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Boris has succeeded where all others failed The declinists will carp, but his voters will not forget this victory

Say what you like, this is a major victory for Boris Johnson

Say what you like, this is a major victory for Boris Johnson


December 25, 2020   6 mins

For some Prime Ministers, their premierships are defined by one thing. Winston Churchill and the war, Anthony Eden and Suez, Tony Blair and Iraq, Gordon Brown and the financial crisis, David Cameron and that referendum. For Boris Johnson, it will be Brexit.

True, Johnson’s relatively short time in office has been dominated by the pandemic. But his premiership was both created and defined by Brexit; it was a response to a crisis that our political system showed itself unable to resolve. From the very beginning, it was anchored in a promise to do what MPs had shown themselves incapabable of doing – to Get Brexit Done.

By securing the Withdrawal Agreement, and now a Brexit trade deal, Johnson has delivered what so many of his critics said could not be delivered. And along the way he has challenged our understanding of him as a leader and politician. While many said that he would prefer a no-deal over the withdrawal agreement, he went for the latter; while many said that he would prefer a no-deal over a trade deal, he went for the latter; and while much of our increasingly shrill media and Twitterati has presented him as an ideological zealot, comparable to the likes of Donald Trump, he has once again shown himself to be what many people on these islands consider themselves to be — a pragmatist.

One of the reasons why Johnson has retained much of his support over the past year is that he ended up leading a reassertion of popular sovereignty over parliamentary sovereignty. Brexit was always destined to lead our country into a constitutional crisis because it was the first occasion in living memory when a majority of people outside of parliament asked for something that a majority of people inside parliament did not want to give: a new settlement, a radical and real rupture from the status-quo that had emerged during the preceding half-century. When parliament refused, the pendulum swung back to the people and at the general election of 2019, they ensured that their request for change was respected and delivered. Johnson and his premiership became their vehicle — and they gave that vehicle the largest majority for any Conservative since Margaret Thatcher’s final majority in 1987. Indeed, it is no coincidence that Thatcher and Johnson have held the largest Conservative majorities of the modern era; both have displayed an instinctive ability to tap into deeper currents that were both overlooked and underestimated by the London-centric commentariat.

Johnson now finds himself as the first Conservative leader who can credibly claim to have triumphed over the Europe question, an issue that took down all four of his Conservative predecessors in No 10. One way or another, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, David Cameron and Theresa May were all brought down by Europe. Johnson, though, has triumphed over it. And he has done so while realigning his party and much of the country. Major, Cameron and May never really understood the true power of the conservative electorate, or the extent to which the conservative brand could connect with parts of the country that were long thought beyond reach.

Few, if any, Conservative ‘modernisers’ who dominated the past two decades grasped how the underlying foundations of Britain were shifting in profound ways. They fell into the trap of believing that social and economic liberalism was the winning formula when in fact it was nearing its sell-by date. On a good day, the Cameroons could just about scrape 38% in the polls; today, that is what Johnson is still averaging after an incredibly difficult and some might say disastrous first year in office. That is the power of the coalition that supports him.

Over the past 30 years, nearly everybody in British politics has underestimated one of the more specific energies behind this realignment – Euroscepticism. In the 1990s, people laughed at the Eurosceptics and called them Bastards; in the 2000s, they dismissed and derided them as fruitcakes, loonies and closet racists; and in the 2010s, they framed them as the Little Englanders who had been duped by Silicon Valley, Cambridge Analytica and what was written on the side of a big red bus.

Yet still, they won. They took numerous detours along the way, of course -the Referendum Party and Sir James Goldsmith, UKIP and Nigel Farage, the Brexit Party and Boris Johnson- but throughout they showed a dogged persistence, a sense of strategy and a commitment to the cause that, for some reason, their rivals never shared or understood.

A cross-class coalition came together to ask for things that even today are routinely absent in our everyday conversation about Brexit: a more directly accountable democracy, a political system in which serious and meaningful opposition is allowed and a country in which people can seriously influence the decisions that are affecting their daily lives. None of these things were even mentioned as I sat through much of the media coverage of Johnson’s Brexit trade deal this week. Even today, more than four years on from the referendum, our ‘conversation’ about Brexit continues to reduce it simply and crudely to economic self-interest — as if the only interest the people of this country have in politics is to extract financial benefit. The people who will be cheering on news of the deal today and over the next few weeks won’t be talking about GDP; they’ll be talking about the one thing that politics is really all about – power, and the restoration of power in their daily lives.

Insiders have struggled to hear this call over the decades, but Johnson, Dominic Cummings and others within No 10 heard it and responded. Even today, as we draw to the end of 2020, the Old Etonian and Oxford graduate holds an 8-point lead over Labour among the working-class and a 42-point lead among Leavers. These voters are not idiots; they can all see Johnson’s mistakes, gaffes and amateurism, just like the rest of us. But they have ultimately stayed with him because of what he represents: restoring power to them.

This is why the deal really matters. It will now form an integral aspect of Johnson’s narrative as we journey toward the next election in 2024. You don’t need to be a political spin doctor to predict what he will say: “You asked me to deliver Brexit. You asked me to take control over immigration. You asked me to restore our democracy. You asked me to redirect our national conversation away from London and back to the regions. I did all of those things. Now give me another term to see it all through.”

His critics will talk endlessly about economic statistics and job losses in the Red Wall. They will compare every possible piece of economic data with its equivalent in Germany, France and the Netherlands. Economists will release forecast after forecast, predicting the imminent or longer-term implosion of the national economy.

Many of our commentators will fall back on the ‘declinism’ that dominated the Left after previous eras of Conservative dominance in the 1950s and the 1980s. They will resurrect the arguments of Tom Nairn, Correlli Barnett, Anthony Sampson and Michael Shanks and a new generation of left-leaning declinists will appear — to shriek and point with glee at what they will present as irrefutable evidence that Britain is in decline, that the nation is finished, that the people were duped. Occasionally, the mask will slip and we will once again see the uglier side of declinism, namely that some people who claim to want the best for Britain actually do not like Britain at all.

Somewhere along the way, the wiser ones will notice what their predecessors were finally forced to acknowledge after not one but three straight election victories for the Conservatives in the 1950s and 1980s – that despising your own country does not sit well with ordinary people. The gloom and doom that will now inevitably descend over our national debate will, in the end, only bolster Johnson further – much like it provided the backdrop to 17 years of Conservative dominance during the 1980s and 1990s. Why? Because most normal people who do not live their lives on Twitter will not hand power to people who appear to loathe everything about the country they love.

A more fruitful and in, the longer-run, electorally profitable reply to where we find ourselves today would be to join the wider conversation about how to build back better – how to address the very real and meaningful grievances that left so many of our fellow citizens feeling disillusioned and disgruntled in the first place.

The United Kingdom has meaningfully decoupled from the European Union. It has regained control over its immigration policy and borders. It is no longer paying into the EU budget. It is outside the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. It can strike trade deals with other countries around the world. And over the longer-term there will be much less rule-taking and much more rule-making.

“From January 1st,” Boris Johnson told the people on the eve of a difficult Christmas, “we are outside of the customs union and outside of the single market. British laws will be made solely by the British parliament, interpreted by UK judges sitting in UK courts 
 For the first time since 1973, we will be an independence coastal state.” I suspect that for more than a few people that will sound just fine.


Matthew Goodwin is Professor of Politics at the University of Kent. His new book, Values, Voice and Virtue: The New British Politics, is out on March 30.

GoodwinMJ

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Rob Butler
Rob Butler
3 years ago

Having secured Brexit, the hard next phase is to rebalance the media, public sector, the third sector, MSM, Police, academia and our judiciary away from cultural Marxism that is endemic.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

As you say, the cultural Marxism is ‘endemic’. As such, a return to sanity and morality will require much more than a ‘rebalancing’. Only a decisive reckoning that sees millions of these people defunded and/or removed will do the job.

Julia Wallis-Martin
Julia Wallis-Martin
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

The tide has already turned on Cultural Marxism. Licence fee payers have abandoned the BBC in huge numbers. Former supporters of the National Trust have cancelled their membership. The guardian is on its knees. Publications such as The New European are unlikely to survive. These are just a few examples of democracy in action. Citizens determine the shape of their country by the choices they make. The vast majority of British citizens choose not to be ruled by Cultural Marxists.

David Bennett
David Bennett
3 years ago

Hope you’re right. The Marxists do have control over our young people as soon as they walk into nursery school. The trend may be difficult to stop

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  David Bennett

Sadly you maybe correct in view of the fact that one of the last bastions, Eton College has just fallen to the Marxist hordes.

Oh, to think of the joy that must bring to the ‘Shriekers of Quislington’, at this festive time.

mike otter
mike otter
3 years ago
Reply to  David Bennett

Leave your kids with no illusions about the nature of their schooling and teachers as we did way back and they are unlikely to suffer from Marxism. You can do it with older kids via learning and point out the essential contradictions of egalitarian or critical theories. Younger kids, say ages 8-11, can grasp the value our society places on money. They observe that the people who set out to damage our childrens’ minds are paid about the same as a skilled plant operator yet live in middle class enclaves with no access to the real world. Stuck in their silos of gossip and keeping up with the Joneses no wonder state school teachers are often miserable, poor (unless second earners) and have mental health/stress issues. Giving your kids the heads up in early school age can help them 1. See thru the BS and use school to get qualifications that will help them 2. Recognise the few teachers still committed to pedagogical work in an open society and learn as much as you can from these characters before they become extinct.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

difficult to turn the tide on something that only exists in the paranoid delusions of third generation followers of Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet.

speaking of Baronets…the likeness of Farage to Penelope Keith in her role in “To The Manor Born” is uncanny.

Farage and pretty much everyone else on this thread are trapped in the time warp portrayed in that first episode of TTMB.

The carnage a collapsing empire and its human toll is a gift that keeps on giving.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

You must have been snorting something a little too exotic after your Christmas pudding squire.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

party hardy my friend…your hangover will be compouned when you discover what is in Johnson’s agreement…get your fishing nets ready.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Miaow!

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

Don’t waste your time on that cretin.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

“Bojo ain’t no Maggie! This dirty deal is BRINO not BREXIT!”

B B
B B
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Quite true, but Mrs Thatcher was strongly in favour of expanded cooperation with the EU.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  B B

until she wasn’t

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

“Boris has sold out our Fisherman, and he wont be ever forgiven for that come the next GE.”

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

I think we can dismiss your post as irrelevant assumption.

Teo
Teo
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

next GE –
from Brexit polarisation to acquiescence.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Teo

the stages of grief

denial…has been worked through for the past two years and now we are into

anger…Farages turf which he will be stoking and fanning in 3…2…

bargaining…Scotland and Northern Ireland leaving the English dumpster fire to burn itself out while they get on with their lives.

depression… Englands natural state.

acceptance.

B B
B B
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Nobody cares. More people work in fairgrounds than fishing.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  B B

and yet here you are…finance is going the way of the fisheries.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Resentment is like drinking poison and hoping it will kill your enemies. Nelson
Mandella.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

“Boris never had any intention of keeping his red line promise on fishing and until the small print is scrutinized and approved Brexit is only a smokescreen for May’s BRINO.”

Benjamin Jones
Benjamin Jones
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Do you mean the EU, that empire that’s just had one of its biggest funders and markets walk away from it?

ard10027
ard10027
3 years ago
Reply to  Benjamin Jones

Well, if there’s a deal in place, then it hasn’t had one of its biggest markets walk away. It remains to be seen what effect Brexit will have on EU funding.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Benjamin Jones

“Yes, British Fishermen have been sold out AGAIN. So much for taking back control when it’s the EU that is dictating how much they will take and how much we will take.”

John Gleeson
John Gleeson
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

I’m sorry for your media-induced psychosis. You’re in real pain. And the tragic thing is it’s all been a creation of Alistair Campbell types and other modern-day propagandists of his ideologically perverted ilk.

Like most, you really didn’t give a second thought to the EU or considered how it supposedly made your life better in every meaningful way before the ref, and now you truly believe the world is about to collapse because that’s the narrative they used. Pure, full-on brute-force fear-mongering and demonization of the opposition.

It’s been strange watching so many people be driven to mental illness simply because they rely on the MSM to inform, educate, and guide them intellectually about the world. That is what they believe their brand of MSM does for them and do not realize they are, in fact, being manipulated (they moronically believe that only happens in the opposite direction). And make no mistake, your loathsome, irrational, vitriolic reply to a factually accurate, balanced piece like this is MENTAL and unhinged.

You’re a poisoned, toxic, uneducated, brainwashed individual. But like most of you, you are too arrogant and delusional to see that.

Bob Rowlands
Bob Rowlands
3 years ago
Reply to  John Gleeson

John what a fantastic summary well done

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  John Gleeson

your grief is noted and the tinge of anger is good sign as it indicates you are moving the stages of grief.

Boris Johnson admits Brexit deal falls short for financial services

PM says agreement ‘does not go as far as we would like’ over sector’s access to EU markets

Boris Johnson has conceded that the Brexit trade deal “perhaps does not go as far as we would like” over access to EU markets for financial services, while insisting he had achieved an accord his critics said would be impossible.

In an interview with the Sunday Telegraph, the prime minister said he had defied accusations of “cake-ism” ““ seeking the impossible ““ in getting a trade deal that allowed divergence from EU standards.

It had been, Johnson said, billed as out of the question “that you could do free trade with the EU without being drawn into their regulatory or legislative orbit”.

Martin Davis
Martin Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  John Gleeson

And…you smell!!!

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Davis

Don’t be such a vulgar t**t!
You can do better than that.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Davis

Don’t be so vulgar.
You can do better than that.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

The Brexiteers won. Time to grow up and stop whingeing about the result Mr Yesbizness, you are beginning to sound remarkably like that idiot President Donald Trump.I can’t help feeling that fanatical EU
propagandists, like you, must also accept some of the blame for helping the
Brexit camp win. Well done!

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

take your expressions of angst to the authors of the comments published in the Press…like this…or not… some find it comforting to put their heads where the sun don’t shine when confronted with difficult truths.

Boris Johnson admits Brexit deal falls short for financial services

PM says agreement ‘does not go as far as we would like’ over sector’s access to EU markets

Robyn Lagrange
Robyn Lagrange
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

The reality is that our “financial sector” is far too large a proportion of our economy and it doesn’t earn it’s keep. The profits, and telephone number salaries and bonuses are diverted offshore and contribute nothing to the welfare of the general population or the country as a whole. It is time we kicked it, and neo-liberal economics into the gurgler.

I think if you check some reliable statistics you will find that countries with a large manufacturing sector are the countries with a favourable balance of trade. Despite our oversized service sector, it doesn’t make up for genuine added value products and the deficit has been made up by selling the countries assets and utilities brick by brick for the last 40 years.

Leaving the E.U. is not an end in itself, It is just the first and necessary step to restoring a sane and fair economy in this country. There is much to do and we are now free to do it. We just need a government that puts the interests of the country and it’s people first.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

It’s a female of the species that inhabits the slopes of Mt Hood, Oregon.
Sadly, you are wasting your time.

Michael Meddings
Michael Meddings
3 years ago

And apparently in the quest for more balanced reporting the circulation figures of the Sun, Daily Mail and Daily Express have rocketed.

williamdavies261
williamdavies261
3 years ago

Dream on and tilt at your windmills.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

LOL

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Why are you laughing Jeremy?
You will lose a lot more battles as democratic accountability is restored to the people of this country.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

Again LOL
The British people had the chance to hold the politicians accountable for the Iraq War during GE2005. The 2 political parties that institutionally supported the war got c.66% of the vote. The only major political party that institutionally opposed the war (LibDems) didn’t win the election. Unless of course it promised to eat English babies in their election platform? Did it?
The British people had the chance to hold Boris accountable after he sold Northern Ireland with his WA – after promising NOT TO DO SO during his Tory leadership campaign.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The Lib Dems a “major political
party”? They have made themselves an irrelevance under a series of non-entity ‘leaders’ and are likely to be buried by Reform UK next year.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

the first body in that grave will be Johnson’s followed in quick succession by Gove The Dunce and Rees-Mogg The Effete…good times.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

“They have made themselves an irrelevance under a series of non-entity ‘leaders’ and are likely to be buried by Reform UK next year.”
Completely pointless in relation to GE2005. But go for it. The insanity is fascinating .

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The 2 political parties that institutionally supported the war got c.66% of the vote.

They were deliberately misled, some might even say lied to, by the Prime Minister. Unless you think MPs should have assumed a PM would lie to them to curry support for a war, of course they would support the government. Once it became clear that they had been lied to that support evaporated. If you tested that Parliament now on whether they still agreed with the Iraq War knowing what they know now, you’d find they wouldn’t, I think.

Lib Dem knee jerk pacifism is not a respectable, moral or worthy position. It’s cowardice masquerading as principle, which is why the Lib Dems are – rightly – laughed at, despised, and irrelevant.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon Redman

By 2005 EVERYBODY Knew that there were no WMDs in Iraq. And as you say the PM lied. People (not MPs) had the choice to punish both parties – they did not.
Lib Dems supported military action in Ex-Yugoslavia (how is that for pacifism?) and Libya.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Sorry, but I’m not going to vote Lib Dem just to punish someone for having assumed the PM to be truthful.

It’s this insistence that whatever matters to them is the only thing that should matter to everyone, and that this alone should drive my vote, that marks the Lib Dems out as a fringe whack job party (see also the 2019 election, and the LD belief that overturning the referendum was going to be a big vote winner).

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon Redman

“Sorry, but I’m not going to vote Lib Dem just to punish someone for having assumed the PM to be truthful.” – nice try!

Valerie Killick
Valerie Killick
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The LibDems is the none-of-the-other party and in reality is just a joke. The party to vote for when you refuse to join the real world.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago

yes, because the party of Jeremy Corbyn, Mark Francois screams competence.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Certainly more so than the party of Jo “I am a candidate for PM” Swinson, or of Nick “Principles? Me?” Clegg, or of Menzies “I’m a foreign policy expert because I’ve got an atlas” Campbell, or of Charlie “I am ash pished ash a farrt” Kennedy, or of Paddy Pantsdown, or of David “Gurr back to yurr constitchencies an’ prepare furr goverrnment” Steel, or Jeremy “Shoot Rinka” Thorpe, or of Cyril “Bend over my knee little boy” Smith…

The Lib Dems have mediocrity running through them like a stick of rock.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon Redman

Not to mention Leila Slugger Moran and her dream to make the LibDem’s more woke than Jeremy Jewbaiter and the National Socialists.

Julia Wallis-Martin
Julia Wallis-Martin
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

The Catch-22 with this argument is that in a democratic country, people have the right to choose whether or not to educate their children privately.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

Bring on the referendums!

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

be careful what you wish for.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

and by ‘…this country…’ you mean England which is destined to become a unitary state with an economy smaller than Scotland’s and that of a unified Irish Republic.

The City’s exodus to Dublin and Amsterdam is the death knell for England’s economy.

“In the wake of Brexit, Amsterdam is the new London”

‘How a city less than a tenth of London’s size is becoming Europe’s unlikely financial powerhouse’

Fortune Magazine; BY VIVIENNE WALT
November 25, 2019

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Stop swallowing the fantasy pills old boy.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

you are the essence of conservative ideologie’s bankruptcy offering feeble ad hominems in the absence of rattional argument.

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

You are insane

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

doubling down on the ad hominem I see

Valerie Killick
Valerie Killick
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Pot and kettle

Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

It’s not boy it’s a nun actually. Maybe we should call her sister from now on?

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago

Ok, sister it is. Sounds a bit creepy though.

Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Did they forget to buy the batteries for your new toys this Christmas then or what?

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

: “Boris never had any intention of keeping his red line promise on fishing and until the small print is scrutinized and approved Brexit is only a smokescreen for May’s BRINO.”

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

ad hominem noted

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

Don’t forget Eton College, that fountainhead of Wokeness!

John Howes
John Howes
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Hopefully soon to wither on the vine.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

go change your diaper.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Happy Christmas Hockey Mom!

What a vulgar specimen you are, and incidentally in English we call the thing you are sitting in a nappy not a diaper.

Couldn’t you also have confined all your juvenile piffle to just one post?

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

perhaps you should try this when you next change your diaper…

In partnership with a retired Salk Institute scientist, Dr. Camille Newton and her husband developed the PureWickñ„± System in the pursuit of a better way to help manage female urinary incontinence. As a visiting physician, Dr. Newton saw caregivers struggle to keep their loved ones dry using traditional incontinence products.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Your derisory, bigoted remarks lead me to conclude you are either unbalanced, or a Marxist troll.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

Well spotted!

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

tut…tut…hey what old boy…

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

“Boris has sold out our Fisherman, and he wont be ever forgiven for that come the next GE.”

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

I’m guessing you didn’t get get many hugs and kisses as a child.

May God heal all your sorrows and turn confusion to calm in 2021.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

fallacies such as the ad hominem are better understood as perversions or corruptions of perfectly good arguments…you really need to try to put forward your perfectly good arguments though I suspect perversion and corruption are your baliwick.

Martin Davis
Martin Davis
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

You know, you can have too much of a good time…

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

I presume your brain transplant got cancelled.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

said the corrupt pervert

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

you third generation Black Shirts are a disgrace.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

You are referring to the Woke brigade, I take it.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

you are too modest ignoring your family’s ties to Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet, that original copy of Mosley’s Memorandum gathering dust in your archives will fetch a pretty penny in the right [extreme] quarter.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Good grief! You are in a far worse state than I thought. Stop taking the drugs, they are obviously screwing up your mind. You poor deluded scumbag. You are totally deranged!

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

..

mike otter
mike otter
3 years ago
Reply to  Rob Butler

Because cultural Marxism is a culture of nothing drawn from nonsense i expect most of the msm, public sector etc are just followers, dupes in thrall to the naked emporer Marx and his successors. The few loud mouths at the front probably believe they have the key to history, but the followers are easy picking for the next snake oil or virus salesman that comes along.

johnpayne2001
johnpayne2001
3 years ago

Anybody with an interest in having a left-leaning government in the future (I count myself as one) should read this article. They won’t, of course. “Most normal people who do not live their lives on Twitter will not hand power to people who appear to loathe everything about the country they love.” In a nutshell.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  johnpayne2001

I would very much rather not have a left-leaning government in future. However, it’s reassuring to know that at least some people on your side of the debate actually want Britain to prosper.

DenialARiverIn Islington
DenialARiverIn Islington
3 years ago
Reply to  johnpayne2001

You’re absolutely right but I doubt there is any hope. Boris is almost certainly with us for the next 10 years. As you rightly say, if you are perceived as hating your country, the loss of the Red Wall will be entrenched. There is no guarantee that it will return.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago

Psephologically speaking, that is nailed on. Nobody goes from an 80-seat majority – which would have been 100 on fair boundaries – to defeat in one election cycle. The Conservatives won so big in ’87 they were always odds-on to win in ’92. After the latter, they became a minority government within a few years, and it is mostly minority administrations that lose elections.

2024 is won already; the only question really is whether 2019 was 1983 or 1987 – or even 1979.

J J
J J
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon Redman

That is incorrect. If a GE were to happen now, based on current polling, then Con would not win a majority (although would be the largest party). I actually think a Hung Parliament is a real possibility and no party would go into a coalition with Con. TBP may go into coalition with Con, but the would only ever take sease that were Con to begin with, so that does no really help.

Therefore a left wing alliance coalition is a real possibility.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Absolutely, categorically not.

There has been only one occasion since WW2 when a government with a majority was defeated and replaced by the Opposition with its own majority (Heath in 1970 won a majority of ~30 against Wislon who’d had a majority of ~60). That’s the one and only time.

So starting from there, look at the landscape and ask yourself what about the Labour Party points to its upending this 75-year trend.

– Its electrifying leader?
– Its impressive suite of policies?
– Its clear and purposeful programme for government, articulately – expressed by heavyweight spokesmen clearly equal to the challenges of office?
– Its freedom from disgusting associations with anti-Semitism or wokeism?
– The large number of winnable marginals where it’s second?
– Its electoral recovery in Scawtlun?
– Public indifference and dislike for the government?
– Its articulate critique of government policy errors?
– Its historic record of competence in office?

Nope to every single one.

On present form, Sir Keir StĂƒÂŒrmer may well go forward a bit but with the loss of Scawtlun he’ll do well to get t about 230 seats. Labour are two, maybe four more elections defeats away from power and the laughable LD and SDP minnows are not going to change this.

Hosias Kermode
Hosias Kermode
3 years ago
Reply to  Jon Redman

I’m not sure the Labour Party aren’t actually finished electorally, certainly in England if Scotland goes. Maybe a different realignment will emerge.

Duncan Hunter
Duncan Hunter
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Dream on, pal.

J J
J J
3 years ago
Reply to  Duncan Hunter

More of a nightmare.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

A very good and readable article from Matthew, as so often. As he says, the BBC, the denizens of QuIslington, the modern Labour party and the vast majority of the media will never understand the lives of normal, decent, useful people. Nor will they ever have any respect for democracy, as demonstrated by their love of the profoundly anti-democratic EU. (And I write as a sometime denizen of QuIslington who was once very pro-EEC and EU). I have also lived, worked and paid taxes in four EU countries, including the UK.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

New conspiracy theories from you every day.

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Calm down Jeremy

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

..

stephen f.
stephen f.
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

Let the jester continue to caper about.

Jerry Jay Carroll
Jerry Jay Carroll
3 years ago
Reply to  stephen f.

His dance seems to be growing more frenzied.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

can’t wait for Johnson’s agreement to be fully disected and diseminated…you and your will be doing a conservative’s jig resembling St Vitus’ dance

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

I’ve a feeling the men in white coats be arriving soon to take you away.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

your ad hominem is noted and your surrender is appreciated.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

What conspiracy theory has Fraser Bailey expressed today? What new conspiracy theory did he express yesterday? What new conspiracy theories did he express on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday?

L Paw
L Paw
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

And answer from Jeremy…. there came none..

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  L Paw

Par for the course with Jezza.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Read Frasers historical comments
trump’s election, biden, who killed Kennedy…the list goes on

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Your insinuation thst Fraser is some sort of paranoid conspiracy theorist is a reliable indication of his excellent grasp of reality.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Pot, kettle, black Jerry.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

QAnon acolytes are as pernicious as genital warts.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

People who are blinded by ideology become fascists.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

“Quislington” – Brilliant!

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Quislinginton founded by the Viking clan of Quisling who also produced Vidkun Quisling who like you was sympathetic to the little Austrian corporal with the Chaplin mustache…brilliant indeed.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Thanks. I’ve been using that one in various comment sections for some years now. One or two people have picked up on it, but perhaps we can get it into everyday speech if we all try hard enough.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

I intend to use it whenever I can, and off course all those ‘up ticks’ I seem to be garnering are rightfully yours!

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

I upvoted you for the Quislington, but this shameless sucking up to Boris will stop when the real world comes along in a few years.

Work From Home, WFH! That is the end of London prosperity. As TVs stopped being made in the West as it outsourced, my guess is desk work will too. Till now the work visa kept global competition from taking London desk jobs. Half a worker’s cost is salary the rest UK costs, Western salaries are very high. Contracting per hour with no benefits or tax or NHS or pension or office costs will run the tedious work overseas to Manila and Mumbai at 1/4 the cost, and they can work 80 hours for it.

You guys are like the home weavers when the factory mills opened. It only takes a few percent of middle class jobs to fallow the service jobs to covid and things can reach a tipping point. How about the pensions holding Office buildings with reduced need? It all is looking like a tsunami!

Boris the craven did this. Sure, he kept at Brexit, but wrecked UK by his lockdowns!

J J
J J
3 years ago

I voted Remain. But was eventually persuaded to support a ‘Global Britain’ version of Brexit. I voted for my first Conservative PM as I thought he had the ability to ‘thread the needle’ . He was very much a ‘use only in an emergency’ type candidate. The Brexit impasse was an emergency. By hook or by crook, I had a sense he would get it done. And he did.

To call the Pandemic a curve ball would be an understatement. He never had the temperament or image to manage a ‘natural disaster’ type crisis. I do however think he may be the right person to lead us out of the pandemic. To ‘bounce back’. The media and the Left tried to assassinate Boris before the election and failed spectacularly. They tried again during the pandemic and had much more success.

But I think the Left and the Media were talking crap about Boris before the election and I think they have been talking crap about him since the election. I actually think he has performed well in almost impossible circumstances. For the first time since March I am optimistic that we may find a way out of this mess and BJ just might be the best person to do it. By hook or by crook

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Are you talking about the same Boris that betrayed NI…after promising during the Tory leadership NOT TO DO THAT?
Are you talking about the same person that is accused by EVERYONE that has worked with him as a liar, charlatan, lazy, immoral and so on?

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

It’s Christmas Day Jeremy. Go and play with your new toy .

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

Nice try!
I state facts and you pretend that I did not.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

neo fascist tory’s don’t do facts

Nigel Farrah
Nigel Farrah
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

You lost. You can retire the fascist rhetoric now. It’s boring.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Farrah

spoken like the good little fascist that you are…loss is something you will become very familiar with in the coming decade.

Jerry Jay Carroll
Jerry Jay Carroll
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

It’s an old toy. Ask Jeffery Toobin.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

That description would fit most of the human race, at one time or another.

As to NI “when the facts change etc”, as that paragon of socialist virtue Keynes so appositely said.

Anyway back to the train set, one of the demented pygmies has derailed the “Flying Scotsman”, yet again!

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

When it comes to NI facts didn’t change at all, Boris just lied.
Leavers here pretend that they he did not.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The ‘art’ of a politician, it was ever thus.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

$350 million pounds a week to the NHS

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

I would expect a better answer from you.
We both know he lied.
Teresa May (in her own weird way) was far more honest.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

OK, yes he lied, but that is par for the course for a politician, even the sainted WSC did so on occasion! Irritating I grant you, but that is the way of the world. Even the Ancients we’re guilty on occasion.

Incidentally one of your countrywomen, one “Nun Yerbizness (NY) from Oregon needs to tone down her vulgarity if she wishes to taken seriously. I have no doubt you find her an embarrassment, as I do.

Finally, I do hope you are not going to desert this “sceptered isle” as a result of the Brexit outcome? You spoke rather eloquently of the gentleness of this place, it would be sad to loose you!

Nigel Farrah
Nigel Farrah
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The issue was not one of betrayal. It was one of splitting a sovereign country with a trade barrier. Highly undesireable but not betrayal to my mind. NI remains within the Uks customs union. Importantly the people of NI have the power to end the withdrawal agreement.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

so Boris is quoting “…that paragon of socialist virtue…” these days.

buy fishing fleet futures now…it is England’s future.

DenialARiverIn Islington
DenialARiverIn Islington
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

I think he’s talking about the man who’s just won the next election, as a matter of fact.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago

I didn’t question the fact that BoJo won the election. I simply pointed out his betrayal and his lies. Snowflake Leavers here pretend they he is not a liar, lazy or immoral!

Kathryn Richards
Kathryn Richards
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Liar? Show me a PM in the last 100 years who hasn’t.
Immoral? Again, not many PM’s around who weren’t. Wilson? Churchill? Major? Others non proven, I am sure.
Lazy? No. That is an out and out lie. No-one who is in No 10 has the chance to be, and certainly not over the last 10 months. I doubt very much that you could have put in the number of hours he must have done.

Andy Nimmo
Andy Nimmo
3 years ago

Lazy? Just ask his old housemaster from Eton.
Boris Johnson is still the man from the Bullingdon Club who delighted in setting fire to banknotes while sneering at the homeless. The man who was the butt of jokes in ‘Have I Got News For You’.
‘There are none so blind than they who will not see’.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

DenialAR…….etc, meant the NEXT election I think you will find.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

conservative ideology requires self delusion and willful ignorance.

Michael Cooper
Michael Cooper
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

As does all fundamentalist ideology especially yours with it’s complete intolerance for anything other than your world view. Name calling belongs to the primary school play ground not to serious discussion.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Michael Cooper

please do point to this “serious discussion” you think you and yours provide.

Claire Olszanska
Claire Olszanska
3 years ago
Reply to  Michael Cooper

Plenty of name calling on here today from BOTH sides of the opinion – or are you picking and choosing what you want to see?

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Actually, you are confusing it with Marxism.
Easy enough mistake for a Moscow troll to make.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

If the train set has already lost its appeal you should go to bed. You are plainly over-tired.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

the next election involving the voters of England and perhaps Wales.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

..

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The J J to whom you address your comment is a person whom I very much disagree with about Brexit, but whom I very much admire, both for his/her respect for democracy, and for the cogency with which he/she expresses his/her views.

J J’s comment, as a Remain-voter in 2016, amounts to a fairly cautious defence of the thesis that Boris is the best man to lead us out of the Covid crisis.

Your first argument, i.e. re Northern Ireland, is specious. Presumably you are to be understood as arguing as follows:-
1. Boris betrayed NI after promising not to
ergo
2. Boris is not the best man to lead us out of Covid.
This argument is manifestly invalid. 1 even if true has no bearing on the truth of 2.

Your second argument is ludicrous. It’s plainly untrue that everyone Boris associates with thinks ill of him. Even if they did, so what? What we care about is his capacity to negotiate EU trade treaties and lead us out of Covid. We don’t care about his social life.

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Give it up, Jerry. You’re pushing water uphill.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

Ralphie you are embarrassing yourself.

Stanley Beardshall
Stanley Beardshall
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Perhaps a lie-down might help you? You seem a little overwrought.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Word of advice, Jeremy, worth what it costs you – shrieking about Boris being a liar from now until 2024 isn’t going to get you anywhere. Literally not one millimetre.

You hate Boris because Thatcher-like he keeps routing the left, but he keeps routing the left because nobody but the left hates Boris. He comes over as a likeable bloke you could have a drink with who’s honestly trying to do his best for the country. I know you hate to hear that, but he does.

I feel your pain because it was obvious in 1995 to thinking people that Blair and Brown were pure evil – why could nobody else see this? But saying so didn’t work and never defeated Blair.

Learn from the mistake. Start by writing off 2024 and 2029 – they’re lost. Stop trying to refight 2019 and think instead about what’s involved in denying the Tories a seventh term in 2034.

DenialARiverIn Islington
DenialARiverIn Islington
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Yup. The Tories under Boris nailed the vaccine. In the end, that’s what people will remember, particularly as the EU starts serious recriminations on why they have failed so badly. Certainly, mistakes were made and sometimes worse than elsewhere (although the same things have been seen almost everywhere) but it was critical to nail the single most important thing of all, and they did.

J J
J J
3 years ago

I agree. I think the vaccine success was very much down to that ‘big picture’ approach of BJ. He had ‘testing’ and ‘vaccines’ in his head from very early on. It’s no coincidence that we now lead the world in both. Not that you would know that from the British media. The PM was focusing on the destination and not the journey. In the short term that has cost him and perhaps the country, but in the long term it will save him and perhaps the country.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

the vaccine developed and created by two Turkish imagres to Germany and both Muslims and manufactured in Belgium…your welcome you mendacious son of a conservative.

J J
J J
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Global Britain, Global Vaccine. Wonderful.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Global British Irrelevance and Decline.

Martin Tuite
Martin Tuite
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Don’t try to be smart if you are ignorant!

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Martin Tuite

heal thyself physician.

Valerie Killick
Valerie Killick
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

And still not used in those countries! Your argument is ridiculous – like claiming to win a war when all your military is stuck on the other side of the world.

Terry Alteri
Terry Alteri
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Free to be! Thank goodness they landed in a country where they could thrive!

Jerry Jay Carroll
Jerry Jay Carroll
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

The media and the left are the same thing.

J J
J J
3 years ago

Unfortunately I largely agree. Things are changing though. The Andrew Neil station will soon to start. Social Media of course is becoming much bigger. The BBC could own the market for ‘factual based news’ if someone their was remotely interested in that. But they seem more intent in pursuing a moral crusade on behalf of the Left.

Andy Nimmo
Andy Nimmo
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

So let’s all forget about the croneyism and the blatant lies. Let’s all forget about the awarding of PPE contracts etc to Boris’s chums. Let’s all forget about the mismanagement of the coronavirus crisis. Let’s all forget about the years and years of austerity that has brought needless misery to oh so many people. Decent hard working families are now seeing their savings diminish. Pensioners are struggling and yes I include a great number who thought their additional private pension would provide a buttress to poverty but now see that they were mistaken. Great Britain has slipped from 1st to 15th in that respect in such a short time.
Don’t get me wrong I’m not a great lover of the EU but I am a great admirer of Jacinda Ardern of New Zealand – 25 deaths in total. New Zealand was once divided into two – the North Island was traditionally a lot more left leaning while the South Island was traditionally conservative. No more – now the whole nation is swathed in red. Why, because she had the guts to make the hard call. The integrity to govern for all the country, not just for the chosen few or the so called elites who are dressing up eugenics in red white and blue.
I give it three months and all who are regarding Boris as some kind of saviour will be demanding his resignation.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Andy Nimmo

You make many good points, but we have been governed by crooked incompetents for at at least 30 years. Perhaps, not the EU issues appears to have been settle, we can focus on getting our own house properly in order.

Richard Pinch
Richard Pinch
3 years ago
Reply to  Andy Nimmo

Great Britain has slipped from 1st to 15th in that respect in such a short time.

In what respect exactly?

J J
J J
3 years ago
Reply to  Andy Nimmo

Good grief. The notion that Boris Johnson’s main objective during the midst of the biggest national disaster since the second world war, was to hand out cash to his friends is absurd. It’s so absurd it undermines the credibility of anyone who makes the accusation. You must know that?

The urgency of the crisis at the start of the year was so great, that only a fool would of expected NHS staff to go without PPE whilst we did a ‘competitive tender’. Or delayed orders whilst we completed the necessary paperwork. We know what the headlines would of been if they had gone out to full tender “NHS staff die whilst Tories try to save cash!”

In terms of austerity, there was no austerity. Public spending did not reduce in any meaningful sense, in real terms, in hardly any year post the financial crisis. It certainly did not reduce for the NHS, that even before COVID was receiving more funding in real terms than any period in its history. Indeed it was receiving more funding than Corbyn promised in the 2017 election. In terms of living standards, disposable incomes were at a record high prior to COVID. This was particularly the case for pensioners. Absolute poverty was at a record low. Income inequality was lower than when the Tories took office in 2010 and at about the EU / OECD average.

Jacinda Ardern is a woke PM extraordinaire. NZ’s economy is destroyed and will be until they reopen their borders (at which point they will get COVID infections). Australia and NZ locked down at the sametime as the UK. They got lucky insofar as they were not infected at that point. The UK was already heavily infected, there was no way to of known that. We also have higher population density and lower vit D levels (research suggests both, particularly the later, increase infection and death rates).

BJ was elected in a landslide victory with 43.7% of the popular vote, and even now polling at 40% (arguably within the margin of error). And this despite the media and the Left literally accusing him of genocide, criminal incompetence and corruption.

People are no longer listening to the hysterical moral outrage you guys pump out, whether its on racism, poverty, our evil national history, COVID or the PM. It’s just vile nonsense and has no bearing on reality, as my reference to the real facts above demonstrate. I am happy to provide citations from the ONS for all the facts I have referenced.

Andy Nimmo
Andy Nimmo
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Well future history books will prove who’s right and who’s wrong

J J
J J
3 years ago
Reply to  Andy Nimmo

As Churchill said, “History will be kind to me, for I intend to write it” . Perhaps Boris ‘the author’ will do the same.

Stanley Beardshall
Stanley Beardshall
3 years ago
Reply to  J J

Spot on. My lifelong distrust of Etonian born-leaders went on hold when he was appointed, I held my breath and hoped he wouldn’t run true to type and, wow! he didn’t. 2021 is already looking a lot better…

Paul Rogers
Paul Rogers
3 years ago

I always enjoy a Goodwin article. This is wonderful.
The observation that (apolitical) people do not vote for people that loathe their own country is such a fundamental truth that I wonder why it needs to be said. But clearly it does.

Vitreol and grievance sell, but only sparingly.
(In a healthy society, at least.)

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul Rogers

“Vitreol and grievance sell, but only sparingly.”

you and yours need to take your own adivce…

“The observation that people do not vote for people that loathe their own country…”

have no fear you and yours will soon enough be able to love the solitary state of England and salute the St. George’s flag with fascist salute.

Nigel Farrah
Nigel Farrah
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Will not happen. This deal is bad news for the nationalists. Much love nevertheless, from someone actually in Scotland. I laugh at your tired fascist trope. You have lost totally now and your grief is less than you deserve for your total disrespect for the democratic system.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Nigel Farrah

said the tired fascists living out the trope.

when Northern Ireland and Scotland’s electorate vote for independence we will see who has “…total disrespect for the democratic system.”

you don’t even know what the deal consist of and your false bravod speaks volumns as to what you fear it entails.

Paul Rogers
Paul Rogers
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

“have no fear you and yours will soon enough be able to love the solitary state of England and salute the St. George’s flag with fascist salute.”

Good grief. That’s quite a leap of logic and sense.

People do not, in the majority, vote for people who loath their own country. The last election result in the UK shows this.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul Rogers

indeed…Northern Ireland and Scotland resoundingly told England to get stuffed.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Paul Rogers

I don’t know. USA has always been Flag Waving Patriotic, that is now just slightly the majority. I would say the Biden/Harris win shows the self hating group is increasing yearly at a fast pace. UK has never been Flag Waving in modern times, and is full of self loathers. I would challenge Frasier and say the mass will soon only vote for people who loath their country. Blair hated the English man so much he set out to have him replaced, and in London replacement is at over 50%.

Ian nclfuzzy
Ian nclfuzzy
3 years ago

I voted for the Referendum Party in 1997 – this has been a long wait. It’s been a terrible year, but I’ll be raising a glass of good cheer to Boris, Lord Frost, Nigel Farage, Daniel Hannan and Dominic Cummings tomorrow.

John Wilkes
John Wilkes
3 years ago
Reply to  Ian nclfuzzy

May they all be subjected to the justice of The Mikado: ‘something lingering, with boiling lead in it …’

Julia Wallis-Martin
Julia Wallis-Martin
3 years ago
Reply to  John Wilkes

For the Crime of delivering what the people voted for?

Aidan Collingwood
Aidan Collingwood
3 years ago

The wrong people, apparently. Or perhaps the stupid people. Remoaners resort to name-calling as a badge of dishonour, it seems.

Valerie Killick
Valerie Killick
3 years ago

Name-calling – the politics of the play-ground. They have no arguments worth the paper, so resort to name-calling, sneering, jeering and ridicule. It doesn’t work – Hillary didn’t collect votes by calling those who didn’t vote for her ‘deplorables’. But they never learn that lesson.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago

Long may it continue, Valerie.

In the 80s, I doubt if even The Lady could have won her three huge majorities without the aid of the loony left. Boris will likewise gain electorally from the loony intolerance of the woke, who are a widely and deeply disliked deranged fringe in much the same way.

The Conservative campaign slogans practically write themselves.

opn
opn
3 years ago
Reply to  John Wilkes

And it’s boiling oil anyway

Geoff Allen
Geoff Allen
3 years ago

Ah the champagne tasted good last night ! To see the idiotic BBC ‘sprouts’ floundering and gobsmacked by Boris achieving the unbelievable – these were the same idiots last week siding with the north of the border scot -1st minister crankey on her idiotic suggestion that the UK should make a further extension to the Brexit timetable. Not only has Boris got the job done – he has saved the UK taxpayer Billions in not having to extend the deadline. Now we have our independence back- its time to start weeding out all the marxist guardian reading idiots from society and opposition government.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Geoff Allen

“Now we have our independence back- its time to start weeding out all the marxist guardian reading idiots from society and opposition government”
How are you going to do that? Shut down Guardian?!
Make creative industries “conservative”?!

Geoff Allen
Geoff Allen
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

The Guardian will shut down itself- it can barely break even now – not surprising with the woke staff

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Geoff Allen

it is a non-profit…donations continue to pour in.

jameswpemberton
jameswpemberton
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

Dry your eyes and shut up.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago

I’m flattered Jim…you’ve come all this way to reveal that you are a conservative snowflake just for me…so sad to see yet another puveryor of ad hominem.

Annette Kralendijk
Annette Kralendijk
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

That’s a hoot coming from you.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Nun Yerbizness

It is certainly non-profit, in the sense that it doesn’t make a profit. As for the donations, they were obviously insufficient to prevent the culling of approximately 20% of the Guardian’s UK staff a few months ago. And I write as one who was still buying the actual physical Guardian newspaper until about 10 years ago.

Stanley Beardshall
Stanley Beardshall
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

When I was at (grammar) school our English teacher advised us to ask our parents to buy the Manchester Guardian daily, as this would show us perfect English and only true stories. Poor “Slasher” Smith, turning in his grave now….

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Geoff Allen

They sold off the profitable Auto Trader to fund the loss-making Guardian and Observer but that could only be done once; and because the online Graun is not behind a paywall they have to resort to begging for ‘donations. Insolvency beckons.

Ted Ditchburn
Ted Ditchburn
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

It may take a while but once the social services and teacher supplement ads went online the writing was on the wall. Business wise they’re just thrashing around like all old media to try and find a viable business model…in UK *journalism* (asterisks because there are so many new forms of journalism that it’s becoming an empty label..but hear meaning what most people think of as *traditional* media) the Mail have a machine that might carry them to really , properly viable and stable model, but video is a key item and they haven’t properly got that, the News UK have print/brands (Sun Times) have started an upmarket talk radio station, and have the Taklsport and Talkradio BBC attackers,but are still light on video.

Guardian is too wordy but has a place near the New York Times as a wokey (they’d say progressive) place but weak on video…. and all media is heading to a singularity based around video where brands will battle it out.

Amazon buying the Washington Post is possibly the way it will go with Newspapers becoming trophy prizes for Big Tech, that owns acerage in the social media and other digital spaces…

It is a really tough environment as Vice, Huff Post and Buzzfeed have found even with no legacy interests to keep bearing in mind.

The biggest problem for the Guardian is that the Internet seems to love monopolies and in a global battle for the *so woke they’re mad* demographic the New York Times seems to have all the weapons it needs.

The state of flux in media is shown by the intersting (which usually means not at all interesting) fact that some of the largest rtraditional media sites, in local newspapers are little more than proxies for a legacy hold on the local football team coverage…the largest threat to the provincial press right now is an outfit called the Athletic, which is VC funded and looks like it’s business plan is to do to spor what getty Images did to the photographic coverage of sport..and own the space…if they succeed you will see enormous and possibly asteroid sized extinction event effects amongst the local papers, and nationals.

It is certainly *interesting timnes in the media* and you are right to point out the Guardian is burning through the cash pile from it’s definitely not-woke, but massively successful in the 2nd hand car mags…and right to say they can’t sell again what they already sold.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago
Reply to  Ralph Windsor

It always amused me the Guardian/Observer was only saved by selling a magazine/website that was very popular with the people the Guardian hates the most. Namely, white working class men.

claus.l.rasmussen
claus.l.rasmussen
3 years ago
Reply to  Geoff Allen

I actually “subscribe” (donate) to the Guardian. I was under the impression that their business model was working for them?

I recently read someone complain that the consequence has been that they’re now catering to the _US_ woke segment

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Well a few months ago they made approximately 20%of their UK staff redundant. This followed cuts in previous years. They have, of course, been catering to the woke segment before woke was even a thing.

A couple of days ago, one of the podcasters I follow highlighted a Guardian story complaining about the success of podcasters and their ‘misinformation’ and ”lack of context’ etc, as if the Guardian didn’t contain more misinformation and lack of context than virtually any other publication on the planet.

Believe me, they are worried.

7882 fremic
7882 fremic
3 years ago
Reply to  Fraser Bailey

Also they have essentially stopped BTL commenting on articles as the few true believers left could not sustain the practice.

K Sheedy
K Sheedy
3 years ago
Reply to  Geoff Allen

Boris did achieve something extraordinary. We are still in the free market, but with extra paperwork and costs for UK business… And a large percentage of the population have been sold this as a victory winning back a sovereignty we never lost.
The UK had the best of both worlds, in the EU but with our own currency, and strong influence. We abandoned a position of strength for a chimera of nationalism and exceptionalism. And roughly 50% of the country are delighted with it. Quite a trick!

Andrew Wood
Andrew Wood
3 years ago
Reply to  K Sheedy

‘but with extra paperwork and costs for UK business’ I own a business which exports. Currently I have three processes for managing orders, UK, EU, rest of the world. Now I will only have two, UK and rest of the world. Actually it is a reduction in processes. In any case we had to get the electronic processing of Customs data working two years ago to be ready for this, so any changes are already in place.

K Sheedy
K Sheedy
3 years ago
Reply to  Andrew Wood

My expectation is ‘rest of the world’ is more complex that ‘EU before brexit’ so a % has moved from a simple process into a more complex one. Plus, there is also a new NI category.

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago

Despite not being a heavy drinker, I must confess to having downed an entire bottle of champagne yesterday.

Julia H
Julia H
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Just the one?

Drahcir Nevarc
Drahcir Nevarc
3 years ago
Reply to  Julia H

It’s only the end of the beginning.

Nun Yerbizness
Nun Yerbizness
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

hold that thought and get back to us in five years.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Drahcir Nevarc

Likewise.

Ted Ditchburn
Ted Ditchburn
3 years ago

Great article…straightforward, sober language and spot on.

Some analyses of politics go down rabbit holes every bit as deep and labyrinthe as conspiracy theorists ever do.

I completely agree that it wasn’t Brexit ambiguity, anti-semitism or failure to articulate sufficently socialist policies that did for Corbynism. It was the combination of not just failing to recognise the core vote crowded at the back of the hall (behind the various noisy identity wars groups waving placards at the front) it was when they did see them and recognise them, Labour didn’t like them.

If things need a ‘moment’ that Thornberry white van man tweet was that moment.

The outriders like Novara Media, Owen Jones, and any passing BLM with a line in marxist patter didn’t help…but it was the overall atmosphere of *anyone but Britain*.

Sir Keir is making noises that he actually realises this, but he has a ton of work to do to even scratch the surface.

Labour disappeared in Scotland because instead of any clear active policy it relied on waving Thatcher’s shround, with *Evil Toarries* inked across it…once the SNP pinched that (when the hard left voluble crew decided infiltrating the nationalists and trying to get power in a smaller country might work where endless attempt to infiltrate Labour and do it in the larger have failed)…once it was gone Labour had nothing.

Once people make that first vote, they can be won back…but they won’t drift back.

Anyway… Johnson may just be either the most lucky general that ever worked the earth, or he has some crazy superpower to tap into stuff (and in people like Mr Cummings, recognise it when he sees it) that other politicians can’t get near intellectually.

Either way he’s got a hell of a wind..and if by May (let alone March) people are revelling in family days out *like we used to enjoy* he could already be sailing virtually unstoppably towards a second win just 8 months after his Slough of Despond.

And if Remainers, who vainly hoped the EU would rain on his parade, hope Nicola Sturgeon will vicarously make them winners I fear they may be disappointed.

Nicola has hidden the Inde issue inside Brexit for a reason..and now Brexit is clearing the focus on Inde will be relentless…in the last two months the UK govt social media effort is already unrecognognisable from the ones under Cameron and May.

Andrew
Andrew
3 years ago

A million vaccinated in an independent UK and not one jab yet in the old EU.

At what point do we consider a humanitarian intervention for this failed state?

Andrea X
Andrea X
3 years ago

Not a minute had passed since the news than someone shouted, Scotland has been shafted!”
I wonder who that was…

John Howes
John Howes
3 years ago
Reply to  Andrea X

Possibly an anally retentive Jockroach.

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago
Reply to  John Howes

“jockroach”? I’m going to start using that…

George Wells
George Wells
3 years ago

Liberty or death!

(Shame about the fish, and the fishermen).

(Life isn’t perfect – but how can we help them?).

Let’s hope, as good Europeans, that this speeds the collapse of the (so called) ‘EU’,

and once again, we British help save the Continentals from Tyranny.

Who is next?

Lindsay Gatward
Lindsay Gatward
3 years ago

This whole amazing escape from the latest attempt for one power to control all of Europe is down to one man Nigel Farage – Without him there would have been no promise of the Referendum and without him no keeping of that promise and without his Brexit Party no escape from May and Ollie’s BRINO and no Boris who has defied the elites that surround him and actually delivered what the British people requested with 17 million ‘F’ offs to Brussels and it’s apparatchiks and especially its ‘Judicial Imperialism’ via the ECJ – Excellent, well done Nigel Farage whose character will feature in so many future movies depicting this ‘Shakespearian’ plot with all its cliff hangers and ironies and distinctive characters scattered throughout.

Fraser Bailey
Fraser Bailey
3 years ago

Farage is, as you say, the hero of this saga. More or less single handed, he extricated the UK from the tyranny of the EU. He did so in the face of enormous opposition and ridicule from our repulsive establishment, and he did so peacefully. How often has a country extricated itself from an empire without a single death?

Jon Redman
Jon Redman
3 years ago

There’s a good case for him getting the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, under the gaze of Nelson, the last man to do as much as he has to thwart a French-led European empire.

Peter Hopwood
Peter Hopwood
3 years ago

Viewed from afar (Australia), Brexit seems to me to hold out the opportunity to set your own course, and to be as good or as great as you wish, or can be. We have a strong economy and a pride in our achievements, and we are an independent nation; the people of Britain can be stronger still. Take the exit for what it is and make the best of it. You really can do it!
(And stop back-biting each other; you’re way better than that.)

Albert Kensington
Albert Kensington
3 years ago

Maybe you’re right, got to look at the small print, but it looks like the EU haven’t left us bruised and bleeding in the gutter as I had thought would be the case. Covid has done and will continue to do immense economic damage, whether it would ever have been possible to level up the Red Wall is problematic, but with £2 trillion public debt?

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago

Don’t worry with MMT it will be a doddle.
Jeremy Smith, our expert Money Lender will, I’m sure be only too delighted to explain it to us.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

UK will print money and GBP will go down. Inflation will be higher than wage growth and the population will be slowly impoverished.
That is all you (anyone) really need to know.

Terry Needham
Terry Needham
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Or so you hope.
We must be punished for our impertinence!

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Terry Needham

No, that is what has ACTUALLY happened since the 2007/8 crash. Look at the numbers – public info.
You are a Leaver snowflake. Feelings over facts!

nicktoeman4
nicktoeman4
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Dear Jeremy,

Your feelings are clearer than your facts I’m afraid. What characterises a snowflake leaver?

Clearly what happened after the crash must be seen relative to what happened elsewhere.

You despise Boris but where are facts about his lazyiness or is it just your impression – how many hours does he put into his job do you think? As to his immorality, what about John Major or Lloyd George who have received much less bile? And which lies are you referring to (most politicians attempt to mislead to some degree)?

Personal attacks are pointless. It would be more helpful to give us some of the facts you allude to but don’t specify.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  nicktoeman4

I wasn’t aware that I (or anyone else) was supposed to argue about Lloyd George – i was talking about BoJo. And (based on your comment) he is immoral. Pointing out Lloyd George is utterly pointless.
BoJo in the last 15 months argue against the Irish (part) of the deal only to betray DUP/NI in less than 3 months. Please, please explain that to me as a “misleading” argument.
He just argued that the WA was not “optimal” and tried to break international law. The same deal that he sold to the public as the “own ready deal”…How is that “to some degree” misleading?

Ralph Windsor
Ralph Windsor
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

And you, Jerry, are a very naughty boy being rude to guests here. Off to bed with you.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

How sad!
So Jeremy, I presume you and your family will be packing their bags and departing this “green and pleasant land” and heading off to the ‘Big Bagel’ and the land of Mr Joe Biden?

Mike Smith
Mike Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

Let us all hope that people like him do just that and give us all a break.

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

My salary is in GPB. my bonus is in EUR. As of now I am FX covered in relation to GBP. During my Investment Banking days (1998-2011) I was paid in USD.
Worst thing, I will have to move to Lux.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago
Reply to  Jeremy Smith

Ah! I missed that in my previous post.

Luxembourg really?

Won’t you miss the warm beer, the sunless skies, the obsession with dogs, the sense of history radiating from the very ground, even the dry sense of humour? This is still a” sceptered isle, a fortress built by nature for herself against infection and the hand of war”. Also a haven from “the envy of less happier lands”.

After a manic Christmas of dogs , feral grandchildren, copious amounts of food and gargantuan amounts of the elixir of life, and having seen most the world, there is, believe me no finer place to live, than England/Arcadia!
QED?

Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Corby

we have 8 people (full time) doing asset management, investor relationship and accounting for the fund. As of now I work in London, my wife prefers Paris but we have no operations in France.
So will see…

“…believe me no finer place to live, than England/Arcadia!”
California is pretty amazing, you can hit the beach and skiing. You can have bears & cougars (cat and women) as neighbors.

Mark Corby
Mark Corby
3 years ago