X Close

Islamism is exploiting Britain’s political vacuum Our leaders have allowed fanaticism to thrive

Pro-Palestinian activists march through London (HENRY NICHOLLS/AFP via Getty Images)

Pro-Palestinian activists march through London (HENRY NICHOLLS/AFP via Getty Images)


February 19, 2024   4 mins

Way back in 2005, when I was an MP in the Netherlands, my party was strategising about the upcoming local elections. I belonged to the centre-right VVD, and we were particularly concerned about appealing to the nation’s growing migrant community. After much discussion, the leaders settled on Laetitia Griffith to represent us in Amsterdam. She was black and had roots in Suriname, a former Dutch colony in the Caribbean. She could pull in the city’s Creole vote. More importantly, the VVD’s strategists thought she could win over some of the city’s Muslim population.

In the hope of making this task easier, the strategy group also issued a peculiar demand: that I keep silent on all issues to do with Islam, at least until after the election. They then went even further and asked that I publicly state that Islam is a religion of peace.

Suffice it to say that I refused. I explained why refusing to question the threat of Islamism wasn’t exactly a shrewd political tactic. Instead, I emphasised, we should be encouraging Muslim minorities to integrate and embrace Dutch values. But the party sided with Griffith, I was put on the naughty step, and we lost the election. Yet even this didn’t give the leadership pause for thought, its main takeaway being: if we wanted to win in the country’s four largest cities, we should continue to give isolationist forms of Islam a free pass. As I was told over and over by my senior colleagues, it was numerical common sense.

Over the past 18 years, we have witnessed the repercussions of such “common sense” — and not just in the Netherlands. Across the West, the fracturing force of Islamism is causing once-mighty political traditions to creak. In France, for instance, Emmanuel Macron is now doing his best to talk tough on Islam in an attempt to claw back what political authority he hasn’t spent. In the US, meanwhile, the Democrats have no such luxury: concerns are already starting to creep in that they could lose this year’s election if the pro-Palestine supporters mobilised by well-organised Islamists stay home in swing states. Already in Michigan, Rashida Talib has urged Democrats not to vote for Biden.

Even the United Kingdom, that island nation often seen as immune to radical forces, is now being forced to reckon with Islamism. In the week since the Labour Party suspended its candidate in Rochdale, much blame has been placed on a nebulous strain of antisemitism. What’s been missing, however, is an appreciation for where this prejudice so often originates: it is not just the product of an activist-decoloniser undergraduate politics, but of the party’s willingness to appease its Islamist voters.

This phenomenon, of course, extends well beyond the confines of Rochdale and one particular party. Rather, we are witnessing what Christopher Caldwell identified as “the revolution in Europe”. As far back as 2009, Caldwell observed how the mass immigration of Muslims was altering the culture of Europe. These new arrivals were, he noted, not enhancing the spirit of Europe’s cities but supplanting it. As he wrote: “When an insecure, malleable, relativistic culture meets a culture that is anchored, confident, and strengthened by common doctrines, it is generally the former that changes to suit the latter.”

For this, he (like many others) was dismissed by many as a fear-mongering xenophobe. And, taking note of his treatment, Europe’s political leaders continued to sell us false promises about multiculturalism — without realising that, in doing so, they were allowing this process of Islamisation to take root.

When observing this downward spiral, it’s fashionable to blame America; it is, after all, the nation that birthed the mantra of multiculturalism. But if America created the seeds of today’s chaos, the European climate allowed it to blossom. It is no coincidence that the European surge in Islamism came just as the continent’s dechristianisation began to take hold. This surging fanaticism was met with a spiritual vacuum — and therefore thrived.

“This surging fanaticism was met with a spiritual vacuum.”

Faced with the arrival of a new community with such a strong belief system, Europe’s political elites sought refuge in the soft bigotry of low expectations. Denying them agency, we shrouded Muslim immigrants in a rhetoric of victimhood. A set of false assumptions were developed to characterise them as a casualty of exclusion and discrimination. It became just another form of “common sense”.

After 2001, when Jihadi terrorism started to take place in Europe, and survey after survey showed that most Muslims quietly supported the belief system that justified the terrorists’ activities, European leaders doubled down on those assumptions. Rules were relaxed, standards were lowered, and excuses were made whenever their estrangement tipped over into violence.

Meanwhile, the phenomenon of data manipulation became the political norm. Academics and think-tankers lined up to produce reassuring outcomes on paper that refused to acknowledge the rising tide of Islamisation, either by ignoring it completely or downplaying the number of Muslim migrants. The establishment of Sharia tribunals was barely registered, while we were told the construction of gigantic Mosques, madrassas, and Islamic centres were led and manned by moderate Muslims. Those brave enough to still speak out — for example over grooming gangs — were silenced or expelled.

This is the backdrop to the rise of Islamist attacks in Europe and the West, but it is also the cause of today’s political crisis in Britain. Across the country — from Rochdale to Tower HamletsSalisbury to Manchester — we are starting to witness what happens when Islamism is given licence to flourish. Many were fooled into thinking that 2024 would be a “boring year” for Britain: that, after the turbulence of the Tories, the reign of Starmer would, at worst, be benignly insipid.

But this was always a fantasy. Starmer, like so many of his predecessors and counterparts in Europe, is simply focused on the short-term goal of winning the general election. And, again like so many of them, he now finds himself wrestling with a Muslim base that will require compromise if he’s to win their vote: only yesterday, he called for a “ceasefire that lasts” in Gaza, without explaining how that might come about. It is, in other words, increasingly starting to feel like 2005 redux: a replay of the VVD’s electoral conundrum, and an allegedly “common-sense” response that inevitably backfires.

It’s hard not to conclude that this is the “new Britain” promised by its next Prime Minister, where scenes like those we have witnessed in Rochdale become repeated over and over again. This is, after all, what happens when a nation’s foundational principles are eroded — and when, faced with a moral and political vacuum, Islamism is the only potent force in town.


Ayaan Hirsi Ali is an UnHerd columnist. She is also a research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, Founder of the AHA Foundation, and host of The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast. Her new book is Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women’s Rights.

Ayaan

Join the discussion


Join like minded readers that support our journalism by becoming a paid subscriber


To join the discussion in the comments, become a paid subscriber.

Join like minded readers that support our journalism, read unlimited articles and enjoy other subscriber-only benefits.

Subscribe
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

288 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
David Lindsay
David Lindsay
3 months ago

People calling for a ceasefire in Gaza are not the fanatics, any more than we were when we opposed the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya, and any more than we are when we oppose killing people in Yemen because they happened to live in the same place as those who were imposing a blockade that had itself killed or injured no one at all.

David B
David B
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lindsay

There was a ceasefire in Gaza, until October 7th when something broke it. I forget what.

Derek Smith
Derek Smith
3 months ago
Reply to  David B

‘Some people did something.’

Frank Freeman
Frank Freeman
3 months ago
Reply to  David B

Not true. The Israelis were imposing a blockade on Gaza and would not allow Gaza to use it’s airport. Also it would not allow Gaza to develop off shore gas and oil reserves. But more to the point, over 200 Palestinians were killed by illegal settlers and IDF in the west bank BEFORE Oct 7. Hardly a ceasefire.

carl taylor
carl taylor
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank Freeman

Now enlighten us on what the poor, innocents of Hamas were doing in Gaza prior to October 7th that occasioned such a blockade.

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  carl taylor

Now enlighten us on what the poor, innocents of the IDF were doing in Gaza prior to October 7th that occasioned such an action.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank Freeman

Guess it was not very effective (the blockade). The Palestinians are not interested in creating a business economy in Gaza. If fact it would appear they destroyed all businesses after the Jewish people left Gaza. They lived off the UN, and planned and plotted their genocide of the Jews.
There were no IDF soldiers in Gaza prior to the 7th.

Michael K
Michael K
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lindsay

People calling for a ceasefire in Gaza rarely call for the release of all hostages first. They rarely acknowledge the devastation caused in Gaza by Hamas and they never, ever mention the millions of people killed in other Arab countries by their own governments.

How many countries are currently accepting refugees from Gaza?
None.

Frank Freeman
Frank Freeman
3 months ago
Reply to  Michael K

Actually many of those calling for a ceasefire are also calling for the hostages to be released, but how many of those calling for the hostages to be released, and are calling for Palestinian hostages held by Israel, including over 3000 held under “administrative detention” and hundreds of children, to be released?
If you genuinely cared about the hostages, you would be calling for a ceasefire, because that is so far the best way to get the hostages back. Yes they got 2 back by force, but killed 3 hostages in the process.
Why should countries that are mainly dessert have to host refugees? It would make far more sense for Israelis to move to the western countries that say they support Israel.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank Freeman

If what you are saying in the first sentence is true, I certainly have not heard it. Not even heard a faint whisper about hostages.
So we have created a new victimhood, all the Palestinians held by Israel are now ‘hostages’; great gaslighting FF.
STOP THE PRESS. It is all Israel’s fault; (sarcasm)

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lindsay

People calling for a ceasefire in Gaza are not the fanatics

Perhaps not – but you are the people effectively calling for the continuation of hostage taking and random acts of savagery perpetrated against women and children.

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

You seem to be forgetting that the Israelis have been committing “random acts of savagery perpetrated against women and children” against the actual indigenes for a century.
And they’re not getting any less savage:
https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2024/02/15/idf-let-israeli-civilians-film-torture-of-palestinian-detainees-report/

William Brand
William Brand
3 months ago

This is part of the end of the world and the imminent return of Christ. We have 2 possible fixed dates for calculating his return and they both yield the same date for the church rapture. The first date is the 2000 anniversary of the assentation into Heaven Pentecost in 2033 subtract 7 years for the tribulation gives 2066. Israel’s Independence Day in 1948 is the second date. A standard life in the Bible is 90 years. A 12-year-old Bar Mitza Jew in 1948 is scheduled to die in 2066. Christ said that that generation will not pass away until all these things come to pass. These two dates independently seem to give a church Rapture date of Sunday May 30, 2066. Christ said that “not even the son knows the date but only the Father knows.” D day may be classified but one can observe the troops moving toward the invasion beaches and Israel’s Independence Day is a big indicator.

Leejon 0
Leejon 0
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

We don’t have this Rapture thing in European Christianity, I think an American salesman invented it. Probably trying to sell something….

Francisco Menezes
Francisco Menezes
3 months ago
Reply to  Leejon 0

Yes, woolen underwear, because it can be quite chilly up there. Protect your bones from the heavenly humidity.

Micael Gustavsson
Micael Gustavsson
3 months ago
Reply to  Leejon 0

The origin is actually and surprisingly an 18th century Jesuit from Chile (whose name Ihave forgotten). It really took off in the preaching of Charles Nelson Darby (founder of the Plymouth Brethren). So not really originating in the US at all.

Seb Dakin
Seb Dakin
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

So that’ll make it the centennial anniversary of England’s 1966 World Cup victory.
“Some people are on the pitch, they think it’s all over..it is now!

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
3 months ago
Reply to  Seb Dakin

Very droll

Rod McLaughlin
Rod McLaughlin
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

20 weeks ago, I would have read this article with interest. I don’t particularly like the rise of Islam in Britain. But everything has changed, changed utterly.

Muslims are the leading opponents of British support for genocide.

The problem is Jewish influence, not Islam.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Rod McLaughlin

Only looking after their fellow islamists . They fully supported the attacks on the dance festival etc .Or was that like the Easter rising ?

Hazel Gazit
Hazel Gazit
3 months ago
Reply to  Rod McLaughlin

But the 21% Arab population in Israel isn’t having Free Palestine hate marches in Tel Aviv, Haifa or even Jaffa. Arabs are not required to do mandatory military service in the IDF, though many do. Since 7th October there has been a big rise in Arab recruitment to combat units, wishing to protect the only democracy in the Middle East.

M Harries
M Harries
3 months ago
Reply to  Rod McLaughlin

Look at the example Islam sets when it’s in control – Iran, Arabia, Islamic State, Al Qaeda, Taliban. Compare those with the democratic jurisdiction of Israel. Sure Israeli politics is flawed but no more so than other democracies are or would be in their situation.
As Youtube’s Apostate Prophet says… “Stay away from islam”.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

2033 minus 7 is 2026 not 2066. Phew , not so long to wait

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

You forgot the changeover from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. When it happened, people protested that they’d “lost” 11 days off their lives.

You’re wasting your own life with this drivel, but that’s your choice.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Fortunately we are in the year 2777 AUC*.

(*Ab urbe condita.)

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

To put it mildly, your reasoning is eccentric. When family members suggest you follow more grounded pursuits, you should listen to them.

Phil Day
Phil Day
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

If you are going to make predictions like this it would be a good idea to check your maths – is 2026 the date you’re shooting for?

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
3 months ago
Reply to  William Brand

Oh no. Very big risk Jesus & Angels will VAR the third goal and rule that it did not cross the line….

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago

Sadly, not entirely a moral and political vacuum. We have our glorious Western post-Christian values of tolerance and inclusiveness – for which wisdom we never fail to congratulate ourselves (even unto our own destruction).

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Are you including the church of Justin Welby in the ‘glorious Western post-Christian values of tolerance and inclusiveness ‘ or do you expect lining up behind Justin and his lady vicars will lead to a crusade or reconquista ?
Actually it’s becoming obvious secular woke post Christian values are the values of Justin Welby and the Church of England . I don’t understand what help Ayaan Hirsi Ali believes is going to come from that quarter .

Stu Std
Stu Std
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Your concern is justified but, unless you faithfully, responsibly and consistently show up for worship in some church every Sunday and do your part, your words are empty.

Stu Std
Stu Std
3 months ago
Reply to  Stu Std

[Correction] “Your concern is justified but, provided you faithfully, responsibly and consistently show up for worship in some church every Sunday and do your part; unless your words are empty.”

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
3 months ago
Reply to  Stu Std

Did you know you can edit?

Roddy Campbell
Roddy Campbell
3 months ago
Reply to  Stu Std

Not in the least. Sometimes the onlooker sees more of the match.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Roddy Campbell

And gets to run away before the action starts.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Stu Std

Rubbish.

David Palmer
David Palmer
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

This is a non-reply. Stu Std makes a good point it seems a good few agree with, as I do.

M Harries
M Harries
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

It’s a safety in numbers game. This is how Salman Rushdie’s book was able to be burnt so openly, fiercely and triumphantly in public. AHA is now on Team Christianity, I reckon, because in the past anyway, it was a force that stood up to the Muslim wave. The Christian base contains some that are unhinged, but the overall numbers provides some measure of safety against encroaching Islamisation.
I don’t want integration … of Quranic / Mohamedic values into the British fabric. I don’t want any of it.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  M Harries

But you do, for certain! I guarantee the vast majority of the Qu’ran’s teachings are EXACTLY what you want built into the British fabric …assuming you’re a decent human being with good Christian values because they are the SAME!

Dave R
Dave R
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Yep. “Death to infidels” is right up there. What’s your guarantee worth?

David Kavanagh
David Kavanagh
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Let’s hear them then.

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Even greater rubbish.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Which is what Isis ,whose leaders were all serious Islamic scholars, so clearly demonstrated .
Or if you prefer Saudi Arabia , Iran , Pakistan and Afghanistan . All models of ‘good Christian values ‘ because they are the SAME .
Hey Liam did you go to one of those boarding schools run by the Christian Brothers ? I was told by one of the old boys their beliefs had much in common with ISIS .

Oh YOU were being IRONIC ! Liam that’s not all that easy to spot , because Justin and his bishops and vicars probably believe pretty much what you posted and certainly the multi -cultists at the BBC and the universities . And the main political parties . Good wind up anyway ! Edit

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

The archbish of Canterbury was dragged up in the gutter. It’s true. So he knows what life is like for us poor bastards.

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
3 months ago
Reply to  jane baker

He is a silly man and proves it each time he opens his mouth.

Margie Murphy
Margie Murphy
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Ridiculous!

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Rolls on floor laughing! Are you making that simplistic atheist assumption that all people are good at heart,all people have an innate moral compass,no one would kill,seduce,traduce,betray or swindle anyone else in a perfect,fair and just society. Because many people are AMORAL and they do not have a Moral Compass . I am one of them,that’s how I know. If I spoke to you in the pub where most atheists seem to hang out most of the time – if they can find one open I guess that isn’t now a Tesco Express,or if I sat by you at your “this is just like the good bits of church” Sunday get together,you would go,”Ugh,get away from me,I’m not talking to you, as an atheist I live by high moral standards of behaviour and impeccable conduct. I can see that you are a depraved deplorable so I am going to freeze you out”. A great deal of history including HISTORY involves populations reaching a critical mass by which point they cease to be the “pat on the head” minority. Labour has got White Saviour Complex. They don’t like brown skinned people who get uppity and don’t want or need their patronising attention. Their voter base goes AWOL and votes Tory once its got a foothold.

Steve Murray
Steve Murray
3 months ago
Reply to  jane baker

What you claim to be an “atheist assumption” is nothing of the kind.
There’s only one group making false assumptions here, and it’s not atheists.

Clare Knight
Clare Knight
3 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Exactly.

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
3 months ago
Reply to  Clare Knight

You’re slurring your words; that’s enough booze for now.

Johan Rehnstrom
Johan Rehnstrom
3 months ago
Reply to  Steve Murray

Exactly

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  jane baker

Jane Baker, I was with you until you declared that you have no moral compass, which is to say, a sociopath. Frightening.

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

You could probably say the same for Mein Kampf (My Jihad). When I skim-read it, it sounded like a modern social justice tract, even down to blaming Jews for being over-privileged.

Eleanor Barlow
Eleanor Barlow
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

No thanks. Any belief system that incorporates misogyny, hatred of Jews and LGBT and threatens death to anyone who challenges or makes fun of their belief system is anathema to me.

elaine chambers
elaine chambers
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

That’s true of all religions. Every last one is misogynist, based on promoting the self interest of men and the subjugation of women in the service of men. In the meantime, we have to look at the greatest threat which at present is Islam and join whatever is available to counter it. Druids are not so well organised as the Christians nor as powerful, after all they are in the House of Lords. Yes it’s the Christians I will go into battle with. We can sirt them out afterwards.

james goater
james goater
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

“Oh ye who believe! Take not the Jew and the Christian for friends. They are friend to one another. He among you who take them for friends is (one) of them. Lo! Allah guideth not the wrongdoing folk.”
(Qu’ran, chapter 5, verse 51)
The book is riddled with chapters of similar sentiment and devout Muslims endeavour to learn the lot, by heart. OBL could recite every chapter, and ISIS leader (and Caliphate butcher) Abu Bakr al Baghdadi was a Qu’ranic scholar. The book is being given away, free, on the streets of London — or was, the last time I visited, in 2023.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Clearly you have never read that book, and if you did peruse a few pages, you failed to understand the contents! The Bible and the Quran are not the same.
1. Most parts of the Bible are descriptive rather than prescriptive. All of the Quran is prescriptive, which means no changes can be made and there is very little room for interpretation.
2. Abrogation: older, more peaceful parts are abrogated by chronologically newer, and always more violent parts. If you don’t know why that is, look up the fictitious biography of the so-called prophet, and his path from illiterate merchant to bloodthirsty and power-hungry warlord.
3. A violent child molester whose urges and wishes were conveniently “approved” by divine revelations, which arrived just when needed, is considered the most perfect human being! No, thanks!

There is much more, of course, and I hope for you that you won’t find your way at the receiving end of Islamic justice. On the other hand, it might be a curative experience.

elaine chambers
elaine chambers
3 months ago
Reply to  M Harries

Humm, somewhere here fits the saying, ‘best to befriend your enemy’s enemy’. I, as an atheist, will join any Christian crusade if it’s fighting off Islam. Bring it on.

Will Longfield
Will Longfield
3 months ago

Christianity is less concerned with “defeating” Islam and more concerned with saving souls. From the Christian perspective, the atheist is in a more desperate situation than a pious Muslim who in his heart seeks God.
Muslims aren’t the ones who slaughter millions of children in abortuaries, flood the world with porn and deify homosexuality and transgenderism.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago
Reply to  Will Longfield

Tell that to my maternal ancestors who bravely fought against the Ottomans at the gates of Vienna in 1683! As for your second claim in sentence three, the people who do this are in it for money and power. Our relative wealth and stability have corrupted us. In the meantime, here is a little tidbit for giggles: https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2019/05/274074/moroccans-porn-consumption-ramadan

sue vogel
sue vogel
3 months ago

Israel is trying to do just that against Hamas and its mindless fellow-travellers

Roddy Campbell
Roddy Campbell
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

I didn’t read anything in this article that suggested that that the course Justin Welby had led the C of E down will address the problem of militant and exploitative Islam. Rather that it was adherence to those values by themselves without a robust underlying counternarrative that was allowing militant, malign Islam to gain traction in the West.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Roddy Campbell

I know she didn’t say that . It is often now said we are still a Christian society in that contemporary secular values actually derive from Christianity . My concern is that that is possibly true and it’s not obvious whether Welby and the CofE ( the actual state official religion ) is parroting woke values or woke values are unconsciously derived from where Christianity has been drifting post Darwin . Either way the established church is not going to provide any kind of defence against islamisation with its current leadership . It’s too masochistic , too obsessed with giving hospitality to outsiders ,the more hostile and sinful the better. Actually woke vicars aren’t especially putting themselves at risk . They like to think they are , but , when a vicar consciously helps an Islamist get a passport by pretending to convert him to Christianity , it won’t be him who is put in much danger . It’ll be others .

It was in a previous article that AHA said she was becoming a Christian , and others seemed to think this was because she sees it a necessary check against islamisation . If only it were .

elaine chambers
elaine chambers
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Good points Alan. Even though we might not practice Christanity, we Brits are all imbuded with a mix of Christian vaules tempered with J Bentham. We are not easliy going to roll over and submit the Islam.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago

Right you are, Ms Chambers!

Norm Haug
Norm Haug
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

There are not many people who have a better understanding of Islam and Islamization than Ayaan. I was surprised when she became a Christian but I am sure she will not be one of those Christians who enables and elevates Muslims by pretending that Islamic values are the same as Christian values.

Jonathan Story
Jonathan Story
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

The CoE has to be taken back from the jackasses who run it. The jackasses who run it are not Christians: they are social justice warriors, ie they are peddling new-Marxist crap.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan Story

It is an incredible predicament for practicing Christians. Luckily, christian worship is not particularly interactive, so one can go through life without having to deal with this type of non christian activism – transgenderism (say). There is no taking it back, it just has to be ignored and this is what I see most people doing.

Jonathan Story
Jonathan Story
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter F. Lee

I am referring to the churches, the precincts which are the beautiful heirloom we inherited. They have been kidnapped by jackasses. The properties must be reclaimed. How? By whom?

Patricia Hardman
Patricia Hardman
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Indeed, society must be tolerant and inclusive to the point that some of us are excluded. Scientific reality and the rights of some people (particularly women and children) must all g8ve way to the woke agenda.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Im surprised, but very pleased, the average UnHerd read supports this assertion. I can only assume thd majority missed the irony?

Dr E C
Dr E C
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

It’s been clear for some time you inject Al Jazeera directly into your veins, Liam, so I wouldn’t be too pleased if ‘the average’ reader can’t spot the garbled attempt at irony here from your regular hallucinations

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago
Reply to  Dr E C

Dear Dr E C,

We all recognise Liam for what he is. I am beginning to believe that he belongs to those who have to experience in order to be convinced. Perhaps being on the receiving end of some Islamic “justice” will cure him of his delusions?

James Love
James Love
3 months ago

Unless Islamism is dealt with it will drive people towards the far right. Make your choice political classes.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  James Love

To oppose question the teachings of Islam is not “extreme right”
Those who suggest so do no favours to that need

John Tyler
John Tyler
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

It all depends on your definition of ‘right’ in politics. More certain is that Islam is an authoritarian religion and, even in some less-extreme versions, approves of the goal of an Islamic theocracy dominating the globe, by force if necessary. It’s only real claims to being a ‘religion of peace’ are that it upholds an ideal of all Muslims living in peace together and another that anyone else should do as they are told by Muslims.
I’m not suggesting all Muslims are fanatics! but that the basic tenets of Islam are autocratic and elitist, which allows a viciously aggressive culture to thrive without criticism.

David Kavanagh
David Kavanagh
3 months ago
Reply to  John Tyler

Yes, a religion of peace to those who accept; death to those who don’t

Grumpy Old Git
Grumpy Old Git
3 months ago
Reply to  David Kavanagh

“Accept”? “Submit” would be a better word.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
3 months ago
Reply to  James Love

Is not Islamism essentially an extreme-right political-religious movement? They believe in enforcing a puritanical dress code on women. They strongly disapprove of homosexuality. They are pretty patriarchal in their approach. Does this sound like a liberal left progressive organisation? Even their approval of polyamory- the latest progressive enthusiasm- is confined to polygamy and has more than a hint of patriarchy. It sounds like the sort of thing your average far-right bloke would be slavering to support. Would not the extreme-right want to support this antidote to all the wet feminist atheistic rot ruining the West? They are even on the same page as the bloke with the toothbrush mustachio, the poster-boy of the extreme right, as far as Jews are concerned.

Paul T
Paul T
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Could you explain that in the context of the last Remembrance Sunday please.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul T

The media barely DO Remembrance Sunday now since the conflict erupted in Ukraine. We used to have weeks of documentaries about the horror and pity of War. Readings of Wilfred Owens poems. Battlefield walks. The interview with Harry Patch. But now we have to be GungHo about War again. We have to be full of bloodthirsty desire to tear Russians limb from limb,we have to approve of “giving” millions of pounds/dollars worth of armaments so whoever can squit on whoever else. As it’s an Arms “trade” that means someone is paying ,but who,apart from the tax payer who intends his/her contribution for the infrastructure of their society.

Hugh Bryant
Hugh Bryant
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

The ‘extreme right’ really only exists in the fantasy of leftists, you know. It’s not actually a thing in any significant way. Even Tommy Robinson is pretty mainstream liberal in all respects other than his opposition to Islamisation. The ‘extreme right’ is essentially just your version of Emmanuel Goldstein.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

says yet another, delusional extreme right winger, perhaps. Nobody is going to admit to being an extreme rightwinger are they? Part of being an extremist is believing yourself to be moderate and your moderate opponents to be extremists; it’s in thd DNA isn’t it?

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Please identify these extreme right wing organizations.

El Uro
El Uro
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

You can find them in any bad Hollywood movie. There’s always a bad white guy with a swastika tattoo.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  El Uro

typical non-answer

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
3 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Bryant

My comment was directed towards the assumption by James Love that unless Islamism is dealt with it would drive people to the far right. Islamists have many beliefs that would normally characterise them as “right wing”. The left particularly the extreme left has throughout history been characterised by anti-religious and atheist sentiments. Religion was attacked during the French Revolution and seldom is promoted under communism except in some nationalist form.

You are, of course, correct that right and left have been drained of much meaning and “extreme right” has simply become a catchphrase to encompass whatever ideological difference the speaker wants to emphasise and disparage.

I could easily imagine a populist “extreme left party” seeking to gain or retain power by attacking the pernicious effects of Islam, the “opium of the people”. The strong family and clan ties fostered by Islam is a direct threat to the centralising anti-family sentiments of the authoritarian left. The present alignment of the left with Islamism may be no more permanent than the Soviet pact with the ruling NSDAP party – a mere temporary convenience – there is really no natural ideological alignment between Islamist and leftist ideology.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

..as indeed are Zionists themselves! But extremists tend to hate other extremists for minor differences even when the majority of their extremist views are in line. Perhaps this us a good thing? Look at what happened when extremist Evangelicals lined up with murderous Zionists.. genocide!

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Not putting up with this jew-hater any longer. Sayonara.

Judy Johnson
Judy Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

I have reaad your comment with interest. I simply cannot see why, in the US, evengelical Christians are almost invariably Republican.
The right wing attitude that when people do not do well, it is because they have not made enough effort, is the opposite of Jesus’ teaching about the poor. (In the UK this almost defined Margaret Thatcher although as a particulaarly intelligent person from a modest background who did not realise her own intelligence, it could almost be interpreted as humility!)
I agree that Islamism has the rigidity of the right wing.

Jeremy Bray
Jeremy Bray
3 months ago
Reply to  Judy Johnson

I thought the extreme right wing opinion as to why people have not done well is supposed to be more that they have not done well because they are inherently inferior.

Undoubtedly some people don’t do well because they have not made enough effort but that might be because they are exercising their freedom of choice to spend their time doing something that will not result in their doing well in a conventional sense. Is that bad? If the person complains about the result and attributes it to wicked capitalism they take on a left wing analysis. I am always uncertain about Jesus’s teaching regarding the poor – the parable of the talents suggest a rather harsh view of those who fail to make use of the talents they are given. I am not sure he would enthusiastically embrace a policy whereby large sections of the population are supported in idleness as a broad principle. Would that make him a right winger?

Of course, we humans are great at making patterns of random shapes and self contradictory words and can interpret the Bible to fit our own prejudices.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Judy Johnson

‘rigidity’ applies to the majority of political wings. The only difference I find between left and right. Is that one only gets obfuscation and non-answers from the left. The certainty of belief seems to be common to all polarities/

Mirax Path
Mirax Path
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

Except it in reality it is the far left ‘progressive’ liberals that march lockstep with the islamists. They share similar totalitarian mindsets. The red-green alliance has been marching on the streets of western countries for 3 solid months now.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Jeremy Bray

You know what you say is complete rubbish. Why do you feel the need to compartmentalize everything into left or right. It then becomes one total smear job. Is facism left or right?

Samir Iker
Samir Iker
3 months ago
Reply to  James Love

They keep calling sensible, conservative people n*z*s but don’t realise they are recreating the Weimar republic.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  Samir Iker

..asdid the people who supported the Weimar Republic! Look how that turned out!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  James Love

Try this: Unless moderate Muslims are nurtured they will drift towards extremism especially if attacked by racial bigots.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

One of the few sensible things you have said. Most Muslims are moderate and want the same things we all want – freedom and prosperity.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Not if you were brought up in a household in which money and wealth was despised and spoken of with contempt. (I’ve got over it!)
This is the odd thing though,and it affects us all,native British or of ethnic background. At some point an individual gets to a level of affluence,not even wealth and he/she/they become a target for the sort of contempt I’ve described above,the despisers may believe their dismissal is from religious principles ie do not hoard up treasure on earth,blessed are the poor (How?),but often it’s envy and jealousy paraded as moral virtue.

Anna Bramwell
Anna Bramwell
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Plus 80% want Israel destroyed.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Unless you were indoctrinated as a child. The Palestinians do not want freedom and prosperity, they want the Land of Israel.

Dr E C
Dr E C
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Your view of Muslims is so incredibly infantilising: you’re suggesting that unless society ‘nurtures’ them like babies they’ll ‘drift’ towards murder, gang rape, acid attacks, FGM etc. Can you hear yourself?

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  James Love

They’ve made their choice. You can use dog-whistle legislation to imprison the right (e.g. “misinformation”, aka non-leftist opinions), but easily offended Islamists have to be treated with kid gloves lest they turn violent. Apparently not much can be done about violent Islamists because that’d be racist, or at least “Islamophobic”.

David McKee
David McKee
3 months ago

We British are good at turning a blind eye to inconvenient facts. For example, Lutfur Rahman got away with it for years in Tower Hamlets, until a small group of concerned citizens, at great cost to themselves, revealed what was going on. The police were forced to take action.

There are murky goings-on in Rochdale and elsewhere. I hope the London-based media shows some sustained interest for a change, so we get to the bottom of it.

Ash Ley
Ash Ley
3 months ago
Reply to  David McKee

You’ve more chance of winning the lottery the same day you marry Miss World and score the winning goal in the FA Cup Final than our partisan media swimming against the DEI tide. Even the Telegraph is being bought by islamists.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  Ash Ley

..much of the problem is the failure to tell moderate, decent Muslims (with values every bit a good as, often far better than, so-called Christians and their racist, bigoted, genocidal views) from the tiny minority of Islamist extremists within that artifical grouping.. Imagine how stupid it would be to label all Christians as extremist Evangelical Zionists! Yet that in effect, is what you’re doing!

R.I. Loquitur
R.I. Loquitur
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Where are all the “moderate, decent Muslims” when their extremist brothers attack Israel? Oh yeah, in the support Hamas parade.

Walter Schwager
Walter Schwager
3 months ago
Reply to  R.I. Loquitur

In Indonesia, by far the largest Muslim nation

Wilfred Davis
Wilfred Davis
3 months ago

What percentage of the Muslims in Britain are from Indonesia?

Genuine question.

David McKee
David McKee
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

You have a very valid point, Liam. Tarring all Muslims with the same brush leaves the moderates isolated and demoralised. And the average Muslim who’s tempted by extremist rhetoric will think, “Might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb.”
We are doing ourselves no favours.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  David McKee

Have you ever heard any muslim moderate speak out against any ‘allah akbar’ terrorist attack.

james goater
james goater
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter F. Lee

Good question. The general response seems to be to say “They ( the terrorists) cannot be Muslims”! I heard this response immediately following 9/11, for example.

Peter Principle
Peter Principle
3 months ago
Reply to  David McKee

Lutfur Rahman is now back in power in his fiefdom of Tower Hamlets, this time heading up his own political party.

Samuel Ross
Samuel Ross
3 months ago

The people in charge don’t have a clue. Clever idiots, they were promoted far beyond their ability perform.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
3 months ago

Politicians need to put on their big boy pants and treat Muslims like anyone else – no special privileges, no soft bigotry of low expectations. Muslims are a small minority of the population. They may be well organized, but their political influence is amplified by weaklings. In 2017, only 1.1% of the population in the USA identified as Muslim. In Britain, Muslims were 4.4% of the population in 2023. This is not a huge voting block. There may be isolated constituencies where Muslims make a large voting block, but these are the outliers.

Jonathan Andrews
Jonathan Andrews
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Politicians need to put on their big boy pants in general and work out what they believe. Then, they have to convince us that their ideas are good ones. If we don’t think they’re good ideas, we can vote for someone else.

They need to stop trying to guess what we want, like at a job interview.

I’m sure in the olden days it wasn’t like this.

Andrew S. Green
Andrew S. Green
3 months ago

Whilst most politicians are only interested in keeping their sorry arses sat firmly in the first class seats aboard the gravy train, I don’t hold out much hope for them firmly and honestly nailing any colours to masts any time soon.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

But Jim, our State Equality Laws compel special and elevated privilege for Muslims! They sit atop the new CRT shaped Hierarchy of Victimhood and Privilege! Yes our progressive political classes are moral cowards who have acted appallingly. They all bow the knee to identitarianism and the nasty street Mobs. But this most twisted of State laws makes your rightful aspiration of tougher fair dealing with a now existential problem for us and Europe doubly impossible.

M Harries
M Harries
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

The APPG British Muslims definition of ‘Islamopobia’ implies being Muslim is an inherent trait. It therefore automatically undermines the position and safety of apostates and leaving those of Jihadi ilk rub their hands with glee. It is an astonishing own-goal.
The definition has been adopted by all parties apart from the Tories, I believe.

Eleanor Barlow
Eleanor Barlow
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

Equality laws were never meant to offer special privileges. They were meant to ensure that nobody got treated less favourably under the law due to their, race, gender etc etc. The big mistake was including religion in the list of protected characteristics. Devout religionists always want to impose their views on everyone else – and none are as good as the Muslims at conning the simple-minded in order to get what they want. Political beliefs aren’t protected under equality law so why should religion?

R.I. Loquitur
R.I. Loquitur
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

“Political beliefs aren’t protected under equality law so why should religion?”

Spot on. Religions are nothing more than belief systems. IMO the inverse is also true.

Walter Marvell
Walter Marvell
3 months ago
Reply to  Eleanor Barlow

I agree Eleanor. The architects of EQA were naive liberal progressives akin to Chinese scientists at Wuhan trying to make the world ‘safer’ by tinkering with research outlawed in the West. But the law like the virus was unsafe and once out in society it has mutated and evolved unpredictably and wildly, to toxic effect. It was pulsed out into every corner of society because it was a mandated State law, not the whim of looney academics. The State did not stop to think – if we posit victims (The Nine), that requires oppressors (White male Patriarchy). So – stunningly – they embedded Americas toxic Critical Race Theory at the heart of a new multicultural mass immigration society. The Nine are now privileged not just in law but in popular culture media art theatre and in coverage by a captured BBC. And the cynical cretins in the Labour Party seek only to deepen the rift by making more EQA about the only policy they are prepared to share.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Walter Marvell

They will not assimilate. They have large families and school indoctrination.

Kate Martin
Kate Martin
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

There are over 2,000,000,000 Muslims in the world and with their fertility rate as high as it is, that number increases nearly exponentially. Yes, they are 1.1% of the US population, but they don’t assimilate. Notable is that nearly 30% of Muslims in the US are Islamophobes themselves.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
3 months ago

Anyone who has not read Michel Houellebecq’s novel Submission should really do so right away. 8 years ago, it’s setting of the French Left making common cause with the Islamists to defeat the National Rally Party seemed far-fetched. Not so much anymore.
In any EU country, the Left’s acceptance of militant Islam appears to be proportional to the number of Muslim voters and the polling percentage of the (increasingly misnamed) far-Right party in said country.

Lewis Betty
Lewis Betty
3 months ago

A more important introduction to what could happen in France, and is well on the way to what is already happening, is a collection of selected political writing by Renaud Camus (“the other Camus”), titled Enemy of the Disaster. The “Disaster” is known as “the Great Replacement”–a reference to the replacement of French culture by Islamicization. A large percentage of Muslims living in France today have migrated north not to enjoy the benefits of a French way of life but to replace it with their own. America has a crisis at its southern border, but at least the migrants swarming up from Mexico want to be assimilated.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Lewis Betty

WHY have the French “lost their bottle”!

I seem to recall that they knew precisely what to do in Paris in October 1961.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago

Gilet Jeaune?

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

There’s much room for ‘improvement’.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Lewis Betty

130 different countries and counting; well over 50% being single males in their twenties and thirties.

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago

What exactly, would a reading of Submission achieve? The book has been referred to many, many times in the UnHerd forums. I’m sure all the readers here know about it even if they have not actually read it (a bit like Orwell’s 1984 in that respect).
Do you imagine the UnHerd readership will spring into action and create a movement dedicated to turning back the migrant hordes? Face the truth – this is an opinion churning talk shop and conservatives are probably the most politically lazy people you could find. They love to talk in strong terms about how the world is going wrong and that somebody somewhere ought to do something about it – then they are surprised to find that determined activist ideologues under the banner of Social Justice have marched through their prized institutions.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

‘The exception proves the rule’ as The Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei  so amply demonstrated not that long ago.

Wasn’t their cry “tomorrow belongs to me”?

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago

You’ve lost me. How is the German Workers Party an exception that proves the rule? A revolutionary rather than conservative movement surely.
Do you imagine that conservative British workers might rise up from their comfy sofas and march into the streets in such vast numbers that our shifty governing class would be forced to find a way to turn back the migrant hordes they currently feel obliged to welcome? Dream on Stanhope.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Newton’s Third Law.

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago

You speak in riddles. Why?

Aphrodite Rises
Aphrodite Rises
3 months ago

Equal and opposite forces. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. Rather like Hegel’s thesis and antithesis though Hegel allows for synthesis.

M Harries
M Harries
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

No, conservative British workers will not march as they are too afraid of being outed as ‘far-right’ and uncaring by the mainstream media. How then would that affect their job prospects and those in social circles who would be quite happy to ‘not invite them’ in various ways.
There are outliers who do it, Ann Marie Waters for one. Her reward?She appeared compared and equated with an extremist Islamist on a BBC programme some years back. Wikipedia, or whoever has the most determination in editing her page, characterisers her as ‘Far Right’.

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago
Reply to  M Harries

Nobody said it would be easy. As I noted in my initial comment posted in the early hours of this morning we are too proud of our virtues of tolerance and inclusiveness – hence the fear of being labelled far right or uncaring. You might be interested in this:
https://www.amren.com/features/2012/07/pathological-altruism/
The link is to a detailed review of a book which explores the way in which altruism can become self-destructive.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

A mere NINE words will sort this out:
Front rank FIRE!
Middle rank FIRE!
Rear rank FIRE!

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago

You’re a bad egg Charlie and no mistake!!

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

An openly anti semitie calling someone e else a bad egg.

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago

I have written it before, but I am quite fond of you, Mr Stanhope. I don’t agree with you on everything, but I respect your clarity of thought and your knowledge of history. Rare characteristics these days.

Anna Bramwell
Anna Bramwell
3 months ago
Reply to  M Harries

The dockers marched, and were ignored, their leaders pilloried and sacked. The race riots of the 1050s, largely against the beloved Windrush generation, led to the marchers being imprisoned for very long periods of time.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

One fly in your ointment is your failure to observe the vast number of British Workers who are themselves immigrants or 2nd generation immigrants..
Another fly is your failure to see the vary divergence of views among (a) workers and (b) Immigrants ..and indeed (c) British even those who are white (nominally) Christians. Not all members of superficially gathered groupings think alike.

Rob N
Rob N
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

“conservatives are probably the most politically lazy people”. It is not so much we are lazy but that telling other people what to do is, almost by definition, anti-Conservative and so hard to justify being an activist.

Simon Templar
Simon Templar
3 months ago
Reply to  Rob N

No, but you can stand up at meetings and say, “There’s another way to look at this.”

Grumpy Old Git
Grumpy Old Git
3 months ago
Reply to  Simon Templar

The Party says there is no other way. And the Party is infallible.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
3 months ago
Reply to  Simon Templar

Or as Solzhenitsyn says, you can refuse to participate in meetings where obvious falsehoods are being affirmed as the truth.

Simon Templar
Simon Templar
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Getting off the couch:

– Get informed by conservative thought leaders like Jordan Peterson and AHA. (They haven’t been silenced yet.)
– Show up at local party events and speak out. More people will agree with you than you realize
– If your reasonable logic will get you expelled, then get expelled but free some hostages in the process
– It’s not too late.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

1) It’s a very good book. Entertaining but with a message. In that vein, I consider Handmaid’s Tale worth reading on the same basis, even though I disagree with its message.
2) A great many conservatives still do not seem to take the immigration problem seriously.
You’re right, conservatives are generally preoccupied with things outside of politics; I wouldn’t say “lazy”, but I understand what you mean. All the more reason for them to wake up. Western governments are not going to defend civilization. Those who believe in it must act accordingly (ala The Benedict Option) to do so themselves.
That’s why you read Submission.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago

..much too narrow a view. Like any great lie it has a marvelling of truth to give it traction..

Sylvia Volk
Sylvia Volk
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

… a marbling of truth to make it tastier?

Ash Ley
Ash Ley
3 months ago

If only western politicians had the wit to consider 1400 years of violent, antisemitic jihad before destroying our culture with mass islamic immigration.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Ash Ley

The secularised Jewish liberals were/are right behind this . They seemed to believe secularisation of Muslims was as inevitable as secularisation of everyone else . Any other thought was ‘racist’ .

Paul T
Paul T
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Did they, the Jews, do it to themselves?

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul T

I realise that’s sarcasm . I am not saying Jews are solely responsible for mass migration of Muslims post ww2 . Just saying it’s equally silly to cast Jews as ALL perpetual victims with no agency . In my own family I have one progressive narcissist for a cousin and her son is a woeful hypocrite of a Newsnight ‘producer’ who will protect serious criminals in his own family ( including a senior policeman) if he calculates it’s in his own interests.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Ah, once again, it’s all the fault of the Jews.

Margie Murphy
Margie Murphy
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

Unfortunately leftist Jews spearheaded modern mass migration into Europe and the US. Many of them make no secret of it. Check out Barbara Spector et Al. Probably to counteract white supremism but it has backfired. Jews have not been such targets in a long time and its not from white supremacists. Mass Islamic migration serves no purpose except to destroy the west like a boiling frog. Slowly. We are no match for muscular aggressive Islam especially in the face of the numerous home grown useful idiots that dance to their tune.

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  Margie Murphy

“Islam is the broom of Israel”

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Margie Murphy

Again, what a bigoted joke to suggest that liberal Jews somehow have more responsibility than the far more numerous number of non-Jewish liberals in the Western world, including the U.S. I mean, if “Barbara Spector et al” said this or that, that’s proof dem Jews were behind it all.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

They (we?) are massively represented in the media and academia , you must admit A soupçon of mea culpa may be in order from western liberals of all backgrounds .

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Margie Murphy

Imagine these same conversations around the camp fires in the prairie lands of North America,among the Sioux,Lakota,Dakota,Cherokee,Navajo et al. This is a huge land,theres room for us all. Their religion is one of kindness and love. Don’t worry.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Margie Murphy

La Spectre was home grown in New York , then Israel and started educating us on the necessary future of Europe from her perch in Sweden , during that country’s aspiration to be a ‘moral superpower’ phase.

Liam O'Mahony
Liam O'Mahony
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

It is odd though, is it not, that wherever Jews go trouble follows.. they are a tiny minority of the world’s population.
Chinese and Indians spread all over (even us Irish too) and all seem to assimilate fine.. but then we don’t think we’re God’s chosen few and the rest are substandard. Maybe that’s the problem? After all, Jews (who didn’t think* that way?) lived in harmony with Muslims and Christians for hundreds of years in Ottoman ruled Palestine.
*I suspect the majority told their Jewish neighbours that was a no-no.

Jim Veenbaas
Jim Veenbaas
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Holy crao dude! You’re an awful antisemite.

Carl Valentine
Carl Valentine
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim Veenbaas

Oh rubbish, why can’t the Jews be criticised? It is not hate speech it is just an opinion, I think you lot just hate Muslims and know very little about them, is that racism or bigotry I am confused? Sounds like the left and the Unherd right are ALL indulging in censorship

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Carl Valentine

“why can’t the Jews be criticised?”.

Perhaps because they are the self-styled “chosen people”?

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Carl Valentine

So mere opinions can’t be hate speech ?

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Pure unadulterated (and woefully ignorant) Jew-hate.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

Hey dudes,we all gotta Lurve Everee-b-o-d-eeee,peace and love man

Carl Valentine
Carl Valentine
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

What would you know Harry, you’re not very bright are you… So you think Jews are lovely and Muslims are bad do you?

Julian Farrows
Julian Farrows
3 months ago
Reply to  Carl Valentine

I know right! Those contemptible Jews throwing acid into children’s faces, ramming cars into people, blowing up concert-goers, throwing old ladies out of windows, molesting young girls, stabbing writers in their eyeballs, blowing up buildings, beheading teachers, and crashing planes into cities. Islam is the Religion of Peace and death to all who disagree!

Another Username
Another Username
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Being one rung above slave is hardly peace and harmony. As much of an ahistorical joke as “Irish assimilation”.

How do you know someone is Irish? Wait five seconds and they’ll tell you.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

As it happens ,Liam , it’s the Irish Travellers who are notorious for criminality and antisocial behaviour .

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Liam o’mahony, you need to qualify your assertion Jews experienced peace in Ottoman Palestine, to acknowledge at the least, the Hebron massacre of 1517.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian_S

The Ottomans were imperialists anyway . I thought woke Liam hated imperialists

Katja Sipple
Katja Sipple
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

They were imperialists, colonisers, and slaveholders! If I recall correctly, the Ottoman corsairs, also known as Barbary pirates, sailed all the way up to southern Ireland where they raided entire villages and either murdered or enslaved the poor residents. The Sack of Baltimore in West Cork comes to mind as a famous example…

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Liam O'Mahony

Spoken like a true anti semitic. You’re not even bothering to hide your views any more.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

All those “Who Do You Think You Are?” Pop tv genealogical investigations that ended up in somewhere in Middle Europe ending in “witz”. To be blessed and chosen by God is a dubious and uncomfortable honour.

Alan Osband
Alan Osband
3 months ago
Reply to  UnHerd Reader

See above

Jim C
Jim C
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Besides Soros, Barbara Lerner Spector, Count Coudenhove-Kalergi, and Jewish progressives who have called for open borders, which Jews are “behind this”?

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim C

Go online and type in “anti-white”

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago

Go F yourself.

Ethniciodo Rodenydo
Ethniciodo Rodenydo
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

Is that the best you can do?

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  Jim C

Well The Yahoo don’t give us much confidence thinking he’s Joshua smiting Amalekites,thou shalt kill them all,even their children,their slaves,their animals. If you let one survive I will punish you. “OK boss”.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  jane baker

Wasn’t SMITE the word?

harry storm
harry storm
3 months ago
Reply to  Alan Osband

Are you seriously suggesting this is all down to a relative few Jewish liberals, who, after all, are far far outnumbered by non-Jewish liberals, who believed precisely the same things.

jane baker
jane baker
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

They ALL own and control the entertainment industry which is how they get toxic pernicious ideas into the mainstream of public thought.

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  jane baker

Don’t forget the ‘Counting Houses’, sometimes misleading called Banks.

Mirax Path
Mirax Path
3 months ago
Reply to  harry storm

This is forum hosts a number of Qanon, David Icke followers. Knuckledraggers who hate the jews in remarkably similar ways to unhinged islamists. They are a minority but they exist.

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago
Reply to  Ash Ley

If only western politicians had the wit to consider millennia or arabic history before bombing their nations!

UnHerd Reader
UnHerd Reader
3 months ago

So very true.
The lack of Leadership is not only appalling, it is sterile,incompetent and worst of all cowardly !

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago

Great essay to start the week – spot on in all respects. These two sentences in particular were brilliantly written and full of the truth that no one dares speak:
“Faced with the arrival of a new community with such a strong belief system, Europe’s political elites sought refuge in the soft bigotry of low expectations. Denying them agency, we shrouded Muslim immigrants in a rhetoric of victimhood.”
I’ve long had the feeling that the only way to redress the balance in this respect is through some highly illiberal assimilation measures. The idea that you need such illiberalism in order to maintain your liberal society is going to blow the minds of all those who can’t hold two contradictory ideas in their heads at once.

Paul Curtin
Paul Curtin
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

“I’ve long had the feeling that the only way to redress the balance in this respect is through some highly illiberal assimilation measures.”
Correct Katharine. We have got to the point where good-people-go-bad and start contemplating the unthinkable. There are dark mutterings from people of something needing to be done and I suspect this will spark a change soon. I hate it’s come to this.

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

I worry about that “bigotry of low expectations” bit. Too often that sort of sentiment is expressed by people who want to show that they are not just concerned about mass immigration but also about the welfare of the migrants. In a similar moral vein we will be told that illegal migration should be discouraged because it is dangerous for the migrants.
Is talk of soft bigotry supposed to expose our elites as guilty of unconscious bias? It is an irrelevance when we should be discussing the fact that they have created politically privileged classes of people who cannot even be criticised with impunity. That is a serious danger to the wider community.
By the way, my local neighbourhood is now so extensively peopled with migrants that I am left with the question: to what culture are all these people supposed to integrate and assimilate?

Anna Heyman
Anna Heyman
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Don’t forget that those low expectations are also projected onto Muslim majority countries, who are often ahead of the West in banning Islamic extremist groups.

Simon Templar
Simon Templar
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

Read Tom Holland ‘s “Dominion”. It’s the Christian ethic which has defined the West for 2000 years, but so few realize that if a society is now post Christian then it started by being at least somewhat Christian. The West is Christian in a profound sense in which Jesus teachings are so endemic that you don’t even need to believe in him to be a follower of his ways. The key is to go back to our Christian roots and find out where we went off track. Everyone needs to re learn Western Civ

Charles Stanhope
Charles Stanhope
3 months ago
Reply to  Simon Templar

Classical Civilisation predates Jesus and his motley crew by quite some margin.

It provided the necessary matrix for the Nazarene and his illogical cult to flourish, much to the detriment of society in general it must be sadly said.

The rise of FAITH and the fall of REASON to put it bluntly.

Katharine Eyre
Katharine Eyre
3 months ago
Reply to  N Satori

By the way, my local neighbourhood is now so extensively peopled with migrants that I am left with the question: to what culture are all these people supposed to integrate and assimilate?”
A growing number of schools in Vienna now have more than 50% of kids with a migration background – many of whom only speak German at school. Only speaking German for a couple of hours a day isn’t enough to attain the grades and academic standards necessary to get a good job here…you can imagine the societal split and tension that we’re going to have 10-15 years down the line when these groups of immigrants are still sitting, struggling at the bottom of society in low-paid, low-qualified jobs.
Plus, the ones who aren’t properly up to the task of school are dragging the other kids down. I’ve heard that parents from the ex-Yugoslavia are taking their kids out of schools in my area, because they fear their little ones won’t be able to learn German there and not get on in this new and lovely life their parents came here to give them. Migrants are avoiding other migrants, for goodness’ sake, it’s so absurd!
And yet you still have people wringing their hands over fairly mild stuff like introducing an obligation to speak German at school and in the playground. To talk about things like this is, of course, FAR RIGHT.
I’m starting to favour having a sorting process in the pre-school year (when kids are about 5) to check which kids can speak the language well enough to cope with school. If they can’t, they can be put through a compulsory pre-school year where their language skills are brought up to par. This can be done in quite a playful way I guess, but there would have to be strict supervision by adults to make sure the kids speak German all the time they are there. Kids at that age soak up the language like little sponges so they’d be ready to take on proper school lessons afterwards.
However, that doesn’t solve the problem of the attitude at home towards the host society and education in general and how that impacts on a kid’s education, integration and long-term prospects.
It’s a veritable Pandora’s box.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

You should study the Residential School program for indigenous children in Canada and see the uproar it has caused in the past twenty years.

M Harries
M Harries
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

Indeed. And your illiberal assimilation measures would be projected by the likes of the BBC as ‘Far-Right’ assimilation measures.
Is the answer for the illiberals to take ownership of ‘Far-Right’? Similar to the way some in the Gay community are now proudly owning ‘queer’?

Vijay Kant
Vijay Kant
3 months ago
Reply to  Katharine Eyre

For a tolerant society to survive it is essential that all its intolerant elements are eliminated.

james goater
james goater
3 months ago
Reply to  Vijay Kant

Exactly! Bigotry against bigotry isn’t bigotry, and tolerance of intolerance isn’t tolerance. Intolerant attitudes that are unacceptable in general life shouldn’t suddenly become acceptable when presented under the guise of religion.

Peter Principle
Peter Principle
3 months ago

Ever since Philip of Macedon, Europe’s ruling elites have made no secret (i.e. no conspiracy) of their fondness for divide and rule as the way to maintain their power. It has taken many forms, but in recent decades in the UK, it has taken the form of mass immigration, combined with so-called “multiculturalism” (a more descriptive terminology being “deliberate non-assimilation”). Thus Islamism is not best characterised as an unfortunate by-product of open borders. Rather, it should be viewed as the sort of phenomenon that elites look for when they want to exploit divisions. So far, this manifestation of divide and rule has been quite successful for the elite (though not for the rest of us). But it is beginning to look like the elite has mis-judged the situation and has lost control. The Islamist tail is increasingly wagging the dog.

jack sales
jack sales
3 months ago

An insightful read.

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago

Unfortunately, Aayan Hirsi Ali’s perfected argument is completely disarmed with a simple cry of “Islamophobia!”

Islamicists are masterful in positioning themselves as the underdogs, and that’s precisely the one thing that takes control of the mind of every liberal on the planet.

james goater
james goater
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian_S

The sooner that people realise the word “Islamophobia” is a propaganda term (and a very effective one indeed), designed to protect Islam from all scrutiny and criticism by secular societies, the better.

Paddy Taylor
Paddy Taylor
3 months ago

A question to those in our society who decry anti-Semitism, yet still insist Diversity is our greatest strength: Who do you imagine poses the greater threat to the safety of Jews in this country? Do you imagine the problem is more home-grown, or imported?
As the situation in Gaza deteriorates we will see a flood of people looking to settle in Western cities. Well-meaning, wooly liberals will suggest it is our duty to offer shelter to these poor unfortunates.
If you are a child growing up in Gaza or the West Bank, this is what you get to watch on TV:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lZ27fj2XNM  It beggars belief
Having spent your young life being thusly indoctrinated, and having those same messages reinforced by your parents, your teachers, your community and religious leaders, is it any surprise that the violence continues generation after generation? What, honestly, are the chances of someone with that mindset assimilating into European culture? Fitting in with values of tolerance and religious freedom?
If such indoctrinated youngsters are – in the name of compassion – relocated here, who thinks that Europe’s Jewish communities will be safer as a result?
We’ve seen Stars of David daubed on the front doors of Jewish homes in Berlin recently. We’ve seen a Dagestani mob storm an airport to “Hunt for Jews”. Every weekend has seen mass protests and rallies across the West in support of Palestine and against Israel, against Jews.
After any Islamist attack or atrocity, our Political leaders rush in front of the camera to insist that such attacks have “nothing to do with Islam”. How do they know? Because, they assure us, “Islam is a religion of Peace”. Govts of Western liberal democracies have tried to ignore the fact that Islamist atrocities are explicitly committed in the name of their faith.
The state seems reluctant to admit this obvious fact for fear of upsetting Muslim communities. Obviously, the vast majority of Muslims do not condone such atrocities, though it is a real problem so many seem reluctant to condemn their co-religionists publicly.
There are plenty of people – it might well be the majority of the population – who have concerns that mainstream Muslim opinion on a number of issues is categorically at odds with what the rest of us might deem basic, liberal values – but it is an extraordinary leap to go from that evident and demonstrable truth to get to the idea that any such criticism thus constitutes “Islamophobia”.
Not being free to discuss that point is, itself, a real problem and only provides cover in which more fundamentalist Islamic extremism can flourish in our midst, unchallenged.

N Satori
N Satori
3 months ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

Thanks for that YouTube link. Quite shocking and it does make you wonder what kind of educational material Muslim children in Britain may be exposed to.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 months ago
Reply to  Paddy Taylor

And when the Islamists run out of Jews to target, where else might they look? You may be right about “the vast majority of Muslims,” but over time, their silence starts to look like approval.

John Le Huquet
John Le Huquet
3 months ago

Islam is a problem for the Labour party. It depends on the Muslim vote. However there will be a time when muslim demands cannot be met by Labour. Its happening now with the pro Palistinian demonstrations. The fear of being seen as ‘Islamaphobic’ led to the situation where many Labour local authorities turned a blind eye to the sexual abuse of young white girls. The Labour party , and indeed the country, need to stand firm against the tide of Islamic demands. These demands often don’t sit well with a Liberal democracy.

james goater
james goater
3 months ago
Reply to  John Le Huquet

Excellent comment. A mere quibble, but I’d remove the word “often” from your concluding sentence.

Daniel Lee
Daniel Lee
3 months ago

The tolerance and generally peaceful attitude of the West has always been its greatest strength, but like all strengths taken too far, they have become its most profound and quite possibly fatal weakness.

Geraldine MacKinnon
Geraldine MacKinnon
3 months ago

Sorry, but what I see isn’t a sudden surge of islamic fans, is just plain common sense and compassion towards the massive killing of people who happens to be in a place another people want for themselves. I’m so sick of the absolute surrendering of Europe to this massacre.

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 months ago

Where is the compassion toward the victims of widespread slaughter carried out by Muslims – against other Muslims and anyone else – from the Middle East to Africa? A one religion crime wave has swept over several nations in Europe and it’s not being carried out by the Catholics, the Baptists, the Buddhists, the Hindus, or the Jews.

Gordon Black
Gordon Black
3 months ago

Israelis are not the only “people who happen to be in a place another people want for themselves”. Uyghurs, Syrians, Rohingya, Kurds, Ukrainians, Armenians and peoples across sub-saharan Africa are similarly persecuted. Europe is powerless to intervene in all these tragedies.

John Tyler
John Tyler
3 months ago

Wonderfully expressed! Thanks!

Cathy Carron
Cathy Carron
3 months ago

As an aside but apropos, if in NYC, do catch a performance of the off- Broadway production of “Prayers for the French Republic.”

Jerry Carroll
Jerry Carroll
3 months ago
Reply to  Cathy Carron

I’m guessing you’re in it.

Tyler Durden
Tyler Durden
3 months ago

Fundamentally, the problem is of people of the Left from the 70s and 80s telling these parties they’ve given up their core values then returning to them precisely when they see power. The secondary problem is that these New Left politics have now been passed down to generation Y and Z in terms of the new governing liberal bourgeoisie.

Mark 0
Mark 0
3 months ago

As I understand it, compared to Judaism and Sikhism for example, who do not seek to create converts, Islam and Christianity look to convert anyone it can to their religion (hence crusades, jihad and the relatively low numbers globally of Jews and Sikhs. This explains the numbers of believers in the world, and why so many Muslims from various places come or have come to Europe to a better life. (Happy to be corrected if this is wrong)

Christianity however has for a long time now embraced the idea of separation of church and state, whereas Islam has not…but if what Hirsi Ali says here is true and reflects this, can someone please explain why Muslim societies of antiquity (ancient Baghdad for example) were relatively benign and tolerant? As far as I know, Jews and Christians lives in these places and could hold positions of power, not to mention the legendary libraries and universities, mathematical advances etc. I just don’t know why modern Islam is written about in such reactionary and illiberal terms when historically it wasn’t always this way. Would appreciate some insight.

Ben R
Ben R
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark 0

I think the book by famed historian Bernard Lewis, “What Went Wrong” are among those required reading to get an answer to your question

Mark 0
Mark 0
3 months ago
Reply to  Ben R

Many thanks for reply, will check out cheers

Andrew S. Green
Andrew S. Green
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark 0

Some strands of Christianity actively seek converts or recruits, but not all.

The Orthodox for example are very much against the concept.

Ian_S
Ian_S
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark 0

Creating converts … Islam uses the sword, Christians the book.

As to why Muslims continue to flood into Europe, it’s for the free kaffir welfare on offer, lax islam-friendly policing, an easily intimidated kaffir political class (which will be put to the sword when the time is right), and of course the dream of the global Umma.

Lilly A
Lilly A
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark 0

Perhaps because modern Islam is reactionary and illiberal?

Alex Lekas
Alex Lekas
3 months ago

 we should be encouraging Muslim minorities to integrate and embrace Dutch values.
What a remarkably sad testament to the quality of political leadership that this has to be said out loud. It is the exact problem being faced across the Atlantic, where Spanish-only enclaves have allowed to develop and where more, perhaps with more languages, will follow. The one-time melting pot is no more, replaced by an incoherent salad bowl whose already-apparent problems will only be magnified with time.

Peter F. Lee
Peter F. Lee
3 months ago

The world knows that these Muslim minorities in the final analysis do not integrate. Not that there is anything wrong with that, except where they have evil intent.
How long did it take to route and eject all the muslims from Spain in 1492. Their raison d’etre is sharia law and conquest it would appear. In fact the history of the moors immigrating to Spain is an interesting historical study.