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The radical Left is now extinct Following Joe Biden's decisive victory, the fate of today's millennial revolutionaries is all but sealed

Lost penguins. Credit: Getty


and
November 27, 2020   5 mins

Emperor penguins, the largest and most well-known penguin species, have peculiar chick-rearing habits. When a baby penguin hatches, one parent must guard their offspring while the other journeys down to sea to feed and catch food. If the hunter is delayed for any reason, the stay-at-home parent is left with a painful choice: stay with your chicks and starve or abandon them in search of food.

Orphaned chicks never survive. They go from one penguin to the next, begging for food and shelter, but are cast away. Eventually, they weaken and die from starvation or exposure to the harsh cold.

The radical Left in the West, especially after the decisive defeat of politicians like Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn, has a great deal in common with these unfortunate penguins. The collapse of Left populism is today final and irrevocable; the rejection and abandonment not only coming from the working-class that these Leftists claimed to speak for, but also from the Left-of-centre parties that the they tried to sell their services to as electorally useful “tribunes of the people.”

But not every penguin is born equal. The true nature of the modern Left should be understood as a sort of composite being, made up of heterogeneous parts. In theory, the Left wants to be, or at least thinks it wants to be, a political alliance between various stripes of “professionals” — college-educated, urban, progressive — and a broader base of  “ordinary people.”

But in truth, the radical Left is a cross-section of the lower half of the managerial class — graduates who work in jobs that, according to Michael Lind, “pay modestly but provide both status and a degree of personal autonomy that the frequently better-paid managerial functionaries in more hierarchical occupations (e.g. within large, traditional corporations) do not possess.” Over time, the interests of this group have increasingly aligned with those of the urban, cosmopolitan elites in the Democratic Party.

For those looking to reach the upper parts of that cross-section, radical (an adjective usually followed by “student”) politics is a smart career move for ambitious young professionals. The now infamous video from the 2019 Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) convention, in which attendees objected to clapping and language they found offensive, is often mocked as representing the uselessness and confusion of the American Left, but this characterisation is only half the story.

In reality, even something as silly as a rule against clapping — because it threatens the disabled working-class comrades who are poised to flock to the red banner — is a useful career training tool. Animals play in order to learn how to hunt, and mobilising the “lack of privilege” along with concerns about “safety” among “marginalised groups” is actually how one wields power in a rapidly increasing number of our society’s institutions today.

On top of that, the dour European social democrats of yesterday who warmly ushered in the post-Soviet end of history were at one point — nearly to a man — radical revolutionaries in their youth, such as the young Trotskyist and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, erstwhile Left-wing militant turned mid-2000s German Green Party vice-chancellor Joschka Fischer, and long-serving former Italian President Giorgio Napolitano.

And while Marxism-Leninism-Maoism is a boutique object to be put back on the shelf when you grow up and join the machine you once raged against, the corporate HR-speak and identity politics of the Left is a useful skill that can be utilised in full once you make the transition from Communism to K Street.

These penguins have already spent their time learning how to hunt for lucrative jobs and move up in the world. Some of them have one foot in the proletarian vanguard and another in the liberal NGO world. Others have one foot in a class-first Marxist seminar, and the other in an anti-racist lecture hall, with former US President Barack Obama, who studied the works of Frantz Fanon and Gwendolyn Brooks to flirt with girls he found attractive, being the latest example.

But not everyone is this lucky. For other parts of the radical Left, the problem is not so much career advancement as it is forestalling a precipitous slide down into the working-class. These are the people who went to college and “did everything right,” but for whom no doors have opened, no jobs seem available, and no succour is offered anywhere.

But for all their rejection of  “bourgeois” politics, the political programmes of these people tend to begin and end with reforms aimed at rescuing struggling college graduates from the horror of having to join the working-class at the workplace. The hope, according to some debt-forgiveness activists, is to create a near-universal class united by “debt” rather than by job or income. What this means in reality, however, is partial student debt forgiveness; payday loan debt forgiveness, the usurious micro-lending targeting the least among us, is not even on the radar.

This makes sense when you consider the backgrounds of some of the people trying to advance such policies: Meagan Day, one of the co-authors of the recently-published socialist manifesto Bigger Than Bernie, can attribute her family’s considerable wealth to success in the rent-to-own furniture industry, another line of business predicated on extracting high rates of interest from poor people. 

Alas, for the majority of orphaned penguins, rejection and abandonment proves devastating. Unable to advocate for anyone or anything, they are compelled to cloak their interests in universalising language about “the people” or “the working-class.” But when those same idealised groups reject them, the radical suddenly finds he or she has no remaining leg on which to stand.

The Labour defeat of 2019, and the subsequent purge of Momentum and Corbyn loyalists from positions of power within the party, must be understood in this context. The purge of Momentum is not the same as a purge of the working-class, because the political wave that swept Jeremy Corbyn into the Labour leadership came from the university towns of Britain. It was a middle-class movement to the bone, and while the new leadership of Keir Starmer’s party may reject Corbyn, they certainly have no plans to turn the party away from its new middle-class and urban base. So with the “true radicals” side-lined, why even bother to humour them?

The same post-election purge can be seen inside the Democratic Party today; although Joe Biden won, the widely predicted landslide did not come to fruition, and talk of socialism and “defunding the police” was seen as a political albatross by grey eminences such as South Carolina Congressman Jim Clyburn. Days after the election, the House majority whip argued that the “sloganeering” of the Black Lives Matter movement “destroyed headway” made by the party. Which begs the question: if these young revolutionaries can’t actually deliver votes, and if many of the workers actually detest them, then what use do they have for the party leadership?

The project of Left populism, properly understood, was not a revolution of the working-class that ended in ignominious defeat. Rather, it was akin to a conflict within the nobility; a fight between “true” radicals on the one hand, and those savvier operators who used the Left to regain access to the mainstream of the party on the other. The latter, though they might have flirted with “radical socialism” from time to time, could always move on to greener pastures. Thus, the collapse of Left populism and its replacement by something else was never a threat to their fortunes.

Whither these unfortunate penguin chicks that once flocked to “Birdie” Sanders? Their likely destination is probably a continued unwavering course towards utopia — a “uo topos,” no place, nowhere. As they wander in the cold and the dark, like those poor penguins, their political ambitions will shrivel away.

Some of them will reconcile to serving as junior partners in the “woke,” liberal coalition that occupies a liminal space between progressive capitalism and the traditional Left-of-centre parties, where they will be paid little and listened to even less. Others will be forced, by dint of inexorable downward social mobility, to study the working-class up close, day in and day out. In politics, just as in nature, the strong do what they will, while the weak do what they must.


Oliver Bateman is a historian and journalist based in Pittsburgh. He blogs, vlogs, and podcasts at his Substack, Oliver Bateman Does the Work

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Daniel Björkman
Daniel Björkman
3 years ago

Eh, this strikes me as entirely too optimistic. These people are true believers. I don’t see them just melting away because at first they didn’t succeed – I’m pretty sure they’ll try, try again. Though I do think it would be a very good thing if the mainstream started trying to ignore them as hard as possible.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

The Left has obviously taken a big step towards centrism by rejecting Sanders in favour of Biden (ignoring the conspiracy nuts who call him a Marxist Maoist revolutionary etc). At least it’s showing a positive direction of travel.
The big question now is will the Right do the same thing? Will they show sufficient rationality to drive a stake through the heart of Trumpism and return to common sense debate ?
I really want to believe so, but judging by some of the comments on sites like this one, I’m not so sure. Raving intolerance is just as addictive as rampant Wokery. A new orange beast could be slouching towards Washington before we know it.

David George
David George
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Trumpism, as you call it, is hardly extreme or far right wing at all, I don’t expect the right (Republicans) to abandon his positions. Why would they
Trump’s defeat was the result of a four year unprecedented campaign of vilification directed at him. His policy direction; reduce foreign wars, reform of draconian criminal law (Biden’s baby), sort out the leaky border, wind back extreme PC and critical theory BS, don’t kow tow to China or Wall Street and so on are widely supported.
A less polarising candidate (Nikki Haley or Dan Crenshaw say) promoting similar “Trumpian” policies will romp in in the next election.

croftyass
croftyass
3 years ago
Reply to  David George

By latest estimates Trump got between 73-75m votes (JB 79M) which given the almost universal opprobrium heaped on him and the number of Republicans who just couldn’t bring themselves to vote for him on a personal level indicates that “Trumpism “(seriously!) has got a significant democratic mandate-I doubt that the GOP will dramatically move away from it and I doubt sleep Joe will in reality change much.
Take away the Donald personality issue and you can easily see the Republicans taking it back next time especially as Biden has been handed the poisoned chalice of the post covid era and the immense challenges it will bring-banging on with pious words won’t cut it I’m afraid.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago
Reply to  croftyass

True, to a point. The Donald personality was not just his weakness, but his strength. He is seen as a strong champion of the little guy, the average worker, the less educated person, all of whom feel cheated and despised by the self-proclaimed elites. In order to be as effective as Trump at capturing the imagination and enthusiasm of these groups one will need to have the inspiring aspects of Trump, preferably without the extreme narcissism and narrowmindedness.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

You’ve already got someone with exactly those qualities. He’s called Bernie Sanders.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Fair point. And the evidence suggests that he would have beaten Trump in 2016. So whey didn’t he start his own party instead of sticking around to be shafted by the corporatist Dems again?

elaine lange
elaine lange
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

he wasn’t shafted. He was bought out twice. It will be confirmed that Sanders won the democratic nomination in this election but he wasn’t the one who could give China to the elites. Biden was. BTW, Biden hasn’t won anything yet

cap0119
cap0119
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Bernie Sanders fell prey to radical race politics(including Open Borders) and so does not stand for the average American worker.

cap0119
cap0119
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Bernie Sanders has fallen prey to radical race politics (including Open Borders) and so does not stand for the average American worker.

Cheryl Jones
Cheryl Jones
3 years ago
Reply to  cap0119

Yes, agree. I always liked Bernie but he’s gone down the woke rabbit hole. When I saw 2 young activists rudely bully him off his own stage at one rally I knew it was over.

Cheryl Jones
Cheryl Jones
3 years ago
Reply to  David George

I agree! There’s nothing radical about Trumpism once you peel back the hysteria about him. In fact I think he hasn’t been given enough credit for a. Doing what he said he would b. Not starting any wars, in fact bringing North Korea and the Middle East to a place they’ve never been in my lifetime c. Putting Americans first when so many have been screwed over by successive globalist administrations. I’m amazed the rust belt would vote against him as Biden means more of the same old same old – I guess the media hatchet job really has worked.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

It was not the Left that rejected Sanders. Essentially, the corporatist Democrats (Obama, Clinton, Schumer etc) fixed it for Biden by getting Bouttigeg and Klobochar to step out of the race. Biden and the corporate Democrats are neo-liberal war mongers in the pay of Wall St and the Military Industrial Complex. They are somewhat to the right of Trump.

You have been sold a pup. I hope you enjoy Biden’s wars and a return to the offshoring of American jobs.

Ian Perkins
Ian Perkins
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Agreed, except it’s not US citizens who’ll get to really ‘enjoy’ Biden’s wars.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Ian Perkins

Well the US media always gets a boost in ratings when the US goes to war, so I guess quite a few US citizens will enjoy those wars. Of course, the media’s love of war was one of the reasons they hated Trump so much.

Sidney Eschenbach
Sidney Eschenbach
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

First, no one said that ‘the left rejected Sanders’. No one. It’s alleged that the center rejected Bernie, but it’s clear that what the ‘centrists’ now work for are nearly all Bernies ideas; healthcare, inequality, climate, etc. Beyond that, you think that either Buttigieg or Kloubuchar could have won? And had they, that their policies would be significantly different from what you think Bidens will be?

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Kevin Ryan said that ‘the left rejected Sanders’. See his comment above. To be sure, he doesn’t really seem to know anything, but that is what he said, hence my response.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

This article has a very peculiar view of the Left, at least the American Left. Maybe it’s just pandering to the prejudices of less well-informed right-wingers? Assigning such as Biden to the Left is extremely odd. Biden is a conservative — as he said of his prospective administration, ‘Nothing fundamental will change.’ As noted above and below, Biden also belongs to the imperial-war or Deep State faction of the Democratic Party establishment. It is hard to say that Trump has any coherent ideology, but his utterances were certainly to the Left of the Democrats, who, for the last four years, pursued an evidence-free paranoid conspiracy theory instead of putting forward any kind of positive, constructive program.

There is at this time considerable sympathy for mild leftish ideas in the US, like ‘Medicare for all’, but at the moment it is badly organized and easily subverted. I doubt if that is a stable situation.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago
Reply to  Starry Gordon

Lol. Biden is a conservative you say? So anyone short of Mao is a conservative? Biden’s platform was written by Sanders. Your claim that Trump’s “utterances” were to the left of democrats places your comment in the comic book section.

Mark H
Mark H
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

The centre ground is where most governments get elected. Very likely the Republican party will eventually realize that and themselves move towards the centre. But will they first do as UK Labour did, and double-down on a shift to the extreme?
In a 2-party system it worries me when one heads to the extreme – it makes their opponents lazy and unresponsive to the needs of the country.

Sidney Eschenbach
Sidney Eschenbach
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Just FYI, no one has ‘rejected’ Bernie. It could be very easily argued that nearly all of his proposals have over the past 10 years become mainstream positions; minimum wage, healthcare, education, taxation, inequality. The left didn’t take steps towards centrism, the center moved to more progressive positions.

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago

True, and that is the danger: these awful, soul-killing, divisive, victimhood praising policies have moved the Overton window. Twenty years ago their proponents were considered kooks or useful idiots, but now they have some acceptance.

“Days after the election, the House majority whip argued that the “sloganeering” of the Black Lives Matter movement “destroyed headway” made by the party. “

Realizing this, the Left will merely choose more palatable slogans but be selling the same destructive snake oil. Black Live Matter is a perfect example. Who can argue with that premise. But it hides within its precepts all sorts of socialist, communist, collectivist destructive nonsense.

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

I’d like to see an explanation of how you can hide all that ‘socialist, communist, collectivist, destructive nonsense’ within the slogan ‘Black Lives Matter.’ It should be pretty entertaining. If a distinctive minority complains about police behavior it’s communism?

Christin
Christin
3 years ago
Reply to  Starry Gordon

You seem singularly ignorant of the actual words that have been spoken by senior blm comrades. They have, on national broadcasts, proclaimed themselves “trained Marxists”. That’s what the call themselves. They have pledged to “burn down the system” multiple times over the national airwaves. Maybe you were asleep.

Cheryl Jones
Cheryl Jones
3 years ago
Reply to  Christin

That cannot be ignored. Neither can the fact that the so-called centrists have fallen over themselves to bend the knee and not question them (or where all that money goes) at all.

Alex Tickell
Alex Tickell
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Candace Owens is not “orange” and would win the presidency in an absolute landslide!

Sidney Eschenbach
Sidney Eschenbach
3 years ago

I’m curious, Daniel… who are ‘these people’? Names. And what are their ‘radical’ political beliefs or policy proposals?

VĂłreios ParatiritĂ­s
VĂłreios ParatiritĂ­s
3 years ago

Anyone who believes and acts on the “successor ideology” to liberalism. Anyone who believe or acts on critical race theory. Anyone who believes or acts on fourth wave feminism. Anyone who believes or acts on trans activism for children. Anyone who believes or acts on open borders for all in the West. Anyone who believes or acts on the climate “emergency” above all things.

Those people.

Note who is not found here here. The leftist who put economics and income as the first and dominant variable in their politics. We want people like this, not “those people”

Christin
Christin
3 years ago

The leftist who puts “economics and income as the first and dominant variable in their politics” gets Venezuela. Or North Korea. Or Cuba. Or the USSR. First time. Every time. It’s great if you don’t mind losing weight and you have a fondness for 1957 Chevrolets.

Micheal Lucken
Micheal Lucken
3 years ago

And that incorporates a significant proportion active in public institutions, the news and entertainment media. Their target is culture and tradition, the economic has become a secondary concern and politicians across the board are dancing to their tune. Hence the current alliance between the woke left and corporate world.

bsema
bsema
3 years ago

I’d just like to point out that the climate emergency has absolutely nothing to do with all that ideological crap you mentioned. Man-made climate change is a fact, not an ideology.

Daniel Björkman
Daniel Björkman
3 years ago

Go on Twitter, you’ll see plenty of “these people.” If you want names with actual power behind them, I freely – and happily – admit that most people who want to abolish the police and unperson anyone who has the wrong thought are not, in fact, in positions of power. That’s why, like I said, I hope that the people who are in positions of power stop listening to them.

I trust Biden to not do anything too insane. Just as long as he doesn’t start thinking that Vicky “In Defense Of Looting” Osterweil represents the will of the people. Does that clarify my position?

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

This article is confused nonsense. The radical left now dominates all areas of public and corporate life and is busy turning the UK and most western countries into Islamic versions of Venezuela.

Mark H
Mark H
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

They may think they dominate – and certainly make the most noise – but the populace is silently ignoring them.

Harold Crow
Harold Crow
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark H

The silent majority is ultimately a pliant majority. The left are not troubled by the passive whims of the masses, they are concerned with seizing the institutions of power. Once captured, these can be used to enforce the dogma, and the people will, with time, conform. How else would we have reached our current state?

Mark H
Mark H
3 years ago
Reply to  Harold Crow

Maybe I’ve been a passive resister all my life – was born into a society where one extreme held the institutions of power – so I don’t believe institutions cannot ultimately be effective in enforcing dogma because people know when they’re being told what to think, and won’t be having it.

Harold Crow
Harold Crow
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark H

If propaganda is “telling you what to think”, then it is not there to convince, but to demoralise. That the common response is silence would suggest that this is effective.

The exception to this are the young, who naturally learn from authority in their formative years. As Hitler once stated:

“When an opponent declares, ‘I will not come over to your side’, I calmly say, ‘Your child belongs to us already. You will pass on. Your
descendants, however, now stand in the new camp. In a short time they will know nothing else but this new community.”

Mike Boosh
Mike Boosh
3 years ago
Reply to  Harold Crow

Agreed. Covid rules are a perfect example… Most people know they make no sense, but follow them anyway and surrender a little more of their spirit each day.

croftyass
croftyass
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark H

and the silence is breaking-its easy to conflate a noisy echo chamber and the twitterati as being representative of mainstream thought-get out in the real world and its unrecognisable with a lot of the progressive policies treated with contempt.

Tom Graham
Tom Graham
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark H

And all the while the majority ignore them, the fanatical minority are consolidating their power – taking over every public institution from the police to the courts to the universities and teaching colleges to the British Library.

The Bolsheviks were never more that a nasty minority of upper-middle class malcontents either. That didn’t stop them inflicting vast suffering on the whole world of the 20th century.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Precisely.

Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
3 years ago

You think it’s all over bar shouting for the radical left? I doubt it. The kidz are all being taught this rubbish in school. And then they go to Penguin and get taught allyship in the “oppressed peoples, allies, and white oppressors” moral universe.

For me, this Activism Culture is an echo of the medieval romance. See, it was after the barons were corralled into the courts of the absolute monarchs that the whole thing about King Arthur and Parsifal and rescuing damsels in distress and searching for the Holy Grail came into fashion. Jolly good fun, and all.

Today we have les activistes reliving the glory days of revolution. Les Mis anyone?

Walter Lantz
Walter Lantz
3 years ago

have to agree with some other comments here: the article is far too optimistic and ignores a few basics.
Such as.
The Left didn’t turn their back on Sanders, the DNC did because they realized he was a threat to their corporate globalist friends.
However the Dems were astute enough to realize, and use to their advantage, the fact that BLM and other such activists have successfully conflated politically unpalatable ‘tear it all down’ anarchy with much more noble-sounding ‘anti-racism’.

When have any Dem leaders denounced the insidious anti-American destruction of the anarchist Left?
Yeah. Never.
Most of the looting, vandalism and shootings occurred in Dem strongholds where local leadership dismissed it all as a being akin to a ‘summer-of-love block party’.
The formerly Woke-approved mayor of Seattle likely regretted those words when the mob turned on her.

I would agree that the natural order of things says these abandoned anarchist ‘chicks’ must inevitably meet their end but corporations, media organizations, educational institutions and individuals of all shapes and sizes keep tossing them fish by buying the cheap BLM t-shirts either out of craven opportunism or simply to avoid being outed, labeled and shunned as racist pariahs.

This ain’t over.
“The beatings will continue until morale improves”

John Aronsson
John Aronsson
3 years ago
Reply to  Walter Lantz

Off hand, I can’t think of any Republican leaders in the Senate who’ve denounced the tools of the corporate-Deep State either.

Peter Scott
Peter Scott
3 years ago

This is great fun to read, because cheering. What could be a better Thanksgiving present for the sane members of society than to find that the ‘woke’, the BLM and Antifa thugs, the looting, arson, and horrible violence against passers-by in city streets in the USA have been sidelined, not least by their Dem Party owners and enablers?

Yet is not all such thinking rather out of date?

Over the course of the past 60+ years the horrible ‘Liberal’ Left marched through all the institutions, took them and public discourse over, and wrecked everything.

Over the course of the past third of a century (I date it from the deregulating of the finance industry in 1986) Big Money has joined with the Loony Left in a steadily accreting takeover of western society in the interests of totalitarian nihilism. (They are allies because both share in the short and middle terms the twin paramount goals of mass immigration and making government unaccountable to those it rules.)

This project is nearly complete; in fact with Biden’s victory it IS complete.

Soon every ratchet holding the Allies (Big Money and the Left) back from total control will be removed. If need be, the Supreme Court will be packed by 12 new Loony Left judges; the Paris Accords will be used to transform US economic policy, &c &c.

I don’t say that is the end of the story = the End of History for the United States. Events can come along (most likely complete economic collapse, long preparing these many years gone by). But that is the immediate prospect.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago

Trump was a godsend for bourgeois Marxists. He gave them the excuse to despise and abandon the working class in whose name they claimed to be fighting. The Democrat Party and its supporters can go back to looking after their own interests. There’s all the money to be made from fighting a war with Iran. Wall Street will be repaying favours done. Antifa activists can crawl up the greasy poles of corporates with the correct transgender policies but who manufacture in China using slave labour and pollute the World.

Daniel Björkman
Daniel Björkman
3 years ago

I swear that Trump was custom-made in a lab somewhere to embody every negative stereotype about straight white men ever imagined. He’s like a living, breathing feminist strawman. It’s downright bizarre.

Christin
Christin
3 years ago

So we have two leftist authors lamenting the failure of violent revolution. They both are pretending that Bernie didn’t write the DNC platform. They fail to mention the Kamala Harris sported the furthest left voting record of any senator. And they’re blind to the conversion of the media in the US and the UK into the propagandist equivalent of Izvestia. The article sounds like a lament from Che shortly before he started murdering people.

Simon Newman
Simon Newman
3 years ago

UnHerd really needs to start exercising some editorial control. This is just rubbish.

Jonathan Ellman
Jonathan Ellman
3 years ago

Yes, the woke will soon find that the champion of Wall Street and multi-billion dollar tech corporations does not represent them. And yet, if Biden doesn’t deliver jobs to the working class voters who returned to him from Trump, he will be deserted by the midterms.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

I don’t think any ‘working class voters’ returned to Biden from Trump. Biden ‘won’ due to the suburban, white, male PMC (Professional Managerial Class) vote. That was the only group among whom Trump lost support in percentage terms between 2016 and 2020.

Jonathan Ellman
Jonathan Ellman
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

“Biden won because he won back Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. The percentage of white working class men voting Democratic increased from 23% in 2016 to 28% in 2020, while among white working class women, support for Democrats increased from 34% to 36%. These voters played a key role in delivering victories for Biden in the Rust Belt states where Clinton lost the presidency in 2016.” https://hbr.org/2020/11/how….

Andrew Harvey
Andrew Harvey
3 years ago

Will Biden still even be alive by the midterms?

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

I’m genuinely confused. Who is supposed to be the champion of Wall St and big Tech in this scenario, Trump or Biden?

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Both.

John Aronsson
John Aronsson
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Primarily Joe “the Big Guy” Biden, who is easily the most corrupt person ever to win a national election.

Sean L
Sean L
3 years ago

‘Decisive victory’… Take a look at the submissions of lawyers claiming widespread malpractice in vote counting. The evidence of fraud is compelling. No surprise that media aren’t reporting it. Trump himself is a product of media lies.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Sean L

Links to compelling evidence please

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

There is ample evidence out there.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Provide the links then to real information. I’m not talking about
‘flat-earther types shouting at me on YouTube’ evidence

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

I really can’t be bothered, and it is obvious from your various posts that although you are plainly a nice, leftie type of person you really don’t know much. For instance, you seem to think that Biden is to the left of Trump, when the reverse applies.

There was substantial fraud and even more substantial malpractice when it came to counting procedures etc, such as Republican observers not being allowed to observe. And that’s before you get to the massive ballot harvesting, vote curing and the censorship of the Hunter Biden and Tara Reid stories – among others – by the MSM and Big Tech. Have you even heard of Tara Reid?

John Lawton
John Lawton
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Or Sydney Powell? https://defendingtherepubli

Terry M
Terry M
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

I voted for and supported Trump. But I have seen very little evidence of massive voter fraud. Indeed, given the procedures used – mail-in balloting, no checking signatures, etc. – how could one find the evidence? The whole thing was engineered to make it difficult to prove any fraud. That doesn’t mean there WAS or WAS NOT fraud; we just will never know.

bocalance
bocalance
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry M

At this point, the evidence seems to consist mostly of extensive, large and inexplicable voting anomalies that uniformly favor Biden. Exactly the kind of “evidence” you would expect to find in these days of digital voting and partisan ballot-counting.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

No, sorry that’s not good enough Fraser. Not even close.
You can’t just keep throwing out random assertions and then coming up with excuses like “everyone knows it, but I’m too busy to actually show any proof”.
If this is just a forum for spurious unprovable claims then we might as well turn on 4Chan or the religious channel.

(Btw Trump is neither left nor right. He has no values. The Rep party was a vehicle he hijacked for his own ends)

David Stuckey
David Stuckey
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

So all the State and Federal courts in the US are corrupt and in the pay of the left wingers despite many of them being Republican Judges? Courts rely on facts rather than “proof by repeated assertion”.

Sean L
Sean L
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Try google. For guided scrutiny of the legal submissions search ‘Academic Agent Sidney Powell kraken’ on YouTube – he assesses merits of each point.

Susannah Baring Tait
Susannah Baring Tait
3 years ago
Reply to  Sean L

Sidney Powell is a she not a he, and even Trump has disassociated himself from her unprovable rantings.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

It’s pretty bad when you can’t even remember the gender of your top forensic conspiracy expert.

Sean L
Sean L
3 years ago

‘He’ refers to AA not Sidney Powell. There’s no reason to suppose that the affidavits are not genuine. What would be the point of inventing fictitious ones? It makes no sense.

john freeman
john freeman
3 years ago

Do not talk of Biden’s “decisive” victory. He expected to win easily, and failed to do so – and therefore, in a sense, he lost.

Michael North
Michael North
3 years ago

What’s Biden got to do with anything?
Harris will be President shortly.

Louise Henson
Louise Henson
3 years ago

You are as silly as the people you write about. These morons think they are saints. They aren’t going anywhere.

Frederik van Beek
Frederik van Beek
3 years ago

The left is dead, or to put it more correctly, the left aligns totally with the global business-elite, the corporate suits. The right is dead also because it is seeking its power within the working class and the working class is going nowhere, soon the working class will not even be working anymore. Global technocracy is the only thing that remains, it’s neither left or right, it just is what it is: total control. China doesn’t need propaganda, the world is obeying China by itself, humanity wants something to control its fear so control is what we will get, just like George Orwell and Aldous Huxley predicted.

Steve White
Steve White
3 years ago

Grim, but a lot of truth in it.

Steve White
Steve White
3 years ago

I don’t think the writer understands that there has been a sea shift of wordview in America. American has embraced a new postmodern worldview and has not only abandoned but is shutting out the previous more Christian informed universals that gave commonality within the structure of the culture. It’s a forever fractured culture, a broken place where there is no more trust between each other, no way back, no functional news media that is not bent on further division unless you conform. All there is for any hope of peace is conforming thought to the new thought masters. America cant go back, because this was not a mere flash in the pan, this is a detachment from the prior cultural moorings by at least half the nation, mainly among the younger generations. The future here seems grim. We’ve educated our young into hating everything about our own nation. A nation that hates itself, thinks of its own history as noting but evil, it cant survive. A nation that can have its mind changed by a few months of news, moved around like pawns, like zombies waiting for the latest programming of what is true is what we live in. None of them have any core governing principles except that if it’s liberal its good. They’re so shallow, and hollowed out, it’s really sad what has happened. The deconstructionists have won, but I don’t think any of them are going to like the future here.

Matt Hindman
Matt Hindman
3 years ago

These stupid little Marxist kids thought that this was their time. It was going to be a great revolution against “racism,” “corporations,” and those icky right wingers. They never realized that having corporate, mainstream media, and major party support meant they would never be allowed to truly succeed. The one argument for tolerating their existence was that they would be useful for votes and fundraising. That did not happen. Instead, after the 2020 election, they have proven to be a liability and as a liability they no longer have to be pandered to. American political elites are fine with this. They got what they wanted with this election. Things will go back to business as usual and they will pretend the Populists don’t exist. The only question is, how well will these pretend proletariats take being stabbed in the back.

Ian Perkins
Ian Perkins
3 years ago

“if these young revolutionaries can’t actually deliver votes, and if many of the workers actually detest them, then what use do they have for the party leadership?”
Not a lot, I guess. But are these ‘young revolutionaries’ primarily interested in elections or popularity, and should they be? I think not.

Michael North
Michael North
3 years ago

After posting below, I noticed that one of the authors is a black man with a silly haircut, living in Sweden.
What more do you need to know?

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago
Reply to  Michael North

It might be useful if we had your list of acceptable haircuts, skin colours and domiciles.

Michael North
Michael North
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

I doubt it.

neilyboy.forsythe
neilyboy.forsythe
3 years ago

LOL! You’re next.

Stephen Hoffman
Stephen Hoffman
3 years ago

Radical rhetoric and terror is always just for show. The object is always to acquire power. Think of the looting and protest marches as just “try-outs” for a job. Antifa and BLM
played a crucial role in getting Joe Biden elected. Now that the old establishment
creatures are comfortably ensconced in the Washington swamp once again, the
ragged “resistance” leaders on the front lines can expect to be rewarded for
their service with a piece of the pie. Consider them “in from the cold,” basking in the warm
and toasty employment opportunities of a new regime. In a recession economy, good jobs are hard to find.

Sidney Eschenbach
Sidney Eschenbach
3 years ago

This article is a joke, as the premise, that there is a significant political group that could be called the ‘radical left’ even exists… and the inclusion of Bernie Sanders in the group that the author tries to put into that box is proof. Since when is it ‘radical’ to believe that citizens of a country should have economically feasible access to healthcare? ‘Radical’ to believe that people should be able to earn enough to at least pay their bills? ‘Radical’ to believe that taxation should be progressive, and that massive inequality creates not just widespread suffering, but dangerous political instability.
The last time the left could be said to be ‘radical’ ended in 1968 along with the european ‘New Left’. Since then, there has been no significant or militant presence on the left, so again, this article is the very definition of a strawman argument; create a false adversary… and destroy it.

Stupid.

Kevin Ryan
Kevin Ryan
3 years ago

That is all true. The political left in the US is very much centre right by anyone else’s standards. There’s an awful lot of gibberish spouted about Democrats being anti-democratic Marxist enemies of the state, by people who haven’t the faintest clue of what a socialist state might look like.

But the ‘radical left’ in this context isn’t really a political position, it’s a description of the woke movement and a segment who seem hell-bent on a race to the bottom of the victim-hood pile. Read the article today about the publisher employees crying at the Jordan Peterson meeting to get a sense of why these ‘radicals’ p:ss people off

Starry Gordon
Starry Gordon
3 years ago
Reply to  Kevin Ryan

Victimhood is powerful. Look at Christianity, whose prophet was unjustly put to death and whose primary symbol is an instrument of Roman execution by torture. Others have looked on and learned.

VĂłreios ParatiritĂ­s
VĂłreios ParatiritĂ­s
3 years ago

Fair enough, but until you and those of your persuasion police the social liberal excesses of the left your economic message will be drowned out and possible coopted by the populist right.
In Canada the conservative party came out in favour of trade unions as official policy. Something is shifting in the West.