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Who cares about race in Miami? Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio hails from a city where white supremacy barely exists

An Afro-Cuban leading a white supremacist group, Enrique Tarrio is a classic petty Miami grifter. Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

An Afro-Cuban leading a white supremacist group, Enrique Tarrio is a classic petty Miami grifter. Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images


January 13, 2021   5 mins

If you stumbled into one of the protests that enflamed America last summer and came across Enrique Tarrio — a dark-skinned, Hispanic man, clearly a “person of colour” — you’d immediately assume he was on the side of Black Lives Matter. If you looked closer, at his attire and the guys he was holding court over, you’d realise, to your complete and utter surprise, that Tarrio is actually aligned with the Proud Boys — the white supremacist larping troupe that’s been battling Antifa and BLM for the better part of a year. Tarrio is, in fact, the Proud Boys’ leader.

Last week he was arrested (then released) in Washington DC, after burning a BLM flag stolen from a black church, once again confounding white Americans with his supposedly distorted racial identity. I found it hard, as I do every time he pops up in the news, not to roll my eyes at the media’s portrayal of Tarrio as some great instigator of racial discord. Because, like me, he’s a Cuban-American from Miami, which is to say that I’ve seen plenty of Tarrio-types in my day.

Tarrio is what I’ll call a petty Miami schemer — the kind known to anyone who lives in the city, which was built on schemes and grifts in its days as a swampland backwater. In Miami, guys like Tarrio, from the personal trainer who tries to sell you steroids after your first session to the sleazy foreign investors who buy up entire high-rises, are a dime a dozen. The Proud Boys leader was first convicted, of theft, at the age of 20; nine years later, in 2013, he was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison for rebranding and reselling stolen medical devices. Before that, he spent some time in North Florida and ran a poultry farm. And let us not forget Tarrio’s failed 2020 congressional run.

That Tarrio leads a white supremacist group can be explained not by national race relations, but by the fact that he grew up in Miami: a place where “whiteness”, as it’s defined by the woke media class, simply doesn’t exist – for the simple reason that there are basically no white people here. It’s the only American city where Hispanics completely dominate the political and cultural landscape, and the few white people who remain no longer feel themselves to be “culturally white”. Everything in Miami, including racial dynamics, is filtered through a Hispanic lens, not an American one. Miamians don’t even consider themselves Floridians, because the rest of the state resembles Miami as much as Zimbabwe does. Those who grew up here are unrestrained by traditional ideas of race.

As a Miami clichĂ©, Tarrio isn’t remarkably interesting. He’s merely an opportunist with some street smarts, who, due to his urban look, cuts an imposing figure. What he represents to the media class — and how they frame him — is far more interesting. The conversation about race in America always revolves around the supposed animus between blacks and whites, with other POC automatically siding with African-Americans due to some assumed melanated kinship. The fact that Tarrio is even a member, not to mention the leader, of a white supremacist group is inconceivable to most liberals. Their paradigm, in which all POC are locked in an interminable struggle against their white oppressors, removes all possibility for the fluidity and nuance with which POC, and especially Hispanics, navigate ideas of race and colour.

In Miami, the main animus Hispanics have is with other Hispanics. The Puerto Ricans and the Dominicans have beef with one another. The Chileans and the Argentinians despise each other for reasons beyond just soccer. Hell, my people, the Cubans, have issues not only with other Hispanics, but with each other! The Cubans who immigrated shortly after Castro took power view themselves as entrepreneurial hard workers; they look down on the “newer Cubans” as lazy dope dealers and Medicare fraudsters.

These disparate Hispanic demographics, in order not to have to deal with one another, have segregated themselves into neighbourhoods where they only associate with themselves. The idea that anyone in Miami is thinking about white supremacy is preposterous; to someone like Tarrio, the “spectre of whiteness” — or any other concept used by the Left to explain American race relations — is completely foreign. Herein lies the problem with a term like “people of colour”; something as surface level as pigmentation doesn’t bind distinct subgroups into some kind of coalition.

If liberals find the impossibility of Hispanic solidarity distasteful, it’s only because they believe that kinship between groups is only achievable if all animus ceases to exist. People who live in cities where cultures are constantly clashing, Miami being the greatest example, get that a utopia in which every single group loves each other isn’t necessary. It’s only those suffering from white guilt who advocate this communal POC lovefest, because they are convinced that “whiteness” — and not natural and historic differences between groups — is what’s keeping the utopia at bay. One of the only things Hispanics seem to agree on, though, is that merely tolerating one another is often all the tolerance that’s needed. Some may find this “division” disconcerting, and maybe even sad, but if there isn’t a deep affinity among disparate Hispanic groups, there is in Miami a begrudging camaraderie that permeates personal interactions and animates the culture, and the city.

Steeped in this culture, a figure like Tarrio, despite all his petty idiocy, has a more acute understanding of American racial dynamics than any African-American Studies major from an elite institution. The race-obsessed commentariat — the same people who’ve pushed the word “Latinx” on Hispanics in the hope of inducing an inorganic solidarity — would be mystified by the Hispanic view of blackness, if they ever bothered to listen to it. To white liberals, if a person looks black, they must automatically identify as black, which isn’t necessarily the case. A Dominican friend of mine, who is very dark-skinned and would be considered “black” by an outside observer, bristles if you jokingly call him so, quickly saying, “I’m Dominican.” Like a lot of Caribbean islanders, he’s not invested in the African-American racial project as understood by those who dominate the race conversation.

Of course, some would argue that this is a result of internalised anti-blackness. Whether that’s true or not — I don’t buy it — the fact remains that in the Hispanic world, black isn’t always black. Which goes a long way in explaining why a guy like Tarrio, who personally identifies as an Afro-Cuban, seems to suffer no cognitive dissonance in leading a white supremacist group.

What his opponents fail to understand is that Tarrio, in a twisted way, is a post-racial man. If I had to guess — and as I said, I’ve known many like him — he truly isn’t concerned with thoughts of colour and race. The only colour that matters to him is the green of the American dollar. In his albeit disturbing quest for finding the ultimate grift, he would’ve fit in just as well with Black Lives Matter as he does with the Proud Boys. He just so happened to have fallen down one internet rabbit hole and not the other.

After the recent events at the Capitol, groups like the Proud Boys will certainly be monitored more closely — and possibly even be forcibly disbanded. But Tarrio, a nasty Miami grifter through and through, will just move on to his next scheme.


Alex Perez is a Cuban-American writer based in Miami, and a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Perez_Writes

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Simon Davies
Simon Davies
3 years ago

What the author never seems to ask is why a so-called white-supremacist group would let a dark skinned person lead them? That is of course if the Proud Boys are indeed a white-supremacist group. Maybe, just maybe Tarrio’s leadership of the group is evidence that the Proud Boys are not white-supremacist in belief at all.

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
3 years ago
Reply to  Simon Davies

What do they believe?

rosie mackenzie
rosie mackenzie
3 years ago

They are their own selves, not Democrats, not Republicans, not black supremacists, not white, not right, not left. They don’t like BLM ruling the roost, or Antifa, and they are the only ones who take them on. The CJS isn’t going to..

David George
David George
3 years ago

They’re supporters of Western civilisation and the nation state. The leap to presenting that as “white supremacists” is absurd. A deliberate strategy to demonise the culture and it’s roots perhaps.
The essay would have been so much better if that aspect had, at least, been explored.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

If anything, to begin with they were more about gender – hence proud boys – in contrast with idea that men should be ashamed. Not “proud whites”.

This, of course, set them in opposition to key tenets of wokeism.

Correct me if I’m wrong about the history, but I believe that antifa took against them for that reason and they then got drawn into the standard polarisation.

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

Ah , yeh that sounds about right. ‘White supremacism’ is more a ‘woke’ obsession than anything which actually objectively exists with a big social representation

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Simon Davies

accusing someone of ‘white supremacy’ means not needing evidence; the accusation stands on its own, gleefully parroted by Dem politicians and most of the mainstream left.

uncia2000
uncia2000
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

Yes, this is effectively a hit piece, whether the author knows it or not. It reads as though they’ve regurgitated Wikipedia and may end up being quoted by them at a later date as “authoritative” as is the way things go nowadays.

Enrique’s long interview with left-leaning Tim Pool on YouTube – “The Proud Boys May Have Noble Goals, HOW They Try To Achieve Them Can Be Critiqued” – was vastly more enlightening than this attempt at indoctrination.

There are MANY “left behind” people in the Proud Boys: what have the Democrats done to give them a feeling of purpose and belonging to the USA in the 2020s?

jameswpemberton
jameswpemberton
3 years ago
Reply to  uncia2000

Excellent video… Thanks. https://www.youtube.com/wat

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

I would not assume a POC would be on the side of BLM since it looked to me that most of the rioters and protesters were middle and upper income white people.

Blue Tev
Blue Tev
3 years ago

And most of the damage was of course in black majority areas (or government buildings)
Which will suffer from decades of underdevelopment, business flight and property price deflation.

While the pr***s playing BLM go on to nice safe government or academic jobs and a comfortable semiurban home away from those pesky “POCs”

Seb Dakin
Seb Dakin
3 years ago

Here in Europe meanwhile, you’d regard a (white) Spanish or Portuguese person as white anyway. Importing all these American neuroses is, apart from being corrosive to society as a whole, also utter nonsense.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Seb Dakin

Tarrio is Cuban, not Spanish. People from Spain or Portugal would be regarded as white in the US as well. As long as they were white. There are black Spaniards and Portuguese people. I know an Asian Italian, she would be regarded as Asian.

But these aren’t actually American neuroses, they are specific to a subset of Americans, progressives. You’ll find very few Americans who actually like separating people by race. But those who do like it are very, very loud.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

As a result of being very loud, they carry outsized influence within the ranks. See how quickly all the talk about “allies” or ‘white fragility’ spread. My favorite part was the white apologists scrambling for lists of black-owned businesses to patronize, totally oblivious about how ridiculous this made them look and ignoring the obvious first question: why are you ignorant about local black owned enterprises?

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

“People from Spain or Portugal would be regarded as white in the US as well. As long as they were white.”

Not sure this is really true. Portuguese friends who have gone to America have come back with a very poor view of the country, because of the way they were treated. This is in marked contrast to people from the U.K.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

Well don’t know what I can say other than that white people are regarded as white in the US. Some friends of yours not liking the US doesn’t really change that. Nor is it likely that they had long conversations with Americans about what those Americans considered their race to be. That would be an odd claim would it not? Is that your claim?

If not, how do you know they were not considered to be white? Is mistreatment of say, white Americans in France due to Frenchmen believing them to be non-white?

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

That’s all true of course, but it was surprisingly consistent, and in marked contrast to the experience of people from the U.K.

I should also add that while people in north Europe doubtless consider Southern Europeans white, they do often treat them differently – sometimes with a kind of veiled contempt. In my experience the Germans are the worst, but people from the U.K. too sometimes.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

I’ll have to remind you that people from the UK are not all white. Do not mistake race with nationality.

Your anecdote has no way of being proven and I doubt that your friends discussed their race with Americans. Is it your contention that they did? Perhaps your friends displayed rude behavior and were subsequently treated a certain way. You really don’t know. Surely you’re aware that Europeans can act rudely at times.

In any case, your anecdote doesn’t change anything I said.

Gabriele
Gabriele
3 years ago
Reply to  Seb Dakin

Here in Europe I don’t think I have ever heard referring to somebody as white. Whiteness, blackness and the like are not European categories, at least on the continent. I don’t know about the United Kingdom. Even in the past there were different categories, such as nordic, alpine, mediterreanean, etc.

Benedict Waterson
Benedict Waterson
3 years ago
Reply to  Gabriele

Yes, it’s become a fashion in the UK to talk about ‘whiteness’.. Probably the anglo relationship.. Obviously the rhetoric is all complete nonsense

rosie mackenzie
rosie mackenzie
3 years ago

And only Kemi Badenoch dare take it on.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Gabriele

Because in Europe there is the larger sense of European identity (culture). That is why Southern/Eastern European migrants to Northern Europe have integrated so well. Lutheran Germans don’t see Italian Catholics or Eastern Orthodox as a “threat” to German culture. Slobodan the Serb will not kill his daughter because she is dating Johan the Lutheran.

Arnold Grutt
Arnold Grutt
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

“Lutheran Germans don’t see Italian Catholics or Eastern Orthodox as a “threat” to German culture.”

This seems to me to be a generalization that requires proof. We may not be hearing about other religious differences than the standard Islam vs everyone else, because the most vocal people now seem to consider religious belief to be irrelevant to human life, even though just about every atheist ‘social’ conviction they hold can be traced back to a Christian origin..

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Arnold Grutt

“This seems to me to be a generalization that requires proof. “
The proof is in your daily life. You are not hearing about religious differences because it doesn’t matter to the Germans or the Christian migrants. Would Serbs/Greeks/Russians refuse to go to Oktoberfest ?
Max Planck institute has studies about the performance of different ethnic groups in Germany (education, crime, home ownership, wealth, political/cultural leanings).
All Eastern and Southern Europeans (adjusted for how long they have been in Germany) perform on avg. just like the Germans. The Turks/Arabs (not Christian Arabs) perform below average.
Do you truly believe that one day the Orthodox Christians in Germany will rebel against the constitutional order?
P.S. Greeks in Germany perform on average better than any other group including the Germans. Spanish guest workers are hard to measure because of very high rate of intermarriage with Germans. Personally I have known 2 Spanish girls (born In German to Spanish parents) married to German men. The only issue was football (Spain vs Germany).

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Err – northern Ireland anybody?

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Arnold Grutt

I consider this one of those vanishingly rare instances in which Jeremy is right.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Because it is the other way round – you are (almost) always wrong.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Being told that I am almost always wrong by Jeremy reassures me as to my correctness in most matters.

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago
Reply to  Gabriele

Hmm…there are plenty of derogatory names to call people of different European nationalities…spics, wops, wogs, frogs, boxheads etc…

stephen f.
stephen f.
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Clarke

As far as “wop”-it is from American immigration-without papers. You left off “limey”. I foresee the time when you cannot ask an Italian “how’d your day go?”

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago
Reply to  stephen f.

…and Paddy and Jock and Taff…

Doug Pingel
Doug Pingel
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Clarke

My English aquaintances still
call me Taff and some still use
“Sheep-ShaXXer just as ‘Stralians still the use the term
“Pommy BastXXX” very few of
either mean it in a nasty way –

Well maybe some of the “Wild
Colonials” do.
No worries – I’ve been called worse by Welsh ‘so called’
Liberals.

anthony okeefe
anthony okeefe
3 years ago
Reply to  stephen f.

Folk etymologies for supposed acronyms are seldom true, without papers being one of them. See also, wharf, posh, and many others. The term wop was in use well before immigration papers were needed and would also apply to immigrants other than Italians were it true.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Clarke

Noddies, cloggies, krauts.

Boxheads is new to me – who are they?

J StJohn
J StJohn
3 years ago
Reply to  Gabriele

Except the ‘wokes’like Jon Snow. https://www.theguardian.com

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago
Reply to  Gabriele

“Here in Europe I don’t think I have ever heard referring to somebody as white.”

That’s because being white was the norm. Colour was only referred to if you differed from it. Whether to do so is racist is an interesting question.

We didn’t used to have the concept “whiteness” in the U.K., but we definitely do now. It is a clear racial pejorative. I would consider anybody who used it to be an obvious racist.

Before anybody points it out, I do realise that in the paras above I am taking different sides in the debate. That’s because I believe there is sense on both sides and find the current polarisation stupid.

Though it’s hard not to feel that the left started it and is getting dafter, and more provocative, by the minute.

Karen Lindquist
Karen Lindquist
3 years ago
Reply to  Seb Dakin

“American neurosis” (fixed your spelling error)? What a joke. The inherent racism in Europeans is where that originates.
There isn’t really any such thing as an American in as much as race or cultural backgrounds go. We are a stew comprised of people from all backgrounds and colors. So, please stop with that ridiculous BS.

Europe sure is in denial about both it’s past and present it seems. Look at you, pretending the entire history of conquest isn’t your legacy. Denial isn’t just a river in Egypt, as they say.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago

An alternative explanation suggests itself: namely that the Proud Boys aren’t white supremacists.

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

🙂

Jurek Molnar
Jurek Molnar
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Far too reasonable.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jurek Molnar

All hail the Principle of Inference to the Simplest Explanation!

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Drachir, such apostasy will get you Twitter-banned, careful.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  7882 fremic

I was briefly on Twitter about a year ago. Never again.

Blue Tev
Blue Tev
3 years ago

So it’s not just Supreme leader Trump who gets the treatment, eh?
The nasty innuendo, bad-mouthing, insinuating evil motives…..the standard works for anyone not keen on the “African-American racial project”
( Those not keen, funnily enough, includes plenty of actual recent immigrants from Africa – far more successful in tolerant America, hate the local “victims”)
You could far easily dig dirt on the thugs and racists driving BLM, but that doesn’t happen, just like no action was taken against the Demrats encouraging or organising bail for rioters.

Be very clear.
Regressives hate Trump not because of anything they accuse him of, usually falsely.
They hate him because they are fascists and he was in the way, and anyone who opposes them is their enemy.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Blue Tev

The nasty innuendo, bad-mouthing, insinuating evil motives…..the standard works for anyone not keen on the “African-American racial project”
it works for anyone who is not in total lockstep with the left, even those who are nominally left but deviate on a couple of topics. These people are like the radical jihadis – anyone not like them is an infidel worthy for repercussions, sometimes violent and sometimes digital as with doxxing and attempts to get people fired.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio hails from a city where white supremacy barely exists
so what is the city where “white supremacy” exists in much larger form? This exercise in bad faith of targeting people of a certain pallor in the nastiest way possible has not helped anyone.

Blue Tev
Blue Tev
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

Pretty much any white minority, Demrat governed city or state has white supremacism: California, Detroit, Chicago..

Where non whites (unless you are upper class elite) have to suffer high crime rates, schooling and infrastructure, the state subsidises initiatives such as welfare benefits that destroy their families, and non whites are relentlessly brainwashed they are inferior victims who must rely on handouts from their white “saviours”

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Blue Tev

“nonwhites”
Don’t generalize. Asians are not victims.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

they’re not victims until they try applying for college.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

True,

Tom Krehbiel
Tom Krehbiel
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

The more elite schools, yes. But Asians can still get into most colleges.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom Krehbiel

Replace asians with blacks and see if this strikes you as okay.

Thomas Laird
Thomas Laird
3 years ago

I almost gave up on your hit piece after the first paragraph. “white supremacist …group”. Whatever else PB and Tarrio may be. That isn’t one of them. A shameful piece.

LUKE LOZE
LUKE LOZE
3 years ago
Reply to  Thomas Laird

The article never really seemed to deal with that point very well, I believe techinally PB are against ‘racism’ but very nationalist. But there seems to be a number of white supremists in or close to their group? Also if they’re in favour of political violence and against democracy they’re bad.

Of course similar things can be said about many of the left affliated groups, including those with a lot of mainstream acceptance and promotion. They are riddled with extreme racists (see Sasha Johnson), authoritarians and people very happy to engage in political violence.

It’s not that PB and indeed Trump aren’t horrible people, it’s that many on the other side are equally as bad. The one sided narrative doesn’t help in anyway, it allowed the left to commit appalling crimes, and acts as a recruiter for the far right and gives them the thinest sliver of justification.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  LUKE LOZE

There are not nationalist but rather proponents of western civilization, which includes people of all races. Who are the white supremacists in or close to the PB?

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

That’s my understanding. They are pro western civilisation. Of course western civilisation was produced largely by white people, and it seems that having a positive attitude towards it is now enough to get you labelled white supremacist.

John Nutkins
John Nutkins
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

Indeed, and that makes me a white supremacist, and of course I support all those defending western civilization against the hordes and mobs of woke cretins and thugs, all their fellow scum and the morons backing the divisive, discriminatory and grossly insulting BLM racists.

Ray Zacek
Ray Zacek
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

All that is required to be labeled a white supremacist is to be white. It is a secular version of original sin, promulgated mainly by white urban liberals with a carapace of sanctimony hiding their anxiety.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago
Reply to  Ray Zacek

“All that is required to be labeled a white supremacist is to be white.”

I think that’s true of racism in some circles. Racism is treated as inescapable for white people. I’m not sure it’s the same for white supremacy.

Robin di Angelo, for example seems to consider herself a racist. But does she really consider herself a white supremacist? That would be really odd.

Joseph McCord
Joseph McCord
3 years ago

What if it’s exactly, civilization (and not even, any particular one) – that’s the problem?

Tom Graham
Tom Graham
3 years ago

If Proud Boys were a white supremacist group, they would not have a non-white person as leader, full stop – whether black, Asian or “Afro-Cuban”.

I stand to be corrected here, but I don’t think the KKK ever had a leader who wasn’t white.

leosavantt
leosavantt
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom Graham

The KKK also never had a leader who wasn’t a Democrat (as in political party).

Madelyn
Madelyn
3 years ago

A white supremacist group??? WRONG! Of course some of their members have been found to be all kinds of things – this happens in any organization – but they are NOT white supremacists. They stand against BLM because that organization is founded by self proclaimed Marxists. Don’t get me wrong! I don’t support PB or any of these groups. But get your labels straight !!!

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Madelyn

Good for you putting in the required bit of not supporting the PB, best safe than sorry.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago

Cubans are different. On average (aside from the new Cuban migrants) they are affluent/wealthy, politically active (Republican – Marco Rubio) and see themselves as white Catholics and are hostile to communism/socialism.
The definition of whiteness in America has expanded to include people that were not considered whites – Italians for example. Cubans are like Italians (without the high culture or the amazing food).
Self perception matters a lot – Cubans see themselves as white. They see their group interest as part of white America.
It was Asians (especially Chinese) in California that voted down Affirmative Action.
The democratic problem is that the base of their voters is the black community but the rest of migrants in America (Cubans, Asians, etc.) don’t feel any guilt about slavery/jim crow. The democratic coalition is highly unstable – but Republicans are too ham fisted to get other minorities on their side.

Al Giacomucci
Al Giacomucci
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

As an Italian immigrant to the US, I understand being Italian and I understand being an American. But what is it with this white thing? It appears to be constructed simply to create racial animosity. There is no white cuisine, white language, white religion, white customs. White exists only as a political construct that obscures the diversity and humanity of the people the politically correct want to classify.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Al Giacomucci

It appears to be constructed simply to create racial animosity.
yup..and it works.

John Nutkins
John Nutkins
3 years ago
Reply to  Al Giacomucci

Indeed, but address your question to the racist BLM thugs.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Al Giacomucci

If you do not understand ‘White’ I guess you do not understand Chinese, Inuit, Indian, Arab, Jew, Polynesian, and so on, other than geographic. Names used to describe the race or genetically similar group in contrast to the world’s other groups. You must live in a confusing world where you cannot understand humanity.

Alex Delszsen
Alex Delszsen
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Cubans without amazing food?????

Michael Coleman
Michael Coleman
3 years ago

Admittedly, I know nothing about the Proud Boys but the entire article left me wondering if the author’s characterization of them as primarily White Supremacists is wrong. Why not include some quotes from Tarrio to support this cognitive dissonance narrative?

J StJohn
J StJohn
3 years ago

Tarrio has been quoted as saying, “I denounce white supremacy. I denounce anti-Semitism. I denounce racism. I denounce fascism. I denounce communism and any other -ism that is prejudiced towards people because of their race, religion, culture, tone of skin.” In regard to his own ethnicity, he has said, “I’m pretty brown, I’m Cuban. There’s nothing white supremacist about me.

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago
Reply to  J StJohn

Clearly this didn’t stop the author from writing his hit piece, facts eh…tuh, who needs ’em?

Alex Delszsen
Alex Delszsen
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Clarke

He looks down on “grifters,” as he is not one of “them.”

Do you ever see expat Americans with other Americans? No, they are not like “those” Americans, and so they do all they can to convince locals that they are “good” Americans. I have also seen this with other people, like the English. People who want no ethnic stereotype clinging to them, but happy to leave it on others.

This is why there is such classism and reverse racism amongst whites. The poor who look like them are scary. With the others they will, ironically, be the great White Saviours. In Germany, they will give a new thick Winter coat and a top of the line double stroller to a new arrival from Africa. I saw her…in the same view of the square where a European, probably German, lady had a thin coat, not fit for purpose, and one of her small children standing on the back of an old-fashioned stroller with a smaller child sitting in it. Germans didn’t see charity as a thing before the Africans came, and they quickly gave a boost to Hartz 4, or welfare recipients, only after they gave out money hand over fist in 2015. Previously, they spent two years pulling on pennies, so that recipients without children ended up only five cents per month better off.

What is likely is that the author is only another cultural elite who knows “better,” and finds a group of “deserving” folks that he can use to put him into relief from the bad “others” of those who share his background.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

Those quotes would interfere with the narrative.

jessegalebaker
jessegalebaker
3 years ago

The quote in the other reply is from Wikipedia, which sources it to WSVN-TV Miami’s Marisela Burgos on Sept. 30. These asides came in response to a spokes for the Jewish Anti-Defamation League, which does view the Proud Boys as anti-Semitic but may just offer the obligatory platitudes regarding what the Boys think about blacks as it’s everyone for themselves in identity politics. And this year it’s all about Donald Trump. Burgos was showing Trump on the split-screen during this interview.

The group’s primary hobby in 2019 was bouts of fisticuffs with Antifa, the thing they were doing when Andy Ngo got creamed in Portland, Oregon by a milkshake thrown from Antifas protesting USICE immigration enforcement. Stuff changes pretty quickly. Trump was of course behind the immigration policies, and admittedly applying them in a rough manner, yet BLM, which in its latest incarnation in most cities has more whites and Hispanics than blacks, got no mention at all.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  jessegalebaker

“BLM, which in its latest incarnation in most cities has more whites and Hispanics than blacks”

With black unemployment the lowest in US history, perhaps black people are too busy at work to attend.

Alex Delszsen
Alex Delszsen
3 years ago

I think BLM, diversity experts, and the like, have actually found a way to make their Grievance Studies” degrees marketable.

Jurek Molnar
Jurek Molnar
3 years ago

It is as if reality has become realitx.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Jurek Molnar

Perfection!

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago

If this writer let his agenda run free would ha call BLM Anti-White?

bob alob
bob alob
3 years ago

With a mention from Joe Biden, just like that they become white supremacists, the cultural power of the Liberal left on full display for all to see, scary stuff.

rosie mackenzie
rosie mackenzie
3 years ago
Reply to  bob alob

While “Antifa is just an idea”.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

I think much hinges on how you define white supremacist. In the view of many, asserting the following to be true will pretty much get you labelled as a white supremacist.

1. Western civilisation is one of humanity’s greatest achievements

2. Western civilisation was largely the production of white people

Now if you are constantly asserting this aggressively and denying other people’s achievements, then you may well be a white supremacist.

But if you are only doing so in response to people (often white people) who are constantly disparaging western civilisation or claiming it owes everything to black people, then you really aren’t.

There really are a lot of perfectly nice, reasonable unracist people out there who value the truth, and who are frankly sick of hearing how cr-p white people are, how cr-p western civilisation is, and how we would lose nothing if we burnt it to the ground.

And they are particular sick of hearing it from rich and privileged white people at elite universities.

CL van Beek
CL van Beek
3 years ago

“Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio hails from a city where white supremacy barely exists”. Now I am curious, please name the cities where white supremacy does exist.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  CL van Beek

The inference is, every last single one, in all USA. Quite likely also in all of them in Aus, NZ, all Europe, and Russia and…….well, anywhere white people infest the cities.

kecronin1
kecronin1
3 years ago

With all the Covid dystopia, this article was a breathe of fresh with its take on common sense and race relations. Anyone who reads US history knows that Europeans segregated themselves between ethnic groups, religion, etc. When I was a kid in St. Louis I asked an uncle why there were so many different Catholic Churches near each other. He responded, all the different European groups hated each other and would never attend church together. So it was no surprise when my grandmother confessed that her German/Bohemian family looked down on the Irishman she married. This despite the fact they were so dirt poor she was the only one of 9 to go beyond middle school and their father so brutal most kids never married remaining with a darkness on their shoulder. I raise my mixed kid with these stories so he doesn’t assume he is superior to anyone and then comes along ‘white privilege.’ I don’t know how you accept this message with accepting the subtext that you are superior. It seems disgusting.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  kecronin1

“with accepting the subtext that you are superior”

I think you probably meant to say “without”.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  kecronin1

“…European groups hated each other…”
No they did not. They simply went to a new country and found comfort with their ethnic group. There are demographic studies that by 2nd generation the intermarriage rate between different European group was very high.
It doesn’t apply to NYC for very different reasons.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Very interesting. I was aware of Tarrio but I didn’t know that he’d been to jail etc. That said, the Proud Boys are not White Supremacists and one bunch of genuine white supremacists, led by Richard Wallace, supported Biden because he is allied with those who are more likely to bring about racial segregation. I believe libraries in Seattle now have separate spaces for different races due to the race grifters.

In recent months I have been watching podcasts from Adam Francisco, a Mexican Jew who lives in Florida. He is a Trump supporter but talks to everyone in a number of different places. I had noticed that the state does indeed seem to be leading the way towards a ‘post-racial’ future, which is something we all want. It also looks like a great place to live, at least on the surface.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

There is no such thing as “post-racial” future. The reality is that all migrant groups in America look down on black people.
And as American grows more diverse (or not) there will be less good will from other ethnic groups toward blacks.

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

This is not true. I migrated to the States and do not look down on black people. I do, however, see a people that are still reeling from the trauma of slavery (it has only been three or four generations since Emancipation) and, since then, have been used as a political football by both Republicans and Democrats. One concern I have for black Americans is that well-intentioned white liberals seek to make them dependent on state aid (reparations, welfare, affirmative action). While I believe in state aid for the poorest and most vulnerable in society, it is a poor substitute for going out and earning your own money. It also doesn’t help that popular Critical Theory disavows resourceful blacks as race-traitors who’ve stepped out of their lane.

There is a peculiar kind of racism in the US that I’ve never encountered elsewhere. White liberals are scared of black people and hope that by giving them everything their own racist attitudes will not come under scrutiny.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

It’s been more than 150 years since emancipation. There are neither slaves nor slaveowners left, and the majority of Americans trace their roots in this country to the time AFTER slavery. And why is it that black immigrants who actively lived under oppressive regimes can come here and succeed?

There comes a point when it is reasonable to start looking at a community’s self-inflicted wounds and stop providing excuses about how people are “still reeling” from anything. Policy today makes it far more likely that a minority will benefit from his/her skin color than be discriminated against for it. Sure, some discrimination still occurs; it occurs to Asians, too, in college admissions applications but that group doesn’t use it as an excuse for perpetual grievance.

You are right that white liberals have done enormous damage to the black community, yet the left takes the black vote for granted and with good reason. Why do black people continue to vote for people whose decisions cause harm?

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Well I have watched countless Adam Francisco podcasts and I can clearly see a route towards a post-racial future. It is impossible to identify the race of many of the people he speaks to as they are the product of one or two generations of inter-racial ‘mingling’. Once can also see this in British society.

Nobody looks down on ‘black people’, except those white liberals who use them as pawns to gain power and virtue-signalling points.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The reality is that all migrant groups in America look down on black people.
Ironically, one group that looks askance at black Americans is immigrants from African nations, people far far less removed from oppression than any native-born individual. Why is that, do you suppose? It may not help that black culture here is the only one that actively celebrates its own denigration, be that in song that is misogynous or glorifies the gangbanger or something else. When a studious black child is accused of “acting white,” that’s not a good thing.

stephen f.
stephen f.
3 years ago

Proud of your country-you are painted as a violent white supremacist by 5th column “journalists”.

-but Perez, a nasty Miami leftist hit-piece writer through and through, will just move on to his next scheme.

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago

Are BLM/Antifa Black Supremacists then?

Surely that would fit with the logic of the author?

brett
brett
3 years ago

It seems anytime someone disagrees with the left they get accused of being a white supremacist. It would be hilarious if it weren’t for the fact that, this type of sinister leftist propaganda is what is essentially driving a wedge through liberal democracies across the world and part of the reason America was subjected to Trump for 4 years. It wont be long until Perez and his cultural Marxist comrades will start accusing Martin Luther King of being a white supremacist. After all, he asked us not to judge people by the colour of their skin. Which Perez, you seem to have a problem with. Wake up you’re the problem.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago

This may be the single worst piece I’ve had the misfortune to read on this site. This is nothing but a fictional personal attack. How on earth was this even published? Total garbage.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Christin

No, there are others like this one. I think they try to get writers form differing views, so when you get a Liberal one they will display their anti Western credentials as it seemingly is required of them.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

I found the authors ideas that the PB would be “possibly forcibly disbanded” interesting. Maybe in China but how exactly would this happen in the US? And how exactly are white Americans “confounded” by Tarrio?

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

Invariably, the left’s approach boils down to force.

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

As someone from the U.K., can I just point out that no one in Europe thinks of Spaniards or Italians as people of colour. I’ve never thought of them as anything other than white. Are people in the US aware of how odd their use of the category POC appears to the rest of us.

If we accept that Romans and Greeks were people of colour, and that they played a key role in founding western civilisation, can we drop the idea that being pro western culture is white supremacist?

Just in passing, presumably both Columbus and Amerigo Vespucii were POC too. Does that mean we can put the statues back up. Or does it mean POC are actually the bad guys?

Steve Wesley
Steve Wesley
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

Careful David, such a logical chain of thought might cause a Guardian reader’s head to implode.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  David Morley

If Spaniards or Italians are black then they would be considered black when they are in the UK. Hopefully you are not claiming that all Spaniards and Italians are white, but if you are, are you aware of how odd that appears to the rest of us? I know an Asian Italian. Would she be considered white in the UK? You confuse race with nationality.

In any case, Mr Tarrio, who is Cuban, not Spanish, would most certainly be considered black in the UK.

Martin Glass
Martin Glass
3 years ago

Do you personally know this man you wrote of? It must be nice to pretend to know his motives by reducing him to a stereotype. Some interesting points you raised, especially about how “”POC” (I hate that term!) view each other, but unfortunately, the whole thing smacks of apparent jealousy of Tarrio. I wish you had left out all the “judgey” stuff and maybe you’d have had a better article. Thanks though, I did enjoy reading it!

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Glass

Good points. I wonder how much color one has to have to be considered a POC. And what if you don’t know your racial background? Can you just assume that somewhere along the line someone was racially diverse and therefore be counted? We have an epidemic of white liberals in the US passing or attempting to pass as POC these days. Perhaps we should all self identify as such and eliminate the stress. Then scholarships and jobs open only to POC would be open to all. Can’t be any objection to that?

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago

Perhaps next you could consider why the English Football Association have punished a Uruguayan for the Spanish word he used in a social media post written in Spanish to another Uruguayan – all in the name of fighting English supremacy (aka racism).

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago

it was at that point when the descent of the wokerati into self-parody began to reveal itself. Someone taking offense where none is intended and punishment stemming from it is a contender for peak stupid, if such a thing is attainable any longer.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago

Seems like more of an indication of English supremacy.

stephen f.
stephen f.
3 years ago

No…”peak stupid” works for me.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago

Exactly. That is the point that the Uruguayan FA have made.

John Nutkins
John Nutkins
3 years ago

My contempt and utter disdain for the FA and its backing of the discriminatory, divisive, fascist, racist and grossly insulting BLM, with oleaginous, sycophantic and hypocritical support by the cretinous multi-millionaire knee-bending ball kickers and Sky TV, was further deepened by its censure of Calvani for using the Spanish diminutive ‘negrito’ as a term of endearment. I note not one of the black players in the Premier League, extraordinarily over-represented in it – 33% or more when the general population figure is 3% – had the guts or balls to defend a fellow player for making an entirely innocent remark. I’m only disappointed that Calvani issued an apology when none was needed.

Tom Krehbiel
Tom Krehbiel
3 years ago

I’d like to add a couple of things that I don’t believe anyone else has said. First, polling of Hispanics in America has revealed that a majority of them describe themselves as white. So, Perez’s idea that there are so few whites in Miami is almost certainly wrong. (“Hispanic”, after all, is a linguistic category, not a racial one.)

Second, East Asians are not necessarily melanin-enhanced compared to Europeans. In northern parts of the region, there are many surprisingly light-skinned individuals. (Surprisingly for those who consider them all POCs, anyway.) In more southerly locales, they are darker, but that happens in Europe too, such as in going south from Stockholm to Palermo. What accounts for the difference in skin colors is that East Asian skin is relatively opaque compared to European and Middle Eastern epidermis, which is (surprise!) more translucent than East Asian. This results in E-ME skin being ruddier than its EA counterpart. Thus, the pinkish vs. amber tones of the skin colors.

Paul Goodman
Paul Goodman
3 years ago

Seems to me that attention to these groups who are really quite small does not help anyone. They are all as bad as one another. Odious though Trump was/is/ and will be some believe him and some hold their nose and vote for him in preference to the alternative. So retaliating to his bad behaviour and pandering to extremes will just generate several Timothy McVeigh type nutters. If Biden is to succeed as leader he will need to dial down the vitriol.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul Goodman

Biden doesn’t really know how to do that though. His first act was the make it racial. Plus is he really the leader of the Democratic Party? I’m not sure if asked if many democrats would say that he was.

Nigel Clarke
Nigel Clarke
3 years ago

So, race is a complicated issue with no clear cut answers. Who knew!

But…But…But…no it isn’t, and the author of the article must be racist…?

Lorraine
Lorraine
3 years ago

Thank you for a great article, very illuminating. Of course, I will have to take your word for it about the social and cultural specifics of Miami but it rang true about Tarrio. The gold however was your analysis of liberal ridiculousness and disingenuousness. This article helps me make further sense of it.

I hoped to find some input in the comments to further verify or debate your take on race consciousness in Miami, but all I see is conservative defensiveness and far right apologists.

I’m left-wing AND anti-COVID-hysteria AND against out-of-touch liberal smugness, looking for nuanced discussion about political developments. The absence of comments from leftists/progressives tells me not many of them are listening outside their echo chamber…

Karen Lindquist
Karen Lindquist
3 years ago

A Hispanic who hates other Hispanics isn’t that unusual from what i see constantly. And who dislikes the Hispanics more than the middle class white people? Black people! Let Hispanic folks move into a black neighborhood and watch the black flight.
Anyhow, the sooner they just declare Florida a third world country and ask it to secede from the rest of the country, the better. Funny how all those cultures from the Caribbean and South America are there hating and hurting each other while they blame white people for racism.

jessegalebaker
jessegalebaker
3 years ago

We can of course say that white supremacy doesn’t exist anywhere in the United States anymore, and the white supremacists who do exist are quite rare now, as they have been since the early 1970s, voices made louder when social media amplifies them. I don’t understand why we must up-label everything to get the attention we deem due, but it’s reached the point we’ll require new terms to denote what we used to mean by “terrorism,” “insurrection” or the KKK. Conflicts the Proud Boys, Boogaloo Bois, Three Percenters”and in my own home state, Utah Citizens’ Alert”are pursuing often concern the “woke” crowd that follows the intelligentsia, not so much blacks per se although Detroit served as a meme. That might explain why the Prouds accept Tarrio as a figurehead. These movements aren’t hierarchical in nature, leadership in them being more a matter of first among equals, I think.

Still, it’s not good for the country. Unlike the UK, semiautomatic handguns and rifles are easily accessible here, and many states have “open carry” laws permitting fellas to parade around downtown with their guns. This hasn’t led to shootouts as of yet, the one close approach I’m aware of a homicide in Kenosha, Wisconsin last summer, but it invites hard feelings turning into trouble real fast. The Utah Legislature is worried about them; they showed up at our state Capitol after the fracas around Mike Pence counting the votes in Washington. Lots of security, lots of hassle I’d rather not see on account of it all.

Derek M
Derek M
3 years ago

So perhaps the “Proud Boys” aren’t actually white supremacists. Although given I’m not American I’m not really that bothered

Michael Hobson
Michael Hobson
3 years ago

It would have been helpful if this otherwise interesting article had mentioned Gavin Mcinnes and the origins of the movement, and why Enrique Tarrio seems to have become its figurehead.

xtina8284
xtina8284
3 years ago

White supremacy is prevalent in Miami but understated. It’s the reason why shows from Univision highlight majority white Latinos and hardly any indigenous or Afro Latinos

Jim Cooper
Jim Cooper
3 years ago

One wonders what revolutionary groups like the Proud Boyz might have learned from ISIS? After all, one can compare their motivation – extreme masculinity, religiosity (Islam/nationalism) fascist heteronomy – and their preferred stated outcomes

Tom Graham
Tom Graham
3 years ago
Reply to  Jim Cooper

Except that BLM are closer to ISIS in terms of ideology and behaviour.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom Graham

I don’t think BLM wants to throw gay people out of buildings or ban music.
Let’s not get too far with comparisons about BLM/ISIS.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

BLM reserves much of that sentiment for men which is why the What We Believe part of the website was taken down. Too many people could read the group’s thoughts for themselves. Too many noticed that “father” was not mentioned a single time and the only citation of ‘men’ was in regard to the potential danger they pose to women. And this from a group ostensibly founded on the premise that black men were being unfairly by law enforcement.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Alex Lekas

None of the above makes them ISIS

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

maybe not but it doesn’t make them worthy of admiration, either.

croftyass
croftyass
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Give them time..they’ll get round to it when they run out of people/things to object to!!!

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  croftyass

LOL

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

I agree, Rosie Mackenzie’s comparison with Maoism is much more apt.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

They do however expect others to kneel or raise their hands on command. They also expect you to stop your car on demand and wake up in the middle of the night on demand. Which is strikingly similar to Isis.

rosie mackenzie
rosie mackenzie
3 years ago
Reply to  Tom Graham

BLM are closer to Maoism with its cultural revolution, its denunciation and humiliation, to say nothing of its violence, intimidation, black propaganda, corruption, and censorship.

Jim Cooper
Jim Cooper
3 years ago
Reply to  Jim Cooper

On reflection, let’s include BLM in that list

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jim Cooper

In what way are the Proud Boys fascistic?

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

They question the BLM narrative. That’s all it takes these days.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Brian Dorsley

La verdad.