw (Cold Comfort Farm)

Thats what you do to protest, but the British only let rafting migrants in, not legal returnees who can support themselves and tell it like it is.

Last edited 3 years ago by Galeti Tavas
David Wrathall
David Wrathall
3 years ago
Reply to  J Bryant

Join the Free Speech Union.

When you hear about a crowd funding application,for somebody fighting back, support it. The Manchester charity founder, who was ousted by his board of trustees over BLM comments, has got his job back after FSU support and is now suing the trustees. Support him.

Write to Kemi Badenoch (the equalities minister), and your own MP, to express your support for her fight against unconscious bias training, and her brushes with woke journalists.

If you’re ever canvassed by a political candidate make it clear it’s a big issue for you.

Check out James Lindsay’s website.

Buy Cynical Theory by Helen pluckrose and James Lindsay and give it to your children.

If your children show woke tendencies engage with them, argue the case.

Do not self censor in purely social settings.

Complain to school trustees if there is any evidence of indoctrination.

Don’t buy goods from woke corporations.

It’s not much but it’s better than nothing.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 years ago
Reply to  David Wrathall

Very good advice. Thank you.
What we need is a register of woke corporations (Coke-a-Cola and Gillette to name but two) to focus the boycott.
My children were so alienated by the woke curriculum at their school that they have moved very sharply in other direction and have opened my eyes to the fact that we cannot ignore what is happening and hope that the crocodile eat someone else.

Benjamin Jones
Benjamin Jones
3 years ago

It won’t be long before it’s re-branded Woke- a- Cola.

Chris Sirb
Chris Sirb
3 years ago

Smart Kids!

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  David Wrathall

I would like to add in a separate issue here but with the same problem. I do not know how many of you have young children but I have an 8 year old granddaughter who will have to experience indoctrination in schools. The LGBT campaigners have also got a grip. I personally don’t care what they do but I am appalled at the materials that have been provided by stonewall to schools for material training. I thought the RSE should be a lesson a week ……it is NOT…..there are instructions how to introduce the subject into history, geography and even music. The final straw for me is material connected to bestiality……anyone who thinks I am making this up should log onto schoolgate campaign.

Kevin Thomas
Kevin Thomas
3 years ago

I was thinking recently how much the current “trans” issue resembles trans-substantiation, one of the biggest bones of contention between Protestantism and Catholicism. They both involve declaring that something is something else, despite all evidence to the contrary, just because a person has said the magic words (“This is the body and blood of Christ” / “I identify as a man/woman”). You could have been burned alive for having the wrong view on trans-substantiation. I suppose we should be grateful you can only have your career ruined for dissenting on the other.

John MacDonald
John MacDonald
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

Hah! That is a brilliant and actually quite profound comparison!

Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

Thanks for that comparison Kevin, it’s the most intersting point that’s been made in the discussion.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

O for the days of Ancient Rome, when it was “Venari, Lavari, Ludere, Ridere, Occ est Vivere” ie: To Hunt, to Bathe, to Play, to Laugh, That is to Live!*

*Roman inscription -graffiti, from a beautiful little city high in the Aures Mts, now in modern Algeria.

Last edited 3 years ago by Charles Stanhope
Mark Preston
Mark Preston
3 years ago

As for the individuals who do not believe in the new faith, they do what people in totalitarian societies have always done – they keep quiet and retreat to an inner world where the intolerance and conformity of the powers-that-be cannot reach them.” NO. They quietly tolerate the insanity and they don’t fight back. This is how tyranny gets a foothold – you tolerate something you consider minor and then before you know it you’re tolerating the intolerable.
Look at how we’re tolerating the lockdown if you don’t believe me.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Preston

Hot weather, it looks light A fiery summer in uk seaside towns and londonium, People WILL Rebel against Scientific SAGE frauds,in UK I managed a walk Most days in lockdown. Apart from Snowstorms at beginning of February

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 years ago

Oh, the glory of being self-employed, a one-woman show. Although perhaps someone will come after me at some point for not having enough ethnic diversity in my business (I’m white – sin of all sins).

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Yes, I am very grateful for the fact that I have not been a full time employee for well over 20 years, especially as my industry is now, apparently, very woke. Still, it’s an ill wind and I get paid to write about ‘ensuring that our company reflects the society in which we live’ etc.

George Glashan
George Glashan
3 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

just claim to be 1.56 % Native American, it worked for Elizabeth Warren and she’s whiter than white

Judy Posner
Judy Posner
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

Alas, it did not really work for her at all. And it may have cost her the presidency.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  George Glashan

”Pochohontas” Trump Wit again…Why does biden &USA politicians continually lie about their origins, Biden is much more English,than Irish!

Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
3 years ago

My concern with this ever growing trend is that the people who are driving it have NO INTEREST WHATSOEVER in achieving equality between the races.
They are not in the Equality business. They are in the Grievance business.
And business is good at the moment. There are fortunes to be made, stirring the pot, feeding the sense of guilt among Whites and feeding the sense of victimhood among the Black community.
Truly – WHO DOES THAT SERVE? Are these people looking to improve relations between communities? It doesn’t seem so. It is creating division and separating and segregating people based on which “community” they “belong” to.
Just a few years ago we were exhorted as a society to be colour-blind, to accept people simply as people, whatever their background, their lifestyle, their “differences”. What happened to that idea?
For many years I lived in London and worked in an industry (Broadcast TV) that was as diverse as one could possibly find anywhere. As far as I was concerned the arguments of Race, Gender, Creed, Orientation had been fought and largely won. We seemed at the time – perhaps naively – to be enjoying the peace.
Maybe those who are inclined to be activists feel they have to keep picking at the scab and reopening old wounds or there is no point to their existence, but it seems incredible that we’ve gone so far backwards and quite so quickly.

David George
David George
3 years ago

Some genuine recognition of the situation, thank you Ed. Things are going down.
“I believe that the good people do, small though it may appear, has more to do with the good that manifests broadly in the world than people think, and I believe the same about evil. We are each more responsible for the state of the world than we believe, or would feel comfortable believing.

Without careful attention, culture itself tilts towards corruption. Tyranny grows slowly, and asks us to retreat in tiny steps. But each retreat increases the possibility of the next retreat. Each betrayal of conscience, each act of silence and each rationalisation weakens resistance and increases the probability of the next restrictive move forward. This is particularly the case when those pushing forward delight in the power they have now acquired – and such people are always to be found.
Better to stand forward, awake, when the costs are relatively low – and, perhaps, when the potential rewards have not yet vanished. Better to stand forward before the ability to do so has has been irretrievably compromised”

“If you do not object when the transgressions against your conscience are minor, why presume that you will not fully participate when the transgressions get truly out of hand?”

Jordan Peterson from Beyond Order Rule 5 – Do not do what you hate.

Sara Gon
Sara Gon
3 years ago

I work for a classically liberal think tank in South Africa. The poltical and chattering classes claim that racism is one of our biggest problems. Given that over 90% of the population is black (by a broad definition) and less than 10% white, they mean white racism. Every year we do a survey to ascertain what the big issues affecting people’s lives. Our interviewees are representative as above. We ask open-ended questions about what they identify as the biggest issues in their lives. Unemployment is always at the top and of 12 to 14 possibilities, racism is at the bottom or penultimate from the bottom. As usual the elite have no idea of what the people think.

Kevin Thomas
Kevin Thomas
3 years ago
Reply to  Sara Gon

Meanwhile there are politicians in South Africa literally talking about killing whites.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

About 50 White farmers a year and that’s OK.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago

Yes I heard about this some months ago, not long after the BLM demos in US and here. I have family is SA who have regularly told us about the issues they are having. So I watched the media avidly to see which outlet would be brave enough to bring the killings of white people to our attention. I haven’t seen anything yet unless I have missed it but it certainly hasn’t had the coverage that Megan Markle has got for her grievances. That tells you a lot!

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  Sara Gon

I wonder who they would blame their problems on if all white people left?

D Ward
D Ward
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

I think we all know the answer to that…

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

When I lived in Australia 1987/88 A lot of Saffas had already worried & Taken Australian Citizenship ( George Gregan,a black Rhodesian Rugby Scrum half Moved )where Black ‘Equality’ would lead to in Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and South Africa

Allons Enfants
Allons Enfants
3 years ago

I may be totally mistaken about this, but as a foreigner my observation is that the English (British?) nature has an obsessive-compulsive reverence for the “underdog” – the abstract notion of the underdog i mean, not actual downtrodden individuals -, bordering on religious fervour. Fetishism even, with its elaborate taboo system, liturgical vocabulary & all that. Probably a subconscious overcompensation for the class system? Or an Anglican replacement activity for Catholic guilt? Can’t think of any other European nation with this particular quirk, even though the “class system” is not a unique British phenomenon – everybody else has it too.
Postwar the country has ran out of the demographic traditionally manifesting the “underdog” idea (at around the same time as it has ran out of its empire); the working class’ livelihood and purpose having been outshored to China for profitz. So a new demographic was needed to fill the underdog-shaped void, for spiritual atonement purposes. And it better be visibly different, for easy identification: the ‘global underclass’. It came readily kitted out with the new Original Sins: slavery & colonisation. An oven-ready cult – new & improved international socialism. Internazism.
Or maybe i’m just overthinking it.
Good article; i always regarded protestantism as the precursor of latter-day wokery.

Last edited 3 years ago by Allons Enfants
Galeti Tavas
Galeti Tavas
3 years ago
Reply to  Allons Enfants

You are over thinking it.

Also Protestantism is the opposite of wokery. Protestantism is Work Ethic. Protestantism is meritocracy, it is self reliance.

Wokery is Marxism, it is ‘I have nothing because I have been held back. It is ‘I am owed’, it is redistribution, it is a ZERO-SUM GAME, where all the amount of goods and property and money is set, thus if anyone has more it is because they took more than their share, and anyone with less means someone took some of what is rightfully theirs.

Claire D
Claire D
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

I entirely agree with you.
There is a stong religious fervour about both Marxism and wokery though, and Marx was writing, more or less at the same time as Darwin. There is no doubt that Darwin’s Origin of the Species had a devastating effect on Christianity generally. I think Marxism gradually became a replacement for lost religious belief for many people, and now we have wokery with it’s superficial virtue-signalling, coupled with a deep anxiety, which fits in so well with our social media age.

Last edited 3 years ago by Claire D
Michael Whittock
Michael Whittock
3 years ago
Reply to  Claire D

The Origin of Species caused a rethink on how to interpret the first two chapters of Genesis. In the perspective of history it was done without too much fuss. To say that Christianity was devestated “generally” as a result of Darwin’s publication is not accurate I think.Today 31.11% of the world’s population is Christian and the Faith continues to grow on every continent except Europe and North America – and their turn will come.

Claire D
Claire D
3 years ago

I am a Christian Michael, I’m with you.
But historically, in Britain at least, Darwin’s Origin of the Species rocked some people’s Christian faith. By using that historical fact in my comment did not mean I personally think people were right to become doubtful, agnostic or atheist, just that it happened and had political and philosophical repercussions.

Last edited 3 years ago by Claire D
Nowhere Woman
Nowhere Woman
3 years ago
Reply to  Galeti Tavas

Redistribution is socialism.
Marxism is about the exploitation that takes place at the point of production. It aims to take control of production based on a rational plan.
The profit motive is based on the competition between privately owned companies, with the emphasis on privately owned. It is the privately owned basis of production that the Marxists used to base their critique of capitalism on. Nowadays its just another bourgeois morality.

Robin Lambert
Robin Lambert
3 years ago
Reply to  Nowhere Woman

Karl Marx had ‘Piles’ no wonder he was miserable..purlioned Friedrich Engels bank account..

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 years ago
Reply to  Allons Enfants

Yes, you are right, rooting for the underdog is a peculiarly British/English thing. I have no idea where it comes from, but I don’t worry about it. I just need to know that if a team like Iceland is going to be coming up against, say, Germany in the World Cup, my English genetics are going to mean supporting Iceland wholeheartedly.

Last edited 3 years ago by Katharine Eyre
Mike Page
Mike Page
3 years ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Even when they’re still butchering whales – u also should to take account of the British luv of animals esp endangered species. Conflict of interest here maybe.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  Allons Enfants

The underdog idea is not ‘obsessive-compulsive reverence’, it’s much more simply a question of fairness and decency – essentially letting everyone have a chance.

I can’t see the connection between wokery and protestantism specifically, although the Woko Haram undoubtedly do exhibit the self-righteous strain of religiosity in general.

Allons Enfants
Allons Enfants
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

The underdog idea is not ‘obsessive-compulsive reverence’, it’s much more simply a question of fairness and decency 

Yes, the sense of fairness and decency ARE the core British traits.
What i’m talking about though is the the woke classes’ obsession with the underdog, no matter how unfair (unethical) that is – no matter how indecent, obnoxious, and often criminal the “underdog” in question is.
An example is the left’s obsession with “punching” as a sole criterion to classify humour and comedy into acceptable and unacceptable categories. You cannot make jokes about the protected-characteristic “underdog” groups, no matter how ripe for jokes their behaviours are, or how rich / powerful the individuals you joke about are. Especially if they are intersectioned underdogs, such as Diane Abbott. No joke on the expense of the “privileged” “oppressor” groups (such as the impoverished white Northerner working class) is considered too crass though.

Woko Haram

That’s absolutely brilliant, can i nick it? My new favourite phrase.

the connection between wokery and protestantism specifically

Well, not the current form of protestantism – but look back at what Cromwell’s lot did back in the day. Half a millenium took off the rough edges, but back in the day the newfangled puritanism must have felt not too dissimilar to nowadays’ wokery. We were all Catholics once upon a time. (Well i still am, but i’m not British – it was a hypothetical use of “we”.)

Last edited 3 years ago by Allons Enfants
Vic Timov
Vic Timov
3 years ago
Reply to  Allons Enfants

Unfortunately the Brits have got themselves entangled in a disastrous triple bind of late.
Sticking up for the underdog – formerly a noble endeavour – has descended into the soft bigotry of low expectation. Whether this is due to Marxist spouting academics or just misfortune is difficult to say. Good manners, formerly the veneer of civilisation, has descended through political correctness to the duplicity of puritanical wokery, usually via the nightmare of identity politics and to each according to the colour of their skin, sexual orientation and self identity…sorry, delusion. And, as we should already know, the religion of Cromwell – right but repulsive – was exported to the US leaving the Rule Britannia with the comfort of the Church of England (up for a hymn down for a prayer) the only religion more interested in a good sing song than the hubris and peccadilloes of a creator deity.
Consequently, is it any surprise that the Brits are perpetually confused about most things including the vagaries of critical race theory and its b*****d offspring the deranged prophets of diversity training. So, none of us should really be surprised that we now face the improbable made possible by the impossible with the unavailable now available due to circumstances.

Allons Enfants
Allons Enfants
3 years ago
Reply to  Vic Timov

Excellent post.

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  Allons Enfants

Thank you for your reply, Allons.

I can claim no proprietorship in Woko Haram, so use it to you heart’s delight. Ditto ‘Wokerati’.

To add to your further points, I think the essence of the underdog theme is an unforced natural sympathy for the individual ‘beneficiaries’; it is not part of a self-righteous systematisation to shunt every individual into a group, and then classify each group into a points-based hierarchy of grievance and oppression.

And, if you’ll excuse my repeating a point I made some weeks ago when the Puritans came up on this forum – the evidence is that in real life the Puritans were a lot jollier than their detractors would have us believe. More fun than Savonarola, for example.

Allons Enfants
Allons Enfants
3 years ago
Reply to  Wilfred Davis

I think the essence of the underdog theme is an unforced natural sympathy for the individual ‘beneficiaries’

Yes, the unforced, natural sympathy for the unfortunate is a universal feature of the human condition in civilised societies; and (as i see it) is most prevalent in the British nature, fairness being a very British trait. (All the more easily exploitable by the wokerati, as being seen spiteful towards the underdog elicits great shame and is a social taboo.)
I can’t find any argument against anything you wrote.
Re: the puritans, i know precious little about thenadays real-life so i will take your word on that.
Savonarola indulged in puritanism to full exuberant excess, like a true red-blooded Italian – they don’t do half measures or sensible moderation.

Caroline Watson
Caroline Watson
3 years ago

Please don’t make the mistake of thinking that ‘gender’ equality is about women. It isn’t, and it certainly isn’t about lesbians, who have been totally erased. ‘Gender’ equality is about men who want to dress up as women without giving up any of their male advantages. Women are nowhere and feminists are fighting this rubbish along with people on the right who would normally make very strange bedfellows!

Dee Frazier
Dee Frazier
3 years ago

US Republicans/conservatives are not “of the right”, that is a misnomer that was pushed by the left. It was embraced in the US and elsewhere by Trotskyites (in the US they call themselves neocons but they are not conservatives) and the Leninist left.

Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
Margaret Tudeau-Clayton
3 years ago

Do those male advantages include pay? I’ve often wondered if a trans is prepared to take the salary cut they would have to take as ‘a woman’ or if they take off their skirt and put the trousers back on when they go to work?

Michael James
Michael James
3 years ago

Isn’t this woke nonsense just a vast a make-work scheme for graduates with useless degrees?

Mark Preston
Mark Preston
3 years ago
Reply to  Michael James

No, it’s an attempt to reshape society by making people kowtow to ideas that are patently rubbish. If it was just bonkers graduates I wouldn’t be as worried as I am.

Kevin Thomas
Kevin Thomas
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Preston

At this point, I strongly suspect a Chinese psy-op to undermine society in its biggest competitors. However most people involved can’t know that and it’s astonishing to me how many willingly buy into this lunacy.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

Couldn’t agree more! This whole thing is completely banal! What the hell is going on as we used to say?

Steve Gwynne
Steve Gwynne
3 years ago

Woke Supremacy
Woke Fragility
Woke Neo-racism
Woke Colourism
Woke Genderism

Woke Bigotry coming to an institution near you.

John MacDonald
John MacDonald
3 years ago

At a recent Diversity and Inclusivity training session in my firm we “learned” that Europeans and Americans are individualistic and that South Asians are communal and family-orientated, and that these differences are innate and must be accounted for in our interactions with each other.
At our next session I expect we will be addressing the dangers of stereotyping people of different ethnicities.
This stuff is hard, sometimes contradictory and very confusing, but I have a mortgage to pay and I must learn to understand it.

Mark Preston
Mark Preston
3 years ago
Reply to  John MacDonald

You have a mortgage to pay so you’ll tolerate this. Then you’ll tolerate something a bit worse and worse – see how this goes? They have bought you because you don’t have FU money.

John MacDonald
John MacDonald
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Preston

Precisely, and the sooner I can get out the better. I fear for those younger than me who’ll have to just suck it up.

Kevin Thomas
Kevin Thomas
3 years ago
Reply to  John MacDonald

That’s not even true. Many European countries are just as family oriented, the Italians for example who suffered badly in the early days of Covid because of their multi-generational dwellings.

John MacDonald
John MacDonald
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Thomas

I know but don’t expect these people to worry about truth or honesty. They are all just consultants making a buck on the latest corporate fad.

Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  John MacDonald

If the Jarrow workers who walked to London, had taken the same view, you may not have had a job to pay your mortgage!

Adam Huntley
Adam Huntley
3 years ago

The point about Critical Race Theory being a religion is accurate for the reasons given. What is perhaps not so obvious is that it also attempts to masquerade as a science, not least to be taken as credible. After all companies may actually shed out some of their profit to you. However it is not entitled to that description- as the following example will illustrate.
An online discussion on Linkedin I followed, examined a press story put out by Prince William’s office. He told of his warm friendship with a black charity worker. He was fulsome in his praise for his white friend. There wasn’t anything racist about William we were assured.
It was met with derision by many. I saw there were many commenting who were working in Diversity. The point was quite reasonably made that this did not prove William was not a racist. It is easily possible, many argued that one could be married to a black person and still be racist. You can imagine the accompanying likes and confirmation comments that followed.
But what could William do other than cite such stories and show evidence of his work in, for example the FA Kick it Out campaign? However, it remains true, he cannot prove his “innocence”.
So what are the grounds for regarding William as a likely racist? Well, theory has it that the Monarchy are the pinnacle of class and race structures. And “if you work in a kitchen you are going to start smelling of food”. Also, many countered when I protested Williams credentials as a decent chap, what grounds had I to say he wasn’t a racist?
Racist is whatever our theory says is racist. You must think and act as our theory predicts. Therefore you are a racist.
Science makes predictions which, in principle, are falsifiable. If I say “nothing goes faster than light”, I may not ever show that something can. But in principle, it could be shown. William (or anyone else) can be labelled racist because your theory predicts it. But what if that theory was wrong? Happily for the Critical Race Theorists it cannot be done. Their prejudices can be forever preserved for as long as they deflect scrutiny with charges of racism, or on grounds of insufficient “lived experience” to be a critic.

Last edited 3 years ago by Adam Huntley
Jayne Lago
Jayne Lago
3 years ago
Reply to  Adam Huntley

A good example! In my view ‘racism’ comes in many forms and was once called many different things, however it suits the racism counsellors to label pretty much anything under racism to justify their views. The biggest scourge of the earth is social media……….indoctrination pure and simple. It’s actually very clever, put an idea out there get your enhancers to support it and hey presto the followers will ‘follow’. In time there will be no need for battleships bombs and even cyber warfare………our enemies will just have to select their agenda, post on social media, and eventually You have a compliant society!

Jonathan Weil
Jonathan Weil
3 years ago

Beautiful last sentence. Put me in mind of this, from Vladimir Nabokov, writing in 1940, newly arrived in a very different America:
“… goodness becomes a central and tangible part of one’s world, which world at first sight seems hard to identify with the modern one of newspaper editors and other bright pessimists, who will tell you that it is, mildly speaking, illogical to applaud the supremacy of good at a time when something called H!tl3r is trying to turn the globe into five million miles of blondness and boots. And they may add that it is one thing to beam at one’s private universe in the snuggest nook of an unshelled country and quite another to try and keep sane among crashing buildings in the roaring and whining night. But within the emphatically and unshakeably illogical world which I am advertising, as a home for the spirit, Messerschmidts are unreal not because they are conveniently remote in physical space… but because I cannot imagine (and that is saying a good deal) such circumstances as might impinge upon that lovely and loveable world which quietly persists, whereas I can very well imagine that my fellow dreamers, thousands of whom roam the earth, keep to these same irrational standards during the darkest and most dazzling hours of physical danger, pain, dust, death.

One of the main reasons why the very great and very gallant Russian poet Gumilev was put to death by Lenin’s ruffians twenty years ago was that during the whole ordeal, in the prosecutor’s dim office, in the torture house, in the winding corridors that led to the truck, in the truck that took him to the place of execution and at that place itself, full of the shuffling feet of the clumsy and gloomy shooting squad, the poet kept smiling.”

Sheryl Rhodes
Sheryl Rhodes
3 years ago

Wokeism is fatally opposed to the most important tenets of Christianity. It’s repulsive and infuriating because wokeism weaponizes the underlying moral basis of modern Western liberal thought, and will ultimately destroy us if allowed to continue their dominance in our societies.
The vast majority of us want to be “good” people who care about each individual, and want everyone to have a decent life. The woke have seized power over us because they claim that only through their worldview can we be truly fair to the oppressed. We have ceded this false moral high-ground to them, because virtually no one wants to not be a good person who cares about the oppressed and the marginalized.
The Judeo-Christian worldview that underlies these moral principles insists that each human life is equal before the sight of G-d and each human life has equal and intrinsic worth. We are also all flawed and fall short of the glory of G-d, and because we are flawed none of us–and no group of us–should have absolute power over others. In order to get along (and in order to comport with Christianity) we must have personal humility and respect for each other, and also be prepared to nurture and forgive each other.
Everything about wokeism actively works against these principles. Only group identity matters, not the individual. Oppressors are irredeemably flawed and must be eliminated in some fashion—the woke rarely spell this out but it’s the only logical outcome of the game they have set up. We are all assigned categories and identities; we are oppressors and oppressed; there is no freedom to disagree, and there sure as hell is no compassion or forgiveness.

Last edited 3 years ago by Sheryl Rhodes
joycebrette
joycebrette
3 years ago
Reply to  Sheryl Rhodes

Please say God, it’s not a dirty word.

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
3 years ago
Reply to  joycebrette

Jewish people do not write God in full because the word is sacred, not because they think it is dirty.

Hendrik Mentz
Hendrik Mentz
3 years ago
Reply to  Sheryl Rhodes

Excellent points you’ve made. Thank you.

Anne-Marie Mazur
Anne-Marie Mazur
3 years ago

All about further eroding the “rights” of workers. Just another reason to justify firing to replace you with a newer, lower paid worker. Criminalizing “hate speech” is the same. It’s about workers’ so called rights being further eroded on an ever expanding continuum (like genders) on behalf of the ruling class employers. The state does their bidding by expanding criminal/economic sanction with their monopoly on violent coercion to keep the workers “compliant” which never works out well for the employees because the goal posts are moved daily. The grievance factory is a new market to exploit with money to be made at the expense of the lower classes and their pay. The division keeps people from united action against this as does the threat to ability to feed oneself under this PC capitalism.

Last edited 3 years ago by Anne-Marie Mazur
Richard Turpin
Richard Turpin
3 years ago

The industry is ironically based in and and round bias and prejudice but the instigators are so immersed in their various levels of wokery and cognitive cognisance they are too stupid to see it. The fact that according to the identity politics mantra, no other creed of human being is apparently susceptible to the same bias makes the entire argument completely implausible. Surely, if the cultural prejudices and white tyrannical hierarchies that are to blame for all the worlds problems exist, then how many other levels of “unconscious bias” must surely exist within many other colours and cultures as a result? One only has to listen to different cultural reference points in music and literature to suggest it’s not the white preserve at all….in fact I would say thanks to the post modernists, its become much more evident in almost everybody but..