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China will save Donald Trump The President may be trailing Joe Biden but growing hostility to Beijing may give him a second surprise win

The race is closer than people think (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)

The race is closer than people think (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)


May 15, 2020   7 mins

Nervous Republicans are right to look around and be concerned. They see headlines such as “Trump Sinking” in the New York Times; “Trump Doesn’t Understand Why He’s Losing” (The Atlantic); “Republicans have already decided Trump is going to lose” (Washington Post); “The Coronavirus economic collapse could break Trump” (CNN); and “Trump’s White House gets ready to LOSE” (Daily Mail).

Read them and it looks like Covid-19 spells the end for Donald Trump — and the argument is not hard to make. America has now plunged into the worst recession since the Great Depression. Unemployment has surged to a post-war record of almost 15%. More than 33 million Americans have lost their jobs in just three months while nearly 84,000 have died from a virus that has been poorly managed. Trump’s approval ratings are slipping. And of the 50 most recent polls, he has only led his Democrat challenger, Joe Biden, in one.

Biden is not only averaging a comfortable 4-point lead nationally, but has also been ahead in many of the recent swing state polls in Florida, Michigan and Pennsylvania. And then there is the point about the big Trump rallies, which some have argued were central to allowing the incumbent to win these states in the first place: there probably won’t be any this time, for obvious reasons. I don’t know about you but I cannot see thousands of Americans flooding to mass rallies any time soon.

All of this explains why legendary Democrat strategist James Carville recently claimed that Trump has “no chance” at the election. “This whole thing is just like a crumbling empire right before your eyes”, said Bill Clinton’s former chief strategist, who went on to claim that Trump’s advisors know they will lose and are now only in the race for the money.

If this is right, then Trump is destined to become the first one-term President since George H.W. Bush and only the third since 1945, the other being Jimmy Carter (not including JFK, who was assassinated and Gerald Ford, who took over from Nixon and was never elected).

But is all of this right?

I don’t share Trump’s politics, but as a political analyst, I do think that we should heed the lesson of the past decade and challenge conventional wisdom a little harder.

Already, there is lots of talk about how economic crises hurt incumbents and help challengers. The obvious examples are Carter in 1980, the first George Bush in 1992 and then heavy Republican losses in 2008 in the middle of the finance crisis.

But are these really comparable? Is what is unfolding in America (and elsewhere) a ‘normal’ recession?

Analysts are already using models that treat this downturn like any other. But on the ground, I suspect that most ordinary Americans do not see this as a normal recession. On the contrary, and as pollster Nate Silver has pointed out, they probably view this as something that is more akin to a “wartime economy”, as opposed to an economy that has been poorly managed by an irresponsible and incompetent incumbent. It is also a crisis that quite clearly started outside of America.

The idea that Trump might not be blamed in the way that an incumbent usually would be is backed up by data. Look at the polls, and you find that the president’s numbers are actually not that bad.

Since the crisis erupted, his approval ratings have certainly slipped a little. But they are now basically back to where they were shortly before Christmas. And if you look under the bonnet you find a lot of variation; nationally, he might be on 44-46% but no fewer than 91% of Republicans say they approve of his presidency. Last week, the pollsters Ipsos reported that while only 42% approve of Trump as president, when it came to the economy and jobs his ratings were noticeably higher — 51% and 52%, respectively.

Perhaps his handling of Covid-19 is what matters?

Maybe, but again if you look at last week’s data, while only 44% of Americans approved of how Trump is handling the crisis, this figure jumps to 52% among whites, 76% among self-described conservatives and 88% among Republicans, all of whom are critical to his re-election hopes. Partisanship, as they say, is one hell of a drug.

Nor is there much evidence that the unfolding economic crisis is translating into an in-built advantage for Biden.

“It’s the economy, stupid” is the immortal line that Carville and Clinton used to win the presidency. But when Americans are asked whether they think their economy would get better or get worse if Biden were in the White House, only 30% say ‘better’ (and 38% say ‘worse’). The equivalent figures for Trump are 36% and 35%.

Last week, another survey found that just one in three Americans feels confident in Biden’s ability to handle the worst economy since the Great Depression, and then this week polling by CNN suggests that while Biden still leads Trump nationally he is trailing him across more than a dozen battleground states, where voters give Trump significant 17-point lead over Biden on the economy.

Sure, these might be outlier polls. And we should always treat polls with reasonable caution. But I do think that they are picking up on something significant — major scepticism about Biden and his ability to be an effective president.

Allegations of sexual harassment and lingering doubts about his mental health might also have something to do with the fact that, nationally, just 41% of Americans think favourably about him, a figure that falls to 34% in the all-important Midwest, a heavily blue-collar region that we were repeatedly told only Biden could win back. Worryingly, his approval ratings are even lower among self-identified independents — just 28% like him.

Compare and contrast Obama’s performance during the unfolding of the Great Recession with Biden’s performance during the unfolding of the Great Lockdown; the one leading the debate and the other  curiously absent.

And Americans seem to have noticed. The fact that only one in three feels confident in Biden’s ability to deal with the coronavirus crisis, while more than two-thirds are ‘uneasy’ or ‘not sure’, should also be ringing alarm bells. These numbers remind me of how the British people viewed the opposition Labour Party at the time of the biggest debate of the day: Brexit. During these big moments of crisis people want a clear, confident and comforting message. If they are unsure about where you stand, or how you will act, then you’ve got problems.

Trump does have a clear pitch. Regardless of its validity he will argue something along the lines of: “Under my presidency the economy was growing, we had one of the longest bull markets in history and the lowest rate of unemployment since 1969. Keep me in office and I will bring it back”. And he will urge Americans to remember what was happening to their pensions and savings during that market rally.

Some readers will inevitably quibble with this, asking who really benefitted in Trump’s economy. But the fact remains that shortly before the crisis exploded more than two-thirds of Americans thought that their economy was ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ good. Trump will urge them to remember this. Biden will hope they forget it.

We also know that when it comes to forecasting the result of presidential elections, while these economic indicators are important, they still only take you about half-way to explaining these outcomes. Other things also matter.

One reason why national populism has been on the rise in recent years is because it has been attacking on two flanks: economy insecurity and cultural insecurity. Liberal progressives tend to only talk about one.

One issue that will also play a key role this year is immigration, which Republicans are a lot more concerned about today than they were four years ago. Inevitably, Trump will pitch to this anxiety by pointing to his recent immigration ban and warning over and over again that Democrats will open the borders. This will, almost certainly, veer into xenophobia but it might also be enough to hold his coalition together.

Turn the clock back to the summer of 2016 and one reason why I argued that Trump was about to pull off a surprise was because of this strong pitch to a loose alliance of blue-collar workers as well as older and affluent social conservatives who shared their values. They wanted to slow the pace of social change, reduce overall levels of immigration and loathed much of the liberal establishment that seemed deaf to these concerns.

Another issue that lies outside of economics, and which has entered the popular psyche, is China.

Politics, in its purest form, is never really about lofty appeals to universal principles. More often than not it is about something else, something more fundamental, potent and darker: the attribution of blame. And who will Trump — and most Americans — blame for this crisis?

Last week, two-thirds of all Americans pointed the finger at China — a view shared by more than half of all Democrats and more than eight out of every ten Republicans. A plurality also said that their country should take action to punish China for the pandemic, which was followed by Republican lawmakers introducing a bill that seeks to impose sanctions on China if it does not cooperate with an investigation into the pandemic, release democratic activists and close its wet markets.

American views of China were already deteriorating before the crisis but since the arrival of Covid-19 something has certainly changed. As an array of different surveys and polls suggest, Americans have become far more convinced that China poses a “major threat” (62% think so), have become more likely to hold unfavourable views of China (66% now are) and are more likely to say they have no confidence in President Xi (71% have no confidence). Nearly three-quarters want their country’s relationship with China to change.

These views cross traditional party lines; they cannot be dismissed as the ramblings of a loony fringe. Disliking China is quickly becoming one of only a few things that appears to unite most Americans. They want to talk about localising or near-shoring supply chains and they have begun to think about China in a way that they have not had to think about any other power since the end of the Cold War: as a serious, systemic threat.

Liberals are quick to lampoon Trump’s “economic nationalism”. But advocates of free trade should remember that our post-Covid world is one in which a large majority of Americans — 75% to be exact — think that their country should end its dependence on China for key goods, such as medical supplies. The Commerce Department rolling out tax incentives for businesses to return to America is a sign of things to come.

There is a button here to be pressed and let’s not kid ourselves: we all know that Trump is going to press it. Some commentators will dismiss this as pandering to xenophobia and Trump will probably prove them right. But this should also not distract us from the point that there is still a legitimate debate to be had about China, its role in this crisis and in the global order more generally. Democrats will need to somehow engage with this debate while navigating a populist who ignores the normal rules of debate.

This helps to explain why Biden has also toughened his line on China and why, most likely, we will witness a verbal arms race in terms of who can be most ‘anti-China’. Trump will inevitably claim that he got there first and that Democrats were slow to recognise the threat. “Voters prefer the original to the copy”, as French populist Jean-Marie Le Pen put it.

Listen to podcasts around the Trump campaign — which talk of “Beijing Biden” and the “CCP-friendly candidate” — and it is pretty clear what the strategy this autumn will be.

So, while there is an emerging consensus around Trump’s impending defeat, a view that draws a crude and simplistic line from economic recession to defeat, I think that this election is still a coin-toss. In fact, if the election were held tomorrow then I would probably gamble on Trump to win. Just like four years ago, we have more than a few reasons to be sceptical of Groupthink. Democrats should not get complacent: they are in for the fight of their lives.


Matthew Goodwin is Professor of Politics at the University of Kent. His new book, Values, Voice and Virtue: The New British Politics, is out on March 30.

GoodwinMJ

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Andrew Best
Andrew Best
4 years ago

Putting everything aside about trump how can the democratic party think that a senile, old, handsy, groper Is the best they can come up with?
In a country of hundreds of millions he’s the best candidate? Ridiculous
And even if you hate trump and everything he stands for he has won once and your best and brightest to beat him is Biden!
I suppose it will give them another 4 years to find a body with a pulse to beat trump’s successor

Carolyn Jackson
Carolyn Jackson
4 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Best

It’s the double standards which sticks in my craw – Trump has been lambasted since he threw his hat in the ring the first time over his locker room comments, but those same people haven’t had any criticism over Biden over his over familiarity with his hands. They also turned a blind eye to Clinton’s sexual misdemeanours (not to mention Kennedy, although I admit that was a long time ago)

Peter Kriens
Peter Kriens
4 years ago

Those locker room comments were about how women let famous men do what they want,not about what famous do.

And it is hard to deny that there is a real groupy effect. Monroe & Lewinsky are not on record that they hated the attention they got from famous men. Generally the complaints come when, inevitably, the famous men decide to move on.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago

Worse, at least Kennedy did his bit with the USN, in PT109.
By contrast Clinton is a wretched draft dodger.
Sadly no decent sniper has found him yet; But we live in hope.

ellenoday
ellenoday
4 years ago

Believe all women except Tara Reade.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
4 years ago

‘I don’t share Trump’s politics,..’

So, your politics are therefore:

– Unlimited, mass immigration and the immiseration of the indigenous working class
– An open border with Mexico so that China continues to flood the US with opioids etc
– Unrestricted trade with China, the selling of US/western assets and IP etc to China
– Ongoing interventions in the ME and wherever it suits the Military/Industrial Complex
– The US pays for the whole of NATO
– Shutting down the US indefinitely so that the private sector, particularly small business, is wiped out

This is why, as Jimmy Dore and other (properly) left-wing commentators keep pointing out, many US progressive hate the DNC and Pelosi etc more than they hate Trump.

Martin Davis
Martin Davis
4 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Mmm, he should thank you for providing an exemplary example of exactly the sort of responses which would buttress a plurality (well, at least in the Electoral College) for Trump come November.

Martin Davis
Martin Davis
4 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Goodwin was commenting on Trump’s chances of re-election, not offering his own opinions on the talking points of US politics. His main approach is a challenge to what he sees as conventional (MSN) opinion regarding expectations of a Trump defeat. This he thought unlikely given how the COVID crisis could be treated as an unanticipatable event, with its handling and consequences not directly attributable to Presidential actions (and inactions). Moreover, he points out that Trump has already made it abundantly clear he blames China exclusively for this crisis, and that to some significant extent the electorate shares this viewpoint. Goodwin himself may not share this opinion on who to blame, but he does count it a significant intervention, and likely a winning card.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago
Reply to  Martin Davis

This sounds very suspicious. Is Martin Davis perchance the pseudonym for Matthew Goodwin?

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
4 years ago

‘So, while there is an emerging consensus around Trump’s impending defeat…’

No there isn’t. Many informed US commentators are predicting a ‘Red Wave’ in November. This is partly because the Republicans have just won two special elections for Congress. In one of these they flipped a Democrat district in California, of all places. The swing to the Reps was 21% at one point, although this will probably reduce as more votes are counted.

At the point in the cycle, Hillary was at least 4% ahead, probably more. Moreover, the ‘enthusiasm gap’ between Biden i.e. how enthusiastic their natural voters are in terms of voting for them, is 15 to 20% depending on the poll.

In addition, more and more people are now aware of Tara Reade’s sexual assault allegation against Biden, and his support among women has dropped 6% in the last couple of weeks. (Needless to say, the MSM suppressed this story for a month, but coverage in the progressive alternative media eventually broke through). Meanwhile, more and more people are aware of ‘Obamagate’ (8 million shares on Twitter).

Add in the fact that Biden is senile, voted for the Iraq war and various other military disasters, has corruptly enriched his entire family and is a long-standing friend to China and….well, it’s not a done deal.

Johnny Norfolk
Johnny Norfolk
4 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

The main piece here is just like the MSN. anti Trump just because they do not like him.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
4 years ago
Reply to  Johnny Norfolk

Yes, there is nothing ‘UnHerd’ about this piece whatsoever. We hear it 24/7 from an MSM that has been wrong about everything for at least 20 years.

ellenoday
ellenoday
4 years ago

Goodwin is usually quite good with political analysis and although he is a lefty at heart he is able to tamp down his Trump/US hatred to provide relatively objective assessment of the shifting political sands. (He is a Brit academic after all.)

But to think that Trump needs China to win re-election to beat Biden is just whistling through a bad set of NHS teeth. The Dems have cleaved so far to the left that independents, perhaps reluctantly, are faced with either voting for Trump or abstaining. Witness brainless post modern Marxist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her laughable pronouncements as an example of the absurd leftwards drift.

AOC’s silly Green New Deal that plans to shut down all aircraft within 10 years is enough to given even the most doubtful independent pause when voting. As an aside I see the Green New Deal is being embraced by Labour in the UK.

But back to Trump. The Dems themselves are in turmoil with the moderate faction adopting much of Bernie Bro Identity Politics nonsense while these same leftists seethe that their candidates had the presidency (they believe) stolen from them (and him, Saint Bernie). The excitement and energy of the Dems has ebbed as semi-senile Biden pushed Bernie aside. Yet the excitement on the Trump side is as strong as ever: he has 94% support among Republicans.

What is it about the British that they can never get American politics right? I blame the British Bias Corp, I do, that feeds Brits an incessant diet of anti-Americanism dressed up as truth.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago
Reply to  ellenoday

Many on this benighted, overcrowded, rain swept, little island see Mr Trump, as the voice of ‘real’ America. That is, Blue collar and Red neck America. The America that with only 5% of the world’s population still dominates the planet in the Imperial sense.
Nothing like it has been seen since the great days Ancient Rome. Although far from perfect, it is, and remains, the sole guardian of all that this good about the West.
China represents a clear and present danger, yet many former, supine, US Presidents have studiously avoided the issue.
The boil must be lanced and in Trump we trust.

Fred Bloggs
Fred Bloggs
4 years ago

The democrats operate on identity based rhetoric and so when they choose a presidential candidate they agonize over which intersectional identity groups are being represented. It risks becoming a “pick your avatar” exercise rather than a “select your candidate” exercise. In fear of losing they fudged and went for Biden – another “old white guy“. Perhaps Biden was picked for his tip top, alert intellect and real world wisdom; it’s hard to tell.

My suspicion is that the voters went for Obama on identity based grounds; and have moved on from identity based thinking being “the big answer“; hence Hilary didn’t get the win she expected in 2016.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
4 years ago
Reply to  Fred Bloggs

Obama was indeed the identity candidate par excellence, not that I wasn’t pleased when he was elected. But ultimately he represented nothing more than empty, albeit superficially profound, rhetoric.

The moment he appointed Geithner of Goldman Sachs as his Treasury Secretary you knew there would be no hope and no change for working Americans. His healthcare reforms delivered nothing really, and on top of that there was Libya, ‘Fast & Furious’ and numerous other disasters. Only now is it all coming out as the real left in the US comes to hate him just as much as they hate the Clintons and Pelosi.

Peter Kriens
Peter Kriens
4 years ago
Reply to  Fred Bloggs

Come on get serious. Obama is one of best political speakers I ever heard. He could charm the sox of any audience. I’m not denying that his skin color helped him but I think he would’ve won anyway.

And he wasn’t a bad president, my only complaint is that he did not reign in the feminist sisterhood in the institutions that are doing so much damage to our society.

ellenoday
ellenoday
4 years ago
Reply to  Peter Kriens

“Obama is one of best political speakers I ever heard.”

You are surely joking sir. Off teleprompter he was and is appalling with umm’s and aah’s that would put a teenager to shame Look on YouTube for confirmation.

And you say he wasn’t a bad president: no, if you believe Globalism is the way to go. He pushed a strong globalist agenda in many areas and indeed had much in common with Bush and Clinton, Globalists all, just as in the UK there was little to choose from between Blair, May, Brown or Cameron.

The importance of Trump that many seem to miss is that he is the first leader of a Western country is that he is openly hostile to Globalism. For that, he gets my vote.

Fred Bloggs
Fred Bloggs
4 years ago
Reply to  Peter Kriens

Obama was eloquent on occasion and hailed as the new Messiah. Just as Blair was; and where is Blair now?

The scale of financial slush in and around the Obama administration was appalling. Bit by bit it comes out: the massive enrichment of the insiders like the Biden family and the Clinton family with money coming from overseas companies and governments. The pedestal on which Obama has postured is being hollowed out as Blair’s has been. Time will tell, truth will out.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
4 years ago
Reply to  Peter Kriens

Obama was, ultimately, an empty suit. He looked good, and sounded good. But there was very little content to his words, and even less delivery for normal, working Americans.

David Bell
David Bell
4 years ago

There is one other aspect to Trump that we in the UK ignore. It was pointed out to me by a business partner who is an Evangelical Christian living in the bible belt of central USA. He told me in late 2015, when Trump announced his candidacy that he would win. The issue was simple: Judges!

During the Obama presidency he failed to appoint judges so there where over 2,000 unfilled posts and at least 2 seats would come up on the Supreme Court which the 2016 president would appoint. Trump was many things but he promised to appoint Conservative Christian judges and he has. He has changed the complexion of many of the Federal “circuit” courts. Places like California now have new conservative judges when previously they where exclusively liberal. He has appointed two judges to the Supreme Court both with conservative Christian views and that has changed the balance of power on the court. The 2020 winner will get to appoint at least one more Supreme Court judge and there are other important vacancies coming up in key court rooms around the country. The Evangelical Christians will vote for Trump because he will appoint judges with their views, Biden won’t! That will be the key difference in many states. It’s that simple.

Trump will win because his coalition is much deeper and stronger than we realise!

Carolyn Jackson
Carolyn Jackson
4 years ago

In Florida, Michigan and Pennsylvania Hilary Clinton was ahead of Trump in double figures, not the single digits which Biden is ahead by. Trump went on to win those states. People who are going to vote need to focus more on Biden’s running mate as he or she will be the one who ultimately (and probably very quickly) takes over when Biden’s obvious dementia becomes too advanced.

David Bell
David Bell
4 years ago

This is correct, his running mate will get more scrutiny than any VP candidate since Sarah Palin. But I have one question, what happens if Biden wins but cannot be inaugurated due to ill health or death? It is very clear what happens if he becomes incapacitated after the inauguration but the US Constitution appears quite on the issue of before.

Peter Kriens
Peter Kriens
4 years ago

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Scott Allan
Scott Allan
4 years ago

You are delusional to keep referencing DNC think tanks as authorities on anything.

Sleep, creepy Joe won’t even be the nominee. You are another far left wishful thinker. The DNC will be lucky to win 4 states, if they put Sleepy, Creepy Joe on the ticket. I think they will nominate Cuomo and Michelle Obama.

Please get out of your bubble and put boots on the ground. You can do random surverys in any neighbourhood.

I predict Trump gets high teens even 20% of the Black vote. That is curtains to every democrat running. That is why 14 voted down Nancy’s ridiculous stimulus 3 package.

Johnny Norfolk
Johnny Norfolk
4 years ago

You do not believe the polls do you. They always favour the left. Trump will win on who he is and what he stands for. Just watch.

Russ Littler
Russ Littler
4 years ago

Yet more bulls**t from this liberal lefty professor who is completely out of touch with reality. Biden is nowhere near Trump in the real world poll of real people. He will sweep to a landslide tsunami type victory in November, and continue to clean house of these corrupt politicians and evil medical mafia (yes Mathew, the people you work for are funded by the Gates foundation), because the American people are no longer asleep. They see who the real criminals are now. The reason you cannot find a suitable candidate to run against Trump is because you have no honest, decent human beings, in your party. They are all self serving globalists who look down their noses at “the deplorable’s”, and the ordinary people see this perfectly well.

Rafael Aguilo
Rafael Aguilo
4 years ago

Mr. Goodwin paints the reaction to China and the COVID19 pandemic as if the U.S., or Pres. Trump, for that matter, was the ONLY leader or country raking China over the coals, and everyone else is as friendly as ever and clapping China. Nothing further from the truth.

As for campaign fodder, all you have to do is look at all the videos of Democratic leaders poo-pooing the “misinformation” about the COVID19 virus, and the travel ban from China as “racist and xenophobic”. NYC’s mayor and Health Commissioner did “Oscar worthy performances” when they exhorted the people to keep living their lives. NYC became THE center of the pandemic. Another “worthy of a trophy” mention performance was given by Rep. Nancy Pelosi in California, followed later my the New Orleans mayor. Add to that all the orders given to Senior Homes to ACCEPT back seniors with positive COVID19 diagnosis, after being discharged from the hospitals.

They were basically following the “brotherly example” of Italy, no? How did that work out?

The pandemic has proven, once and for all, what anti-globalists have been saying all along, you can’t depend for another country to manufacture and supply your critically needed products. All you’re doing is asking for a kick in the nuts when the crap hits the fan. Well, the crap DID hit the fan, and the West WAS kicked in the nuts. Now you can see a LOT of countries pointing their collective finger at China. Case closed.

After “selecting” another “establishment to the core, old white guy” as their ideal candidate to “defeat Trump” (their ONLY call to arms); the party of “diversity and inclusion” is now faced with the prospect of selecting their VP candidate, from a “let’s see who can go further to the Left”, and diverse field, that was thrown under the bus before . Can anyone see the hypocrisy here? Good luck.

Warts and all, Pres. Trump has been the ONLY “in your face” non-political establishment president the U.S. has had in a very, very long time.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago

‘Emerging consensus’ of Trump’s impending defeat, what drivel is this?
It is precisely the sort of piffle that is heard every day, in the salons of both Hampstead hypocrites and Islington idiots. No doubt there are pockets of the same nonsense in the US?
Red neck and Blue colour America will see Trump back in the White House in November.
Does anyone seriously believe that the geriatric old pervert Biden has any appeal whatsoever? Even ‘my turn’ Hillary or worse the ‘botox b***h’, Polossi would be preferable as the Democrat candidate.
Trump is a businessman, used to evaluating and taking risks. His instinct over China is correct.
It is appalling that so many former US Presidents have facilitated the rise of China, this festering carbuncle on the backside of humanity.
In any war, whilst the US will remain inviolate, her ‘theatre’ allies are likely to be devastated, due to the dereliction of duty and, frankly supine behaviour of the previous inhabitants of the White House.
Trump may not be perfect, but he is the best we have, in the time available. Good luck to him!
Vae victis!

David George
David George
4 years ago

Recent events are playing straight into Trumps hands; while we await Durham’s report to the DOJ and the Obama/Clinton (the so called Obamagate) crimes therein China is having another tantrum and threatening to invade Taiwan, blocking imports from anyone that so much as questions them and generally behaving like a spoilt brat.
A rich vein to exploit come election time I would say.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago
Reply to  David George

“Spare the rod and spoil the child”.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
4 years ago
Reply to  David George

“Spare the rod and spoil the child”.

jmarsden1961
jmarsden1961
4 years ago

I am in the UK and so don’t see much on CNN Fox etc. but in the last election it was clear that Trump appealed to blue collar workers with his ‘I’m one of you’ mantra which resonated with many people who felt unrepresented.

Secondly it seems Clinton represented the old guard and the email scandal was the final nail in the coffin.

Now even though Trump is a complete narcissist – witness how he turns on even loyal inner circle members when they disagree with him- and is presiding over massive unemployment- I believe he is banking on post Covid economics – Being seen to be righting the economy and taking on China economically as well as politically.

Crucially Biden hasn’t seized the opportunity to sow nearly enough doubt in voter’s minds about Trump not has he demonstrated enough nous to encourage the population to vote for him.

Therefore US underlying conservatism will kick in: let’s stick with what we know – the least worst option.