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ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago

What on earth can one expect from a society where a Black Police Lieutenant deliberately shoots and kills a White woman and gets away with it, whilst a White Policeman inadvertently kills a known Black criminal during an arrest and is condemned without hesitation?
Yet the ‘justification’ of this horror is rooted in the arrant nonsense routinely trotted out about the convicted criminal and ‘latter day saint, one George Floyd Esq! He was not, repeat not Jesus Christ reincarnated as some would have us believe, but really just another version of Barrabas.

What would the ‘Founding Fathers’ say about that I wonder?

Last edited 6 months ago by ARNAUD ALMARIC
Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
6 months ago
Reply to  ARNAUD ALMARIC

Are you referring to the killing of Justine Damond, a law-abiding citizen who was shot dead at close range by a black Minneapolis policeman in 2017?

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago

No, I was referring to a Ms Ashli Babbitt, shot & killed by Capitol Police Lieutenant Michael Byrd.
To my chagrin I hadn’t even heard of the killing Ms Justine Damond, so I thank you.
Unfortunately here in ‘Arcadia’ news arrives rather slowly, if at all.

Brendan O'Leary
Brendan O'Leary
6 months ago

a precariously employed former aspiring athlete and rapper and who spent a decade drifting in and out of jail 

Presumably what led to him “drifting” – as if by accident! – in and out of jail was that he spent more time and effort on his (unmentioned in this brief resume) life of drugs and crime than his rapping and athletic aspirations , let alone his employment prospects

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago

Lacking all employment prospects (dead-end jobs aside) is it any wonder that he drifted into drugs and crime ?

Would you have done any better in his shoes ?

Alex Tickell
Alex Tickell
6 months ago

The autopsy said that Floyd did not die from lack of oxygen, but due to a “heart attack” and drug misuse,

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  Alex Tickell

Why isn’t this extraordinary fact not better known may I ask?

Marianne John
Marianne John
6 months ago

I look forward to Candice Owens documentary about George Floyd and some truth about exactly who he was and what happened. Main stream media has proven they are not be trusted with telling us the truth.

JJ Barnett
JJ Barnett
6 months ago
Reply to  Marianne John

She’s got some big b***s that gal. Good on her!

Candace is basically fireproof, so I hope she pokes at all the sacred cows. The current orthodoxies have become more smothering, at the same time as they are less supported by facts. Time for some tough interrogations (the function that used to be performed by journalists… way back when we remember having those).

Alex Tickell
Alex Tickell
6 months ago
Reply to  JJ Barnett

Candace for VP in the next DJT administration, How great would that be?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  Marianne John

Tony Buck is a woke provocateur, as ghastly as AOC or Owen Jones.
Merely more aggressive.

Brian Villanueva
Brian Villanueva
6 months ago

George Floyd: the saint for those who know they’re too smart to believe in gods and saints.

AC Harper
AC Harper
6 months ago

George Floyd may, or may not, have been a triggering event, but to argue that things have reverted to normal is wishful thinking.
Joe Biden is extremely unpopular, Kamala Harris even more unpopular, and neither seems capable of leading America in any direction other than ‘confused’. There are even rumours that Joe Biden may have to stand for President again because there doesn’t appear to be anyone else. This is the collapse predicted by Peter Turchin’s cliodynamics – it’s just in slow motion until the final bust up.

M. Waugh
M. Waugh
6 months ago

Did Chauvin appeal his conviction for murder ? After looking at the footage multiple times, I could understand a conviction based on negligence, but find it difficult to accept one based on intention or reckless indifference to harm,much less grievous harm.

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  M. Waugh

Exactly, an absolute travesty of justice is ever there was one, that brings eternal shame on the whole concept of the US Legal system.
Together with the slaughter of Ms Ashli Babbitt and Ms Justine Damond, one really has to wonder what is going on in the rotten heart of the “Defender of the Free World”.

Alex Tickell
Alex Tickell
6 months ago
Reply to  ARNAUD ALMARIC

Couldn’t agree more the worst miscarriage of justice that i have ever witnessed and there have been a few. Sheer cowardice by the judiciary in the face of supposed “civil unrest”
America is in grave danger unless the people return Donald John in 2024 and give some hope to the Western world

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  Alex Tickell

Spot on Sir!

R Wright
R Wright
6 months ago
Reply to  M. Waugh

I remember watching the full video the day it was released and being shocked that anyone could have construed it as murder.

Allison Barrows
Allison Barrows
6 months ago

I was an elementary school kid during the “days of rage” riots. The most notable difference between then and now is Big Money. Now we get concierge rioting: paid transportation, convenient printed signs and other cool branded merchandise, mics instead of bullhorns, per diem compensation – you get the picture. It’s all corporate-sponsored now. That’s why there were no riots after the Rittenhouse acquittal: the paymasters knew it was a loser. On to funding the next destabilizing outrage, brought to you by [insert logos here]!

Mike Michaels
Mike Michaels
6 months ago

George Floyd did the world one great service. The authorities’ allowing of marches etc in his memory at a point when we had been locked down in fear of a terrifying “pandemic” for weeks. Apparently this mingling and mixing was acceptable, unlike any lockdown protest, because “racism”. This was the moment most thinking people realised that Corona was not quite what we were being told. BLM marches were allowed to go ahead because they had the same purpose as covid, the destruction of the west.

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  Mike Michaels

Good man! At least someone is paying attention!

Mike Michaels
Mike Michaels
6 months ago
Reply to  ARNAUD ALMARIC

Thank you.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  Mike Michaels

With attackers like you, the West doesn’t need friends.

John Dowling
John Dowling
6 months ago

I watched a lot of the Chauvin trial, there was so much doubt as to the real reason for Mr Floyd’s death, fentanyl overdose was most likely. Officer Chauvin was hung out to dry by his superiors and condemned to satisfy the baying lynch mob outside.

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  John Dowling

Salem all over again?

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  John Dowling

I think you mean involuntary manslaughter at best don’t you?

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago
Reply to  ARNAUD ALMARIC

No. Since no one in Chauvin’s position could have been so stupid, as there not to have been a possibility that the death was inflicted deliberately.

Sue Sims
Sue Sims
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Buck

Could you rewrite that sentence so that it makes sense?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  John Dowling

Floyd’s death was very plausibly manslaughter, but nothing more.

J Hop
J Hop
6 months ago

A good deal of ink has been spilled over the question of whether “wokeness” — closely identified with the cause of racial justice given impetus by Floyd’s death — should be described as a religion rather than a mere political movement. But the question proceeds from an overly neat distinction between these two phenomena. Any political formation that succeeds in assembling an enthusiastic public must partake of “religious” elements. In other words, political groupings must be forged and renewed through experiences of “collective effervescence”, the sociologist Émile Durkheim’s term for the shared experiences of the sacred that bind people together.”
So, these people are wrong in that it’s NOT like a religious experience, but I am right and here I will describe it as it IS a religious experience…

Lesley van Reenen
Lesley van Reenen
6 months ago
Reply to  J Hop

What about calling it a cult?

AC Harper
AC Harper
6 months ago
Reply to  J Hop

I think it’s too easy, in certain cultures, to identify particular social enthusiasms as ‘religious’ since this is the familiar way they play out.
Yet I’d argue that Wokism is not a religion (there is no supernatural involvement) but that Wokism and Religion (philosophical world views and political extremisms, and even died-in-the-wool supporters of particular sports teams) share common features. Among the features are the separation into those who have gained the special knowledge and those who are still ignorant. The Good and the Evil. Those who signal their virtue and those that don’t. Those whose enthusiasm cannot be challenged by real world events, and those with a more informed attitude (and therefore beyond the pale).
I’d argue too (h/t Lesley van Reenen) that Wokism is not a Cult either. Cults tend to have specific characteristics (a Glorious Leader, a definitive body of work, thought-terminating clichés, isolation of cult members from friends and family) not present in Wokeism.
In a world going through an ’emotional phase’ these enthusiasms are more likely to take root, and are more dangerous because of their insulation from reality.

Mathieu Bernard
Mathieu Bernard
6 months ago
Reply to  AC Harper

I would mostly agree that Wokism is not a religion per se for the reasons you’ve described. However, there is a certain gnostic element involved, given the separation between “those who have gained the special knowledge and those who are still ignorant.” I therefore understand Wokism as more of a secular spirituality with some loose parallels to traditional religious faiths. If there is a “Glorious Leader” it would undoubtedly be Karl Marx, who synthesized the quasi-spiritual ideas of Hegel and Rousseau. (Marx is rarely invoked by the Woke, however; most likely because he is a dead, white, male who happened to be a racist. But I speculate.) Others, such as Gramsci, Horkheimer, Adorno and Marcuse further developed his ideas into what is known as “Critical Theory.” The gnostic elements of Theory are unmistakable: 1)The existing social order is comprised of structural oppressions that serve to uphold the interests of the system, 2) the vast majority of people are ignorant of their own oppression (false consciousness) 3) the work of critical theorists is to enlighten people to the secret knowledge of the conspiracy against them by the system, 4) as people awaken (hence the term “Woke”) to the true knowledge of their oppression, they move from false consciousness to “critical consciousness” and continue the work of liberation. The whole process eventually leads to state socialism and ultimately the communist utopia. So Wokism is neither a secular, materialist movement, nor a religion – but it is at the same time faith-based, irrational and dogmatic.

R Wright
R Wright
6 months ago

At least in death Fentanyl Floyd the aspiring rapper, Esquire, made himself useful to someone.

Lindsay S
Lindsay S
6 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

He certainly did more for his family in death than he did in life.

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  Lindsay S

$27 million, minus ‘expenses’. wasn’t it?

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago
Reply to  R Wright

Why sneer at the dead ?

Why sneer at someone done to death by a cop ?

Why sneer at someone who lacked your opportunities in life ?

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Buck

Because he really wasn’t a very nice man, and his death has been exploited by the woke scum as a pretext for two years of disgusting racism against white people.

Christopher Barclay
Christopher Barclay
6 months ago

By the absence of protest since January 2021, I assume that no black person has been shot by a police officer in the US. If my assumption is wrong, then it would look like BLM was supported and the protests promoted in order to get a Democrat elected President.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago

My response to the disgusting photograph accompanying this article:-
BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Peter Mott
Peter Mott
6 months ago

Not entirely fair to call Turchin a “doomsayer”. He believes history moves in cycles so there is no end point of “doom” – just the start of a new cycle.

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago

Many of those posting below clearly imagine themselves to be defenders of the West and its civilization.

But there are no deadlier enemies of the West than such dweebs posing as its defenders.

For what civilization propped up by such people, has even the tiniest hope of surviving ?

ARNAUD ALMARIC
ARNAUD ALMARIC
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Buck

Four angry posts ‘on the trot’, have you sought help may I ask?

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago
Reply to  ARNAUD ALMARIC

I would need help if I wasn’t angry.

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago

What horribly cruel people right-wingers are, witness many of the comments below.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Buck

What horribly cruel people left-wingers are, witness many of the comments by Tony Phuck.

Tony Buck
Tony Buck
6 months ago

In many of the posts below, can be heard the hellish, mocking voice of the Rich deriding the Poor, the Snug deriding the outcasts, the Smug deriding the tragic, the Winners deriding the Losers.

In one thing, at least, George Floyd was Christlike – being derided by Evil people.

Richard Craven
Richard Craven
6 months ago
Reply to  Tony Buck

“In many of the posts below, can be heard the hellish, mocking voice of the Rich deriding the Poor, the Snug deriding the outcasts, the Smug deriding the tragic, the Winners deriding the Losers.”
Oh, so you don’t like woke Remainers either.