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AC Harper
AC Harper
4 months ago

The Elite, consciously or not, always recruit minions to secure their position. Whether it is religion, the clerisy, approved forms of democracy, wars, or big business, strangely the Elite always come out on top.
The commodification of psychedelic drugs for health would inevitably lead to greater recreational use. That might be a positive thing or it might be a negative thing overall. I just keep imagining Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, with the constant consumption of a soothing, happiness-producing drug called Soma.

Last edited 4 months ago by AC Harper
Arnold Grutt
Arnold Grutt
4 months ago
Reply to  AC Harper

What is far more likely is that certain people take cocktails of various ‘psycho-active’ drugs and also alcohol and then go out and shoot-up a school.

Jeff Butcher
Jeff Butcher
4 months ago
Reply to  Arnold Grutt

I think the drugs used to treat mental illness are a more likely culprit

Richard Abbot
Richard Abbot
4 months ago

What else could a society that has become so disconnected from reality do, other than trip out?
Been there, done it, bought the t-shirt, bought and sold the t-shirt printing factory. The benefits are largely over-stated and are as nothing to what can be glimpsed through a commitment to intense meditation or prayer.

Mark Vernon
Mark Vernon
4 months ago

Michael Pollan gets to the heart of the matter, saying that the success of the renaissance will turn not on the trips or the studies but the maturity of the culture in relation to matters of mind, wellbeing, worldview, spirit.

Arnold Grutt
Arnold Grutt
4 months ago

“We see studies from top institutions suggesting psychedelics can “decrease political authoritarianism”.

Again the familar delusion that one can have a political regime which is NOT ‘authoritarian’. This is a fantasy. There are only two political states of man: a ‘state of nature’ without ‘mind’ and based on physical force, or an ‘authoritarian’ state.
Re. the latter the key issue is ‘What is the source of the authority and how is it made acceptable to those upon whom such ‘authority’ is exercised (i.e. how does ‘consent’ manifest itself)? Surprisingly we are not the first generation to examine this question.
Then one has the correlative question of ‘What kinds of states can there be based on this worked-out notion of ‘consent’?

Last edited 4 months ago by Arnold Grutt
Warren Trees
Warren Trees
4 months ago
Reply to  Arnold Grutt

These outlandish quotes are merely just that…outlandish quotes. There are such quacks present in any industry and such quotes can be manufactured on demand to suit a narrative. They are used only as tools. It’s one reason why we can’t agree on anything anymore as truth becomes irrelevant.

Go Nutty
Go Nutty
4 months ago

The article is correct that there is this overzealous euphoria and utopia surrounding the psychedelic industry that needs to be more grounded in reality. But in the end, the war on drugs has always been flawed. If we are really honest, in what world are we better off throwing people in jail for choosing to use a substance we think is dangerous or not, even if they do end up addicted or if it is an unhealthy choice? Never forget illegality doesnt mean a drug isnt used. It just means pretending, it isnt. It probably makes more sense to regulate the industry, and slap on warning labels as we do with say model glue and alcohol than pretend drug use doesn’t happen everywhere, hide it due to weird social cultural norms and then, indirectly proliferate wealthy violent drug cartels. So yes, tech gurus and the wealthy pharma billionaires are overselling the savior but on the other hand, a fungi like a magic mushroom (psilocybin) doesn’t deserve to be associated with jail time and lifetime ostracism either. Its just not that big a deal. The healthy middle to me is to legalize it, regulate it and give folks the freedom to make their own damn decisions.

Last edited 4 months ago by Go Nutty
Richard Craven
Richard Craven
4 months ago

Despite finding hippy/shaman nonsense completely off-putting, I took a lot of mushrooms in the past. I’m too old for proper shroom frenzies now though, and would certainly never do DMT. That said, I’m not averse to micro-dosing.

Niklas Serning
Niklas Serning
4 months ago

The author asserts that Prof Nutt’s Lancet article is flawed, but does not provide any evidence, indeed any explanation – I’d be curious as to how it is flawed?

Guy Ogilvy
Guy Ogilvy
4 months ago
Reply to  Niklas Serning

Me too.

Bill Wainwright
Bill Wainwright
4 months ago

Psychedelics are a variation on transhumanism, with a significant profit motive driving the urgency.

John Frater
John Frater
4 months ago

I hope your MSc is better referenced. Twitter and other opinion pieces don’t count as substantive citations and in several places claims are made with no reference at all. You lost me by half way. It’s fair enough to question the efficacy of these drugs but if you want to do that then do it with integrity. In medical matters this is more important than ever.

Ted Monday
Ted Monday
4 months ago
Reply to  John Frater

John, your attempt to slander Mr. Prideaux by insulting him doesn’t speak well of your own integrity. I would be interested to hear which specific claims you take issue with, and I hope you have substantive citations to back up your counterclaims.

Warren Trees
Warren Trees
4 months ago
Reply to  Ted Monday

As someone who has first-hand knowledge of the incredible success that is being experienced with these methods of treatment, it is important to understand that the process only works while the patient is under complete supervision during their “trips”, which is how the industry is developing their product. The key difference with using this process is that it actually cures patients of their trauma vs. subjecting them to a lifetime of office visits that only attempt to deal with the trauma.
As with any medical breakthrough, the established hierarchy will attempt to downplay the efficacy of the new treatment to protect their financial interests. I wouldn’t pay too much attention to a psychology student’s opinions.

Last edited 4 months ago by Warren T
Ted Monday
Ted Monday
4 months ago
Reply to  Warren Trees

“It is important to understand that the process only works while the patient is under complete supervision during their “trips”, which is how the industry is developing their product.”
Citation? All science in this area is so far from conclusive. We do not have enough evidence to say any psychedelic process works. I also have first-hand experience and have no stake in who in the medical industry profits.
Speaking of financial interests, I think this piece demonstrates the considerable financial interest combined with religious fervor of a growing psychedelic industry that is already part of an established financial hierarchy. Like the parent comment, resorting to the ad hominem and insult of the author by virtue of his being a student is a tell to me.

Last edited 4 months ago by Ted Monday
Warren Trees
Warren Trees
4 months ago
Reply to  Ted Monday

I have a relative who is a PHD working with actual patients who have been cured of their trauma, via this therapy, after years of suffering. This person had spent 25 years as a psychiatrist, never curing anyone before, merely helping people deal with the symptoms for decades. Actually curing individuals of their trauma has been exhilarating to this person and has changed their life.