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Why Stamford said no to modernity The Lincolnshire town may be stuck in the past — but is that really such a bad thing?

Stamford's thoroughfare is a constant. Credit: National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

Stamford's thoroughfare is a constant. Credit: National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images


August 6, 2020   6 mins

If you’re driving through Lincolnshire from the South-East, chances are you’re just passing through. Perhaps you’re heading to the nature reserves further north for a spot of scenic tourism, or to the east coast for a day at the beach. As you bomb up the A1’s ancient carriageway (parts of it are 10,000 years old), leaving behind commuter-belt Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire for the thinner air of Lincolnshire, the landscape gets emptier, petrol gets cheaper and roadside cafes get more eccentric. Settlements get sparser, too. Lincolnshire is the second-largest English county, but one of the least populous: 42nd out of 48 in terms of people per square mile.

You keep going, finally outside London’s blast radius, free from its cultural and economic gravity but not yet into the post-industrial North. Names on the motorway signs reek of Middle England. Grantham, birthplace of Margaret Thatcher and the Dambusters. Melton Mowbray, birthplace of the pork pie. This part of the world is about as Brexity as it gets: in 2016, in some parts of Lincolnshire, 75% voted to leave the European Union.

If you’re more comfortable in the post-Blair Britain of social liberalism, buy-to-let portfolios, Eurostar minibreaks and ironic bunting, you probably don’t want to stop in Lincolnshire. You should stop in Lincolnshire.

Pull in at Stamford, a town preserved to an almost surreal degree from the depredations of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries thanks to its near-feudal relationship to the nearby stately home, Burghley House. This colossal sixteenth-century ‘prodigy house’ was constructed by William Cecil, Lord High Treasurer to Elizabeth I. Today it’s still owned by the Cecils (confusingly, the Marquess and Marchioness of Exeter), though the family themselves now mostly live in British Columbia.

Burghley House has featured in more than one period drama. Credit: Matthew Lewis/Getty Images

Down the road, Stamford itself is almost wholly seventeenth- and eighteenth-century in its architecture, and permanently besieged by people filming the type of BBC costume drama that can’t decide between nostalgia and trying to cancel the past on the grounds of being old-fashioned.

BBC Costume Drama History, roughly speaking, covers an era that began with the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and lasted until the sexual one began (as Philip Larkin put it) in 1963. After 1963, Britain modernised, with a capital M, and since then anyone who demurs has been increasingly shoved to the margins. You’d be forgiven for thinking we had no history at all before the BBC Costume Era (BCE). But in fact the BCE is barely the tip of a huge, mostly submerged iceberg of Britain’s past, the vast majority of which lies under dark waters, in a time where people spoke strangely and really didn’t think like us at all.

Stamford in the BBC Costume Era was pretty dull, largely ignoring the Industrial Revolution and earning its keep mostly from North-South coaching traffic, farming and a malting business. Its more violent, colourful and contentious formative years lie further back.

The town gets its name from its position on the Roman-built Ermine Street. This ancient road, now mostly over-written by the A1, in those days crossed the river Welland in a gravelly water-meadow, giving it the name ‘stone-ford’. After the Romans left in around 400AD, Stamford persisted as a small settlement known for glazed pottery but not much else. The Vikings changed all that.

When the Viking chief Ragnar Lodbrok was captured by King Aella of Northumbria in 865, legend has it that Aella executed Ragnar by throwing him into a snakepit. Whether this happened or not, Ragnar was definitely killed: his sons Hvitserk, Ubba, Bjorn Ironside and the superbly named Ivar the Boneless were so infuriated that they recruited an enormous band of Scandinavian warriors, known in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 865 as the ‘Great Heathen Army’. This horde piled into longboats and headed south from Scandinavia to wreak revenge on the soft Saxon southerners.

Unwisely, the then king of East Anglia, Edmund the Martyr, gave Ragnar’s sons and their army food and horses in exchange for agreeing not to attack his kingdom. This pusillanimous move did him no good in the long run: having conquered York in 866, Ubba and Ivar the Boneless returned to East Anglia, where in 869 they killed Edmund for refusing to renounce Christianity. By then the Northmen had a firm foothold in England, and in 874 they consolidated their political power across the East and Midlands.

The Great Heathen Army was always a coalition force, and the region was divided between their various factions. Stamford became a fortified Danish ‘burh’ — one of the Five Boroughs of the Danelaw — that is, the castle stronghold of a Danish horde who henceforth ruled the defeated Anglo-Saxon peasantry in the area according to Danish law and custom.

Stamford’s new Danish rulers built their burh on the north side of the Welland. Thanks to its position at the foot of Danish Mercia, it was of strategic military importance, and Danish Stamford remained a political hub in the East of England until 918. At that point, it fell to two of Alfred’s children, the formidable warrior queen Aethelflaed of Mercia and Edward of Wessex.

Rather than trying to rule Danish Stamford, Edward established his own parallel burh on the south side of the Welland, with Danes and Saxons facing one another across the water. One gets a sense that the atmosphere was probably somewhat bad-tempered to begin with. The antipathy must have waned over time, though, because by the Norman Conquest some 150 years later Stamford was booming. Its twin boroughs over-spilled their bounds on both sides of the river, suburbs spread out along approach roads and iron-smelting thrived in what’s now St George’s Street. It became, in its way, a happy story of integration.

It didn’t last. There’s no record of the Norman defeat of Stamford’s existing population, but it can’t have taken long. In 1070, a mere four years after the Battle of Hastings, the Norman abbot of Peterborough took refuge at Stamford with 160 men when pursued by Hereward the Wake’s anti-Norman insurgency.

But Stamford’s brief prominence as a site of strategic military importance, for invaders first from the North and then from the South, gave way to an increasingly respectable-but-marginal status once invaders stopped coming. Out of the Five Boroughs of the Danelaw, Stamford was the only one not to become a county town, and it flourished instead as a coaching stop, and a centre for the wool trade — an industry so fundamental to the medieval English economy that it funded the Hundred Years’ War.

Grown prosperous on the proceeds, in the Middle Ages Stamford was one of the biggest towns in England, with a castle, 14 churches and even (briefly) a breakaway university founded in 1333 by dissidents from Merton and Brasenose colleges in Oxford. In the 1840s, though, Stamford made a decision to side-line itself. Faced with the prospect of a railway hub, the people said thanks but no thanks. In this they were supported by then 3rd Marquess of Exeter, another William Cecil, who didn’t like the idea of his pretty town being ruined by the march of progress. The hub station was instead built in Peterborough.

Then in the 1960s Stamford retreated still further, with the construction of an A1 bypass. In doing so, it reached the end of the BBC Costume Era, having politely opted out of the March of Progress. From a pro-development point of view, this was the wrong choice. Stamford and Peterborough both had between 4000 and 5000 inhabitants at the start of the nineteenth century. Today, the population of Peterborough is around 200,000, while Stamford houses barely a tenth of that.

From a cultural and aesthetic point of view though, you can argue the toss. Peterborough today is a mess of ring roads, racism and ugly buildings, voted worst place to live in Britain for the second year running in 2020 and notable chiefly for being home to the UK Passport Office and a particularly unattractive multi-storey car park. Stamford, on the other hand, is quietly prosperous, with a thriving Civic Society association and an Urban Group dedicated to keeping the town clean, litter-free and friendly.

Perhaps shaped by its convulsive foundation in successive waves of invasion, Stamford’s bone-deep conservatism has, finally, become the town’s main stock-in-trade: in 1967, it became England’s first conservation area. Today Stamford covers barely more than two square miles, and yet it contains 446 listed buildings — a conservation density whose gravity pulls in tourists, down-sizers, retirees and restaurateurs as well as BBC location crews.

As the story we’ve been telling ourselves about modernity and progress starts to look increasingly rickety, it’s worth wondering whether Stamford was right to opt out. We might yet discover that larger but uglier — more atomised and therefore less liveable — urban areas could learn a thing or two from this prosperous small town about getting the balance right between economic development and grassroots civic life.

That’s if we get things right, and our small country can hold its communities together. If we don’t, we may yet find ourselves facing the more distant ghosts of Stamford’s past: the vengeful raiders, bull-runners, market-day massacres, religious schism, invasions and counter-invasions of those darker and stranger days before England’s BBC Costume era. I catch myself sometimes wondering how many of those older shadows are truly gone, and how many are just sleeping.


Mary Harrington is a contributing editor at UnHerd.

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David J
David J
3 years ago

Stamford was en route to my Vale of Belvoir cottage back in the 1980s. I even had a tryst with a lady in The George, though I drove a smarter set of wheels than the Mini in your picture.

It’s a bit unfair though to talk of Stamford ‘retreating’ in the 1960s. I reckon that the town’s leaders instead chose to ignore the vile planners and architects who were then so busy despoiling many of our towns and cities.

Stamford’s retreat became an investment in the future, so the place today remains wholesome to live and visit.

Basil Chamberlain
Basil Chamberlain
3 years ago
Reply to  David J

“The vile planners and architects who were then so busy despoiling our towns and cities.” What happened to so many of the historic city centres of Europe and Asia in the 1960s was probably the greatest cultural crime ever committed in time of peace.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago

Modernization happened, like it or not.
Vienna and Munich are very pretty cities. As is Barcelona.

titan0
titan0
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

But two wars that damaged or gutted those cities, almost within living memory, might be the reason for modernization there.
Go look at pretty Paris, further out and their capitulation that saved the city from destruction has some quite odious areas.
Planning is not just the buildings and style. It is who lives where and how they live too.
Nowhere is perfect. But careful ignoring of modernizers can keep somewhere looking quite good.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  titan0

Yes, and people made the same complains (modernization) when Paris was modernized in the mid 19th century.
I like modern architecture but it does require excellence in manufacturing/construction technology.
In many places (you are right) it looks bad because 3r world people live there.

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

It severs communities.

Pedestrianised shopping precincts protect people from the mess of normal business with a huge toll. Our tolerance of normal life spirals downwards and exaggerates our perception of risk. & Ironically crime goes up!

Basil Chamberlain
Basil Chamberlain
3 years ago
Reply to  titan0

I think Mr Smith was pointing to Vienna, Munich and Barcelona as examples of cities that hadn’t been drastically modernised. Munich of course was badly damaged in the war, as were parts of Vienna, but most of those cities were rebuilt faithfully according to the historic plan.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

But none are as pretty as Prague,
an absolute jewel, that has everything.

Basil Chamberlain
Basil Chamberlain
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Have you been to Lviv? Like Prague, it survived World War II practically unscathed, and also got off lightly in Soviet times (it was part of Poland, of course, in the most iconoclastic era of Soviet Communism between the wars). It’s almost as lovely as Prague or Krakow, and doesn’t have anywhere near the tourist numbers. I celebrated Ukrainian independence day there back in 2013 – the neoclassical statues on the main square were dressed in Cossack shirts for the occasion, and the young men painted their cheeks with the blue and yellow of the Ukrainian flag. This feels quite moving in retrospect, since it was just a few months before the Russians invaded eastern Ukraine.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

No I haven’t, thank you for the recommendation. I have been meaning to go ever since reading Sand’s, East West Street.

I gather it is so pluralistic that it even allows devotees of a former Ukrainian unit of the Waffen SS to march through the streets.

I am very glad to hear that so much of Austro-Hungarian Lemberg survives. A miracle really, given the last hundred years

Basil Chamberlain
Basil Chamberlain
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

I have East West Street on my bedside table, as yet unread.

It’s not only Habsburg Lemberg that survives, but also some marvellous remnants of Polish Lwow, such as the exquisite seventeenth-century Boim Chapel.

As for pluralism, well, yes, Stepan Bandera is held in rather high regard there. Ironically, having not been Ukrainian until very recently, it’s now the country’s most nationalistic city.

Drop me a line if you do plan a trip to that part of the world; I’m happy to recommend some of my other favourite places in Western Ukraine.

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Can we think about Blighty please?

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

Well we were chatting about the merits of Stamford versus Peterborough, so what in particular would you wish to hear about?

Basil Chamberlain
Basil Chamberlain
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

I should say it’s not really that I object to modern architecture, though much of it is not to my taste; rather, it’s that I hate the destruction of the old. If a new town was being built, I wouldn’t expect it to imitate historic forms.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

In England’s case not quite as bad as the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The same was also true in wee little Scotland.

Brian Dorsley
Brian Dorsley
3 years ago
Reply to  David J

I remember my parents taking me for lunch there back in the 80s too. Used to live in Peterborough back then and we’d go for family drives all around the countryside.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Sounds great – except for the BBC types crawling all over the place. Why can’t they film all their crap costume dramas on a purpose built costume drama set somewhere a long way from all the rest of us?

Martin Adams
Martin Adams
3 years ago

Great! The description of the contrasts with nearby Peterborough is a hoot!

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Adams

Sadly no real mention of Peterborough’s magnificent Norman/Gothic Cathedral, with its stunning West Front, amongst the finest in Europe.

The fine market place, with its late 17th century Guildhall also gives one a ghostly vision of how it must have rivalled Stamford, before the arrival of the Great Northern Railway in the 1850’s.The replacement of oolitic (Barnack?) limestone by brick was an aesthetic disaster.

Martin Adams
Martin Adams
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

All true! I had not before thought of the impact of brick. I suspect you’re right about how it must have rivalled Stamford. There’s quite a lot of food for thought in those comments about brick, stone and aesthetic disasters.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Adams

The Cathedral was originally a great Benedictine Abbey, one only six saved at the Dissolution by be being, as we would say, ‘re-booted’ as a Secular Cathedral.

To the immediate west of the Cathedral, the old market square is infinitely larger and more impressive that either Red Lion Square or Sheep Market in Stamford, despite the hideous brick!

Albert Kensington
Albert Kensington
3 years ago

I was interested in the fact,noted when visiting Stamford, that the town council had sought, encouraged and fostered the development of an electrical engineering factory around the beginning of the C20th. They did this to bring higher paid manufacturing jobs to the town to complement the agricultural sector – always a poor payer. This struck me as an excellent interventionist initiative,, practical and undogmatic – more than you can say for national economic policy, especially from 1980 onward, kow towing to the monstrous graven image with feet of clay that is the City of London. Maybe we should have stuck with mercantilism, works for the Chinese

“That’s if we get things right, and our small country can hold its communities together”

Rotherham, Rochdale, Telford, Oxford, Huddersfield English towns and cities afflicted by a hideous plague which would shame the Dark Ages – pretty obvious that “we” have already got things disasterously wrong, there is little enough now to hold our small country together. Years ago it was a proud boast that people would say “this is a free county” with the strong message, “I’ll say what I like and tough if you object to it.”. No longer, “cohesion” is enforced with hurty tweets thought crime hate speech coercion. The more the diversity, increasing at a rapid pace, the less the vanishing centre will hold, the more things will fall apart. As for racism mentioned re Peterborough – two words, Ross Parker, that’s where the Dark Age re-run threat comes from

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

Yes, the slaughter of Ross Parker was a truly revolting killing, but not quite the harbinger of things to come.

It is nearly twenty years since that dreadful day, and yet the apocalyptic nightmare foretold by that brilliant classicist Enoch Powell has yet to arrive. But arrive it will, as surely as night follows day. Are we prepared? Off course not!

Albert Kensington
Albert Kensington
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Fair point about harbinger of things to come. The reason I mentioned Ross Parker is that the author apparently fears the return of the dark ghouls of the past, and she referred to racism in Peterborough. She seems to fear the indigenous population turning on immigrants. So I felt at pains to mention the victim of this atrocious racist murder in Peterborough.

Of course there are clear more proximate harbingers to hand – the terror attacks, the tens of thousands of wannabe jihadis on MI5′ lists

And above all the rape gang scouring of the shire, here’s the latest example which the Guardian and the BBC will unfailingly swerve

https://www.keighleyonline….

Dougie Undersub
Dougie Undersub
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

I think you’re right. BLM certainly seems up for a fight.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago

Nothing wrong with stuck in the past; other cities (regions) had to be the motors of economic modernization.

Roger Davis
Roger Davis
3 years ago

An excellent survey of Stamford’s heritage, Mary, but did you really need to denigrate Peterborough in order to celebrate Stamford? In this respect you seem to totally ignore UnHerd’s mission statement: “UnHerd aims to do two things: to push back against the herd mentality with new and bold thinking, and to provide a platform for otherwise unheard ideas, people and places.”

The “herd mentality” amongst the literati certainly makes it easy for authors to give Peterborough a good kicking, not least because of the “worst place to live” soubriquet resulting from a ludicrous joke survey.

Just as in Stamford, we in Peterborough have a thriving Civic Society, plus, of course a very impressive Cathedral and one of Britain’s finest country parks. We must plead guilty to possessing a very efficient parkway system enabling residents and visitors to get around easily without causing congestion and pollution around our housing areas and city centre. If you visit again, you will find that the “particularly unattractive multi storey car park” you mention has in fact been demolished.

Racism? Given that we are a very diverse bunch, we seem to have managed reasonably well so far without either race riots or grooming scandals.

We do, of course, have our share of problems, most of all perhaps in terms of standards of education, an issue that is recognised and being tackled, not hidden away.

Finally, we do have some impressive stately homes, including one that forms the centrepiece of your article. Yes, that’s right, Burghley House. It’s situated over the border in Peterborough, not in Stamford at all!

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago
Reply to  Roger Davis

You voted Labour tho in the by-election just before the G. Election. That put me off everything except your cathedral.

Roger Davis
Roger Davis
3 years ago

“Everything except your cathedral? So, Burghley House included then?

David J
David J
3 years ago
Reply to  Roger Davis

Ahem, Burghley House and Park are more than a dozen miles from Peterborough, only a 20 minute stroll from Stamford.

Peterborough’s postal code extends well outside its borders. I had a similar issue when I had a Stevenage code, despite living in a smallish village nowhere near it.

Roger Davis
Roger Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  David J

In the course of that 20 minute stroll you cross over from Stamford (Lincs) into the historic Soke of Peterborough.

There can’t be that much wrong with the UK if people can find only postcode angst to obsess about.

David J
David J
3 years ago
Reply to  Roger Davis

True enough. Borders aye? Love the UK!

JR Stoker
JR Stoker
3 years ago

Very good article, thank you

Lee Johnson
Lee Johnson
3 years ago

‘a self-confessed groper…’

OK stop right there. None of the article is worth reading.
Why ? Because reasoned argument is one thing and ‘values’ are another.
I have my own values already, if I am looking to test and change them I will refer to someone who does not use provocative language.

Andrew Baldwin
Andrew Baldwin
3 years ago
Reply to  Lee Johnson

Oh, give Sarah a break, Lee. It seems most journos seem they need to put a drive-by slander of the Donald into their copy just to show that they are on the side of the angels. I don’t follow American politics closely, so I was vaguely aware that Phyllis Schlafly was opposed to the ERA. I didn’t know that her big consuming interest was actually foreign affairs and opposing the feminists was just a sideline for her that consumed more and more of her time. If that’s really true. Anyway, even if it isn’t, it opens up an interesting debate. Just treat comments that exhibit Trump Derangement Syndrome from journos writing on other topics as background noise. It’s much easier to keep one’s sanity that way.

A.N. Other
A.N. Other
3 years ago

I love in a village just outside Stamford and can be in Peterborough almost as quickly as it is all country roads. I visit both often.

Some interesting stuff here but falls It over with the snide points about Peterborough and by giving the impression Stamford is a museum piece preserved in aspic.

Stamford is a prosperous, modern, thriving town full of independent shops, a superb weekly market, and great places to eat and drink. With amazing countryside on the doorstep. And many magnificent old buildings.

I scratched my head the first time I saw the “survey” about worst place to live. Then I looked at its origins. A site that claims 80,000 survey participants. Have a look at ILiveHere site. Basically, a site that gets people to say everywhere is a $hit hole. Troll central, full of hatred and bile. My view – having travelled all over England and having lived in Lancashire and Yorkshire for 40 years – is that Peterborough is Ok. Some tough areas. Some beautiful areas. And miles off being worst.

And then she glibly says it is racist! Oh dear. There is a huge Pakistani, East European and Portuguese population amongst others. Despite that I would say not particularly better or worse than anywhere else. We have integration issues in the UK. Shame we can’t talk about it. But perhaps I missed the race riots?

Mary, if you read this can you provide your evidence? Have you even been to Peterborough? (Passing through on the East Coast Main Line does not count).

And Peterborough “notable chiefly for being home to the UK Passport Office….”. Eh? Never heard of Peterborough Cathedral? Have a look at where it stands as rated by the critics of these things.

As bad is the central argument about rejection of the main railway line being the reason for Peterborough’s dramatic growth and Stamford’s supposed atrophy. Peterborough was chosen as a new town in 1967 when the population was around 80,000. That is why it is now 200,000.

The history stuff you can get from books. The other stuff requires some shoe leather. I think Mary may have been in lockdown when she wrote this.

Lindsay Gatward
Lindsay Gatward
3 years ago

Really interesting read. I bet the village of Lindfield north of Haywards Heath could rival it for listed buildings per person but probably not such exciting virile Viking action. Love the ‘happy story of integration’ and bet this is the unrecognised happenstance between the recorded historic moments of action and is what really makes us what we are?

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago

Lindfield has been wrecked by its proximity to H.Heath. Outside the home counties, thankfully there are no H.Heaths.

Jim Cooper
Jim Cooper
3 years ago

Obviously, different women want liberation from different oppressions. As a result they’ve been “liberated” from the imperfect freedoms they enjoyed pre-feminism And imprisoned in the dual/triple burdens of worker, homemaker and amateur porn star. Well done feminists

David Morley
David Morley
3 years ago

Stamford is also pretty posh. You only have to look at some of the shops in the town centre. I believe that pre Second World War it was the only town in Britain to have an actual nazi town council (can’t remember my source, so please check).

My mother grew up in Stamford, and I’ve visited regularly since I was a child. Another lesson that might be learned from Stamford and the past? The lovely pre war council houses where my mother grew up – in the days before crazed housing markets and high rise broken down “machines for living”.

Fabulous market, some really nice cafes, the meadows, kingfishers on the welland if you are lucky, and burghley house and grounds. Oh and a surprisingly good local Shakespeare company. Well worth visiting. Preserved in aspic, and can’t really be used as a model for the present – but perhaps there are lessons to be learned about how to create attractive surroundings.

Plus some lessons on what not to do – like the church turned into an ugly row of shops!

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
3 years ago

The Charlton’s father was given the chance to change shift so that he could watch the match. He chose to work. Difficult to know for sure what were his motivations. However a desire to send a message to his World Cup winning sons that they were still subordinate to him may have been one.

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago

Ever bigger, faster roads and roundabouts have wrecked the British countryside incl its towns and villages, hamlets and farms. It’s just as Larkin descibes in “Going going”. We need decent rail & less vehicles. The uk is now stuffed full of severed communities with distinctiveness seen as a moral outrage. This is seen in the intolerance of difference on the ground, everywhere.

David Gould
David Gould
3 years ago

Think you must have had you jimjammies & rose tints on Mary, Stamford is changing .
Ok it is stuck with four streets mainly full of old out of date pokey buildings . Try getting about the pedestrianised areas with crutches and one leg tied up out the way .

Blackstones closed and became retail shopping area with half a dozen nationals taking up the occupancies . The George pub /hotel is OK once in a while but the pub a bit further up the hill on the opposite side of the road going to the A1 was truly gopping. Sticky carpets & tables with bits of food on the table cloths .
The old water mill out on the Deepings road might have become a decent multi occupancy dwelling place with time .
I uderstood that Candlesticks restaurant closed because of lack of business

The local hospital was straight out of Dr Finlay’s Case book era, in the 1990’s I had surgery in there … has it changed for the better ?

The only thing I recognise the older part of Stamford for is the overspill of financially secure early retirees mainly from London , Peterborough & Leicester. Though there used to be a pub called ” The hole in the wall ” where the odd lock in took place every blue moon if you were fortunate , is it still there ?

scoobydoobz69
scoobydoobz69
3 years ago

I think you need to check some of your facts! Stamford is somewhat larger than 2 square miles I can assure you & it hasn’t decided to stick in the 60’s but has kept its charm & multi storey car parks at bay because TRUE Stamfordians stick together & vote for the better of their community rather than money!

Peter B
Peter B
1 year ago

Minor quibble: Melton Mowbray is mercifully well off the motorways (and not in Lincolnshire).
Very happy to be living outside “London’s blast radius”. A great phrase.

Jonathan Bagley
Jonathan Bagley
3 years ago

“…roadside cafes get more eccentric.” Live music – duelling banjos.

iambetsytrotwood
iambetsytrotwood
3 years ago

Hopefully it’s a reaction against anodyne town planning, business rates and urban infrastructure and ever wider, harder roads. Trouble is, roadside cafes do nothing to integrate communities. They are just punk fringes.